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» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » Kids these days just don't understand (Page 2)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Kids these days just don't understand
Karl: Liberal Backslider
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# 76

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And kids who'd get off your lawn when you yelled.

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

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Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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Chamber pots, because it was too cold to use the (outside) toilet on a winter night.

Laying the coal fire the night before, so come the morning you only had to shiver for the time it took to light it.

Waking up on a winter morning and finding the water in the glass on your bedside table was frozen.

Having to light the fire on a summer evening, because how else would you get hot bathwater?

Yes, I was born in the 80s, why do you ask? [Biased]

Amy

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Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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Hand washing, with Lux Flakes, endless rinsing and then putting through the Mangle - what luxury when Twin Tubs were invented!

And Freezers, who could live without them these days? Only people who remember only one channel on the TV, I guess.

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

Posts: 34559 | From: Cream Tealand | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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Teachers used to smoke in elementary school (grades 1-8) in the staff room. They could smoke if they were at their desks in high school. In university, smoking in large lecture theatres was allowed if you were in the side sections, which was the same as in movie theatres.

They wouldn't understand air travel when you just walked out to the plan with no security, they always served meals and there was a 5 pack of cigarette included on the tray.

Thinking of smoking, my barber would always offer a cigarette while getting a trim, the magazines were mostly things like Popular Mechanics and Field and Stream, and in the bottom of the pile there always a copy or two of Playboy or Gallery. The kids these days would not understand that we didn't know women did have pubic hair.

[ 24. August 2017, 22:00: Message edited by: no prophet's flag is set so... ]

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Maybe I should stop to consider that I'm not worthy of an epiphany and just take what life has to offer
(formerly was just "no prophet") \_(ツ)_/

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mousethief

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# 953

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quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
And kids who'd get off your lawn when you yelled.

Ha! Kids these days never get ON my lawn because they're inside playing with their electronics.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Chorister:


And Freezers, who could live without them these days? Only people who remember only one channel on the TV, I guess.

Until I was seven (and lived in North Africa) we didn't have a fridge! It was two years later before we had one back home in Britain we didn't have a freezer until ten years after that (1977). We did have two TV channels, but mum regarded ITV as "common" although she allowed dad and I to watch the Big Match on Sunday afternoon.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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anoesis
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# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I remember the joy of shelling peas grown in the garden for dinner. I was made to whistle as I shelled them. It is much more difficult to eat raw peas while whistling than while singing or talking.

I remember it too. Though not as a joy. Usually about four ten-litre pails of pods would come in, and once podded, that would give you maybe 8 litres of peas. Pea pods, when mature, are usually developing some sort of mildew - it stinks, the smell sinks into your skin, and doesn't come out with washing. Topping and tailing several buckets of gooseberries and/or blackcurrants, I didn't mind so much. They smell ok. (Yes, blackcurrants have a scent vaguely reminiscent of cat pee, but I guess I was just already gearing up for a lifetime fandom of sauvignon blanc).

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

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anoesis
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# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by Amorya:
Chamber pots, because it was too cold to use the (outside) toilet on a winter night.

Laying the coal fire the night before, so come the morning you only had to shiver for the time it took to light it.

Waking up on a winter morning and finding the water in the glass on your bedside table was frozen.

Having to light the fire on a summer evening, because how else would you get hot bathwater?

Yes, I was born in the 80s, why do you ask? [Biased]

Amy

Jeepers Creepers. And I thought I (born in the 70s) had it primitive. All our hot water did come from a wetback, so yes, the stove had to be lit every day, but we DID have a shower. A very dribbly one, due to the low-pressure hot water - but I guess you're going to tell me that you're talking about heating water in a pail, on top of the stove, and pouring it into a tin bath. On Sundays. No?

And why couldn't the fire be on overnight? Coal too expensive?

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

Posts: 960 | From: New Zealand | Registered: Oct 2008  |  IP: Logged
Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
but I guess you're going to tell me that you're talking about heating water in a pail, on top of the stove, and pouring it into a tin bath. On Sundays. No?

And why couldn't the fire be on overnight? Coal too expensive?

It wasn't quite that bad, there was a back boiler as part of the fireplace, which fed into a water tank. So we did have hot water on tap, assuming the fire was lit! One bath a week was still the norm though [Smile]

I guess cost of coal was an issue. We were pretty poor. I was only a kid at this time, so didn't notice all the nuance. When I was eight we moved to a modernised house with central heating, and it was like moving to the future!

