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Source: (consider it) Thread: Interesting Words
keibat
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Shame on you, Leaf. Not one exciting word in your entire post. You could at least have suggested that no prophet's flag's geolinguistic perspective was peculier [sic].

Meanwhile, back on the eastern side of another country: conversation about a family with an unusually high offspring count was rendered more concise by noting that the parents must be polyphiloprogeniitive [thankyou, T S Eliot]

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keibat from the finnish north and the lincs east rim

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Stercus Tauri
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quote:
Originally posted by keibat:
Shame on you, Leaf. Not one exciting word in your entire post. You could at least have suggested that no prophet's flag's geolinguistic perspective was peculier [sic].

Meanwhile, back on the eastern side of another country: conversation about a family with an unusually high offspring count was rendered more concise by noting that the parents must be polyphiloprogeniitive [thankyou, T S Eliot]

'Peculier' is a fine word, sic or otherwise. Of course it's not the same as it used to be when I was young, but Old Peculier is still one of the finest beers of them all.

The Washington Post, inspired by Kim Jong Haircut's complimentary words to donald trump, has just run an article on lesser known insults, but he scored the bullseye with 'dotard'.

[ 23. September 2017, 01:18: Message edited by: Stercus Tauri ]

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Thay haif said. Quhat say thay, Lat thame say (George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal)

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
peely-wally

(used by my Scottish grandmother whenever she saw teenaged me looking what I called soulful)

My wife uses when I am pale and sickening for something (a cold or the like), or just very tired.
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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by keibat:
The parents must be polyphiloprogeniitive

Or just exhausted.
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Meconopsis
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Scofflaw.
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Meconopsis
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trepidatious
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Martin60
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Meconopsis

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Love wins

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Graven Image
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Once while held up in bed I started thinking how diseases often sound like flowers. I imagined going into a florist and ordering a bouquet of Epilepsy, with some Asian Flu, and a stem or two of dislocated spines.

Perhaps it was the fever talking. [Mad]

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
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quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
diseases often sound like flowers

I miss the disease names of yesteryear, replaced by awfully clinically sounding words now:

dropsy (edema)
the vapors (PMS)
undulant fever (brucellosis)

and so on.

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"Stop your noisy songs; I do not want to listen to your praise bands." -- Amos 5:23, Good News Bible (modified)

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Huia
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When we were children one of my brothers and I were laughing over the words "galloping consumption". Granddad overheard us and gave us a lecture about how serious it was.

Since then, under it's current label of TB, it's made a re-appearance due to overcrowded and damp homes. It's definitely not something to laugh about.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Baptist Trainfan
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In the "Para Handy" books by Neil Munro, the crew of the "Vital Spark" try to convince a lazy colleague that he is actually suffering from the deadly "galloping convulvulus".
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Moo

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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
When we were children one of my brothers and I were laughing over the words "galloping consumption". Granddad overheard us and gave us a lecture about how serious it was.

Since then, under it's current label of TB, it's made a re-appearance due to overcrowded and damp homes. It's definitely not something to laugh about.

It was also known as the 'white death'.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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Anselmina
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Dialect vernacular words are great.

In Ulster/Scots we worry about ending up in the 'shuck', if we drive or walk too closely to the grassy, boggy verge at the side of a road.

If you're 'foundered' you're freezing cold.

Being up to your 'oxters' in anything is usually very uncomfortable. I know you find this word in other parts of Britain, too.

And, as a probable mispronunciation of 'beak', you'll be told to 'shut yer bake' (flat vowel please!) if you're talking too much. By the same token, 'gob' becomes 'gub' in Ulster.

And a classic of my father's would have invited you to 'aff ye go and claw mowl roun' yersel'. (Again bearing in mind the flat Ulster vowels.) In other words, why don't you go into the garden, sit in the muck and claw mud around yourself like the lunatic you are?

And my favourite - 'thrawn', as in 'he's a thrawn old bugger'.

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Irish dogs needing homes! http://www.dogactionwelfaregroup.ie/ Greyhounds and Lurchers are shipped over to England for rehoming too!

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
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Another colorfully named disorder is St. Vitus' Dance (Sydenham's Chorea). My mother would tell us kids that we'd come down with it if we couldn't sit still and stop fidgeting.

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"Stop your noisy songs; I do not want to listen to your praise bands." -- Amos 5:23, Good News Bible (modified)

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LutheranChik
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LOL...my mother used to threaten me with St. Vitus' Dance too, but I can't remember why...probably for not wearing a coat or for sitting on the cold ground or other thing she found unhealthy.

