homepage
  roll on christmas  
click here to find out more about ship of fools click here to sign up for the ship of fools newsletter click here to support ship of fools
community the mystery worshipper gadgets for god caption competition foolishness features ship stuff
discussion boards live chat cafe avatars frequently-asked questions the ten commandments gallery private boards register for the boards
 
Ship of Fools


Post new thread  Post a reply
My profile login | Register | Directory | Search | FAQs | Board home
   - Printer-friendly view Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » potätö_potahtö (Page 6)

 - Email this page to a friend or enemy.  
Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8 
 
Source: (consider it) Thread: potätö_potahtö
Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

 - Posted      Profile for Penny S     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Round here we have Trottiscliffe - Trosley, Wrotham - Rootum, Shipbourne - Shibburn, and probably some others so familiar I don't notice them (like Salisbury). Like Southwark - Suthurk, on the same principle as Newark.

[ 30. May 2017, 18:14: Message edited by: Penny S ]

Posts: 5683 | Registered: May 2009  |  IP: Logged
Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

 - Posted      Profile for Boogie     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Round here -

Barnoldswick = Barlick

Bacup = Bay-cup

Todmordon = Todmeddun

Lomeshaye = Lommeshuh

[Smile]

--------------------
Garden. Room. Walk

Posts: 12336 | From: Boogie Wonderland | Registered: Mar 2008  |  IP: Logged
St. Gwladys
Shipmate
# 14504

 - Posted      Profile for St. Gwladys   Email St. Gwladys   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
All regions have name place contractions - the most confusing I can think of locally are Hirwaun, which should be pronounced "here wine" but is normally "urwin" and Pentwyn in Cardiff, "pent oin" normally called "pent win", and Fleur de Lys (there was a Hugenot settlement there) which is known as "flower" with two syllables.

--------------------
"I say - are you a matelot?"
"Careful what you say sir, we're on board ship here"
From "New York Girls", Steeleye Span, Commoners Crown (Voiced by Peter Sellers)

Posts: 3251 | From: Rhymney Valley, South Wales | Registered: Jan 2009  |  IP: Logged
ArachnidinElmet
Shipmate
# 17346

 - Posted      Profile for ArachnidinElmet   Email ArachnidinElmet   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Personal favourites round here are:
* the oft mispronounced Penistone - PENis ton (with a short e, like the writing implement)

* Slaithwaite - Sla w't

Yorkshire names, like other Yorkshire pronunciation, involves lots of missing letters.

We also have Pontefract and Castleford, sometimes colloquially known as Pontey Carlo and Cas Vegas, but that's another subject.

--------------------
'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

Posts: 1774 | From: the rhubarb triangle | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

 - Posted      Profile for Pigwidgeon   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
When I was visiting friends in Brighton, England, we were preparing to leave for Salisbury the next morning. So, I pronounced it like the steak dish, Sal lis berry. Our hostess kindly corrected me. She said it's pronounce Salls bry there!

I always thought the steak dish was also pronounced Salls bry. I've never heard it with four syllables.

--------------------
Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

Posts: 9109 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
What are "U" and "non-U" words please?

Read Nancy Mitford's book "U and Non-U Revisited" for a good laugh. Just remember that she and fellow contributors are not being serious.

U is English as supposedly used by proper Upper class people, Non-U by the rest of us. So looking glass instead of mirror, frock instead of dress, and many other indicia of class.

I wonder how well such distinctions translate across the pond, and whether I'd be amused or just confused.
Do posh Americans, or some of them- I don't just mean rich ones, I mean people like Boston Brahmins or Southern aristocrats, if they still exist, or the contemporary equivalents of FDR- have any distinctive vocabulary?

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6356 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

 - Posted      Profile for Amanda B. Reckondwythe     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
I always thought the steak dish was also pronounced Salls bry.

My mother always referred to Schubert's A minor sonata, D.845, as the "Salisbury Steak" sonata.

