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Source: (consider it) Thread: Roses, foxgloves, snowdrops, blue forget-me-nots
Bishops Finger
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My Old Mum used to make a most delicious Green Tomato Chutney, whose delicate sweetness was an ideal complement to a strong mature Cheddar Cheese.

She was a dab hand at Flaky Pastry too, using what would probably now be illegal amounts of Butter.

BTW, it's been another lovely mild, sunny day here, though we could Do With A Good Drop Of Rain. The Churchyard Grass received its first trim of the year, but I think I'll leave the second, third etc. trims for the (much) younger and stronger Churchwarden to do... [Help]

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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Nicodemia
WYSIWYG
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Bishops Finger told us about his Mum:-

She was a dab hand at Flaky Pastry too, using what would probably now be illegal amounts of Butter.

You can never have too much butter in a good flaky pastry. My Mum was a great pastry-maker too! Goes with that generation, maybe?

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Bishops Finger told us about his Mum:-

She was a dab hand at Flaky Pastry too, using what would probably now be illegal amounts of Butter.

You can never have too much butter in a good flaky pastry. My Mum was a great pastry-maker too! Goes with that generation, maybe?

Pastry lives! Mrs Sioni and one of her sisters do wonderful pastry, especially shortcrust which is the pastry for pies.

Mrs S reckons that keeping things cool (including a cool room) and not over-working the mixture are important, so a centrally heated kitchen, or one with the cooker going full blast, will probably knacker your pastry. We also have a marble (or faux marble) slab to work on.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Bishops Finger
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Proper Flaky Pastry does indeed go with that generation, and probably further back. My Old Mum told me that she acquired her skills simply through following the example of her own mother, who was born in 1885.

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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M.
Ship's Spare Part
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I do love flaky pastry! Which is very easy to make, put the butter into the freezer for a little while and then just grate it into the flour.

Now puff pastry - when I was about 10, mum made me make puff pastry, just so I'd made it once, and then told me just to buy it from then on. Which I always have.

M.
(A couple of months older than Sioni)

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L'organist
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I make flaky pastry and also what I was told was 'rough' puff pastry. What I cannot make is common-or-garden shortcrust pastry.

I do make quite a few things with choux pastry, both sweet and savoury. And when I really have time (and can be arsed) I have been known to make cold-water crust pastry for things like game or pork pies for a picnic.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Sarasa
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My grandmother (born circa 1890) was a great puff pastry maker. She lso made wonderful liver and bacon with mashed potaoes. As a vegetarian not something I'd eat now, but I loved it as a kid. My other grandmother (born circa 1900) made rather nice shortcrust jam tarts and great spotted dick.

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'I guess things didn't go so well tonight, but I'm trying. Lord, I'm trying.' Charlie (Harvey Keitel) in Mean Streets.

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Bishops Finger
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Oooh! Spotted dick! With loads of runny golden syrup! Another of My Old Mum's masterpieces....

[Overused]

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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Penny S
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When my mother was not up to a 'proper' pudding, she would serve up plain suet pudding and put on the table golden syrup, butter, white sugar and brown sugar, possibly jam, and let us choose what to add to the pudding. I can remember the mouth feel of softening butter with the crunch of the sugar as if I were eating it now.
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Piglet
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I know this is descending into a sub-foodie thread but as it's specifically British food we're talking about, maybe it should pass ... [Biased]

Steamed pudding (a sponge pudding with golden syrup) was something of an institution in our family; there was a sort of in-joke that we only had it once a year (which probably wasn't quite true). At one point (we'll say it was in about 1969) we had it rather more often than usual and I remember my dad joking that we were on to 1975's pudding by the end of the year.

As I recall, it was served with the top of the milk* poured over it, which sounds a tad parsimonious, but it served to cool it down, which was a good thing as the syrup made it very hot.

