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Source: (consider it) Thread: Find your inner chef - Recipes 2018
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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It looks as though the old Recipe thread has gone to Higher Planes, so if it's OK with the Heavenly Hosts I'll start a new one.

As it was an unutterably filthy day here (you name it, it's been falling from the sky) the correct response seemed to be to make soup, and as I had sundry bits and bobs left over from a Hogmanay dinner party, I used them up. I adapted a recipe from the old Delia Smith books, but I think my version is different enough to claim as my own.

Hogmanay Leftovers Soup

A little butter and oil
1 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
Salt and pepper
About 1lb cold clapshot*
About ½lb cooked ham, chopped
1 pint chicken stock
1 pint milk
About a tablespoon of cream
A pinch of nutmeg

* Clapshot is a traditional accompaniment to haggis, and is made by boiling turnips (swedes) and potatoes (separately) in a ratio of 1:2 and then mashing them together with butter and pepper.

Heat the butter and oil over a low/medium heat in a heavy casserole and add the onions, a little salt (bear in mind that the ham may be salty), the garlic and a few twists of black pepper. Stir to get everything coated, cover and cook on a low heat for about 5 minutes.

Stir in the clapshot and chopped ham, cover and cook for a further 10 minutes.

Add the stock and milk, bring to a simmer, turn the heat down very low and cook, covered, for about 15 minutes or until the onions are soft.

Take the pan off the heat, add the cream and nutmeg and whizz with an immersion-blender until smooth.

Taste to adjust the seasoning and serve.

[ 05. January 2018, 03:13: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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That sounds warming and filling, ideal for the weather you people have up there now.

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Roseofsharon
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I have also started on the winter soup round, andwe have just had split pea and ham soup, made with the stock from the gammon piece I cooked for New Year.

I did a big supermarket shop today and, with celery soup in mind, bought a couple of heads of celery and extra onions. I also bought parsnips for our favourite, a curried parsnip and apple soup, using some cooked bramleys from the freezer.
Recipes available if anyone fancies them

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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My brother every now and again gives us a lobster dinner for Xmas. A firm named LobsterGram ships these out. This year my brother foolishly failed to note that we were going to Atlanta for the holidays. Thus my son, who was keeping the home fires burning and feeding the cats, sent me a frantic text, "There are three lobsters on the front step!"
Upon opening the styrofoam coffin he found there were 2 live lobsters and one very dead one, apparently slain in transit. He cleverly cooked the live two and popped them into the freezer, and when I came back I made lobster thermidor and then used the shells to make lobster stock.
Also when I came back I emailed the LobsterGram people, reporting the dead crustacean. They immediately offered to replace it, and yesterday I was astonished to get another styrofoam coffin with not one but two lobsters in it. Apparently, like many vital organs, lobsters come in twos. So we boiled and ate these two last night, eking them out with a loaf of garlic bread and some roast butternut squash. And once again the shells and detritus went to make lobster stock.
So now I really have to make some fish stew, to use up some of this stock!

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
That sounds warming and filling, ideal for the weather you people have up there now.

It was indeed. I was a bit worried it was going to be a bit bland, but D. described it as "subtle" and we really rather enjoyed it.

It was handy too, because we usually go out for lunch on a Friday after D's concert, but because we were getting a lift with someone else we had to go straight home, and all it needed was heating up.

BC, I'm glad it was you and not me who had to deal with the lobsters; having always thought I wouldn't like them, I had lobster-salad rolls for the first time last summer at a friend's house and enjoyed it, but the idea of having to cook the things doesn't appeal at all.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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It's not the cooking. It's the liberating of the succulent flesh from the carapaces. There's a reason why lobster rolls, lobster salad, etc. cost so much.

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
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I don't think I could deal with killing the lobster myself. I'd end up turning it into a pet like Homer Simpson.

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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The 'sever spinal chord with one blow of cleaver' bit is beyond me, I agree. But to pop the lobsters into a large kettle of boiling water is not technically difficult, thank Heaven.

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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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Just one time I cooked live lobsters. The steam was escaping from the carapaces and it sounded like the lobsters were screaming. [Waterworks]

Never again.