I take online classes for fun, and the lecture transcripts seem to be generated by voice recognition technology, which often creates unintentionally humorous phrases. In one lecture, the professor kept referring to MOOCs, Massive Open Online Classes. The computer kept transcribing this as "mooks," which every fan of New York based crime dramas knows is slang for " disreputable person." Right now I'm taking a class on Plato, and the transcript rendered "Meno," Socrates 'dialog partner, as "meano," which struck me as funny.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

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Moo

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When I was in Belfast, I was the Research Assistant for Ulster Dialects, and I also taught a small class. One day I asked the students what Gaelic words they knew that were in common local use. All the examples they came up with were insults that children used on the playground. They were vague about the exact meaning of these words.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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Meconopsis
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weisenheimer & wiseacre (I think they mean the same).
schlemiel

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gustava
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psammomatous
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keibat
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Hula posted:
quote:
When we were children one of my brothers and I were laughing over the words "galloping consumption". Granddad overheard us and gave us a lecture about how serious it was.

Since then, under it's current label of TB, it's made a re-appearance due to overcrowded and damp homes. It's definitely not something to laugh about.

In Finland, an immigrant recently died, because over a period of six months no one, from local health centre to regional hospital, realized that he had TB. A chest x-ray would have saved his life. It was only taken in the week he died.

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keibat from the finnish north and the lincs east rim

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keibat
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Shipmasters: This is the second time recently I've been shunted up this particular cul de sac:
quote:
We require that you perform one complete performance of "Do The Hokey-Pokey" between all submissions. (Make sure it takes at least 120 seconds).

Use your back button with whatever extremity is not currently "OUT" to return to the previous page. Or use your browser's reload button.

And that's what it's all about.

» Please use your browser's back button to return, unless you got this because of flood control, in which case the back button will just try to screw with you. Sorry about that.

And the only way out, in fact, is to reload the thread in question. Frankly, I don't find this amusing, I find it frustrating.

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keibat from the finnish north and the lincs east rim

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jedijudy

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I understand your frustration, keibat. This is a problem more suited to the Styx board than Heaven. I hope you can get some help there.

jedijudy
Hoping to be a helpful Heaven Host


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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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balaam

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Sometimes it is the common words that have a nice sound to them:

oblong,
mangle.

Recalcitrant is another favourite, and something I could never be [Two face]

There is a dialect phrase, much beloved of my maternal grandmother, used to describe a woman of loose morals as being as "leet geen as a posser 'ead." "Leet geen" meaning lightly given. Posser.

The phrase maternal grandmother, paternal grandfather etc. are more satisfying than the grandmother or grandfather alone. I dislike the word nan for grandmother intensely.

Bleb, the word is fantastic; having a bleb is not. (Currently using bleb ointment [Frown] )

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Fearfully and wonderfully mad
Love the dinner, hate the din.
ن
blog

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balaam

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ETA

Why are the other words for bleb: Zit, Pustule etc. also satisfying to say, particularly as an insult?

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Fearfully and wonderfully mad
Love the dinner, hate the din.
ن
blog

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
... other words for bleb ...

Like plook? [Big Grin]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
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Aye.

That is the exception though when it comes to collective nouns. An infestation of blebs, or zits sounds right, but for that word the alternative collective noun sounds better:

A gathering of plooks.

As they are hard to shift, despite the prescribed gunge, I have a gathering of recalcitrant plooks.

Bye for now, must go and scratch. [Roll Eyes]

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Fearfully and wonderfully mad
Love the dinner, hate the din.
ن
blog

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M.
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Balsam,

So a posser is what I would know as a dolly?

M.

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balaam

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quote:
Originally posted by M.:
Balsam, (sic)

So a posser is what I would know as a dolly?

M.

Like a short stool on a long handle?

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Fearfully and wonderfully mad
Love the dinner, hate the din.
ن
blog

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
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Words starting with fl can never be uninteresting.

Flavour

Flicker

Flounder

But flange, that is a satisfying word, say it again, flange.

Flange mmmm.

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Fearfully and wonderfully mad
Love the dinner, hate the din.
ن
blog

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keibat
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Balaam commented;
quote:
The phrase maternal grandmother, paternal grandfather etc. are more satisfying than the grandmother or grandfather alone.
Swedish at least, and probably all the Scandinavian languages (not, however, Finnish, which is not a Scandinavian language) systematically distinguish between mormor, morfar, (= mother's mother, mother's father) and farmor, farfar, (= father's mother, father's father), and similarly between moster, morbror, (= mother's sister, mother's brother) and faster, farbror, (=father's sister, father's brother).