I can just about taste it now ... **drooling smilie** [Smile]

* There may well have been cream for those who liked it, but as a small piglet I hadn't yet developed the taste for it. I have now. [Big Grin]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Sioni Sais
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Sponge pudding, made with golden syrup is Eldest Son's favourite. We serve it with custard as we do with apple pie and every kind of crumble, treating cream as an affectation: OK in it's place, such as with fruit, but not with a bona fide pudding.
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Lothlorien
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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Sponge pudding, made with golden syrup is Eldest Son's favourite. We serve it with custard as we do with apple pie and every kind of crumble, treating cream as an affectation: OK in it's place, such as with fruit, but not with a bona fide pudding.

It is a shame most of the family are eating fairly low carb now. However, if I made golden syrup steamed pud, as known in my place and visitors smelt it. I think an exception would be made. We have always served ours with cold milk and were dumbfounded when a guest suggested custard. Custard with other things, be never with golden syrup steamed pud.

Made in my steamer basin, now around 100 years old.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Bishops Finger
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The runny golden syrup which My Old Mum used to serve with spotted dick was due to my aversion to custard (sorry, custard fans).

She made it runny by putting the quantity required in an old marmalade jar, and resting it on top of the oven whilst the spotted dick was cooking. By being warm and runny when applied, it soaked quickly into the hot spotted dick.

Yummmm..........

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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Penny S
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Most of my golden syrup has crystallised. It doesn't seem to melt properly.
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Nicodemia
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Try standing the tin in very hot water for a while. works with honey!
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ArachnidinElmet
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Speaking of food (for a change) all the stalls at Leeds Market seem to be selling stacks of very cheap citrus fruit. I've come home with 2 dozen lemons and a dozen limes for the grand total of £3.00. Lemon curd!

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Lothlorien
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Lemon curd? Delicious. I used to make mine from an updated Mrs Beetons cook book. It was then called lemon butter. I doubt it would survive being posted down here or the possible surveillance of Customs officers.. they do a wonderful job in stopping and nasty diseases for plants and animals getting through.

I will dream of (imaginary) toast with butter and lemon butter. Not exactly low carb friendly.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Piglet
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A friend gave me a lovely little pot of home-made lemon curd for my birthday a few years ago; it was delicious spread on freshly-made bread. [Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
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(Watching Strongbow commercial with pronounced skepticism)

How do y'all Britmates feel about flavored hard cider?

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I cannot expect people to believe “
Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
Kelly Alves, somewhere around 2003.

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Penny S
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quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Try standing the tin in very hot water for a while. works with honey!

First port of call - not happening. I think the invert sugar has reverted.

I think this is organic chemistry (which mystified me at college) not physics.

[ 19. March 2017, 07:11: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Uncle Pete

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Unless the hard cider tastes of apple (as God, herself, intended), the concept of flavoured cider is [Projectile] and I am sure I am not alone in feeling this way.

What they do with apple juice is beyond my ken.

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Even more so than I was before

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Penny S
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Ummm - owns up to liking the pear stuff.
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Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
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quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
Unless the hard cider tastes of apple (as God, herself, intended), the concept of flavoured cider is [Projectile] and I am sure I am not alone in feeling this way.

What they do with apple juice is beyond my ken.

Whelp, that's about how I feel. The things they showed on the commercial looked like a row of Dr. Brown's Soda bottles. All these jellybean colors. Nope.

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I cannot expect people to believe “
Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
Kelly Alves, somewhere around 2003.

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Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Ummm - owns up to liking the pear stuff.

( cocks eyebrow) Is it actual cider made from pear juice or augmented apple juice? And if the latter, is it al least subtle? ( because I can see pear being complementary in flavor)

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I cannot expect people to believe “
Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
Kelly Alves, somewhere around 2003.

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M.
Ship's Spare Part
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Cider made from pear juice?? Isn't that perry or is that different?

And how is hard cider different from cider?

Things have obviously changed from my scrumpy drinking days!

M.

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moonlitdoor
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# 11707

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It is perry strictly speaking, but they have started calling it pear cider recently, presumably because a lot of people don't know what perry is.

Aldi also do a perry made to resemble white wine rather than cider. I like it though I expect a wine snob will be along to tell me what poor taste I have.

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We've evolved to being strange monkeys, but in the next life he'll help us be something more worthwhile - Gwai

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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
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I think I am right in saying that 'hard cider' is what Americans call cider (ie alcoholic). What they call 'cider' may be just an apple juice based drink, not alcoholic.

