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Source: (consider it) Thread: How bad is bad language?
Gwai
Host
# 11076

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I've been thinking bout this because I don't swear a ton, but I swear more than anyone else in my immediate family, and I swear in mixed company more than most of my immediate friends too. I couldn't figure out why. Then I realized that I spent so many years being told that I had to be a ladylike good little Christian girl who never swore. FUCK THAT.

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A master of men was the Goodly Fere,
A mate of the wind and sea.
If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.


Posts: 11861 | From: Chicago | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Eirenist
Shipmate
# 13343

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But it gets boring.

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'I think I think, therefore I think I am'

Posts: 411 | From: Darkest Metroland | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Russ
Old salt
# 120

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quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:
it is absolutely true that there are forms of white trash talk that includes a lot of anglo-saxon words.

So what's your take on that ? what's going on there ? What leads someone to pack their sentences with the f-word and the c-word ?

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Wish everyone well; the enemy is not people, the enemy is wrong ideas

Posts: 2976 | From: rural Ireland | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rolyn
Shipmate
# 16840

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quote:
Originally posted by Russ:
What leads someone to pack their sentences with the f-word and the c-word ?

Culture and competition is my experience thus far.
Some workplaces provide a good example of this. Ol' Fred uses a couple of 'effs, and ol' Joe uses a few more. Then at the end of it you get poor ol' Jack who is so easily influenced that he ends up with the f- word as a prefix to every single noun in a sentence.

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Change is the only certainty of existence

Posts: 3037 | From: U.K. | Registered: Dec 2011  |  IP: Logged
quetzalcoatl
Shipmate
# 16740

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quote:
Originally posted by Gwai:
I've been thinking bout this because I don't swear a ton, but I swear more than anyone else in my immediate family, and I swear in mixed company more than most of my immediate friends too. I couldn't figure out why. Then I realized that I spent so many years being told that I had to be a ladylike good little Christian girl who never swore. FUCK THAT.

Yes, my missus is like that, although she tends to swear at Tories on the box. If I hear a raucous 'fuck off', it's usually at Theresa. I have known both sides in working class life - you get a certain pudeur among some people, who never swear, and obviously, the opposite. But then posh people can swear like dockers.

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no path

Posts: 9507 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by SvitlanaV2:
quote:
Originally posted by mr cheesy:

Today a particular target seems to be various forms of black culture - which often seems to have these kinds of words embedded within the punctuation and rhythm of the dialect, so that saying "I don't like hearing those words all the time" is actually code for saying "I don't like hearing black people speaking like that".


Do black people swear more than white people? That's an interesting thought. Which black communities are you thinking of? American, British, etc?

If you're referring to the n-word, there are many black people who disapprove of that. Even among those who use it there's an acceptance that it's problematic, since it clearly has a different significance depending on who's using it.

I my experience, swearing is more along socio-economic lines than colour lines. As you know, but many do not perceive, black culture is not monolithic. So, "black people swear more" is problematic.

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So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16598 | From: the round earth's imagined corners | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by Gramps49:

How many of you had to look up the word "dotard" this past week?

I already knew what it meant. But, then, I do interact here...

[Biased]

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So goodnight moon, I want the sun
If it's not here soon, I might be done
No it won't be too soon 'til I say goodnight moon

- A. N. Parsley, D. Mcvinni

Posts: 16598 | From: the round earth's imagined corners | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged
Paul.
Shipmate
# 37

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I it was the inimitable Richard Briers, by way of the Bard, that introduced me to the term.

[ 24. September 2017, 17:33: Message edited by: Paul. ]

Posts: 3670 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I knew dotard, but I've been teaching Shakespeare for years.

My workplace takes a very dim view of any swearing at all, but I work in education, so I don't swear much at work. My daughter is a railway engineer, one of my sisters is a lorry driver and my father is ex-Navy and factory floor. My father's language is so bad, even in sailing circles, that he was known as Bollocks Bill, so I grew up with a stream of invective on the tip of my tongue.

