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Source: (consider it) Thread: Dirty little secrets
L'organist
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# 17338

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Smoked mussels: hot toast, buttered and the mussels mashed onto it, black pepper - bliss [Yipee]

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4684 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I don't really get babies and toddlers. I liked my OWN kids when they were that age, and tolerated the children of my friends during the same period, but I do not get the oohing and aahing over babies.

No, I agree, they're much more interesting when they're a wee bit older.
I think babies are very interesting. I like watching them figure things out.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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anoesis
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quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
... and how do I confess on so illustrious a website, surrounded by aficionadi of Taverner and I dunno, Tallis and whatever other dudes scrwled spiders' footprints on fence wire, that I love (much, not all) country music [Ultra confused]

I'm sorry. [Hot and Hormonal]

Hah! - I read your opening post, was right with you on the coffee thing, decided to play along, and thought, what am I going to confess to? ...oh, wait - country music... -but no, too late to the party!

So, I guess I'm left with sweetened condensed milk, eaten on buttered toast.

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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What? on toast? not straight from the tin? [Razz]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:


So, I guess I'm left with sweetened condensed milk, eaten on buttered toast.

Close! My preference is blackcurrent jam on toast with Philadelphia cheese on top. Sort of instant cheesecake.
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Pangolin Guerre
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# 18686

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:


So, I guess I'm left with sweetened condensed milk, eaten on buttered toast.

Close! My preference is blackcurrent jam on toast with Philadelphia cheese on top. Sort of instant cheesecake.
I do exactly that with Scandinavian crepes! Well, cheese first, then the jam. I use either black currant or sour cherry jam. Roll the crepe, sprinkle with a pinch of cinnamon and sugar.
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Boogie

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# 13538

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I don't really get babies and toddlers. I liked my OWN kids when they were that age, and tolerated the children of my friends during the same period, but I do not get the oohing and aahing over babies.

No, I agree, they're much more interesting when they're a wee bit older.
I think babies are very interesting. I like watching them figure things out.

Moo

From a distance, until they start crying.

When my niece's twins were babies and visiting our house she asked if I'd like to change a nappy. She looked a bit surprised when I said 'no thank you'! Her Mum and sister happily did so. I have a very high ick threshold and happily clear up after pups. But - other people's babies nappies? - NO thank you!

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Garden. Room. Walk

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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I listen almost entirely to classical music – I confused a fellow doing a survey the other day "What station do you listen to from 9-12?" "The Concert Programme""What do you listen to between 12 and 3?" "The Concert Programme" "what do you listen to between 3 and 6?" "The concert programme"etc.
But I don't like most choral music – especially I can't listen to The Messiah, only occasionally to one piece of it.
I don't like female choirs.
I've enjoyed singing alto (="a soprano who can read music")in church choirs and in congregational singing and when almost any traditional hymn is sung I sing the alto part automatically.
I love male voice choirs, especially Welsh ones...

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
I love male voice choirs, especially Welsh ones...

You would have enjoyed our Golden Jubilee Concert last Saturday, then. (A bit loud in our small church, though - not the one on the poster!)
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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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I am surrounded by friends and neighbours who love rugby and I pretend to understand what is going on. (The technicalities and rules of the game have been explained to me many times, in vain.)

I like singing 'Don't Cry for Me Argentina' in the bath.

I don't consume very much Marmite on toast (always with butter) unless I'm travelling in places where it is not readily available. Then it becomes a Primal Need and I will do anything to get hold of a small pot-bellied yellow-labelled jar of it.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
I am surrounded by friends and neighbours who love rugby and I pretend to understand what is going on.

Be comforted: so do they. The only people who understand are referees - and even they're not too sure at times.
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betjemaniac
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# 17618

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
I am surrounded by friends and neighbours who love rugby and I pretend to understand what is going on. (The technicalities and rules of the game have been explained to me many times, in vain.)


you've got one of the best museums of the game in the world in Cape Town - go and drink deeply at the well and all shall be revealed...

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And is it true? For if it is....

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Leorning Cniht
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# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
The only people who understand are referees - and even they're not too sure at times.

