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Source: (consider it) Thread: Kids these days just don't understand
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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The rapid changes in technology have widened the ever-present generation gap. I had plenty of 14-year-olds in my classes last year who couldn't read an analogue clock, for instance. Leaving aside books and movies and TV shows, which are ephemeral anyway, what are some things that kids these days just don't understand?

The one I thought of today: the aggravations of trying to make a folded map go back the way it started out.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

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RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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My 10-year-old nephew can't seem to get it through his head that not all screens are touchscreens. He keeps poking at my laptop screen with his grimy fingers.
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Golden Key
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# 1468

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Having an F2F conversation, from what I've read/heard lately. So used to electronic devices that many/most don't know what to do, so they just stay home and text.

Hmmm...maybe cooking non-quick oatmeal from scratch? Mending things, rather than buying new ones? Using a print encyclopedia?

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--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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They do not understand that once upon a time, cars did not have aircondtioning at all.

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Baptist Trainfan
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Or even heaters.
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Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

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And that a family would generally only have one car.

They were expensive luxuries, even without heaters.

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Curiosity killed ...

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Forget about folding a map, the necessity of using a map and/or compass when your phone can do it for you. And the city based kids I work with don't ever go places with no mobile coverage, so they see it as pointless.

Analogue clocks is an odd one as dyslexics really struggle (something to do with flipping directions, so find it difficult to know if the hands are pointing to the hour or after the hour) so it seems pointless to keep pushing that one when it isn't necessary to be able to read analogue dials to tell the time.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
Or even heaters.

Dad had a Renault 750 when I was a kid. It had one of the most successful car heaters I have seen. It had an outlet under back seat and we used to spread a ruv over our legs and toast. Occasionally we would take pity on our parents and and lift the rug to give them some heat.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Karl: Liberal Backslider
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# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by Schroedinger's cat:
And that a family would generally only have one car.

They were expensive luxuries, even without heaters.

We have only one, and cars *are* expensive luxuries. Over my dead body we have more than one. There are too many cars already.

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

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Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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pulling/pushing the little knob on the TV to turn it on/off

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and mayhap this too: http://broken-moments.blogspot.co.nz/

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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And 1 TV in the house, and you had to gather round it together and watch the one show you all agreed on, at a specified time, on a specified day, or you missed it.
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Galloping Granny
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I was greatly entertained when I played a vinyl record on the turntable for a 12-year-old once and then turned it over and played the other side.
Of course vinyls are back now so they'll be getting used to the idea.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Anselmina
Ship's barmaid
# 3032

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And of course. Telephones. I can just remember my family having a shared party line, with the neighbour. Having to wait for them to finish their call, so we could make ours.

When we got our very own phoneline, boy, where we posh!

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anoesis
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# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
pulling/pushing the little knob on the TV to turn it on/off

You've just reminded me of chokes in cars - which have certainly gone the way of chainmail and crinolines. Thinking about it, the one thing I can definitively say has changed between my childhood, and now, (my children's generation), is that mechanical - and electronic - things are just much more reliable. Despite being way more complex, cars rarely break down now. Our lawnmower starts reliably and keeps going until you're done with it, or it runs out of petrol, whereas an enduring memory of my childhood is my Dad, steaming with fury and full of creative euphemisms for swearwords, as he wrestled with the mower, yet again. And (fingers crossed) the era of computers just up and dying, as a regular happening, seems like it might also be on the way out. I did have a phone die comprehensively on me last year, but it was a Samsung, so...meh.

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

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L'organist
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# 17338

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The answer is to bring up your children with the values and skills of an earlier age: things like
  • saving up for desired 'luxuries'
  • how to work out a simple budget
  • writing a cheque
  • working out menus for a week rather than shopping 'on the hoof'
  • how to use an encyclopedia
  • social skills - in particular chatting to people older than themselves
  • how to write letters

Of course, the disappearance of things like small shops doesn't help but if you give pocket money, encourage thank-you letter writing, don't permit electronic games to be taken to family gatherings, you can produce children who are pleasant to have around.