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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'God save the king' was played in the picture theatre before the programme started, and everyone stood for it.
(Was there an equivalent in the US?)
There would be a newsreel and a cartoon before the main film, and a trailer for a forthcoming programme.
The films were on huge reels. Now that they're on DVDs a movie can open all over the country/world on the same day, but these bulky reels travelled round the country and it might be some time before they reached your small town.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

Posts: 2593 | From: Matarangi | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Schroedinger's cat

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# 64

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Saturday Morning Pictures?

The cinema would show a film and cartoons, I think, to fill an hour or so. It was so the parents could go and shop.

Shopping for stuff. Having to go around the actual shops and look at stuff and decide and buy. Rather than just check up in the net and buy online.

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Blog
Music for your enjoyment
Lord may all my hard times be healing times
take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

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Lothlorien
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# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I remember the joy of shelling peas grown in the garden for dinner. I was made to whistle as I shelled them. It is much more difficult to eat raw peas while whistling than while singing or talking.

I remember it too. Though not as a joy. Usually about four ten-litre pails of pods would come in, and once podded, that would give you maybe 8 litres of peas. Pea pods, when mature, are usually developing some sort of mildew - it stinks, the smell sinks into your skin, and doesn't come out with washing. Topping and tailing several buckets of gooseberries and/or blackcurrants, I didn't mind so much. They smell ok. (Yes, blackcurrants have a scent vaguely reminiscent of cat pee, but I guess I was just already gearing up for a lifetime fandom of sauvignon blanc).
I know some pods had mildew but nothing as you describe. Certainly no smell on my hands etc. I used to have a limit set. Do twenty pods and you can eat the contens of one.
Along similar lines. I was not allowed to cream butter and brown sugar with a wooden spoon for cakes. I ate a large proportion of it and Mum's famous date loaf would be half the size she wanted.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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betjemaniac
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# 17618

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quote:
Originally posted by Amorya:
Chamber pots, because it was too cold to use the (outside) toilet on a winter night.

Laying the coal fire the night before, so come the morning you only had to shiver for the time it took to light it.

Waking up on a winter morning and finding the water in the glass on your bedside table was frozen.

Having to light the fire on a summer evening, because how else would you get hot bathwater?

Yes, I was born in the 80s, why do you ask? [Biased]

Amy

Not only was I also born in the 1980s, right at the start actually, but minus the chamberpot and the hot bathwater all those are still things that I do...

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And is it true? For if it is....

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betjemaniac
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# 17618

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Thanks to "life in the eighties" (TM) I could still probably change a gas mantle, and I do have vivid memories of my father putting more coal on the range while the Sunday roast was cooking...

I've long held a suspicion that the childhood of a provincial English child of the 1980s was closer to that of those who'd been children in the 40s and 50s than it is to those who were children in the 1990s and 2000s.

Let me take you to 1980s Kidderminster....
- factory hooters measuring our the day for the whole town at the various carpet mills
- brown smog hanging low over the rooftops from thousands of coal fires
- the coal man coming round every Thursday and dropping off sacks of coal on doorsteps - to be squirreled away in concrete bunkers in the back garden
- the "pop van" coming round selling cream soda
- a rag and bone man plying the streets with horse and cart
- TVs with coin slots in them so you paid as you went (5p a throw from memory)
- those red and white stripy shelters they used to put over holes in the street
- BBC playing the national anthem on TV every night before closedown
- BBC having a closedown
- rest days in the middle of test matches
- "Sunday League" one day matches in the middle of county matches
- *some* cars and lorries still on the roads from the 50s and no one batting an eyelid (a friend at first school was shamefacedly dropped off every day in an ancient Humber (to much jeering). I'd love that car now.
- some houses (ours) still cooking on coal fired ranges

Here ends my contention that the 1940s and 1980s were sisters under the skin. It's just that the latter also had new romantics.

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And is it true? For if it is....

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Twilight

Puddleglum's sister
# 2832

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My landline phone once rang five times before going to voice mail, it had gradually gone down to three rings and there was no longer any hope at all that I, and my cane, would be able to answer in time. A bit of online research said the company was probably doing this to double the charges. Ex; Jane calls me and gets a charge, I have to call her back and there's a second charge.

I called the phone company and after about five minutes of pushing buttons and holding I reached a tech who was happy to give me six rings.(32 whole seconds!)

A day later I realized I hadn't had any incoming calls since then, a friend reported that my number was all busy signals. I called the phone company to get it fixed. It took five days and six techs to correct the mistake they had made.