But agreed, English makes no such distinctions.

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keibat from the finnish north and the lincs east rim

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Words starting with fl can never be uninteresting.

But flange, that is a satisfying word, say it again, flange.

Flange mmmm.

Thanks to the BBC show "Not the Nine o'clock News" (1980's) flange became the collective noun for baboons.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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M.
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Balsam,
Yes re dolly/posser (which would make a good name - she's probably the tweenie in a middle class Victorian house).

And thank you so much for pointing out the inherent interest of 'fl' words! I would never have thought of it, but you're quite right!

M.

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Piglet
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I'm currently reading a book called Horologicon by Mark Forsyth. It's a journey through the hours of the day, exploring words that for one reason or another have fallen out of use.

So far, my favourite has to be:

snollygoster, n. One, especially a politician, who is guided by personal advantage rather than by consistent, respectable principles.

I suspect our American friends might find a use for it ... [Devil]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Bishops Finger
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O, thank you, Piglet, for that absolute gem!

Sorry about the capitals, but SNOLLYGOSTER really does deserve them!

[Killing me]

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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andras
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Fussbudget. As in Peanuts!

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God's on holiday.
(Why borrow a cat?)
Adrian Plass

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ArachnidinElmet
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obfuscation

The word, not the action.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Bishops Finger
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Eschew!

As in 'eschew obfuscation'....

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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keibat
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flummoxed

flabbergasted

fleshly

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keibat from the finnish north and the lincs east rim

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andras
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Bufflehead - Pepys uses it in his diary to describe the then Lord Mayor of London; Pepys considers that he's a few sandwiches short of a picnic (!) and the word surely deserves to be brought back into use!

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God's on holiday.
(Why borrow a cat?)
Adrian Plass

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Baptist Trainfan
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Pity he wasn't around to use it a few years ago, post-Livingstone but pre-Khan! (Although, admittedly, the "Mayor" of London isn't the "Lord Mayor").

[ 09. October 2017, 14:43: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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Bishops Finger
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No, but 'BoJo the Bufflehead' is surely a most appropriate moniker for our beloved Foreign Secretary (pity he isn't permanently in Foreign Parts......).

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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Eirenist
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Bojo a bufflehead? He will be discombobulated!

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'I think I think, therefore I think I am'

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Stercus Tauri
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Amanuensis. I was struggling for the right word in a perfectly normal conversation the other day, and it was perfect.

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Thay haif said. Quhat say thay, Lat thame say (George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal)

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Piglet
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I owe La Vie en Rose an apology - she had already mentioned Horologicon way back near the beginning of page 1, and I didn't notice. Sorry about that, La Vie! [Smile]

I have trouble with:

lascivious, (of a person, manner, or gesture) feeling or revealing an overt and often offensive sexual desire

To me, it should mean being over-zealous when adding cream to one's strawberries, i.e. more related to the sin of gluttony than of lust.

I might be mixing it up with luscious ... [Hot and Hormonal]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Meconopsis
Apprentice
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scalawag
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Eirenist
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When my brother and I behaved like SCALLYWAGS, my mother would say we gave her the OOPAZOOTICS.

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'I think I think, therefore I think I am'

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MaryLouise
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OOPAZOOTICS is perfect.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

Posts: 521 | From: Cape Town | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
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# 9826

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Michigan's Native American place names: Meauwataka; Kitchi-Ta-Kipi; Topinabee.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6356 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
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# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
Amanuensis. I was struggling for the right word in a perfectly normal conversation the other day, and it was perfect.

Interestingly, Mr Al Stewart, who got a mention in rebutting Schroedinger's Cat's scurrilous accusations regarding folk music over on the unpopular opinions thread (why by golly those accusations belong), believes himself to be the only person to have
worked the word into a song.

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17720 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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Petrichor, the aroma of rain on hot dry earth.

Both a good sounding word and a delightful definition.

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Fearfully and wonderfully mad
Love the dinner, hate the din.
ن
blog

Posts: 8832 | From: Somewhere else | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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From the dim and distant, a couple which I believe are my own invention (in any event they became family standard):

Apachoocha An old fashioned gas holder
Glodda A kick-down motorbike stand

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

Posts: 24054 | From: Newport, Wales | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged



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