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anoesis
Shipmate
# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
And of course. Telephones. I can just remember my family having a shared party line, with the neighbour. Having to wait for them to finish their call, so we could make ours.

When we got our very own phoneline, boy, where we posh!

Heh. I turned 40 just a couple of months ago, and we were on a party line until I was, I think, thirteen. Must surely have been one of the last of them in the first world.

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

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anoesis
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# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
The answer is to bring up your children with the values and skills of an earlier age: things like
  • saving up for desired 'luxuries'
  • how to work out a simple budget
  • writing a cheque
  • working out menus for a week rather than shopping 'on the hoof'
  • how to use an encyclopedia
  • social skills - in particular chatting to people older than themselves
  • how to write letters


Some interesting things here. Cheques, for instance. You sort of think that no-one under 80 uses them anymore - but we're having a house built at the moment and keep on needing to pay simply massive bills - and actually, by far the best way to do it is by cheque. Our bank won't allow us to make really big payments by internet banking, and charge astronomical fees for teller transfers - so cheque it is. Easy as pie. The kids have seen me writing them. Whether they'll ever get to write one themselves is another matter.

Also, the meal plan. I do that, despite hating it, because I know it's sensible. I don't think my kids could exist without the list on the fridge saying what's coming up for dinner, it seems to be what life hinges around...

How to write a letter? Interestingly, my nine-year-old is being made to practice this, regularly, by her teacher. Everyone in her class has to write a letter to either Mum or Dad, each week, and have it signed off as having been read. It's maybe not coincidental that her teacher is pushing sixty...

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

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Mili

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# 3254

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Last week I accompanied a group of 10 and 11 year old children to a local nursing home. They are going to be visiting over a number of weeks to put together a history project with the residents.

This was the first week so the children just had getting to know you conversations with the residents. One lady had me explain to a child what a pea shooter was - something I had only seen in books, though boys at my school used to spit paper spitballs through plastic straws. Turns out this 91 year old lady's favourite childhood memory was hiding in a tree with her siblings or friends and using a pea shooter to shoot peppercorns at the heads of the men returning from work! Apparently they always got away with it too. The girl she was talking to was really shocked and it is funny to think that people always like to stereotype kids as less well behaved than previous generations. But very few Australian children would even be out unsupervised let alone think of playing that sort of trick on adults they didn't know or their neighbours today.

Another lady, when asked if she liked living in a nursing home, said of course as she had a roof over her head, food etc. She then went on to tell the story of two Nigerian children she had known or known of who only had a blanket each and burnt to death when their house caught on fire and they ran in to get the blankets [Ultra confused] In her childhood that was probably considered a totally ok story to tell children to teach them the moral of valuing their posessions!

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anoesis
Shipmate
# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
And of course. Telephones. I can just remember my family having a shared party line, with the neighbour. Having to wait for them to finish their call, so we could make ours.

When we got our very own phoneline, boy, where we posh!

Heh. I turned 40 just a couple of months ago, and we were on a party line until I was, I think, thirteen. Must surely have been one of the last of them in the first world.

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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How strange to think I could be asked at the age of 93 to demonstrate how we rewound cassette tapes in a canary-yellow Walkman with a pencil. So I could listen to Phil Collins sing Just Another Day in Paradise for the 400th time because I wasn't able to download a few thousand songs any time I wanted.

No Spotify, Soundcloud, alternative playlists, MP3, iPod Touch, CDs etc. And the batteries on my Sony Walkman had to be replaced every other week.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Re writing letters. My son had been taught to write formal letters at school, and had written thank you letters as a matter of course, but had never written a no-special-reason letter until he went to University and wrote to his sister.

He ended it with "I must close now, for I fear I may miss the post. I remain, my dear sister, your most affectionate brother, North East Loon"

His whole knowledge of letter writing, it turned out, was based on having read Jane Austen.