Through it all I had to keep convincing the techs that I honestly, truly, definitely did not have a mobile phone and that, yes, it really should be possible to fix my landline even though I didn't have a mobile to talk on at the same time.

I had to tell AT&T how to fix my phone.

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Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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quote:
Originally posted by betjemaniac:
I've long held a suspicion that the childhood of a provincial English child of the 1980s was closer to that of those who'd been children in the 40s and 50s than it is to those who were children in the 1990s and 2000s.

I don't remember all the things you mentioned, mainly because I grew up in the middle of nowhere. Eleven houses, farming community, there was a bus to town once a week on market day. But a lot of them are familiar.

I did enjoy being there for a lot of new developments. We had a colour TV, but had friends who had black and white. We owned a typewriter, then I saw in computers, first with greenscreen monitors, then colour ones you hooked up to the telly, then something with a mouse. I dialled up bulletin boards before we got the internet. I went from a landline rotary phone with a three digit number (347, since you asked) to touch tone phones, plug-in answering machines, then finally when I was about fifteen then some kids started having mobile phones.

My maths textbooks still taught how to add up in pounds, shillings and pence. My school desk still had a pot for the inkwell. (Which I didn't use back then, we used pencils; but in secondary school I started writing with a dip pen and ink bottle just to be hipster.)

I keep finding surprising ones too. Like people not knowing what fuse wire is for. And while I never knew a house that had no electric lights, the power was unreliable enough that I knew how to use paraffin lamps as well. Seeing people freak out about an unexpected power cut is rather amusing.

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Graven Image
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# 8755

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I have a two wooden potato mashers, One was carved by my grand father prior to 1910, and the other carved by my husband's grandfather. My grandchildren brought up with electric mixers think they are a hoot and always want to mash the potatoes at my house.

I think electric mixers make potatoes the texture of glue by the way.

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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
'God save the king' was played in the picture theatre before the programme started, and everyone stood for it.
(Was there an equivalent in the US?)
There would be a newsreel and a cartoon before the main film, and a trailer for a forthcoming programme.
The films were on huge reels. Now that they're on DVDs a movie can open all over the country/world on the same day, but these bulky reels travelled round the country and it might be some time before they reached your small town.

GG

I don't remember "The Star Spangled Banner" being played before movies, but it was played at the end of the TV viewing day in the 60s (when the programming day began at 6 AM and ended at 1 AM). But even today the national anthem is played before most team sporting events and many community concerts.

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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anoesis
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# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I remember the joy of shelling peas grown in the garden for dinner. I was made to whistle as I shelled them. It is much more difficult to eat raw peas while whistling than while singing or talking.

I remember it too. Though not as a joy. Usually about four ten-litre pails of pods would come in, and once podded, that would give you maybe 8 litres of peas. Pea pods, when mature, are usually developing some sort of mildew - it stinks, the smell sinks into your skin, and doesn't come out with washing. Topping and tailing several buckets of gooseberries and/or blackcurrants, I didn't mind so much. They smell ok. (Yes, blackcurrants have a scent vaguely reminiscent of cat pee, but I guess I was just already gearing up for a lifetime fandom of sauvignon blanc).
I know some pods had mildew but nothing as you describe. Certainly no smell on my hands etc.
I don't know where you are/were from in Aus., and I know it's not bone dry all over [Biased] , but it's pretty seriously damp in most places here. We can grow mildew anywhere. Fences, shoes, carpet, walls, plastic, windowpanes...

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

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anoesis
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# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
I have a two wooden potato mashers, One was carved by my grand father prior to 1910, and the other carved by my husband's grandfather. My grandchildren brought up with electric mixers think they are a hoot and always want to mash the potatoes at my house.

I think electric mixers make potatoes the texture of glue by the way.

I was not aware that electric potato mashers were a thing. Don't have one, never seen one...

--------------------
The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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I remember earning pocket money for top and tailing gooseberries, and for cleaning the big sash windows. Threepences or sixpences.(c1942)

Our closing down tune for TV was 'Goodnight Kiwi', actually a lullaby usually sung in Maori, though it wasn't traditional. A cartoon kiwi clambered up a pylon, lay down in a 'dish' and pulled up a blanket – there was a cat, I think, that joined him.

In 1964, in a remote Scottish Youth Hostel, being a lark by nature I'd be up early and get the coal range going, all ready for the city types who didn't know how to handle the thing.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Joan Rasch
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# 49

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Good Night Kiwi video
I knew I'd seen this somewhere...

