homepage
  roll on christmas  
click here to find out more about ship of fools click here to sign up for the ship of fools newsletter click here to support ship of fools
community the mystery worshipper gadgets for god caption competition foolishness features ship stuff
discussion boards live chat cafe avatars frequently-asked questions the ten commandments gallery private boards register for the boards
 
Ship of Fools


Post new thread  Post a reply
My profile login | Register | Directory | Search | FAQs | Board home
   - Printer-friendly view Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » Confess Your Unpopular Opinion (Page 9)

 - Email this page to a friend or enemy.  
Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  ...  6  7  8  9  10  11  12 
 
Source: (consider it) Thread: Confess Your Unpopular Opinion
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
My unpopular opinion:
In public life, downbeat, thorough, competence is generally preferable to glamour and charisma. So Attlee and, except in foreign affairs, Chamberlain, rather than Churchill as peacetime British PMs; Truman and Johnson (rather than JFK) as US Presidents; Fisher rather than Ramsey as Archbishop of Canterbury.

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6460 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Nick Tamen

Ship's Wayfaring Fool
# 15164

 - Posted      Profile for Nick Tamen     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Kitten:
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Hmm, I disagree. Paul Simon's Graceland was seminal in getting African music out from the 'world music' bin and into wider hearing. Without 'You Can Call Me Al' there would have been no Lion King.

And that would be a bad thing?

I detest Disney cartoons

But the stage version is incredible; infinitely better than the movie, both visually and musically, and in terms of the African influences.

--------------------
The first thing God says to Moses is, "Take off your shoes." We are on holy ground. Hard to believe, but the truest thing I know. — Anne Lamott

Posts: 2510 | From: On heaven-crammed earth | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

 - Posted      Profile for lilBuddha     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Nick Tamen:
quote:
Originally posted by Kitten:
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Hmm, I disagree. Paul Simon's Graceland was seminal in getting African music out from the 'world music' bin and into wider hearing. Without 'You Can Call Me Al' there would have been no Lion King.

And that would be a bad thing?

I detest Disney cartoons

But the stage version is incredible; infinitely better than the movie, both visually and musically, and in terms of the African influences.
When heard the opening part of the film version of the main song, my heart soared. Only to come crashing down and lie crushed on the floor when the trite, rubbish vocals began. The film was typical Disney.
But the stage production reclaimed the music and the design was fantastic.

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16963 | From: the round earth's imagined corners | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

 - Posted      Profile for Pigwidgeon   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I never saw the movie but have seen the stage version twice and loved it. I will go see it again the next time it comes to town.

--------------------
Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

Posts: 9461 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

 - Posted      Profile for Golden Key   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Karl and all other Welsh folks--

quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
Aravis--


[Biased] There's an old joke that Welsh and Hawai'ian were once one language. Then they split up. Welsh got the consonants, and Hawai'ian got the vowels.

[Biased]

Welsh has seven vowel symbols, more than Hawai'ian, and a rich array of diphthongs. Some words e.g. Wy, Wyau (egg, eggs) - are made up entirely of vowels. This tired old joke is crap because it's not based even on an exaggeration. Welsh is in fact a very vowelly language, and tends towards softer consonants, partially because of the mutation system which frequently changes c to g, t to d, gw to w. Dd and f are pronounced so softly they are frequently dropped altogether. The ignorance gets trying after a while.
I apologize.
[Hot and Hormonal]

May I quickly explain something? A non-Welsh speaker looks at the words, and sees almost all consonants. (At least, the Welsh I've seen over the years. I've had very little chance to hear it spoken.) From what you said, some of the letters that are consonants in English are vowels in Welsh. There's no way a non-speaker would know that.

And Hawai'ian is just the opposite--lots and lots of vowels, both written and spoken.

That's it.

Again, I'm sorry.

--------------------
Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?"--Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon"
--"I'm not giving up--and neither should you." --SNL

Posts: 17996 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Aravis
Shipmate
# 13824

 - Posted      Profile for Aravis   Email Aravis   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I've no objection to the Welsh language itself and I understand a reasonable amount of it. Enough, for example, to notice errors in bilingual signs on a regular basis. It's the political agenda I object to.

(I started writing more but deleted it. Free speech doesn't really exist on this topic.)

