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Source: (consider it) Thread: Lands of the Southern Cross
Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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Hoping that all those under the weather are being plied with copious amounts of hot soup and warm support. There are a number of clergy shippies especially in need of TLC at present. May you be back on deck soon - but not before you have made a full recovery.

[Votive] [Votive] [Votive]

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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From my experience of clergy friends they are not good at self-care and often return to work [if they even allow themselves time off] far too soon!

Listen to Banner Lady and give yourselves time.

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:

Yes, the English would be hard to beat in a soup off, even when handicapped!

And you have not even seen the Scots entrant.

<waves trotter excitedly>

I'm here! [Smile]

Soup-making (extreme or otherwise) has to be one of the most therapeutic things. My default soup is made of potatoes, onions, carrots and celery, with a couple of handfuls of pulses and home-made chicken stock, but you can make soup from anything.

D's definition of a good restaurant is one where they can make a soup that he likes out of ingredients that he doesn't (a notable example having been red pepper and aubergine).

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
D's definition of a good restaurant is one where they can make a soup that he likes out of ingredients that he doesn't (a notable example having been red pepper and aubergine).

Off to the quotes file with you!

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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I used to hide leftovers from such foods in completely new dishes, then listen to the compliments.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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Soup is always [always, always] better after it has sat for a day to allow the flavours to meld and mature so leftover soup is guaranteed to be better the next day.

The problem here is that it never gets the chance as we always eat it all on the first day!

[Hot and Hormonal]

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Huia
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# 3473

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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Soup is always [always, always] better after it has sat for a day to allow the flavours to meld and mature so leftover soup is guaranteed to be better the next day.

The problem here is that it never gets the chance as we always eat it all on the first day!

[Hot and Hormonal]

I usually make 5 litres, and as Georgie-Porgy doesn't partake there are left overs which are frozen into plastic pottles for future meals after a day in the fridge to let the flavours develop (and give me time to sort the pottles and the lids).

Today's effort is Kumara, Pumpkin and Peanut Soup. Which is sitting on the stove cooling down before I add the peanut butter and attack it with the stick blender. I was wondering why I hadn't made any soup with pumpkin in it for ages, then when it came to chopping and peeling the pumpkin ... I remembered. Extreme soup making calls for a creative approach, so I went outside and threw it on the concrete for the initial cut/break. (Then I recalled reading that partially cooking it in the microwave is the more civilized method [Roll Eyes] )

If we have a fine day on Sunday I will take my large knife to the Market to be sharpened again. I was only charged $5 last time and a sharp knife is safer than a blunt one (the cut is cleaner so it's easier to sew amputated fingers back on).

According to ACC pumpkin is the vegetable associated with the most injuries people claim for, and injuries to people preparing avocadoes cost the country over $70,000 last year
[Eek!]

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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MaryLouise
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Any passing mention of soup turns a thread into a recipe thread. Huia, that sounds like a very good soup -- is kumara that orange-coloured sweet potato?

I make winter soups each week for a local soup kitchen and the most popular soup is not my cure-all chicken soup but a curried butternut soup with coconut cream and a topping of toasted coconut shavings and fresh coriander puree.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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Those soups sound amazing...

All I can do is a vegetable affair. But it does keep me warm and happy so I should be content.

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Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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A lot of discontent around B1's workplace this week. She works in the Australian Taxation Office. TP commented today that things may be looking up for her career prospects....seems there may be a few openings at the top....... [Roll Eyes]

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

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Huia
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# 3473

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MaryLouise - yes, NZ grows the original red as well as orange and golden kumara. I usually buy the orange as they're not as knobbly and are easier to peel.

Kumara

Ian - I cheat and use a recipe (sometimes x3 for volume) except for Mum's bacon hock soup where I use my memory of the recipe she followed.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Yesterday I made a small amount of curried caulflower and onion soup. It wasn't cold here today but miserable and fairly dark. The soup was a good choice for lunch. I cheated and used a commercial korma paste.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Dennis the Menace
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# 11833

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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Soup is always [always, always] better after it has sat for a day to allow the flavours to meld and mature so leftover soup is guaranteed to be better the next day.