But I also learned code-switching young, and would speak different dialects to school friends in the backseat of the car and my parents driving. Or picking up the phone to my parents when with other friends.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13479 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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No one shall ever deny to me any word in the language. All of it, bad, good, is mine, my domain, to use as I see fit. Words are my tools, my weapons and memory and programming systems, my time machine and my FTL drive. Not a one will I ever give up. You'll have to pry them from my cold dead hands.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 5355 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
Aravis
Shipmate
# 13824

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Swearing can be an issue if you settle in another country; if your children learn swear words in the playground, you won't tell them off for using the words if you don't understand them yourself.
I once spent an interesting afternoon with a Japanese friend, who presented me with tea and biscuits and asked me, in confidence, to explain the meanings of various words her children were using. This included everything from explaining that "stupid" was an insult to intelligence, but not actually swearing, to the literal meeting of "bugger" which made her gasp so loudly that I thought she was about to have an asthma attack.

Posts: 643 | From: S Wales | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Eirenist
Shipmate
# 13343

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Two window-cleaners overheard leaving a neighbour's house:
Older window-cleaner: What's up with her?
Younger window-cleaner: She doesn't like me saying fuck.
Older window-cleaner: Well, fuck me! If you can't say fuck, what CAN you fucking say?

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'I think I think, therefore I think I am'

Posts: 411 | From: Darkest Metroland | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
DaleMaily
Apprentice
# 18725

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From my (somewhat limited) knowledge of France and Spain*, the use of many "equivalent" everyday words (like "putain"/"joder" for "fuck" and "merde"/"mierda" for "shit") is a lot less of a taboo, at least in informal, everyday settings, which are the circumstances in which I think we are generally discussing here. I can't speak for Spain, but in France they don't have a watershed for TV, I have definitely heard "putain" on TV during the day and have also seen some racy bedroom scenes and condom adverts, none of which I would expect to experience on UK TV.

Given this example in neighbouring Christian countries (at least nominally), I tend to hold the view that this is very much a cultural issue, and actually has very little (or nothing at all depending on your views on blasphemy) to do with religion. My girlfriend, on the other hand, believes strongly that it is "not Christian" to use "bad language". I firmly disagree with this, because I think she is marrying the cultural (and only her culture at that) with the religious erroneously.

That said, I don't swear in front of her for the same reasons why I don't swear in front of my father or sister (they find it unnecessarily crass rather than blasphemous), namely I find it fairly easy leave out these words in contexts, so I don't feel it requires a big effort on my behalf not to cause offence. I always thought this was rather normal...

*I would greatly appreciate confirmation/correction from Shipmates living in these countries

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The more I get to know the less I find that I understand.

Posts: 44 | From: London | Registered: Jan 2017  |  IP: Logged
Forthview
Shipmate
# 12376

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'putain' is a word for prostitute in French.By using the word or expression 'ta mere est putain' or just 'putain' for short one is simply saying that the other person is a 'bastard'

In the same way that 'shit' in English sometimes is expressed as 'sugar' the French word 'punaise'
('bug' as well as 'drawing pin') is sometimes used instead of 'putain'

'une punaise de sacristie' is used for a type of woman who is always frequenting churches.

You don't mention the word 'con' which at times can be a word not to use too much in public as it is the same as the English word 'cunt'.However it is used much more easily simply to mean an idiot ,a stupid person.I suppose that 'pauvre con' is like 'poor bastard' in English.

Posts: 3396 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged
la vie en rouge
Parisienne
# 10688

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"Putain" is not a polite word for a prostitute. Best literal translation is "whore" but I don’t think people who say it are usually thinking about it’s real meaning. It’s roughly equivalent to the f-word in force and application. IME it’s not a word one says in front of one’s grandmother.

"Con" is vulgar but considerably less so. I would translate it "bloody stupid", and "pauvre con" as "poor bugger".

The Quebeckers OTOH have an entirely different set of rude words, mostly related to the Catholic church.

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

Posts: 3558 | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
Martin60
Shipmate
# 368

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I find Dutch acceptance of ... filth on their immaculately clean streets, unavoidably, in your face, all over a suburban railway station and their hypocrisy of swearing in English but NOT Dutch ... interesting.

Talking of railway stations, it was only my fellow English who batted an eyelid at the Sex Messe, Homo Porn! filling the shop window welcoming you out of Bonn Hauptbahnhof 35 years ago. And worse down a really nice shopping mal where handsome German mothers walked their little girls.

God bless the English double standard I say, better than none at all.

[ 02. October 2017, 13:58: Message edited by: Martin60 ]

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Love wins

Posts: 16584 | From: Never Dobunni after all. Corieltauvi after all. Just moved to the capital. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged



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