I did eat them, however! [Big Grin]

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lily pad
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# 11456

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If you pop them in head first, there is no noise. That being said, we only ever buy them already cooked at the wharf. They are exceptionally fresh and beautifully cooked that way.

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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Son of a fishmonger here:

I have done this many times.If you pop them into a pan of boiling water head first they put their claws on the bottom of the pan and for a short while push back. Not a task for the squeamish the first few times, you get used to it.

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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And far, far less gruesome than stabbing them on a cutting board. My son-in-law (an adventurous cook) prepared lobster in this way, and it turns out that some neurological functions continue even when the main brain stem is severed. Like, the thing is still moving even after you cut it in half. I carefully focused upon my email during that period, because I did want to eat the lobster after he cooked it.

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lily pad
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# 11456

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quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Son of a fishmonger here:

I have done this many times.If you pop them into a pan of boiling water head first they put their claws on the bottom of the pan and for a short while push back. Not a task for the squeamish the first few times, you get used to it.

We use much deeper pots!

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Sloppiness is not caring. Fussiness is caring about the wrong things. With thanks to Adeodatus!

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wild haggis
Shipmate
# 15555

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I like your recipe Piglet but sadly it isn't really Scottish.

Traditionally Scots would never use garlic in cooking. It wasn't available for ordinary households. When I was growing up you would never dream of cooking with garlic.

Hogmanay meals traditionally were steak pie with mashed potatoes and usually eaten after 10pm, when all the cleaning had been done to make the house sparkle for New Year and before you ushered in the New Year with your whiskey, shortbread and various cakes including black bun.

Clapshot is not a traditional accompaniment for haggis. It comes orginally from Orkney.It is good with game. We do it with sausages.

Traditional haggis meals served on Burns Night or St Andrew's Night consist of haggis, neeps (orange turnip/swede not the white stuff) and tatties. The mashed turnip and potatoes are cooked and served separately with plenty of salt and pepper. As haggis is already spiced you don't want any more or you would spoil the spice mix in the king of sausages. Sometimes it is served with a whiskey sauce but it our house we used to add some tomato sauce - sacrilage, I know!

But I still like your recipe.Must try it sometime.

Here is a Chorizo hot pot for cold nights. It's a variant on Portuguese/Brazilian fejeoada. I learned it from my Portuguese landlady.

Serves 4

8onz ring of chorizo of your choice (I prefer Portuguese, not quite so spicy or fatty as Spanish but Spanish can do)

I tin chopped tomatoes

2 sweet potatoes thickly sliced

A small tin each of chick peas/butterbeans/cannelli beans


1 green & 1 red pepper cut into thick chunks

Handful fresh corriander and parsley.

1 large onion

You can add peas if you want, but I never do.

1)Fry onions with thickly diced chorizo until red and rich smelling.
2)Add tomatoes & sweet potatoes and cook for 20 mins.
3)Add beans and herbs and cook another 10-25 mins until it is all melded together into a rich stew.


(Sometimes I have to cook it a wee bit longer, depends on ingredients.)

When ready serve with thick chunks of rough corn bread or other country bread.

Sit back and feel warm and satisfied.

Good for using left over veg including potatoes.

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wild haggis

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Wild Haggis

You do realise you are lecturing an Orcadian on what is and what isn't Scottish, don't you?

Jengie

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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If piglet makes it, it is Scottish, ipso facto.

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Even more so than I was before

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
I like your recipe Piglet but sadly it isn't really Scottish ...

I make no claims about the Scottishness or otherwise of the soup - only that it was based on leftover clapshot.
quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
... before you ushered in the New Year with your whiskey (my italics)

If we're talking about what's Scottish and what isn't, I doubt that any self-respecting Scot would usher in the New Year with whiskey ... [Devil]

I should imagine there are as many "traditional" Hogmanay feasts as there are Scottish families: in mine IIRC it was usually a baked gammon joint. When my mum really started to enjoy the delights of cooking (she was a very good cook), it would be served with gratin dauphinoise - potatoes with cream and garlic - and cabbage cooked with garlic and juniper, which I freely admit had b*gger-all to do with Scotland but tasted very nice indeed.

[ 06. January 2018, 19:29: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20085 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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Sorry for double-post - missed editing window
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
If piglet makes it, it is Scottish, ipso facto.