Posts: 654 | From: S Wales | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

 - Posted      Profile for Karl: Liberal Backslider   Author's homepage   Email Karl: Liberal Backslider   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
Karl and all other Welsh folks--

quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
Aravis--


[Biased] There's an old joke that Welsh and Hawai'ian were once one language. Then they split up. Welsh got the consonants, and Hawai'ian got the vowels.

[Biased]

Welsh has seven vowel symbols, more than Hawai'ian, and a rich array of diphthongs. Some words e.g. Wy, Wyau (egg, eggs) - are made up entirely of vowels. This tired old joke is crap because it's not based even on an exaggeration. Welsh is in fact a very vowelly language, and tends towards softer consonants, partially because of the mutation system which frequently changes c to g, t to d, gw to w. Dd and f are pronounced so softly they are frequently dropped altogether. The ignorance gets trying after a while.
I apologize.
[Hot and Hormonal]

May I quickly explain something? A non-Welsh speaker looks at the words, and sees almost all consonants. (At least, the Welsh I've seen over the years. I've had very little chance to hear it spoken.) From what you said, some of the letters that are consonants in English are vowels in Welsh. There's no way a non-speaker would know that.

And Hawai'ian is just the opposite--lots and lots of vowels, both written and spoken.

That's it.

Again, I'm sorry.

It's a prickly subject as its sometimes violent repression is still in living memory, and the English tendency to mock it, whilst simultaneously knowing nothing about it, can seem like a continuation of English domination. FWIW, I'm not Welsh, but (unusually, perhaps) have taken the decision to learn the language of people with whom England's history is entwined so closely and is in regular current use only a hundred miles or so away from me.

I am firmly of the opinion that familiarity with (I'm not talking about gaining proficiency, although that option should I think be available) the minority languages of the UK should be part of the curriculum throughout. I think we're selling English children short by letting them either not know they exist, or thinking they're not proper languages, or just a pretext for ridicule. It's a pipe-dream, I know, but to me it has always seemed utterly bizarre that the English generally don't know a word of the languages of people with whom they share a small land-mass. OK, most of them know iechyd da, but they usually pronounce it wrong (it's not "yacky dah") and don't know what it means (it doesn't mean "hello")

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17627 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

 - Posted      Profile for mr cheesy   Email mr cheesy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Aravis:
I've no objection to the Welsh language itself and I understand a reasonable amount of it. Enough, for example, to notice errors in bilingual signs on a regular basis. It's the political agenda I object to.

(I started writing more but deleted it. Free speech doesn't really exist on this topic.)

The political agenda.. for Welsh people to see official communications in their own ancient language..?

--------------------
arse

Posts: 10212 | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I think that Aravis may be one of those English people who live in Wales by virtue of job?

In any case: while Welsh may not be the majority language for lots of people living in our national capital (Cardiff) it is entirely right that it should be on signs, and as the first language on those.

As for a "political agenda" I have no idea, unless it is to try to claim that people like the oldest of my still-living relatives are being over-sensitive if they stll feel it was wrong that they were punished for speaking their mother tongue in the school playground?

Self and the sons aren't fluent (though improving) but we do occasionally go into Welsh if we want to share a private joke or comment.

And I heartily agree with KLB: it is baffling that schools are scrambling to offer pupils Mandarin, etc, yet those on the border don't offer Welsh.

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4686 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

 - Posted      Profile for lilBuddha     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:

And I heartily agree with KLB: it is baffling that schools are scrambling to offer pupils Mandarin, etc, yet those on the border don't offer Welsh.

Bilingual signs, encouraging the study of Welsh, getting the English to understand the Isle is not completely theirs are worthy aims.
But not understanding why it is desirable to learn the language of one of the most dominant economies in the world is, in itself, difficult to understand.

[ 30. October 2017, 14:49: Message edited by: lilBuddha ]

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16963 | From: the round earth's imagined corners | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

 - Posted      Profile for Karl: Liberal Backslider   Author's homepage   Email Karl: Liberal Backslider   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Of course it is an important language, but in my life, and I suspect that of many others, I have had several occasions where mastery of Welsh would have been to my benefit, but none where Mandarin would. This has something to do with living rather nearer Blaenau Ffestiniog than Beijing.