There are plenty of referees who are completely sure that they understand the rules, and are wrong...
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Stercus Tauri
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# 16668

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
I am surrounded by friends and neighbours who love rugby and I pretend to understand what is going on. (The technicalities and rules of the game have been explained to me many times, in vain.)

I like singing 'Don't Cry for Me Argentina' in the bath.

I don't consume very much Marmite on toast (always with butter) unless I'm travelling in places where it is not readily available. Then it becomes a Primal Need and I will do anything to get hold of a small pot-bellied yellow-labelled jar of it.

Tangent with a South African flavour... After a Marmiteless year or so I happened to be visiting your lovely country with friends. We stopped at a grocery shop in Aliwal North for supplies, where I spied that very jar and grabbed one from the shelf. My sanity was questioned and I was not asked to share it. We spent the evening watching rugby, recalling that back in grammar school, I had been a hooker.

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Thay haif said. Quhat say thay, Lat thame say (George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal)

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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My dirty little secret sounds dirtier and dirtier.

It is a big thing out here in a sports-mad country. I once confessed my ignorance about/disinterest in rugby to a black academic colleague who promptly assumed this meant that I was a dedicated soccer lover (South Africa's other great passion) and he talked to me conspiratorially about Bafana Bafana and Kaiser Chiefs soccer teams each time we met. I know nothing about soccer.

betjemaniac, I have heard about that magnificent rugby museum at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town. A much-loved older neighbour who once played forward (back? goalkeeper? scrum-half? clueless) told me all about it with tears in his eyes and I assured him I would love to spend time there. *ashamed hypocrite*

Baptist Trainfan, Lorning Cniht, whenever I listen to a supporter of the Stormers (Western Province) and supporter of the Blue Bulls (Gauteng) discuss a game they have watched together where the Stormers inevitably beat the Blue Bulls, it is evident they have watched two different games and the referees presided over a third unrelated game.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Karl: Liberal Backslider
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# 76

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I feel for you. I have no interest in sports of any kind; I used to follow Test Cricket but realised it was just the numbers and wondering about the rain; I got bored watching it and was very vague on who the players were.

Some people really cannot cope with it; had plenty of blokes especially give me the cold shoulder after the answer to "my team" being "haven't got one, I have no interest in football." Fortunately I work in IT so it doesn't affect work relations but I've heard horror stories.

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

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Prester John
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# 5502

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quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
We spent the evening watching rugby, recalling that back in grammar school, I had been a hooker.

Umm... this comes across as something completely different to an American.
[Ultra confused]

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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It has that ambiguity in English-English too, I think. Blame the Marmite.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Karl: Liberal Backslider
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# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
It has that ambiguity in English-English too, I think. Blame the Marmite.

Source of endless single-gag fourth-form humour.

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

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Anselmina
Ship's barmaid
# 3032

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quote:
Originally posted by Prester John:
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
We spent the evening watching rugby, recalling that back in grammar school, I had been a hooker.

Umm... this comes across as something completely different to an American.
[Ultra confused]

You mean not all American hookers look like this?

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Irish dogs needing homes! http://www.dogactionwelfaregroup.ie/ Greyhounds and Lurchers are shipped over to England for rehoming too!

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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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I lied to my Fitbit albout what I ate today.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

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Pigwidgeon

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# 10192

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quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
You mean not all American hookers look like this?

I think that one would have to work a pretty dark street corner.

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Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

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Pangolin Guerre
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# 18686

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quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
You mean not all American hookers look like this?

I think that one would have to work a pretty dark street corner.
Could be quite successful in a niche market.
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Prester John
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# 5502

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quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
quote:
Originally posted by Prester John:
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
We spent the evening watching rugby, recalling that back in grammar school, I had been a hooker.

Umm... this comes across as something completely different to an American.
[Ultra confused]

You mean not all American hookers look like this?
Not that I'm speaking from experience of course but he doesn't look like any that I see on the TV show Cops. Which exposes my dirty little secret. I watch a show that could very fairly be described as panem et circenses for the masses.

<slightly off coding>

[ 08. September 2017, 23:49: Message edited by: Prester John ]

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Huia
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# 3473

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I loathe and detest rugby, what's more I can't name a current All Black* and couldn't give a hoot whether they win or lose.

On the other hand I was glad when the first post quake game could be played in Christchurch because I knew how important it was for some people's morale.