The problem here is that it never gets the chance as we always eat it all on the first day!

[Hot and Hormonal]

Same for casseroles, stews or any wet dish

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"Till we cast our crowns before Him; Lost in wonder, love, and praise."

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Galloping Granny
Shipmate
# 13814

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It seems that a Lands of the Southern Cross cookbook might be a good idea.
I do very little real cooking as it involves standing. I've actually consented to go on to five meals on wheels a week until my laminectomy (27 June) is over and done with. Having seen the meals that another DHB (District Health Board) gets frozen from the other end of the country, I cannot sing the praises loudly enough for our chef who I suspect is expected to cope on a ridiculously basic budget but who can cut up a couple of cooked sausages and put them into a more than acceptable sauce, and whose vegetables are fresh (the abovementioned disgraceful DHB meals had a spoonful of Mr Wattie's peas and chopped carrots most of the time).
My neighbour makes brilliant soup, according to what she has in the fridge, and brings me a pot.
But I shall still do my jellies and marmalades for CWS (Christian World Service), the preparation of which can be done sitting down, or cooked with my apprentice to help. Yesterday I juiced a kilo of limes and began to shred them, because my old-fashioned shredder has to be screwed to the barbecue table outside so it needs a sunny day. In twenty minutes I only produced about a spoonful of shreds: the peel was as hard as leather. I'd decided I'd have to use the bender but had another go today and it was much better; it must have softened a bit in the fridge.
The shredder came from a dear Scots neighbour who taught me to make marmalade and lent me her shredder (a bit like Mum's old mincer) each year; when she died I asked if I might have it, so she lives on in my marmalade. I make lime because people are frightened by the stickers on their medication that says they mustn't have grapefruit, but my GP just laughed when I told her I have grapefruit marmalade on my toast every morning. Her predecessor said 'Well, spread it thinly then.' But the chemist said that over the years they've had a couple of customers becoming seriously ill after eating grapefruit, or drinking the juice.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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GG, your sausages and sauce could have been my meal tonight. Good quality pork sausages, different veges which were fresh and a can of crushed tomatoes. Easy and I deliberately made enough for two meals. Tomorrow night will be chicken thighs with dried porcini mushrooms and other vegetables. Also deliberately made for two serves. I try not to hasve the same meal two nights in a row but to vary them for variety. So glad winter is coming. That means good parsnips, a favourite of mine in many forms.

My damaged hip ligaments are slowly heaing but standing for any length of time is difficult. Unfortunately I still have to convince my brain that I do not need a cane.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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One vegetable I really miss here in the tropics is parsnips - they are very much a temperate zone veg but roast parsnips or parsnips parmesan...

Where is the drooling smilie?

Yes, I have been salivating whilst typing this.


eta: and they go wonderfully in soup.

[ 20. May 2017, 12:57: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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You may drool alone, Wodders dear. I ABHOR parsnips.

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Even more so than I was before

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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Parsnips are fine in small quantities, but they do have a very strong flavour, which can overpower others.

My next venture into soup-making is going to be with fiddleheads - there's a stall selling them down the road from us and I bought a big bag yesterday. We were at a dinner-party a while back where we had fiddlehead soup and it was so delicious I decided I'd have a go once they came into season.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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and when is a gingernut not a ginger nut?

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

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Galloping Granny
Shipmate
# 13814

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Parsnips are fine in small quantities, but they do have a very strong flavour, which can overpower others.

My next venture into soup-making is going to be with fiddleheads - there's a stall selling them down the road from us and I bought a big bag yesterday. We were at a dinner-party a while back where we had fiddlehead soup and it was so delicious I decided I'd have a go once they came into season.

Fiddlehead in te Reo Maori is koru. I think they were on the menu before we Europeans arrived. Now you see them on our national carrier when it's not decked out in the actual fern leaf for the sake of the All Blacks.

I had one dead banana (ie black skin all over) and one terminally ill so I had to make a banana cake. I don't do much baking these days but grandson and I made a great one in October. So what do you call it when you have to leave it in the oven for twice the stated time? I think it will be all right. After the Stick a Fine Blade Into It test I checked using Mum's rule: Listen to it. If it's absolutely silent it will be dry; if it's very faintly ticking, not still sizzling, it's ready.
Too soon to cut it, and I'm going out soon.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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If it's too dry you could always eat it with custard or cream.