[ 31. May 2017, 00:40: Message edited by: Amanda B. Reckondwythe ]

--------------------
"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

Posts: 10055 | From: The Great Southwest | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

 - Posted      Profile for Piglet   Email Piglet   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
What are "U" and "non-U" words please?

Read Nancy Mitford's book "U and Non-U Revisited" for a good laugh. Just remember that she and fellow contributors are not being serious.

U is English as supposedly used by proper Upper class people, Non-U by the rest of us. So looking glass instead of mirror, frock instead of dress, and many other indicia of class.

For a slightly more modern*, and just as tongue-in-cheek take, read The Complete Sloane Ranger Guide by Ann Barr and Peter York for what to say (and what not to), how to say it and much more.

* well, early 1980s anyway

--------------------
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 18982 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

 - Posted      Profile for Moo   Email Moo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Berlin, New Hampshire is pronounced BER-lin.

Moo

--------------------
Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 19997 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Celtic Knotweed
Shipmate
# 13008

 - Posted      Profile for Celtic Knotweed   Email Celtic Knotweed   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Some relatively local placenames:
Cutteslowe - cuts-low
Towcester - toaster
Bicester - bis-ter

Edit to add - I've never heard Salisbury pronounced any other way than Salls bry either. (long a in the first half of it, don't know the correct phonetics symbol)

[ 30. May 2017, 22:19: Message edited by: Celtic Knotweed ]

--------------------
When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.
Erasmus of Rotterdam

Posts: 648 | From: between keyboard and chair | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

 - Posted      Profile for mousethief   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:
Edit to add - I've never heard Salisbury pronounced any other way than Salls bry either. (long a in the first half of it, don't know the correct phonetics symbol)

So like sales-bree? First syllable rhymes with "halls" or "wales"? I'd call the latter a long A, not the former.

--------------------
God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

Posts: 62437 | From: Ecotopia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

 - Posted      Profile for Leorning Cniht   Email Leorning Cniht   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:

Edit to add - I've never heard Salisbury pronounced any other way than Salls bry either. (long a in the first half of it, don't know the correct phonetics symbol)

Clearly, Salisbury rhymes with halisbury-scalisbury.
Posts: 4477 | From: USA | Registered: Feb 2013  |  IP: Logged
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

 - Posted      Profile for mousethief   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
Do posh Americans, or some of them- I don't just mean rich ones, I mean people like Boston Brahmins or Southern aristocrats, if they still exist, or the contemporary equivalents of FDR- have any distinctive vocabulary?

I can't speak for the posh, not being one, but I do know we have regional vocabularies. "Yinz" for example is the plural of "you" in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

--------------------
God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

Posts: 62437 | From: Ecotopia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Nick Tamen

Ship's Wayfaring Fool
# 15164

 - Posted      Profile for Nick Tamen     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:

Edit to add - I've never heard Salisbury pronounced any other way than Salls bry either. (long a in the first half of it, don't know the correct phonetics symbol)

In these parts (there is a Salisbury, North Carolina), it's pronounced Salls-Berry. The steak, too.

--------------------
The first thing God says to Moses is, "Take off your shoes." We are on holy ground. Hard to believe, but the truest thing I know. — Anne Lamott

Posts: 2346 | From: On heaven-crammed earth | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Nick Tamen

Ship's Wayfaring Fool
# 15164

 - Posted      Profile for Nick Tamen     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
Do posh Americans, or some of them- I don't just mean rich ones, I mean people like Boston Brahmins or Southern aristocrats, if they still exist, or the contemporary equivalents of FDR- have any distinctive vocabulary?

I can't speak for the posh, not being one, but I do know we have regional vocabularies. "Yinz" for example is the plural of "you" in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Which in the South would be "y'all." And much could be (and has been) written on the varied meanings of "Bless your [or his or her] heart."

But I can't really think of any vocabulary distinctive to Southern "aristocracy."