* the last one I could name was Tana Umaga, but that's because I taught him when he was 6.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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anoesis
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# 14189

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I don't know how you have managed to get through a supermarket checkout anytime in the last several years without being visually assaulted by women's magazine covers relating the latest dealings of Dan Carter, Richie McCaw et al. - why, only last month, Israel Dagg's wife had a baby! [Biased] [Projectile]

I am quite literally sitting in front of the TV with my laptop right now, about to watch the (delayed) coverage of ABs vs. Pumas in New Plymouth. Huia, never pass up an opportunity to watch 15 very fit Argentinian men capering about a field! (Anoesis' other dirty secret - the rugby isn't entirely about the rugby...) [Hot and Hormonal]

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

Posts: 982 | From: New Zealand | Registered: Oct 2008  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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I'd rather watch the Argentinian polo team. Horses as well to watch as well as players.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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anoesis
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# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I'd rather watch the Argentinian polo team. Horses as well to watch as well as players.

Indeed. Where can one see such a thing, though? I doubt that would even feature on the full SkySport package...

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

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L'organist
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# 17338

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Well, the Polo World Cup is taking place in Sydney in mid to late October and teams from Argentina, Chile, USA, England, New Zealand, Spain, India and Australia will be competing. New Zealand haven't qualified before so they're very much the underdogs.

If you contact the NZ Polo Association (I think they're based in Auckland) they'll be able to tell you what coverage there is - probably a live link to clubs but you never know...

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4684 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Huia
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# 3473

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I didn't realise Ritchie McCaw was still an All Black - I did know he was a Crusader (Christchurch team) at some time because they supported a "reading crusade" encouraging Primary School children to improve their reading.

I think a lot of the celebrity stuff passes me by because I don't watch TV or read women's magazines unless I have forgotten to take my book with me when I go to the doctor's and I only listen to RNZ national, mainly the weather forecast.

Huia - probably not a dinkum Kiwi [Razz]

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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ChaliceGirl
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# 13656

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quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I don't really get babies and toddlers. I liked my OWN kids when they were that age, and tolerated the children of my friends during the same period, but I do not get the oohing and aahing over babies.

No, I agree, they're much more interesting when they're a wee bit older.
I think babies are very interesting. I like watching them figure things out.

Moo

From a distance, until they start crying.

When my niece's twins were babies and visiting our house she asked if I'd like to change a nappy. She looked a bit surprised when I said 'no thank you'! Her Mum and sister happily did so. I have a very high ick threshold and happily clear up after pups. But - other people's babies nappies? - NO thank you!

I feel the same way! I'm not a baby person, and never wanted one. Give me pets any day!

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The Episcopal Church Welcomed Me.

"Welcome home." ++Katharine Jefferts Schori to me on 29Mar2009.
My KJS fansite & chicksinpointyhats

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Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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Good to see you, ChaliceGirl!
[Smile]

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Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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Thanks to the influence of a friend who is a serious contemporary musician, I listen to difficult modern composers like Philip Glass, Bartók, Elliot Carter, Arnold Schoenberg. And I love the avant-garde edge of jazz.

But when it comes to popular music, I'm stuck in the worst (and I do mean worst) pop schlock of the 1970s: Seasons in the Sun (Terry Jacks),Love will keep us together (Captain and Tenille),You light up my life (Debbie Boone), I think I love you (The Patridge Family).

I know all the words by heart and can sing along, like someone with a good taste/debased taste Jekyll and Hyde syndrome.

'I think I love you so what am I so afraid of/
I'm afraid that I'm not sure of/ a love there is no cure for'

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

Posts: 498 | From: Cape Town | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
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# 17338

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MaryLouise
You are not alone!

Yes, I earn my living as a "serious" musician and even listen to/play "serious" music for pleasure - BUT, if I had to choose my 8 records for Desert Island Discs one would have to be the Chris Montez recording of The More I see you - it even wins over My baby just cares for me.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4684 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
wild haggis
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# 15555

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All those folk who don't like children! I can guess what they were like as kids from their descriptions. It takes one to know one. We were all once kids Or were they born fully formed adults - poor mothers if they were!