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17627 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

 - Posted      Profile for Baptist Trainfan   Email Baptist Trainfan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:
quote:
Originally posted by Aravis:
I've no objection to the Welsh language itself and I understand a reasonable amount of it. Enough, for example, to notice errors in bilingual signs on a regular basis. It's the political agenda I object to.

(I started writing more but deleted it. Free speech doesn't really exist on this topic.)

The political agenda.. for Welsh people to see official communications in their own ancient language..?
It does mean that all brochures, newsletters etc. are twice the thickness as they have English starting at the front and Welsh (the other way up) starting at the back.

Mind you, who knows which end is the front or the back? Depends on your viewpoint. And, just for fun,look at this (available in both languages). What a shame it's mere fiction. (PS We live at the far reaches of the red line ... ).

[ 30. October 2017, 15:22: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

Posts: 9430 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

 - Posted      Profile for mr cheesy   Email mr cheesy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
It does mean that all brochures, newsletters etc. are twice the thickness as they have English starting at the front and Welsh (the other way up) starting at the back.

Oh no!

--------------------
arse

Posts: 10212 | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

 - Posted      Profile for Baptist Trainfan   Email Baptist Trainfan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
Of course it is an important language, but in my life, and I suspect that of many others, I have had several occasions where mastery of Welsh would have been to my benefit, but none where Mandarin would. This has something to do with living rather nearer Blaenau Ffestiniog than Beijing.

You could surprise the staff at this place! (Of course they might be Bulgarian ...).

[ 30. October 2017, 15:26: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

Posts: 9430 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

 - Posted      Profile for Baptist Trainfan   Email Baptist Trainfan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
It does mean that all brochures, newsletters etc. are twice the thickness as they have English starting at the front and Welsh (the other way up) starting at the back.

Oh no!
Oh yes - including the programme of the concert we went to the other day at St. David's Hall.
Posts: 9430 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

 - Posted      Profile for mr cheesy   Email mr cheesy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I'm struggling to understand why the thickness of programmes is really a bad thing.

--------------------
arse

Posts: 10212 | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

 - Posted      Profile for Karl: Liberal Backslider   Author's homepage   Email Karl: Liberal Backslider   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Well it's easily resolved; the English version is there as a favour to the monoglots, so if they don't like it it can always be removed...

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17627 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
That's what the former Archdruid Robyn Lewis used to say (slightly mischievously), isn't it- bilingual text can't be for Welsh-speakers because they all understand English so it must be for English speakers who don't understand Welsh.
And actually, despite the myths that there are around it, it's not that difficult a language to learn, at least to a basic level.

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6460 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Eirenist
Shipmate
# 13343

 - Posted      Profile for Eirenist         Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I think the suspicion of the speaking of Welsh among the monoglot English is due to the thought that the Welsh-speakers are passing uncomplimentary remarks about them. Sometimes they are right, of course.
Many years ago, my family were climbing Cnicht, a mountain near Blaenau Ffestiniog. We passed a house offering tea, and called in to refresh ourselves. There was a good deal of giggling going on, and we realised that the people running the tea thought we were unaware that this was a money-raising event for Plaid Cymru (the Welsh Nationalist party, FYI Trans-ponders.)

--------------------
'I think I think, therefore I think I am'

Posts: 444 | From: Darkest Metroland | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

 - Posted      Profile for Baptist Trainfan   Email Baptist Trainfan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:
I'm struggling to understand why the thickness of programmes is really a bad thing.

Increases printing costs and postage?
Posts: 9430 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
leo
Shipmate
# 1458

 - Posted      Profile for leo   Author's homepage   Email leo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:
I'm struggling to understand why the thickness of programmes is really a bad thing.

Increases printing costs and postage?
More trees cut down.

--------------------
My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

Posts: 23064 | From: Bristol | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

 - Posted      Profile for Karl: Liberal Backslider   Author's homepage   Email Karl: Liberal Backslider   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
That's what the former Archdruid Robyn Lewis used to say (slightly mischievously), isn't it- bilingual text can't be for Welsh-speakers because they all understand English so it must be for English speakers who don't understand Welsh.
And actually, despite the myths that there are around it, it's not that difficult a language to learn, at least to a basic level.