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* A cyclist on the information bikepath

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Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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I phoned someone yesterday to say I'd send some photos of the pup (they'd been looking after him) and asked if they had whatsapp - she replied "there are no computers in this house".

That's pretty unusual these days isn't it?

I'll have to print and snail mail the photos.

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Garden. Room. Walk

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Nenya
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# 16427

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.

Our salads used to be lettuce, tomato and cucumber with grated cheese and salad cream; sometimes hard boiled egg. And there was none of this side salad stuff - that was the meal.

I was well into adulthood before I realised that I don't actually like lettuce and that salad can be made without it, and include other things.

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They told me I was delusional. I nearly fell off my unicorn.

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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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Yes, my childhood salad memories are similar...but we also had SPAM!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_eYSuPKP3Y

Kids these days wouldn't understand, indeed.

[Disappointed]

[Projectile]

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Leorning Cniht
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# 17564

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Do people still make sandwiches with sliced tongue?
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Pangolin Guerre
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# 18686

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Tongue sandwich? Of course. Well, I don't make them, but I order them at deli.

Another thing kids don't know: municipally mandated curfew. It was 9pm, IIRC, but disappeared, or ceased to be enforced meaningfully, when I was a child.

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mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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One I heard today in the mousehold: "Sorry I missed your call. I couldn't find my phone in time."

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
One I heard today in the mousehold: "Sorry I missed your call. I couldn't find my phone in time."

Hell's bells! I use that!
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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.

Our salads used to be lettuce, tomato and cucumber with grated cheese and salad cream; sometimes hard boiled egg. And there was none of this side salad stuff - that was the meal.

I was well into adulthood before I realised that I don't actually like lettuce and that salad can be made without it, and include other things.

Our salad was like that until well into the 1970's, with the addition of spring onions and grated carrot. Someone around the family must have read Elisabeth David because by c1982 there were different kinds of salad.
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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by betjemaniac:
Those red and white stripy shelters they used to put over holes in the street

With a brazier outside.

Has anyone said policemen (and they were men!) on point duty?

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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Or police wearing white gloves (and no hazard vests) directing traffic at busy intersections? And the traffic lights didn't have to be out: they were non-existant.
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mousethief

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# 953

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That predates me, Pete.

Anybody else remember lights built into curbs (kerbs) in the street at Y intersections? They had yellow lights that flashed, and were inside a heavy steel cage. They're all gone now and for the life of me I don't remember the last time I saw one in operation.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

Posts: 62895 | From: Ecotopia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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Joan, thanks for the link to the "Goodnight Kiwi". Our family used to have an ongoing discussion on how the cat managed to get up to the dish, and decided that it was a bit of everyday cat cunning.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 9960 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
# 13

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quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
Anybody else remember lights built into curbs (kerbs) in the street at Y intersections? They had yellow lights that flashed, and were inside a heavy steel cage. They're all gone now and for the life of me I don't remember the last time I saw one in operation.

We've got one in my town.

My first "oh crap, I'm getting old" experience was some years ago when I was helping lead the youth group at my church. Someone gave the group an old console stereo, a huge piece of furniture with a turntable built in and some polka records in the cabinet. One of the kids put a record on the turntable, lifted the arm, and then stopped before putting down the needle and asked, "Do you start on the inside of the record or the outside?"

Posts: 24352 | From: La La Land | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rossweisse

High Church Valkyrie
# 2349

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What we used to call "no-speed" bicycles, sans gears. Those don't seem to be made nowadays once you get past itty-bitty beginner bikes.

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I'm not dead yet.

Posts: 14545 | From: Valhalla | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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quote:
Originally posted by Rossweisse:
What we used to call "no-speed" bicycles, sans gears. Those don't seem to be made nowadays once you get past itty-bitty beginner bikes.

"Fixies", singular "fixy" is what they call them today. All the rage with the vegan tiny house moss wearing tree huggers. Not sure why.
Posts: 10741 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
mousethief

Ship's Thieving Rodent
# 953

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We used to have what was essentially very expensive white paint that came in a nail polish bottle, and if you were typing and you typed a wrong letter or number, you'd paint over the wrong one with this white paint, then back up the typewriter one letter and type the letter or number you should have typed. When this was first invented it was a godsend and it made document creation tons easier for secretaries, students, etc.

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God has shown me that I should not call any man impure or unclean. --Acts 10:28

Posts: 62895 | From: Ecotopia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Galloping Granny
Shipmate
# 13814

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quote:
Originally posted by Pangolin Guerre:
Tongue sandwich? Of course. Well, I don't make them, but I order them at deli.
.