Yesterday I went over to the Port where they have a Farmers' Market. It was cold and I could have done with a wind-proof layer of clothing as the hills on the other side of the harbour, which is the breached crater of an extinct volcano, had more than a dusting of snow. The wind was blowing off the snow and the sun didn't reach the market until 10.30am. Thank goodness for the soup seller (tomato and basil - yum).

I bought 3 humungous leeks for $5, some freshly dug spuds and some parsnips.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Great purchases, Huia. Love leeks here. One son will not eat onion unless it is chopped so small he can't see it. It is texture not taste that he hates. Leeks are quit acceptable. I use them a lot, even just for myself.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... I bought 3 humungous leeks for $5, some freshly dug spuds ...

I can feel some more soup coming on ... [Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19626 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... I bought 3 humungous leeks for $5, some freshly dug spuds ...

I can feel some more soup coming on ... [Smile]
Who? Me? [Razz]

In other, totally unrelated news...The Bishop of Christchurch has announced that the decision on what is to be done about the earthquake wrecked Cathedral will be made at the Diocesan Synod in September. Given that an announcement was to be made before last Christmas, that the decision is affecting the rebuild plans of nearby developers and there is a well connected outside pressure group that wants total restoration of the building to its pre-quake condition,this will probably not be received well in the wider community.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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Great - let's pour a whole stack of money into making a mausoleum for nostalgia's sake. Then let's watch the white elephant moulder away until it is taken down by another catastrophe. Sounds like a plan. The same kind of plan that brought us Brexit and Trumpdom. Yay.

Is there still an active cathedral community, Huia?

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

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Huia
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# 3473

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Yes. Scroll down here to see a small photo of the temporary Cathedral.

The trouble is that many people, even those with no affiliation to any religious group, have an emotional attachment to the building. I remember when the Visitors' Centre, where I volunteered for some years, was added there was a huge outcry because some felt in spoiled the Gothic effect of the building (which has a category 1 Historic Place listing). In addition ratepayers money was used for earthquake strengthening* so some feel they have a vested interest.

* Although this didn't save the building, it is thought to have saved lives in the 2011 quake, when, despite the damage, no one received a physical injury. (I am so grateful for this).

I parted ways from the Cathedral some years ago, but I was in there on Christmas Eve 2010 minding the Christmas tree where generations of Christchurch children left presents for those who might otherwise not have any.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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Dealing with my own cathedral disaster today. Some little darling(s) graffiti'd the side of my studio last night while TP and I were at Evensong. I wouldn't have minded so much if it had been even vaguely artistic graffiti - but no. They spray painted the word BLANK on the side facing the laneway in raggedy black and silver letters with two big X's inside the B.

I felt like marking it with a big red F for artistic effort.

I suppose I needed the exercise, and at least it is not too cold today...but I begrudged the two hours it took to get the gunk off.
And I have learned so much about cleaning products! (Need to get stuff with xylene in it). [Disappointed]

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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May 24, Empire day. Now day and empire seem to have gone. A half holiday from school to prepare the bonfire and 5/- from my grandmother to buy fireworks or crackers as we called them. I could spend a lot of time choosing the best value for my money.

I also remember the night when a catherine wheel spun loose from the post it had been nailed to and cartwheeled into the shoe box of crackers of one of us.

The best part was afterwards where we would enjoy Mum's pea and ham soup and home made sausage rolls.

[ 23. May 2017, 23:38: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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"The 24th of May is the Queen's birthday
If you don't give us a holiday, we'll all run away!" -schoolyard chant.

On the last day before that auspicious date, we had a special assembly singing patriotic songs for Empire Day. And for some reason, The Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire attended to hand out New Testaments with Psalms to public school kids! My Jewish classmates loved this part. The IODE continues to this day on its sclerotic way.

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Even more so than I was before

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Dark Knight

Super Zero
# 9415

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In WA, the holiday is at the beginning of October.
I don't give a good God damn when Liz was born, but it's nice to have a public holiday in the second half of the year.