Thanks, Uncle Pete! [Killing me]

eta: I've just noticed Wild Haggis's "from" line ... [Two face]

[ 06. January 2018, 19:32: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20085 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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Many years ago (maybe 40?) I found in my local library The Alice’s Restaurant Cookbook by Alice May Brock (Yup, that Alice.) IIRC, she suggested adding wine to the boiling water before plunging in the lobsters, so that they died happier and were therefore more tender. I seriously doubt that the wine had time to take effect that quickly.

I know I could never do it. I don't even like taking apart a whole, cooked lobster -- but I love the tails!

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wild haggis
Shipmate
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Sorry for the spelling but I am dsylexic!! This site, sadly doesn't have a spell check and looking up a dictionary isn't much help. So please......... no need to be nasty about spelling for those of us who have a genuine disability.

I am aware that there are different traditions within Scotland. I am Scottish after all, born and breed on Clydeside from a proud Scottish family and lived and taught there until I was 27 - with continual visits and stays back. I am very proud of my nationality and all things Scottish.

There is debate about whether the islands in the north are truly Scottish because of their Norse heritage but for my money they are part of Scotland.

New Year's day was a day for ham, yes I agree. Now you're talking!
Ham with marrowfat peas, mashed potatoes and carrots, followed by my grand-dad's trifle.

But Hogmanay always was steak pie, traditionally in Scotland. Modern Scots don't always stick to the old ways.

Yes, Scots do drink the water of life at New Year. My home town, which was almost flattened in the Blitz and had a distillery has now started again. So try some Auchinstoshan. Great stuff.

A happy new year to you all and enjoy traditional Scots food accepting that there are many food traditions within our wonderful country.

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wild haggis

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
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<tangent>Most browsers have spell checkers or the option to use a spell checker. It's not a site function but a browser function. </tangent>

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
Sorry for the spelling but I am dsylexic!!

My apologies - no offence meant. I just thought you were referring to the wrong nationality of whisk(e)y. [Big Grin]

I've never come across the steak-pie Hogmanay tradition, although my parents both came from Greenock, so if it was a Clydeside thing, they (or their families) must have missed the memo ...

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20085 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
Yes, Scots do drink the water of life at New Year. My home town, which was almost flattened in the Blitz and had a distillery has now started again. So try some Auchinstoshan. Great stuff.

I have the American Oak finished one. However I saw in the new year with The Botanist, a Scottish GIN, and tonic. It was what I fancied at a time. Rules are made to be broken.

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Love the dinner, hate the din.
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georgiaboy
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# 11294

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What is called 'clapshot' (up-thread) sounds like what my Swedish friend serves at her Christmas Eve dinner. She called it 'root-moose' (my approximation of her pronunciation). Google came up with the Swedish spelling of 'rotmos.' Delicious! Particularly with gravadlax.

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Piglet
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# 11803

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The recipe (by the British cookery writer Delia Smith) from which my soup was adapted calls the base recipe Punchnep.

I'd never heard the name anywhere else; in the recipe book it's described as Scottish, but she seems to have given it the Welsh name.

From the description in the link, I can see where the name comes from - "punched neep" (turnip).

You learn something new every day, eh? [Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20085 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
Shipmate
# 9657

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Swede (yellow turnip) and potato mashed together seems to be a fairly widespread dish. An elderly friend (of Welsh extraction) used to call it 'potch'
(She also called her tortoiseshell cat the same name).
i have often wondered if the word derives from, and should be pronounced, 'poach' as mashing the veg together does remind me of the land often seen around field gates, where it has been 'poached' by the trampling feet of cattle.

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ArachnidinElmet
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I know quite a few people of Scottish extraction and steak pie is definitely a thing with them. They are Glaswegian or from the Kingdom of Fife. I couldn't say which part of Glasgow though.

'Traditional' means whatever we decide it need to means.

BTW, root mash would be stamppot or stoemp in Belgium/the Netherlands and in Casa Arachnid is served with fricassee (a stew of meatballs and pork pieces in lemon gravy) and pickled red cabbage, for birthdays.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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L'organist
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# 17338

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My children call root vegetable mash "Hunters Mash" because they associate it with shooting lunches for which it is jolly useful since it means you don't have to lug masses of different containers of vegetables out of the back of a 4 x 4 into a draughty bothy.