Kids are interesting, intuitive and tell it as it is.
Wonder what the kids think of those critical adults?

No wonder children have given up on church/religion with that kind of attitude from adults. Didn't Jesus tell off the disciples for chasing children away?

Marmite ................I'm married to a lover of the brown stuff. Love the hubby not the brown stuff! But I just have to put up with the 'orrible smell.

Now daddy long legs (or jenny long legs as we called them in my far and distant youth in the land of the mountain and the flood)....that's another story. The boys used to capture us girls at the close mouths (entrance to houses for the Sassenachs) and stuff the beasties down our backs. These boys were mean and horrible and the daddy long legs were..........

Even after all these years, if I see one today, I run or duck under the duvet.

Didn't put me off the boys, just the daddy long legs!

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wild haggis

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Wesley J

Silly Shipmate
# 6075

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Hubby ain't got long legs and/or ain't a daddy?

Enquiring mind wants to know! [Confused] [Big Grin]

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Be it as it may: Wesley J will stay. --- Euthanasia, that sounds good. An alpine neutral neighbourhood. Then back to Britain, all dressed in wood. Things were gonna get worse. (John Cooper Clarke)

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Albertus
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# 13356

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quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
It has that ambiguity in English-English too, I think. Blame the Marmite.

Source of endless single-gag fourth-form humour.
UK shipmates with longish memories may recall that Jeffrey Archer - a rugby referee as well as a novelist and politician- was accused of having paid a prostitute £2000 to keep quiet about an alleged liaison.
Sure enough, first game he referees after this comes out, up comes one of the players- 'I'm a hooker- now, where's my two grand?'

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My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6460 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
anoesis
Shipmate
# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
All those folk who don't like children!

Shocking, yeah. [Roll Eyes] I have kids, by choice. (Do you?) I wouldn't un-have them. But God, they're hard work. All the time. Every day. And not the rewarding kind of hard work, like going to the gym, or finishing a piece of copyediting.

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
I can guess what they were like as kids from their descriptions.

I note you conveniently fail to pad this one out. I think you should. I can't, for instance, tell what they were like as kids, from their descriptions. It might be good to clarify, here, because it sounds a little like you might be suggesting they're basically lifelong selfish assholes.

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
It takes one to know one.

Wot? Sorry? A kid? Or a kid-hater?

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
We were all once kids Or were they born fully formed adults - poor mothers if they were!

Yeah, I'd hate it if my kids had empathy, ate without making an entire room sticky, could refrain from hitting one another, made their own toast when hungry, drove themselves places, and went to the toilet at 2am without telling me they needed to do so. Oh, wait...

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
Kids are interesting, intuitive and tell it as it is.

The thing that surprised me the most about my kids, once they became verbal and I had continuous, non-optional insight into their train(s) of thought, was just how not interesting those thoughts were. Really, even if you allow for the fact that they're figuring stuff out as they go along, 99.9% of it is just total dross. With one, minecraft, minecraft, minecraft, food, minecraft, food, parties, minecraft. The other, food, food, food, ninjas, minecraft, food, ninjas. And here's the thing. They're normal - I see enough other kids on a daily basis to be able to attest to this.

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
No wonder children have given up on church/religion with that kind of attitude from adults. Didn't Jesus tell off the disciples for chasing children away?

1.) That's exceptionally harsh, even measured against the rest of your content.

2.) I don't think that folk who've chosen not to have kids should have to be answerable for what's (apparently) going on with the current generation of kids. You can blame me and my compatriots for that, instead.

3.) Do you have any evidence that children are giving up on church/religion? I mean, they kind of have to go where their parents go - or don't go - and also, they are not amongst the most surveyed of groups, in respect of either memberships or convictions.

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

Posts: 982 | From: New Zealand | Registered: Oct 2008  |  IP: Logged
Kittyville
Shipmate
# 16106

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Thank you, anoesis - much more elegantly expressed than I would've managed.
Posts: 287 | From: Sydney | Registered: Dec 2010  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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quote:
Originally posted by Kittyville:
Thank you, anoesis - much more elegantly expressed than I would've managed.

I agree. I started to respond but then remembered that this is Heaven, so my response would not have been appropriate.

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Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

Posts: 9459 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ethne Alba
Shipmate
# 5804

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DLS?