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Fancy a break beside the sea in Suffolk? Visit my website

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
I think I am right in saying that 'hard cider' is what Americans call cider (ie alcoholic). What they call 'cider' may be just an apple juice based drink, not alcoholic.

Cider is different from apple juice because it is not filtered; it has solids in it.

Moo-

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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M.
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Thanks all!

M.

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Piglet
Islander
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quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
... How do y'all Britmates feel about flavored hard cider?

I can't really imagine cider being flavoured with anything except apples (except, as others have said, pears, in which case it's perry).

What on earth are Strongbow up to??? [Confused]

I must confess to being rather ambivalent about cider; my very first hangover (aged 16) was courtesy of a rather sweet cider called Autumn Gold, and I've never really felt the same about cider since. [Hot and Hormonal]

Having said that, there's an independent cider brewery here with a nice little restaurant attached, and when we go there I'll have a glass - it's very refreshing.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Boogie

Boogie on down!
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Me too - also aged 16, I still can't drink it!

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Garden. Room. Walk

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jacobsen

seeker
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It wasn't the cider, mild-as-mother's-milk-drink that it is.

No. It was the preceding beer, schnapps, white wine and red that did the damage..... [Projectile]

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But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

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Bishops Finger
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Do ee be careful with thi zider, me dee-ars....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bp9yK_k6wCk&nohtml5=False

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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jacobsen

seeker
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quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
The runny golden syrup which My Old Mum used to serve with spotted dick was due to my aversion to custard (sorry, custard fans).

She made it runny by putting the quantity required in an old marmalade jar, and resting it on top of the oven whilst the spotted dick was cooking. By being warm and runny when applied, it soaked quickly into the hot spotted dick.
Yummmm..........

IJ

I see no problem with having that and custard as well.

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But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

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Penny S
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The pear cider I have come across seems to be cider flavoured with pear juice rather than perry, which has more tannin. It is Swedish, from a company called Kopparberg Pear cider There are other things on the page which seem un-cidery in the extreme. My Little Ciders for the gurlies.
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ArachnidinElmet
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Fruit ciders are usually too artificial and should be avoided like the plague, and you're right, Penny S, about Koppaberg which tastes like pop, but some small producers make their own with proper fruit juice. The Most Blessed Aspall's make a blush cider with blackberries which is pretty good.

I do confess to violent urges though when I'm asked if I want ice in my pint of cider.

Lothlorien, I'm sorry I can't post you some physical lemon curd, rather than making do with the virtual. It's definitely worth making, and according to MotherinElmet, very easy to make.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Thanks for the offer. Yes mine was easy to make too.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Piglet
Islander
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D. spent three years at university in Bristol, and has probably patronised most of the cider dives there (at least once anyway). He told me of one where IIRC the cider came in three varieties - Regular, Strong and "I wouldn't have more'n half a pint of that if I were you". [Eek!]

He also takes great pleasure in recounting tales of hapless Northerners, used to downing several pints of beer of an evening, having three pints of Scrumpy and falling over.

[Killing me]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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A Pub Near Me In My Yoof used to offer the third pint of scrumpy free. There were no known takers....although there was a rumour that the landlord had run out of space in which to hide the bodies.

[Help]

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
# 2522

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
I think I am right in saying that 'hard cider' is what Americans call cider (ie alcoholic). What they call 'cider' may be just an apple juice based drink, not alcoholic.

Pretty much this plus what Moo said. American "soft" cider is juiced that is pressed but not strained clear.

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I cannot expect people to believe “
Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
Kelly Alves, somewhere around 2003.

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M.
Ship's Spare Part
# 3291

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I've certainly heard of pubs in the West Country where they wouldn't sell grockles more than one pint of scrumpy.


M.

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
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Back feeling bleary-eyed from celebrating the in-laws fiftieth wedding anniversary in foie gras land.