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Wronger than a drooling idiot on stupid juice - but I understand his argument.
mousethief (paraphrase)
----
Love is as strong as death (Song of Solomon 8:6).

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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quote:
Originally posted by Dark Knight:
In WA, the holiday is at the beginning of October.
I don't give a good God damn when Liz was born, but it's nice to have a public holiday in the second half of the year.

psst: We're talking about Victoria RI. The holiday was established long before you or I or anyone else on this Ship were born. Currently in Canada it is known (where celebrated) as "Let's Open the Cottage (or camp or cabin) weekend.

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Even more so than I was before

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Queen's birthday gives thos of us in NSW a long weekend in June. A welcome break after the number in late summer and early autumn. Then nothing till June.

Long weekend in October is LAbour Day.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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Any excuse for a public holiday! That said we have far too many public holidays here in South Africa and, as a freelancer, schedules fall apart in months like March/April. Human Rights Day, Easter, Family Day, Freedom Day, plus Workers Day to begin May.

The Western Cape has been declared an official disaster area and emergency relief will be given as the drought and water shortage worsens. I keep waiting for the morning when we turn on the tap and no water comes out. On the other hand, I'm an expert at washing my grubby bits in a mugful of water and recycling the mugful as grey water for the blasted garden.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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Thoughts for you MaryLouise, and all on the Western Cape.


We came first in trivia last night. Quite a surprise. And a nice voucher for pub food for next week.

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I used to hide leftovers from such foods in completely new dishes, then listen to the compliments.

We have a friend who doesn't like (?won't eat) pumpkin. So a friend cooked pumpkin pie for dessert and he had two helpings.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

Posts: 2604 | From: Matarangi | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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I can understand that.

I do not like pumpkin, but love pumpkin soup.
[Ultra confused]

Posts: 7558 | From: Albury, Australia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gee D
Shipmate
# 13815

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:

The Western Cape has been declared an official disaster area and emergency relief will be given as the drought and water shortage worsens. I keep waiting for the morning when we turn on the tap and no water comes out. On the other hand, I'm an expert at washing my grubby bits in a mugful of water and recycling the mugful as grey water for the blasted garden.

Things did not get that bad in the last long drought in the eastern states here, a decade ago now. Goulburn, a city roughly two thirds of the way from Sydney to Canberra very nearly ran out but hung in there. More recently there have been similar fears for Broken Hill, a town near the NSW/SA border, about 1000 km west from Sydney as the crow flies. So far, the taps haven't run dry there yet. A terrible position to be in, yet still governments talk of increasing the population..

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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We have had a little sporadic rain in the last week or so but we are desperate for next week for the onset of the monsoon, and for the kids to go back to school - but that is a whole other subject!

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What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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Ooo...Oooo...I have found a new addiction. On line family tree research - very suck-in-able. Thirty years ago I had a go at putting a tree together and it was a nightmare of photocopied microfiche records and typed pages that didn't sync. Research was a bit hit and miss if you didn't have loads of cash to employ people. Now so many records are on-line and linked, that it is a breeze. Really enjoying seeing the automatic links come up where others have already done that bit.

It took me all of one night to go back 400 years and as far afield as China. And putting census records together with google maps meant that I could turn to the stately gent in the daguerreotype on my mantlepiece and tell him I had just had a virtual stroll down his street in Cornwall. Nice place. I wonder if he used to have a pint at The Fountain pub after work? [Razz]

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I used to hide leftovers from such foods in completely new dishes, then listen to the compliments.

We have a friend who doesn't like (?won't eat) pumpkin. So a friend cooked pumpkin pie for dessert and he had two helpings.

GG

Very occasionally I used to make a sweet tart when sons were small. They did not like it. I called it "sunshine tart" and it went down easily. One of them now makes one around Christmas as part of his cooking tradition and it is very good.