True, true. No noun cases, single verb conjugation, about five irregular verbs. The difficult bits I find are unpredictable genders and plurals. People get het up about mutations but they're really not that bad.

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17627 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
No, the mutations are nice and regular, and genuinely do, mostly, make it easier to speak. Generally it's quite a logical language- apart from those unpredictable genders and plurals, but most native speakers I know would admit to being a bit unsure about some of them. Easier than Russian, I'd say- I don't mean because of the Cyrillic alphabet, I'm thinking about things like the different verb forms which always used to trip me up a bit.
There is, unfortunately, a bit of bollocks occasionally spoken by a minority of old shags along the lines of 'if you don't speak Welsh you're not Welsh really' (really? So what are the people in Pontypridd, then, because they're sure as hell not English), or 'if you're not Welsh you'll never really get it', or outrage because some footballer who's been willing to use his Welsh in a TV interview turns out to speak Welsh, well, about as correctly as some footballers speak English. But on the whole I've found people very supportive of any effort you make to learn and speak it. And like you, way back, even before I moved to Wales, I did have a sense deep down that if one could one really ought to know something of the second language of this island- and I still do.

[ 30. October 2017, 20:10: Message edited by: Albertus ]

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6460 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

 - Posted      Profile for mr cheesy   Email mr cheesy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
No, the mutations are nice and regular, and genuinely do, mostly, make it easier to speak.

Hahaha. Well yes, they're regular in the sense that they happen regularly in particular circumstances. But one has to know those circumstances, which aren't necessarily obvious. Sometimes words are mutated because of words which used to appear in the sentence but have been lost or are no longer spoken. Sometimes words mutate in two directions depending on the person being referred to (my car, her car, his car - fy nghar i, ei char hi, ei gar e).

But then my Welsh teacher does say that some of the mutations are commonly ignored in speech.

It's all fun. But I wouldn't say it is easy and I've heard people who are fluent in several languages say that Welsh is hard.

--

On the Welsh-welsh thing; I know someone who is very Welsh (strong accent, has family who has lived in valleys for generations) who runs a Wales-wide organisation. He told me once that he gets abuse from Welsh-only speakers who say that as a leader of a nationwide organisation he should be fluent in Welsh, and as a result he is actually "English".

Which is pretty offensive. The guy is learning, the organisation has fluent welsh-speakers at high levels.

--------------------
arse

Posts: 10212 | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

 - Posted      Profile for Baptist Trainfan   Email Baptist Trainfan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Leanne Wood, the Plaid Cymru leader, is not a native Welsh speaker, though she learned the language (pretty well obligatory in her position, I would have thought).
Posts: 9430 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider
quote:
Of course it is an important language, but in my life, and I suspect that of many others, I have had several occasions where mastery of Welsh would have been to my benefit, but none where Mandarin would. This has something to do with living rather nearer Blaenau Ffestiniog than Beijing.
Or France?

My late Godfather loved to tell the (true) story of getting lost in deepest rural France with his MFL graduate s-i-l and asking directions the fluent French speaker was baffled - while Godfather understood, was able to reply in Welsh and then translate the Breton into English for his s-i-l (who had previously been very dismissive of Welsh as a language).

As for Mandarin being more useful, it depends where you use it: try it in Hong Kong (for instance) and you're likely to get a frosty reception; language in the ex-colony is highly political and the deliberate attempt by Beijing to suppress written and spoken Cantonese is well-documented and on-going.

[ 31. October 2017, 10:01: Message edited by: L'organist ]

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4686 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

 - Posted      Profile for Karl: Liberal Backslider   Author's homepage   Email Karl: Liberal Backslider   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider
quote:
Of course it is an important language, but in my life, and I suspect that of many others, I have had several occasions where mastery of Welsh would have been to my benefit, but none where Mandarin would. This has something to do with living rather nearer Blaenau Ffestiniog than Beijing.
Or France?

My late Godfather loved to tell the (true) story of getting lost in deepest rural France with his MFL graduate s-i-l and asking directions the fluent French speaker was baffled - while Godfather understood, was able to reply in Welsh and then translate the Breton into English for his s-i-l (who had previously been very dismissive of Welsh as a language).
.

They're not mutually intelligible; limited communication is possible but it's very much individual nouns, point and gesture. My fluent 1st language Welsh speaking friends confirm they cannot understand Breton or Cornish, although they recognise individual words.