For the first time in my life, I am feeling grateful for a French strike. We were meant to leave at 9 am from Orly and then the Air France staff walked out and the flight got cancelled. Consequently we booked the night train with much complaining and grumpiness. In view of subsequent events it seems rather providential that we weren’t at the airport at 8:30 on Saturday morning when the gun-wielding maniac turned up [Eek!] . We wouldn’t have been in actual danger but the whole place got shut down for hours so we wouldn’t have made it to the South and the outlaws would have been très upset.

Weather was warm and sunny in foie gras land and I didn’t want to come back…

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

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Celtic Knotweed
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# 13008

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quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
I think I am right in saying that 'hard cider' is what Americans call cider (ie alcoholic). What they call 'cider' may be just an apple juice based drink, not alcoholic.

Pretty much this plus what Moo said. American "soft" cider is juiced that is pressed but not strained clear.
Ah... This has finally cleared up my confusion as to why someone in a Heralds of Valdemar book was drinking cider when in the infirmary and wishing for alcohol.

In the UK that's just called apple juice, possibly with 'cloudy' on the label (but equally possibly not).

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My little sister is riding 100k round London at night to raise money for cancer research donations here if you feel so inclined.

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by M.:
I've certainly heard of pubs in the West Country where they wouldn't sell grockles more than one pint of scrumpy.


M.

I was in digs in Frome many years ago and I remember one thereabouts. They only sold me one pint for my first three visits.

My (late) brother used to make cider down in Somerset, taking in apples from next door and the farm over the road. It improved from utterly undrinkable at Xmas to very pleasant indeed by the time the apple blossom came out - apparently that is when home made cider is ready.

Dry as a bone though. Most people mixed it about 50/50 with lemonade.

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Baptist Trainfan
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On the night before our son's wedding in a Devon village a few years ago, we went to the pub. I asked for cider and was disappointed to be offered a proprietary brand. "Haven't you got anything local?" I asked. He drew some draught cider out of an unmarked keg behind him - it was magic, and not too dry. I only dared drink half-a-pint!

(PS It was much cheaper than the Str++ng+b+w).

The best range of ciders I've ever encountered was at the Pig's Nose in East Prawle (also Devon). Pure nectar after a hike along the coast path on a hot day!

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Jengie jon

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quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:

In the UK that's just called apple juice, possibly with 'cloudy' on the label (but equally possibly not).

Other options on the label include "pressed" or "unfiltered". Although "unfiltered" on apple juice seems more common in the USA according to my googling.

Jengie

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Leorning Cniht
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# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
(Watching Strongbow commercial with pronounced skepticism)

How do y'all Britmates feel about flavored hard cider?

1. Nothing made by Bulmer's (the makers of Strongbow) is worthy of being called cider. It's like calling Budweiser "beer".

2. I gather that the products they sell in the US are rather sweeter than the thing they make for the domestic market. Imagine that!

3. Yes, flavoured "ciders" are evil. They're presumably aimed at the alcopop market.

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
Nothing made by Bulmer's (the makers of Strongbow) is worthy of being called cider. It's like calling Budweiser "beer".

Do not diss Bulmer's (although I tend to agree with you)! They played a major part in early railway preservation.
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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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Well, quite. And their cider is OK as a nice, refreshing, apple-flavoured fizzy drink!

The sole surviving pub in Our Place's parish serves a particularly wicked home-brewed cider. It tastes, and acts, in quite an innocent manner, until you try to stand up....

IJ

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Penny S
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I was on a geology trip in the Marches, not driving, carried about on a coach, and had some cider from a small keg on the counter of the pub. I was agreeably surprised to have no reaction to a pleasant drink, and had a second half. Still no response.
Encouraged by this, on a second coach trip, to the Isle of Portland, I spotted a similar keg, with a similar label, on the counter. Boy, was it different. I was only half way down the half when it hit me.
And then there was the bottled stuff my neighbours bought in specially for me at the leaving party, and which I had to drink without a proper meal first because of a very long union meeting in my place that I couldn't kick the people out from. I drank a pint of milk, first, before I went, but I still ended up with the room rotating round me. After less than a half.
I was very disappointed in Wells to find the pub I was in only had Strongbow and Woodpecker.

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