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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That is so funny, NEQ! When my younger sister was nine years old she read Louisa May Alcott's Little Women and came into the kitchen to ask us:'Pray tell me, where are the cornflakes?' I seem to recall she also tried to use the word 'prithee'.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Karl: Liberal Backslider
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# 76

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I have a daughter with ADHD. Distractions, and electronic ones could be amongst them, are exactly what makes her pleasant to have around.

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

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Jane R
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CK:
quote:
Analogue clocks is an odd one as dyslexics really struggle (something to do with flipping directions, so find it difficult to know if the hands are pointing to the hour or after the hour) so it seems pointless to keep pushing that one when it isn't necessary to be able to read analogue dials to tell the time.
Not *necessary*, no... but if you can do it you have the following advantages over your digital-only friends:

1. You can read a clock-face from much further away (easier to see the position of the hands than to read numerals)

2. You can use pre-digital timepieces - such as Big Ben, or my mother-in-law's 200 year old grandfather clock.

3. Dunno whether this is backed up by data, but I find it's easier and quicker to read clockfaces than digital clocks. I suspect this is why digital clocks have not replaced traditional ones; for those of us who are not dyslexic, learning how to read a clockface is worthwhile because once you've done it your life becomes slightly easier.

4. Clockfaces look nicer. Some are works of art.

And like Karl, we have only one car.

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Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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I teach art one day a week to 11 year olds.

The teacher uses augmented reality to teach them, completely alien to me, but fascinating [Smile]

Kids expect all screens to be touch sensitive and are confused by 'old fashioned' laptops.

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Garden. Room. Walk

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Bene Gesserit
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# 14718

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A young friend, who I used to travel to work with on the bus, was absolutely fascinated when I demonstrated a slide rule to him (I wasn't carrying one randomly, I'd been telling him about them for some reason the previous day).

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Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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I loved slide rules from an aesthetic and tactile point of view, but hated using them - I was always getting my decimal places wrong.

But (wait for it ...) I was a dab hand at using logarithms.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
And 1 TV in the house, and you had to gather round it together and watch the one show you all agreed on, at a specified time, on a specified day, or you missed it.

When the Muppet Show was on, the whole family sat in the family room and enjoyed it. There were a lot of subtle references my husband and I got, but our daughters missed. OTOH, they enjoyed the slapstick more than we did.

As far a analog clocks are concerned, when our children were very small I bought an analog clock with an owl on it, which I put in their bedroom. They enjoyed looking at it and gradually learned to tell time. When my grandsons were small, I gave them an analog clock with a monkey on it. They loved it and learned to tell time.

Moo

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
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One thing kids don't understand is that there used to be far less variety in food. I didn't taste garlic until I was at University. I can remember when pizza started appearing, and there being a debate as to how it was pronounced. Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.
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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.

I think that is 'Scottish Sunday teatime salad', at least according to my wife who she out each summer at the Kilcraggan Conference Centre in the 1970s.

We in decadent London had beetroot, cucumber and even spring onion at times! But - as with you - mayonnaise had yet to be invented.

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Trudy Scrumptious

BBE Shieldmaiden
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The idea that teenagers today can't carry on face to face conversations is easily dispelled by actually spending time with them. The ones I know talk face to face, to adults and to each other, as much as I remember kids ever doing. But one thing that's different is how much devices like smartphones are integrated into their face to face interactions (not just "taking a selfie" to capture the moment, although that's one easy thing to recognize and identify -- but then Snapchatting the selfie to another friend who's not there, reading out and discussing her response with the friends who are there, etc etc). May seem alien to us old folks but from what I see of my kids, their friends, and my students, the kids are basically all right.