[ 31. May 2017, 02:30: Message edited by: Nick Tamen ]

--------------------
The first thing God says to Moses is, "Take off your shoes." We are on holy ground. Hard to believe, but the truest thing I know. — Anne Lamott

Posts: 2346 | From: On heaven-crammed earth | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Gee D
Shipmate
# 13815

 - Posted      Profile for Gee D     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:

Do posh Americans, or some of them- I don't just mean rich ones, I mean people like Boston Brahmins or Southern aristocrats, if they still exist, or the contemporary equivalents of FDR- have any distinctive vocabulary? [/QUOTE]

This:

Here's to dear old Boston,
The home of the bean and the cod,
Where Cabots speak only to Lodges,
And Lodges speak only to God.

explains why no-one can say what distinctive features there may be in Boston Brahmin conversation - no-one outside Brahminry ever hears it.

Not sure about your Southern Aristocracy. Did it ever extend beyond Virginia?

--------------------
Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

Posts: 6385 | From: Warrawee NSW Australia | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Nick Tamen

Ship's Wayfaring Fool
# 15164

 - Posted      Profile for Nick Tamen     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Not sure about your Southern Aristocracy. Did it ever extend beyond Virginia?

Most definitely, or as my mother would have said, but of course. Charleston (where the Ashley River and the Cooper River converge to form the Atlantic Ocean) and Savannah come quickly to mind.

--------------------
The first thing God says to Moses is, "Take off your shoes." We are on holy ground. Hard to believe, but the truest thing I know. — Anne Lamott

Posts: 2346 | From: On heaven-crammed earth | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

 - Posted      Profile for lilBuddha     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Nick Tamen:
]Which in the South would be "y'all."

Which has spread beyond the South, with the emigration of southern black people. And, likely because of its association with Hip Hop and American black culture in general, it has spread beyond America. It is also used by Indian people in South Africa.

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16056 | From: out of the corner of your eye | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:

Edit to add - I've never heard Salisbury pronounced any other way than Salls bry either. (long a in the first half of it, don't know the correct phonetics symbol)

Clearly, Salisbury rhymes with halisbury-scalisbury.
Ah, the man who ran around Hampshire without any pampshire... [Big Grin]

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6356 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:

Do posh Americans, or some of them- I don't just mean rich ones, I mean people like Boston Brahmins or Southern aristocrats, if they still exist, or the contemporary equivalents of FDR- have any distinctive vocabulary?
This:

Here's to dear old Boston,
The home of the bean and the cod,
Where Cabots speak only to Lodges,
And Lodges speak only to God.

explains why no-one can say what distinctive features there may be in Boston Brahmin conversation - no-one outside Brahminry ever hears it.
...
[/QUOTE]
very good!

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6356 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

 - Posted      Profile for Ian Climacus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Since moving to the border between NSW and Victoria I noticed Victorians saying KA-sl while I say KAH-sl [for castle].

But they do pronounce the NSW town NEW-kah-sl.

Posts: 7212 | From: Albury, Australia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gee D
Shipmate
# 13815

 - Posted      Profile for Gee D     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Some of us are old enough to remember Henry Cabot Lodge, a scion of both families. A Republican politician very much of the liberal Rockefeller school - he was a Senator, ambassador and from memory was also Nixon's running mate in 1960.

--------------------
Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

Posts: 6385 | From: Warrawee NSW Australia | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Gee D
Shipmate
# 13815

 - Posted      Profile for Gee D     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
And thanks Nick Tamen

--------------------
Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

Posts: 6385 | From: Warrawee NSW Australia | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

 - Posted      Profile for Jengie jon   Author's homepage   Email Jengie jon   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I have said this before but it is worth repeating...

Well if you listened to the news recently you will have heard talk of Whalley(Wally) Range with a short a. (It's one of the suburbs of Manchester around where the Salman Abedi lived). Fine except it is named after Whalley (Warley) Abbey .

Jengie

--------------------
"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Walking 18 miles to help Refugees get an education.

Posts: 20459 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

 - Posted      Profile for Moo   Email Moo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
In Virginia we do not say "y'all"; we say "you-all". There is a problem with forming the possessive.

Moo

--------------------
Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 19997 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

 - Posted      Profile for Amanda B. Reckondwythe     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
In Virginia we do not say "y'all"; we say "you-all". There is a problem with forming the possessive.