Be particularly careful of ordering gwin coc'h in Brittany - coc'h means "shit".

[ 31. October 2017, 13:37: Message edited by: Karl: Liberal Backslider ]

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17627 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

 - Posted      Profile for Karl: Liberal Backslider   Author's homepage   Email Karl: Liberal Backslider   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
No, the mutations are nice and regular, and genuinely do, mostly, make it easier to speak.

Hahaha. Well yes, they're regular in the sense that they happen regularly in particular circumstances. But one has to know those circumstances, which aren't necessarily obvious. Sometimes words are mutated because of words which used to appear in the sentence but have been lost or are no longer spoken. Sometimes words mutate in two directions depending on the person being referred to (my car, her car, his car - fy nghar i, ei char hi, ei gar e).

But then my Welsh teacher does say that some of the mutations are commonly ignored in speech.

It's all fun. But I wouldn't say it is easy and I've heard people who are fluent in several languages say that Welsh is hard.

--

On the Welsh-welsh thing; I know someone who is very Welsh (strong accent, has family who has lived in valleys for generations) who runs a Wales-wide organisation. He told me once that he gets abuse from Welsh-only speakers who say that as a leader of a nationwide organisation he should be fluent in Welsh, and as a result he is actually "English".

Which is pretty offensive. The guy is learning, the organisation has fluent welsh-speakers at high levels.

Shows there are knob-ends wherever you go, doesn't it?

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17627 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:

And I heartily agree with KLB: it is baffling that schools are scrambling to offer pupils Mandarin, etc, yet those on the border don't offer Welsh.

Bilingual signs, encouraging the study of Welsh, getting the English to understand the Isle is not completely theirs are worthy aims.
But not understanding why it is desirable to learn the language of one of the most dominant economies in the world is, in itself, difficult to understand.

no thanks. Bad enough as it is that the buggers are going to run the world, without our making it easier for them to do so.

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6460 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

 - Posted      Profile for lilBuddha     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:

And I heartily agree with KLB: it is baffling that schools are scrambling to offer pupils Mandarin, etc, yet those on the border don't offer Welsh.

Bilingual signs, encouraging the study of Welsh, getting the English to understand the Isle is not completely theirs are worthy aims.
But not understanding why it is desirable to learn the language of one of the most dominant economies in the world is, in itself, difficult to understand.

no thanks. Bad enough as it is that the buggers are going to run the world, without our making it easier for them to do so.
[Roll Eyes] The idea is to make it easier for us.

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16963 | From: the round earth's imagined corners | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
...to be run by them. Top.

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6460 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

 - Posted      Profile for mr cheesy   Email mr cheesy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Meanwhile a local group has been set up to protest at the local council replacing signs with bilingual versions.

The ironic fact that this group loudly claims to uphold and remember local history doesn't seem to register to anyone.

Political correctness gone mad, I'm told.

--------------------
arse

Posts: 10212 | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

 - Posted      Profile for mr cheesy   Email mr cheesy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I wouldn't mind, but I'm in Nottingham.

Not really - I'm in the South Wales valleys.

--------------------
arse

Posts: 10212 | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

 - Posted      Profile for jacobsen   Email jacobsen   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by agingjb:
I like reading Jane Austen's novels, which, I suspect, puts me in an unpopular minority.

That makes two of us. I'm having a re-reading jag of all her novels and they're amazing. I keep spotting things which had previously passed me by.

--------------------
But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

Posts: 7806 | From: Æbleskiver country | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I am thinking of reading George Eliot. I loathed Silas Marner in high school, but suspect I will do better with it now.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 5679 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

 - Posted      Profile for lilBuddha     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
...to be run by them. Top.

You think you are funny, but ignorance does not end in bliss.

--------------------
So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16963 | From: the round earth's imagined corners | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Believe me, I don't think I'm funny, not on this occasion, anyway: nor do I think that the prospect of China running the world is anything to laugh about.

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6460 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

 - Posted      Profile for Moo   Email Moo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
I am thinking of reading George Eliot. I loathed Silas Marner in high school, but suspect I will do better with it now.

The BBC did an excellent production of that back in the 1980s.