One thing kids today do not get, and even I am starting to find hard to believe, is how difficult and sketchy it was to make plans when we were young. You'd arrange to meet some friends at the mall after school. One friend didn't show up and ... that was it. Maybe they stopped by the house on the way and their mother made them stay home; maybe they were killed and eaten by wolves on the way to the mall. No such thing as texting to say "I'll be a bit late," or "I can't make it, meet up with you later." The whole business of arranging to go anywhere or do anything was so cumbersome in retrospect. Kids get it a little bit when they watch TV shows or read books set in an earlier era. My daughter watched all 10 seasons of Friends when it appeared on Netflix and said, "90% of the plot problems in these episodes could be resolved if they had smartphones."

[ 23. August 2017, 13:53: Message edited by: Trudy Scrumptious ]

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.

P.S. I remember going to the south of France in 1969 and first experiencing Salad Nicoise - my family ate well at home but this was nevertheless a revelation!
Posts: 9124 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
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Oh, I wear an analogue watch and had one mobile phone saver screen set to be an analogue clock. My dyslexic daughter cannot read analogue however many ways we've tried. It doesn't matter; carrying a mobile phone means she always carries digital time, so clocks are irrelevant. The flipside is that she can see maps and drawings in 3D and if she concentrates see how engineering drawings move too.

Food depends, I grew up with mayonnaise and vinaigrette, not salad cream, but also knowing how to mix vinaigrette in a tablespoon at the table, because we made both. We used to stock up on pasta at Italian corner shops when we visited London, before spaghetti was available in every supermarket and bought cans of olive oil, which was otherwise only available at the chemist. I ate pâté (homemade) when my school friends ate meat paste. Came of having a mother who loved France and cooked.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
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We had beetroot! It was pickled and served with stovies. Actually, that's another thing kids today don't understand; the progression from Sunday roast to Monday cold meat to Tuesday stovies. One day's chicken was the next day's chicken soup.

That was before the days you could get pea and ham from a chicken.

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Hedgehog

Ship's Shortstop
# 14125

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I recall my nephew staring at my rotary-dial phone in utter confusion as to how one was supposed to use it.

(I no longer have the phone--my cat took matters into her own paws one day and made sure it could never be used again.)

On the other hand, I am sure all my nieces and nephs know all about checks, as I send them one on their birthdays.

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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At Daughter-Unit's workplace, the late teen and early twenty-something interns frequently ask her to translate documents that are handwritten in cursive!

That same D-U asked me if I had VCR recordings (she was young!) of the TV shows I enjoyed when I was a kid. When I told her there was nothing capable of recording shows at the time, she asked if we had mirrors then. [Paranoid]

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 17707 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

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quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
pulling/pushing the little knob on the TV to turn it on/off

I remember a TV we had which neede to be switched between 405 and 625 lines (BBC1/BBC2). And tuned in with a proper tuning knob, like radios used to have.

And when it broke down, we got a man in to mend it.

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Blog
Music for your enjoyment
Lord may all my hard times be healing times
take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

Posts: 18468 | From: At the bottom of a deep dark well. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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Recently I found myself having to explain the concepts of landline and party line phones to our 7- year-old granddaughter....that once upon a time phones were attached to the wall, families usually only had one, and the line had to be shared with neighbors. Our granddaughter looked at me as if I were insane.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6228 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Bishops Finger
Shipmate
# 5430

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Bus Timetables. User-friendly, simple, clear, and posted up at every Bus Stop in the town.

Yet I still see youngsters struggling to comprehend them, almost as if they can't actually cope with the printed word (or numbers).

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

Posts: 8496 | From: With The Glums At The Bus Stop | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Bishops Finger
Shipmate
# 5430

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(Forgot to add - nice to see you back on board, LutheranChik!)

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

Posts: 8496 | From: With The Glums At The Bus Stop | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Chelley

Ship's Old Boot
# 11322

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quote:
Originally posted by RuthW:
My 10-year-old nephew can't seem to get it through his head that not all screens are touchscreens. He keeps poking at my laptop screen with his grimy fingers.

I've found myself doing that one sometimes if I switch from iPad to laptop or more basic mobile! (I try not to do it with grimy fingers though).

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"I love old things, they make me feel sad."
"What's good about sad?"
"It's happy for deep people!"