I think they simply add an apostrophe + s in Texas: y'all's.

--------------------
"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

Posts: 10055 | From: The Great Southwest | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

 - Posted      Profile for Moo   Email Moo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
I think they simply add an apostrophe + s in Texas: y'all's.

That works for y'all but not for you-all.

Moo

--------------------
Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 19997 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Nick Tamen

Ship's Wayfaring Fool
# 15164

 - Posted      Profile for Nick Tamen     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
In Virginia we do not say "y'all"; we say "you-all". There is a problem with forming the possessive.

I think they simply add an apostrophe + s in Texas: y'all's.
"Y'all" is, of course, a contraction of "you all." The latter is sometimes heard here, but not nearly as often as "y'all." And yes, the possessive if "y'all's."

And meanwhile, if a group is large, "all y'all" may be used.

Local variations like "you all," "y'all," yinz" (related to "you'uns"/"you ones"), etc. are what happens when the language loses the distinction between second person singular (thou/thee) and plural (you/ye). Blame the Normans, who introduced the idea of formal and familiar second person singular.

--------------------
The first thing God says to Moses is, "Take off your shoes." We are on holy ground. Hard to believe, but the truest thing I know. — Anne Lamott

Posts: 2346 | From: On heaven-crammed earth | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Nick Tamen

Ship's Wayfaring Fool
# 15164

 - Posted      Profile for Nick Tamen     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
I think they simply add an apostrophe + s in Texas: y'all's.

That works for y'all but not for you-all.
I agree it's awkward, but I have heard "you all's," and I've even "you alls's" (pronounced all-zez).

--------------------
The first thing God says to Moses is, "Take off your shoes." We are on holy ground. Hard to believe, but the truest thing I know. — Anne Lamott

Posts: 2346 | From: On heaven-crammed earth | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

 - Posted      Profile for Moo   Email Moo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I've heard "your-all's". It sounds very peculiar.

Moo

--------------------
Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 19997 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hedgehog

Ship's Shortstop
# 14125

 - Posted      Profile for Hedgehog   Email Hedgehog   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
Newark, New Jersey -- NEW-urk
Newark, Delaware -- NEW-ark

The town name in Delaware originally was two words "New Ark"--we just didn't change the pronunciation when it was condensed into a single word.

And there is some argument to be had that the New Jersey pronunciation is closer to "Nurk." [Smile]

--------------------
"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

Posts: 2547 | From: Delaware, USA | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged
Trudy Scrumptious

BBE Shieldmaiden
# 5647

 - Posted      Profile for Trudy Scrumptious   Author's homepage   Email Trudy Scrumptious   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Nick Tamen:
Local variations like "you all," "y'all," yinz" (related to "you'uns"/"you ones"), etc. are what happens when the language loses the distinction between second person singular (thou/thee) and plural (you/ye). Blame the Normans, who introduced the idea of formal and familiar second person singular.

It's still "ye" here in Newfoundland, at least in rural places and among older folks (and some younger urban folks when speaking more casually). When I lived in Ontario I used to hear people say "youse" in the places I would be used to hearing "ye" at home. The language cries out for the second person plural, and dialect responds to the need even if standard English doesn't.

--------------------
Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

Posts: 7293 | From: Closer to Paris than I am to Vancouver | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

 - Posted      Profile for Amanda B. Reckondwythe     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
As a Latin teacher I found y'all very useful in explaining the difference between tu and vos.

--------------------
"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

Posts: 10055 | From: The Great Southwest | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
# 2522

 - Posted      Profile for Kelly Alves   Email Kelly Alves   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
That's when I picked it up, too-- my high school Spanish teacher used it to teach us usted ( you) and ustedes (y'all).