Moo

--------------------
Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20206 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Leaf
Shipmate
# 14169

 - Posted      Profile for Leaf     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
IMUO:
Dr. Who is unwatchable.
Dark fruit cake is inedible.
Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan are supremely talented songwriters and supremely untalented vocalists.
There are good aspects of American Evangelical Christianity, which go unacknowledged because it's more fun to sneer at them.
Ruth Negga was a perfect casting choice for Tulip in "Preacher."

Posts: 2760 | From: the electrical field | Registered: Oct 2008  |  IP: Logged
Marvin the Martian

Interplanetary
# 4360

 - Posted      Profile for Marvin the Martian     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I like the Star Wars prequels. Even Phantom Menace.

--------------------
Hail Gallaxhar

Posts: 29891 | From: Adrift on a sea of surreality | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

 - Posted      Profile for Baptist Trainfan   Email Baptist Trainfan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I don't like "Star Trek".
Posts: 9430 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

 - Posted      Profile for Lamb Chopped   Email Lamb Chopped   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Since I was bad and posted on the wrong thread:

I hate Christmas. It just sucks.

--------------------
Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

Posts: 19992 | From: off in left field somewhere | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

 - Posted      Profile for balaam   Author's homepage   Email balaam   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Marvin the Martian:
I like the Star Wars prequels. Even Phantom Menace.

Especially Jar-Jar Binks. Anyone who has taken kids along and seen their reaction to Binks will see that the character works, It is a family film, get over it.

--------------------
Fearfully and wonderfully mad
Love the dinner, hate the din.
ن
blog

Posts: 8775 | From: Somewhere else | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

 - Posted      Profile for mr cheesy   Email mr cheesy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
Since I was bad and posted on the wrong thread:

I hate Christmas. It just sucks.

I don't feel so bad this year (yet!) but in past years I've dreaded the whole experience and have done everything possible to avoid it. Church, in particular, is awful.

I've heard others have visceral reactions to Easter but I've never felt the same level of dread then.

--------------------
arse

Posts: 10212 | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Stejjie
Shipmate
# 13941

 - Posted      Profile for Stejjie   Author's homepage   Email Stejjie   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Pop/rock concerts don't work on the radio: you don't get the feeling of "being there", so you too often end up with rubbish sound quality and what sound like poor cover versions of the songs sung by tribute acts.

--------------------
A not particularly-alt-worshippy, fairly mainstream, mildly evangelical, vaguely post-modern-ish Baptist

Posts: 1061 | From: Urmston, Manchester, UK | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged
mr cheesy
Shipmate
# 3330

 - Posted      Profile for mr cheesy   Email mr cheesy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Ice hockey is not a televisual sport.

--------------------
arse

Posts: 10212 | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

 - Posted      Profile for Karl: Liberal Backslider   Author's homepage   Email Karl: Liberal Backslider   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
quote:
Originally posted by Marvin the Martian:
I like the Star Wars prequels. Even Phantom Menace.

Especially Jar-Jar Binks. Anyone who has taken kids along and seen their reaction to Binks will see that the character works, It is a family film, get over it.
I did. They didn't like him.

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17627 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Enoch
Shipmate
# 14322

 - Posted      Profile for Enoch   Email Enoch   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:
Ice hockey is not a televisual sport.

Nor is tennis.

I don't like Christmas that much either. I like the religious part of it a lot, but find the social pressures it imposes oppressive.

--------------------
Brexit wrexit - Sir Graham Watson

Posts: 7332 | From: Bristol UK(was European Green Capital 2015, now Ljubljana) | Registered: Nov 2008  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
No, Christmas is a horrible slog, totally co-opted by the shops. My mailbox fills with catalogs.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 5679 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

 - Posted      Profile for Pigwidgeon   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Enoch:
quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:
Ice hockey is not a televisual sport.

Nor is tennis.

Nor golf. But I have difficulty thinking of golf as a sport at all.

--------------------
Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

Posts: 9461 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged



Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  ...  6  7  8  9  10  11  12 
 
Post new thread  Post a reply Close thread   Feature thread   Move thread   Delete thread Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
 - Printer-friendly view
Go to:

Contact us | Ship of Fools | Privacy statement

© Ship of Fools 2016

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0

 
Check out Reform magazine
sip of fools mugs from your favourite nautical website
 
  ship of fools