Sally Sparrow to Kathy - Doctor Who

Posts: 2856 | From: Wonderland, UK | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
His whole knowledge of letter writing, it turned out, was based on having read Jane Austen.

One could do a lot worse!

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

Posts: 62895 | From: Ecotopia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
basso

Ship’s Crypt Keeper
# 4228

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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
They do not understand that once upon a time, cars did not have aircondtioning at all.

Cars? Where I grew up, houses didn't have air conditioning. (Not much need for it in the Bay Area...) So the first air conditioner I ever saw was in my grandfather's car when we visited Kansas.

I was about 8 years old.

Posts: 4338 | From: Bay Area, Calif | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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Houses here didn't have air conditioners, until the last 20 or so years and the advent of heat pumps.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

Posts: 62895 | From: Ecotopia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pangolin Guerre
Shipmate
# 18686

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I'm not so old (53), but I'm met with incredulity when I explain that until the age of nine I had a choice of two TV channels: one English, one French, not the ca. 80 I receive, of which I regularly watch perhaps ten. The KFC French advert's tag line (Bon poulet!) became a running joke in family.

Incredulity that other than my swimming lessons, my summer days were innocent of structure: rock climbing, biking everywhere, hiking in the woods, swimming in the springs (Be home by 5!), playing after dinner (Come home when the street lights come on!). We were feral.

Making go carts. Playing street hockey. Picking blue berries (they weren't commercially available there). Most of our vegetables being tinned, even for major things like the Christmas dinner (poor transportation to a somewhat remote area, and frozen vegetables at the time were mostly corn, peas, or the medley of peas and carrots, and only then becoming available).

I am viewed as a strange mix of primitive and hokey.

Posts: 611 | From: 30 arpents de neige | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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I remember the joy of shelling peas grown in the garden for dinner. I was made to whistle as I shelled them. It is much more difficult to eat raw peas while whistling than while singing or talking.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

Posts: 9255 | From: girt by sea | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Palimpsest
Shipmate
# 16772

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quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
And of course. Telephones. I can just remember my family having a shared party line, with the neighbour. Having to wait for them to finish their call, so we could make ours.

When we got our very own phoneline, boy, where we posh!

Heh. I turned 40 just a couple of months ago, and we were on a party line until I was, I think, thirteen. Must surely have been one of the last of them in the first world.
Never mind party lines. I was watching an analysis of the musical "Company" and the speaker explained that kids don't know what a busy signal is any more. (It's blended into the opening music.) He also mentioned they wouldn't know what an answering "service" was.
Posts: 2970 | From: Seattle WA. US | Registered: Nov 2011  |  IP: Logged
Spike

Mostly Harmless
# 36

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quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Bus Timetables. User-friendly, simple, clear, and posted up at every Bus Stop in the town.

Yet I still see youngsters struggling to comprehend them, almost as if they can't actually cope with the printed word (or numbers).

IJ

And bus conductors who would collect cash and sell tickets and chuck kids off the bus if they were misbehaving

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"May you get to heaven before the devil knows you're dead" - Irish blessing

Posts: 12841 | From: The Valley of Crocuses | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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quote:
Originally posted by Palimpsest:
He also mentioned they wouldn't know what an answering "service" was.

As soon as they try to call their doctor after hours, they'll learn about that.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

Posts: 62895 | From: Ecotopia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chelley

Ship's Old Boot
# 11322

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quote:
Originally posted by Spike:
And bus conductors who would collect cash and sell tickets and chuck kids off the bus if they were misbehaving

This!
And teachers who threw the chalk (or wooden chalk rubber) at you in class if you were talking - not that it ever happened to me [Two face]

[ 24. August 2017, 06:40: Message edited by: Chelley ]

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"I love old things, they make me feel sad."
"What's good about sad?"
"It's happy for deep people!"

Sally Sparrow to Kathy - Doctor Who

Posts: 2856 | From: Wonderland, UK | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged



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