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Cathscats
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# 17827

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The steak pie is definitely a thing for the turn of the year, but some eat it on New Year's Day, rather than Hogmany. I understand from.a Glasgow butcher I know, that some of the Clydesiders like their New Year's pie (but only that one, not the rest of the year) to include sausages with the steak. Which is weird.

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Baptist Trainfan
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My wife (from Clydebank) remembers New Year steak pie from her youth. But we always have a good ham now.

There is a pub in Devon (The Nobody Inn) which used to do (5 years ago) the most magnificent steak pie. Whether it's still as good today I don't know.

[ 09. January 2018, 18:13: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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Gill H

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For our New Year's Eve meal a deux, Hugal and I made Mary Berry's ginger ham (as seen on the 'party' programme on BBC1 just before Christmas). It was delicious!

Basically it's an unsmoked gammon joint cooked in a saucepan on the hob, or a lidded casserole dish in the oven. You cook it in ginger ale and water for about two and a half hours. Then take the skin off and score the fat. Wrap the joint in foil, leaving the top open. Then pour over some syrup from a jar of preserved ginger (we left our foil a little bit open so it would run down into the foil to create lovely juices). Finish with chopped up stem ginger pieces on the top. Then give it 25 minutes in the oven to brown the glaze.

Amazing, and it did us two meals and some sandwiches too.

We did braised red cabbage and apples with it, which left us with 3 portions to freeze as well as plenty on the day.

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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Sounds wonderful - and I love red cabbage with apple!
Posts: 9646 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I must find that Mary Berry recipe - I made baked ham, but with apricots, studded the top with cloves and used a mustard/vinegar/molasses glaze. I didn't see any red cabbage to braise with apples, because I love that.

One of the things I found in the very reduced pile recently was a pack of red cabbage glazed with cranberry, which worked really well. It microwaved in not very long or took ages on top of the stove (an hour?).

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
I didn't see any red cabbage to braise with apples, because I love that.

We bought ours ready prepared from the chiller cabinet at W++tr+s+. You can also get it in glass jars from your local Polish shop.
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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
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I used to get red cabbage regularly when I had a veggie box and would braise half and use the other half in salads. Braised red cabbage with sausages and baked potatoes is a nice supper meal, followed by rice pudding - fills the oven and cooks about the same temperature, leaving left overs for another day. Red cabbage works shredded in with a blue cheese dressing.

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MaryLouise
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Another fan of red cabbage chopped up and stewed with red onion, a green cooking apple, soft brown sugar, cloves, a little cinnamon, a few caraway seeds and balsamic vinegar, some black pepper.

Excellent with venison, lentil bakes, roast duck and gammon.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
pour over some syrup from a jar of preserved ginger .

There just isn't enough syrup in a ginger jar for all the things it could be used for!
My usual gammon recipe has a whisky & marmalade glaze, but I am very fond of ginger, so when I have a new jar of ginger, one with enough syrup to spare, I might give this a try - I do have a piece of gammon in the freezer, as I halved a big joint at Christmas. (The supermarket had pieces of gammon that would fit in my slow-cooker for £10, or some "on offer" that were twice as big, which I could cut into two pieces of roughly the right dimensions for £11. The smaller "half" of one of those big joints is the piece in the freezer).
I also like red cabbage, but they are too big for the two of us. I braise half with apple, which serves the two of us twice, and leaves another serving each for the freezer. Then the other half cabbage gradually dehydrates in the veg box.

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wild haggis
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# 15555

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Yummy.

I make a mix of runny honey, a teaspoon of English mustard and some thick cut marmalade - depends on the size of the ham how much I use. That's after I have taken of the skin, scored the fat and put cloves in.

I boil my ham first with celery, onion and bay leaf and the last half hour finish it off in the oven with the glaze. The boiling liquid then can be used for a base for soup.

My grandfather used to use a mixture of marmalade and whisky. My aunt used home-made bramble jelly. My mum used apple sauce. You can take your pick I suppose.

Served with buttered mashed potatoes with chives or parsley, glazed carrots and peas - what could be better on a cold New Year's day.