--------------------
"Take your broken heart, make it into art"-- Carrie Fisher (1956-2016)

Posts: 35035 | From: Pura Californiana | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Teekeey Misha
Shipmate
# 18604

 - Posted      Profile for Teekeey Misha     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
Bogota, New Jersey -- buh-GO-tuh
Bogota, Colombia -- BOE-gu-tah
Newark, New Jersey -- NEW-urk
Newark, Delaware -- NEW-ark
St. Augustine, Florida -- AW-gus-teen
St. Augustine, Bishop of Hippo -- uh-GUS-tin
Versailles, Pennsylvania -- ver-SALES
Versailles, France -- ver-SIGH
and the perennial favorite:
Houston, Texas -- HUES-ton
Houston Street, New York City -- HOWS-ton

Which in the UK would be:
Bo-guh-TAR
NEW-uck (-on-Trent)
Aw-GUS-tin
Vair-SIGH
and HUES-t'n!
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Barnoldswick = Barlick
Bacup = Bay-cup
Todmordon = Todmeddun
Lomeshaye = Lommeshuh

Not to mention Blackley = BLAKE-li
Rawtenstall = ROʔen-storl (where ʔ is the IPA symbol for the glottal stop - as in the catch in "uh-oh")
Oswaldtwistle = Ozzel-twizzel
and Besses o' th' Barn (where "o' th'" is pronounced as one word "uth" and the "ar" in barn is a long short a!*

*Edited to clarify: Short "a" as in "cat", but repeated as a single, long, smooth sound - "ba-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-n"

[ 01. June 2017, 11:35: Message edited by: Teekeey Misha ]

--------------------
Misha
Don't assume I don't care; sometimes I just can't be bothered to put you right.

Posts: 296 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2016  |  IP: Logged
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

 - Posted      Profile for mousethief   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I lived near a Buena Vista street in Chicago, pronounced "byoo-EN-na." Which is weird because Chicago has lots and lots of native Spanish speakers.

Cairo, Illinois: KAY-roh.

--------------------
God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

Posts: 62437 | From: Ecotopia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

 - Posted      Profile for Amanda B. Reckondwythe     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
At least in Beverly Hills they have the good sense to call Rodeo Drive ro-DAY-oh.

--------------------
"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

Posts: 10055 | From: The Great Southwest | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

 - Posted      Profile for no prophet's flag is set so...   Author's homepage   Email no prophet's flag is set so...   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I'm led to ask about the urinary versus anal pronunciation of Uranus. Urine-us I think was a media thing to not sound rude saying Yer-anus. (Butt man myself.)
Posts: 10501 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

 - Posted      Profile for Moo   Email Moo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Buena Vista, Virginia is pronounced BYOO-na vista.

Moo

--------------------
Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 19997 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Horseman Bree
Shipmate
# 5290

 - Posted      Profile for Horseman Bree   Email Horseman Bree   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Even in the minor colonies (New Brunswick or Nova Scotia in this case), there are unexpected variations on town names.

"Petitcodiac", despite appearing to be French, is spoken as "pettycodiac" - not far off, but enough to annoy the French (which may be the point!).

More unusual is "Apohaqui", pronounced "Apahawk"

or "Nigh-garry" for "Niagara"

And there is the apocryphal story of the tourists driving through "Shubenacadie" who needed to know how to say the name. So they went into the coffee shop next to the highway and asked the server "Could you please say the name of this place, slowly?" After looking a bit startled the girl said "Tiiimmmm Hooortoon's" (Timmies being the most identifiable coffee chain in Canada)

(BTW, "Shubenacadie" is a Mi'kmaw word for "where the red potatoes grow". "Shuben" is pronounced as it reads, while, since "Acadie" is a French word for a heavenly place, it is pronounced in the French manner, although Acadiens will add a "z" after the "d".)

--------------------
It's Not That Simple

Posts: 5361 | From: more herring choker than bluenose | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

 - Posted      Profile for Pigwidgeon   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Buena Vista, Virginia is pronounced BYOO-na vista.

Moo

I've heard that it's also pronounced that way in Colorado.