All in the name.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Yes, BL, a bit addictive. I have a couple of booksfor both sides of my family, quite thick and I dip into them occasionally. I opened the one for Dad's side when I first got it and there he was, staring at me from a full page photo. Except it wasn't, it was from someone several generations before him. My sister had the same experience with that photo and sent me an excited email about the resemblance.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Zappa
Ship's Wake
# 8433

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quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Ooo...Oooo...I have found a new addiction. On line family tree research - very suck-in-able. Thirty years ago I had a go at putting a tree together and it was a nightmare of photocopied microfiche records and typed pages that didn't sync. Research was a bit hit and miss if you didn't have loads of cash to employ people. Now so many records are on-line and linked, that it is a breeze. Really enjoying seeing the automatic links come up where others have already done that bit.

It took me all of one night to go back 400 years and as far afield as China. And putting census records together with google maps meant that I could turn to the stately gent in the daguerreotype on my mantlepiece and tell him I had just had a virtual stroll down his street in Cornwall. Nice place. I wonder if he used to have a pint at The Fountain pub after work? [Razz]

Bloody hell ... I've spent hours over months an barely got back beyond 1900

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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Researching online genealogy is both fun and madly frustrating. I found out all kinds of surprising things about my mother's family line but drew a blank on my father's family history. And everything can come to a stop if there is an adoption or disinheritance or emigration.

Made a large pot of tomato,bacon and barley soup, too hearty perhaps.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Huia
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# 3473

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One of my cousins on each side of the family has done an exhaustive family tree, so I don't feel any need to do a genealogy. Having said that I visited the museum library here and found Mum's family tree going back to an apprentice in England in the 1700s. Her family were early settlers in Christchurch (not the First Four Ships, but within a year of them) and a family member visiting from England had been helped by the library staff so he sent them a copy of his research.

MaryLouise I think barley is a wonderful ingredient in soup. I've been told it's good for diabetics too as it doesn't cause a rise in blood sugar the way some rice can.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
One of my cousins on each side of the family has done an exhaustive family tree, so I don't feel any need to do a genealogy.

Huia

Same here, but on Dad's side the cousin was in Oamaru so although she did a lot in Dunedin I did the Wellington bits. In those days (30 years ago or more) you could do the Births Death etc, find what you wanted (no charge for looking) and pay for a photocopy; it seems that part of it is now much more expensive.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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I think it was at my dad's funeral [2006] that my brothers and I met a [now] elderly cousin who had been tasked by an even older cousin to complete his family research and told us [without much explanation] that he had come across some, what he called, disturbing information and decided that none of us really need or want to know!

We know we come from Huguenot stock and, realistically, that is enough.

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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Someone on D's side of the family has done a lot of research and got back as far as the sixteenth century, which is quite impressive.

Whenever we had Australian relatives visiting us back in the 1970s, they would usually come armed with lots of information about who they were looking for. One particular couple, who were - how shall I put it? - a bit holy, came with quite an elaborate family tree, but with gaps where there would have been anyone they didn't deem holy enough*.

* i.e. didn't subscribe to their particular brand of holiness

Piglet, who surely would have been deleted. [Two face]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19626 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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[Killing me]

My family tree if done by them would be holey rather than holy; a few skeletons in the recent past that only came to light after funerals.


Off today for a weekend away at Buchan in Victoria...almost now have got rid of 50 hours overtime by flex-days. Staying at a B&B and looking forward to exploring the caves, a bushwalk or two, and a nice cooked breakfast. Hope you all have a good weekend, and hope it rains across the Atlantic in SA soon.

Posts: 7558 | From: Albury, Australia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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Atlantic!?!? Indian Ocean, I think. I haven't had a coffee yet, if that is an excuse.
Posts: 7558 | From: Albury, Australia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
RainbowGirl
Apprentice
# 18543

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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I think it was at my dad's funeral [2006] that my brothers and I met a [now] elderly cousin who had been tasked by an even older cousin to complete his family research and told us [without much explanation] that he had come across some, what he called, disturbing information and decided that none of us really need or want to know!

We know we come from Huguenot stock and, realistically, that is enough.

I wish my family had the same policy, we trace back to the first fleet and are not from the "just stole a loaf of bread but are pretty decent otherwise" convict stock. I was only six or seven the first time someone excitedly told me the family history, I had nightmares for weeks.
Posts: 32 | From: Australia | Registered: Jan 2016  |  IP: Logged



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