I like tongue. I once found a butcher who had, or could get, tongue, and I cooked one and pressed it in a basin in the fridge. It was actually not difficult. I remember peeling it, which was easy if you'd cooked it long enough. I suppose we had it sliced with salad (salad again!)

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

Posts: 2593 | From: Matarangi | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Pangolin Guerre
Shipmate
# 18686

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MT - Trivia for you: a patent for a correction fluid was held by Bette Nesmith Graham, mother of Michael Nesmith, of The Monkees. She left him a ton of dough.

GG - A friend of mine had me over for dinner, and served me a delicious calf's tongue in an almond and red wine sauce. (She and her partner joke that when I'm invited, they feed me "guts".) If I get the recipe I'll post it in Heaven's recipe thread, and pm you.

Posts: 611 | From: 30 arpents de neige | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
Or police wearing white gloves (and no hazard vests) directing traffic at busy intersections?

That is point duty! (British terminology).
Posts: 9124 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
If you were typing and you typed a wrong letter or number, you'd paint over the wrong one with this white paint ...

There is of course the apocryphal person who was new to computers and wrote their first document. After finishing the job they said, "That was great, now how do I get the white blobs off my screen?"
Posts: 9124 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
M.
Ship's Spare Part
# 3291

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A slightly different take, not mine sadly, but seen in the Times a few days ago. Someone showing their old typewriter to a grandchild and getting the response, 'wow! It's got an integral printer!'

M.

Posts: 2230 | From: Lurking in Surrey | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
quote:
Originally posted by Rossweisse:
What we used to call "no-speed" bicycles, sans gears. Those don't seem to be made nowadays once you get past itty-bitty beginner bikes.

"Fixies", singular "fixy" is what they call them today. All the rage with the vegan tiny house moss wearing tree huggers. Not sure why.
Not the same thing. A single speed gearless bike still has a freewheel - you can stop pedalling and it keeps going. A fixed gear, or fixie, has no freewheel so while it's moving you have to pedal. The appeal is maintenance - less of it - and apparently greater sense of control.

[ 27. August 2017, 07:38: Message edited by: Karl: Liberal Backslider ]

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17422 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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I'm trying to remember the last time I saw a Toledo Torch as a cautionary warning where road construction was happening. When I was young, I thought they looked like little bombs!

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 17707 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Twilight

Puddleglum's sister
# 2832

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I still get on a bike and think I should pedal backwards to stop. It's the only kind I ever had. It had a nice comfy wide seat and you sat up straight so you didn't fear going over the handlebars onto your teeth if you hit a bump.
Posts: 6606 | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
I still get on a bike and think I should pedal backwards to stop. It's the only kind I ever had. It had a nice comfy wide seat and you sat up straight so you didn't fear going over the handlebars onto your teeth if you hit a bump.

That's what I still have! Foot brakes, comfy seat, handlebars that allow you to sit upright -- but I do have three forward gears.

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Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

Posts: 9259 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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Speaking of gears, I drive a car with a manual transmission -- they're few and far between in the U.S. I've had young men at car washes baffled by mine.

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Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

Posts: 9259 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Pangolin Guerre
Shipmate
# 18686

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About fifteen years ago friends were getting married, and we had a stag and doe for them where we had a silent auction to raise money for their honeymoon. I picked up an orangey-gold one-speed coaster break Columbia bike (ca. 1958-1964) with white wall tires and canvass paniers with a cowboy on a bucking bronco stencilled (gold on silver!) on each panier flap. I don't use it - it's more an objet d'art in my diningroom, When I took it home, I felt like I was 10!

Reactions have ranged from "You use that?!?" to "That is so cool!"

[ 27. August 2017, 13:34: Message edited by: Pangolin Guerre ]

Posts: 611 | From: 30 arpents de neige | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged
sharkshooter

Not your average shark
# 1589

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quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
quote:
Originally posted by Rossweisse:
What we used to call "no-speed" bicycles, sans gears. Those don't seem to be made nowadays once you get past itty-bitty beginner bikes.

"Fixies", singular "fixy" is what they call them today. All the rage with the vegan tiny house moss wearing tree huggers. Not sure why.
Not the same thing. A single speed gearless bike still has a freewheel - you can stop pedalling and it keeps going. ...
We called them coasters because when you weren't pedaling, you were coasting.

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Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O LORD, my strength, and my redeemer. [Psalm 19:14]

Posts: 7695 | From: Canada, eh? | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged



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