--------------------
Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

Posts: 9109 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

 - Posted      Profile for jedijudy   Author's homepage   Email jedijudy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Horseman Bree:
And there is the apocryphal story of the tourists driving through "Shubenacadie" who needed to know how to say the name. So they went into the coffee shop next to the highway and asked the server "Could you please say the name of this place, slowly?" After looking a bit startled the girl said "Tiiimmmm Hooortoon's" (Timmies being the most identifiable coffee chain in Canada)

We had the same story in Kissimmee! The punch line there was Buuurrgeerrrr Kiiinngggg. BTW, it's KISS a mee by night and Kis SIM mee by day! [Biased]

--------------------
Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 17584 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

 - Posted      Profile for lilBuddha     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
At least in Beverly Hills they have the good sense to call Rodeo Drive ro-DAY-oh.

I had thought is was more to distance themselves from this than the desire for proper pronunciation.

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16056 | From: out of the corner of your eye | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

 - Posted      Profile for Ian Climacus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
I'm led to ask about the urinary versus anal pronunciation of Uranus. Urine-us I think was a media thing to not sound rude saying Yer-anus. (Butt man myself.)

I tend to say u'-ra-nus, if I'm thinking...

How do you pronounce urine? I say u'-rin; do you say u-rine?

[where ' is emphasis]

[ 02. June 2017, 09:12: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]

Posts: 7212 | From: Albury, Australia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

 - Posted      Profile for Ian Climacus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I've just found out tailgating has the additional meaning in the US of games before a party/big event [I think] -- as well as being up someone's arse/ass in a car (which is all it means here).

Any idea of the etymology for the games meaning?

Posts: 7212 | From: Albury, Australia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
# 2522

 - Posted      Profile for Kelly Alves   Email Kelly Alves   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
A tailgate party is a nosh held by people who are about to see a sporting event-- basically, you show up early to get good parking, you drop the tailgate of your Ford, and you fill up on beer, cold cuts and chips/ crisps so you don't get knocked out by concession prices. The tailgate of the truck becomes a buffet table.

As you were RE: driving definition.

[ 02. June 2017, 09:45: Message edited by: Kelly Alves ]

--------------------
"Take your broken heart, make it into art"-- Carrie Fisher (1956-2016)

Posts: 35035 | From: Pura Californiana | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
sharkshooter

Not your average shark
# 1589

 - Posted      Profile for sharkshooter     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Horseman Bree:
...

"Petitcodiac", despite appearing to be French, is spoken as "pettycodiac" - not far off, but enough to annoy the French (which may be the point!).
...

Usually just referred to as "Petty" which sounds more like "Peddy".

--------------------
Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O LORD, my strength, and my redeemer. [Psalm 19:14]

Posts: 7680 | From: Canada, eh? | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
LONDON:
Beauchamp Place = Beechum

UK:
Marlborough = Morlbruh
Worcester = Woustuh

SURNAME:
Leveson-Gower = Loosun-Gore

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4514 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Celtic Knotweed
Shipmate
# 13008

 - Posted      Profile for Celtic Knotweed   Email Celtic Knotweed   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:
Edit to add - I've never heard Salisbury pronounced any other way than Salls bry either. (long a in the first half of it, don't know the correct phonetics symbol)

So like sales-bree? First syllable rhymes with "halls" or "wales"? I'd call the latter a long A, not the former.
Having had a little time thinking, the pronunciation is probably more like sauls-bree, so rhyme with halls. Length of letters I might leave till I'm not trying to post in a 30 min lunch break! [Smile]

--------------------
When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.
Erasmus of Rotterdam

Posts: 648 | From: between keyboard and chair | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged
Signaller
Shipmate
# 17495

 - Posted      Profile for Signaller   Email Signaller   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Sauls-brih, not -bree.

Unless you are a whining ten-year-old [Frown]

Posts: 108 | From: Metroland | Registered: Jan 2013  |  IP: Logged



Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8 
 
Post new thread  Post a reply Close thread   Feature thread   Move thread   Delete thread Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
 - Printer-friendly view
Go to:

Contact us | Ship of Fools | Privacy statement

© Ship of Fools 2016

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0

 
Check out Reform magazine
sip of fools mugs from your favourite nautical website
 
  ship of fools