You can take you pick, I think.

We had a butcher in Clydebank who made brilliant steak pies. He was called Mr Tough and his strap line was...."If it's Toughs, it's tender."

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wild haggis

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Roseofsharon
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quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
We had a butcher in Clydebank who made brilliant steak pies. He was called Mr Tough and his strap line was...."If it's Toughs, it's tender."

Love it!

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Piglet
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# 11803

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Another fan of braised red cabbage with apples checking in! On Hogmanay, as well as haggis and clapshot, we served a small baked ham with braised red cabbage and apples (recipe from Delia Smith's Christmas).

I was lucky enough to find a half red cabbage, so I halved the recipe and it worked out very well, with just a little left over. I kept it in the fridge and re-heated it in the microwave about a week later, and it was just fine.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Gill H

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Yes, we used Delia’s recipe too. Delicious.

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Hedgehog

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Over on the Soup Maker thread, I mentioned making Red Lentil & Lemon Soup today, so I may as well put the recipe here.

Ingredients:
● 3 tbsp olive oil
● 1 large onion, chopped
● 2 cloves garlic, minced
● 1 tbsp tomato paste
● 1 tsp ground cumin
● 1/4 tsp kosher salt, more to taste
● 1/4 tsp ground black pepper
● 1 pinch ground chile powder , more to taste
● 1 qt. chicken broth
● 2 cups water
● 1 cup red lentils
● 1 large carrot, peeled and diced
● Juice of 1 lemon
● 3 tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped

Directions:
1 In a large pot, heat 3 tablespoons oil over high heat until hot and shimmering. Add onion and garlic, and sauté until golden, about 4 minutes.

2 Stir in tomato paste, cumin, salt, black pepper and chili powder, and sauté for 2 minutes longer.

3 Add broth, 2 cups water, lentils and carrot. Bring to a simmer, then partially cover pot and turn heat to medium-low. Simmer until lentils are soft, about 30 minutes. Taste and add salt if necessary.

4 Using a blender, purée half the soup (about 4 cups) then add it back to pot. Soup should be somewhat chunky.

5 Reheat soup if necessary, then stir in lemon juice and cilantro.

It makes roughly two quarts of soup.

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

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MaryLouise
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That looks delicious, Hedgehog. I have a vegetarian friend coming over for lunch this week, so I would use vegetable stock rather than chicken broth.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Huia
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# 3473

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How does kosher salt vary from other salt? Is it what my mother's generation would have called "plain salt," which was salt with none of additives?

In NZ iodine is added to table salt because it is a trace element lacking in the soil which meant that goitres were common in earlier times.

Huia

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Hedgehog

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# 14125

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Kosher salt tends to be somewhat coarser than regular table salt, but the real difference is that it usually does not have the added iodide.

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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When a friend was going through treatment for thyroid cancer, she was told to avoid iodised salt and use kosher salt instead. She was concerned that shop-bought bread would have ordinary salt in it, so I bought some kosher salt and used it in some bread that I made for her.

It seemed to behave pretty much the same way as ordinary salt - I usually crushed up the grains a bit so that the volume would be right in the bread recipe.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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L'organist
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Standard UK table salt is not iodised. You are only liable to get iodised salt if you either specifically buy it (a well-known brand still makes it - yellow packaging) or you opt for "sea" salt.

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Kitten
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# 1179

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I remember when I was young, my mother had separate salt for cooking and table. The cooking salt arrived in a loaf shape wrapped in waxed paper and was slices with a bread knife before being stored in a crock.

I haven't seen this for years and use table salt for everything

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jedijudy

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# 333

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quote:
Originally posted by Hedgehog:
Over on the Soup Maker thread, I mentioned making Red Lentil & Lemon Soup today, so I may as well put the recipe here.

This recipe looked really good, in spite of the fact that I don't seem to enjoy lentils as much as everyone else does. Oh. My. It's really good! I made a pot of it this morning, and took a container over to my parents' house, too.

I'm waiting for their opinion, and mine is that this is a permanent addition to my soup recipes!

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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MaryLouise
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What JJ said. Hedgehog, that soup (with vegetable broth) was a great success.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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