My spouse is on a very strict diet and weekly i make dark chocolate krispie cakes for myself and hide them at the far end of a cupboard that i know cannot be (easily) seen.....

Posts: 3125 | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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In a confession that I just know will have our dear and much missed shipmate ken spinning in his grave, I have to own up to currently having a big craving for mild cheddar.

I actually find myself thinking of ken every time I cut myself another slice of that glorious, plasticky, nuclear orange marvellousness.

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"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
wiblog blipfoto blog

Posts: 5756 | From: the land of the deep-fried Mars Bar | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
In a confession that I just know will have our dear and much missed shipmate ken spinning in his grave, I have to own up to currently having a big craving for mild cheddar.

I actually find myself thinking of ken every time I cut myself another slice of that glorious, plasticky, nuclear orange marvellousness.

Out, out, I command you, Spirit of tastlessness! Out and to the Abyss!

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17624 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
... modern composers like ... Bartok ...

He died in 1945 - does he really still count as "modern"? [Two face]

Did you have to mention Seasons in the Sun? Now I've got that really unsubtle key-change as an ear-worm. Thanks for that ... [Devil]

My own confession: we've just had our cable TV hooked up and I can't tell you how pleased we were to be able once again to watch Jeopardy!. High intellectual culture it ain't, but it is addictive. [Hot and Hormonal]

Oh yes, and I actually thought the music, fashion and style of the 1980s was rather good (except for the avocado bathrooms - see the "Moving" thread in AS).

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19618 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
MaryLouise
Shipmate
# 18697

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
... modern composers like ... Bartok ...

He died in 1945 - does he really still count as "modern"? [Two face]


I wondered about that myself, Piglet. The terminology is a bit imprecise, in the same way that Virginia Woolf (died 1945) is described as a 'modern' writer where her contemporaries Arnold Bennett and JB Priestley are seen as following on in 19th-century traditions of the novel.. Modern as akin to Modernist, but not contemporary.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

Posts: 498 | From: Cape Town | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
The terminology is a bit imprecise, in the same way that Virginia Woolf (died 1945) is described as a 'modern' writer where her contemporaries Arnold Bennett and JB Priestley are seen as following on in 19th-century traditions of the novel..

Arnold Bennett was born in 1867. Virginia Woolf was born in 1882. Those fifteen years made a huge difference. I am a great fan of Arnold Bennett, and his writings resemble that of the earlier Victorian novelists, who were his role models. By the time Virginia Woolf started writing, the Victorian model was no longer so powerful.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20205 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
MaryLouise
Shipmate
# 18697

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Moo, it isn't so much about when they were born as the kind of writing they did. Jules Laforgue who influenced TS Eliot and is known as a proto-Modernist was also born in 1860. But 'modern' is a slippery word.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

Posts: 498 | From: Cape Town | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged
Trudy Scrumptious

BBE Shieldmaiden
# 5647

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quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
In a confession that I just know will have our dear and much missed shipmate ken spinning in his grave, I have to own up to currently having a big craving for mild cheddar.

I actually find myself thinking of ken every time I cut myself another slice of that glorious, plasticky, nuclear orange marvellousness.

I think of him every time I play "Dear Lord and Father of Mankind" on the piano at church.

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Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

Posts: 7360 | From: Closer to Paris than I am to Vancouver | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
In a confession that I just know will have our dear and much missed shipmate ken spinning in his grave, I have to own up to currently having a big craving for mild cheddar.

I actually find myself thinking of ken every time I cut myself another slice of that glorious, plasticky, nuclear orange marvellousness.

You might as well go the whole way and have processed cheese slices.
Posts: 9430 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Jane R
Shipmate
# 331

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wild haggis:
quote:
All those folk who don't like children! I can guess what they were like as kids from their descriptions. It takes one to know one. We were all once kids Or were they born fully formed adults - poor mothers if they were!
Well, I think that's a bit unfair. I can see where these people are coming from; I don't like all children. I like some people who happen to be children at the moment.

I like chip butties, but this is not really a secret as part of the pleasure of eating them is due to Other Half and Daughter pretending to be embarrassed when I have one...

Posts: 3934 | From: Jorvik | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged



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