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» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » All Saints   » Roses, foxgloves, snowdrops, blue forget-me-nots (Page 35)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Roses, foxgloves, snowdrops, blue forget-me-nots
Bishops Finger
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Soup may indeed be perennial, but SOUP heated up on the Stove is definitely an Autumn/Winter thingy...

...and your granny (RIPARIG) must have had asbestos-based feet, no? [Eek!]

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
... The Season of Soup ... is almost here!

Soup doesn't have seasons - it's perennial. [Smile]

I should have added when talking about the Stove that my granny (may she also rest in peace) used to use the lower oven to warm her feet. [Eek!]

If dad was cold when he sat in front of fire, he would open oven door to let the heat out more quickly.

The side of stove made wonderful soups, simmered meat for my mum’s famous pies and beef and burgundy cooked for hours at the side of their stove was very good.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
... your granny (RIPARIG) must have had asbestos-based feet, no? [Eek!]

She'd have had stockings on, and I think the edge of the lower oven wasn't so terribly hot. Then again, Granny was one of those people who was always cold (especially her feet), so perhaps she didn't notice ... [Big Grin]

Ambling and Ecclesiastical Ironing™ have been accomplished. Doing my surplice isn't so bad, as I'm only 5"1", but D. is nearly six foot, and his takes up the whole length of the ironing board (which is no small matter, as it's the longest ironing-board I've ever seen). I think organists get married so that they have someone to iron their surplices (and turn their pages, obviously) ... [Paranoid]

[ 05. October 2017, 20:56: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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Do people close oven doors after the food is removed and waste the heat?

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Fearfully and wonderfully mad
Love the dinner, hate the din.
ن
blog

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Piglet
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That depends very much on how much heat we either do or do not want.

Our last house, despite being in the middle of a row of three, was not a warm place in the winter, and we quite often left the oven door slightly open after use to get the benefit.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Do people close oven doors after the food is removed and waste the heat?

You won't waste the heat whatever you do - it has to go somewhere. But, if you open the door, it will escape moe rapidly.
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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
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I live upstairs from a boulangerie. Fantastic news for our heating bills. (And surprisingly, much less hot in the summer than our old place facing due South on the fifth floor.) Only downside is that the bread-kneading machine makes a bit of a noise at 5 o’clock in the morning.

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Do you wake to the smell of freshly baked bread and croissants etc?

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Piglet
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Freshly baked French bread, baked by real Frenchmen ...

(need that drool smiley again) [Smile]

I've got the smell of freshly-baked bread-sticks (some with garlic-and-rosemary oil brushed on them) in the house at the moment, as I've just taken them out of the oven.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Japes

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You've just reminded me, Piglet, of one of the reasons I don't robe to play the organ! The ironing of the surplice.

I had more original reasons in the beginning, but as my arrival five years ago, also saw the death of the choir, which had dwindled to three men, two of whom have died since. As now it looks like the end of our monthly Evensong, for the time being, I don't think robing is necessary. I do need to go through the choir robes soon and check them, though.

On a totally different tangent, why oh why do the Royal Mail Sorting Offices have such ridiculous opening hours? (7.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Monday - Saturday) I don't have many parcels, I try only to order things out of term time so I'm home for the post, but occasionally I can't and the re-delivery thing never works well for me. Never mind, it means I'm probably getting my 20,000 steps in all before 11.00 a.m. as I have another parcel to collect from a collection locker. That's a much more exciting one as it's Books and Music.

[ 07. October 2017, 06:09: Message edited by: Japes ]

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Blog may or may not be of any interest.

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
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M has just posted in Hell about earworms which has prompted me to say that my current earworms are from the Magic Flute, which I saw at the Royal Opera House on Thursday. [I was in the cheap seats, right up in the Gods, five tiers up and directly over the orchestra pit, even had to lean out a bit to see the far right of the stage (but so were all of us up there)].

This week I've also managed to see a re-imagining of Purcell's King Arthur at the Barbican, performed by the Academy of Ancient Music, singers and a chorus who were in modern dress. The music and Dryden's lyrics remained, but reordered. The words between the songs were replaced with poetry and Shakespearean speeches and it built into a unsettling feeling of confusion following Brexit. The music was brilliant, some of the poetry was amazing, but we lost some of it in the telling. That was Tuesday and last night I saw Juliet Stevenson in Wings at the Young Vic, which was amazing.

Having not been allowed to leave work in August or September, after handing in my notice at Easter, because my successor had to wait for her DBS, she arrived on Tuesday and I've been told I'm leaving on 20 October. I have no idea quite how my boss thinks I've been able to apply for jobs with no end date and if she imagines I will be able to just walk into another job which I am less convinced of. But I am so glad to be getting out of this situation. Yes, I know I could have walked away, but what I do is fairly extensive and complicated and I need to hand it over to someone. And if I don't hand it over, the young people are the ones that suffer.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
I've also managed to see a re-imagining of Purcell's King Arthur at the Barbican, performed by the Academy of Ancient Music, singers and a chorus who were in modern dress. The music and Dryden's lyrics remained, but reordered.

I saw a performance many years ago by the English Opera Group (I think) at the old Sadler's Wells. I'm afraid I found it dull but I might have viewed it differently today as I love Purcell's music. Of course the piece may have been hacked about to reflect musical sensibilities of the time. I understand that it has always had a political resonance.
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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Do you wake to the smell of freshly baked bread and croissants etc?

Verily my home doth smell of patisserie. You get used to it after a while TBH.

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

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Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Do you wake to the smell of freshly baked bread and croissants etc?

Verily my home doth smell of patisserie. You get used to it after a while TBH.
Mmmmmm - very nice too 💕

My home smells of soap. The ‘bird’ soap is selling like hot cakes. I’ve done a lemon and a rose+geranium version so far. Sadly, I can’t sell them online as the postage is too much on low cost items. Even so, people are phoning me and calling round to put orders in.

They say it’s unusual and that makes it popular. I’ve put a photo of the rose and geranium one on my ‘Room’ blog 😎

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Garden. Room. Walk

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
My home smells of soap.

Just so long as it doesn't smell like a certain range of shops, whose sickly scent can be detected half-a-mile away (or so it seems).
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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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That sounds overly lush.

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Even more so than I was before

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Baptist Trainfan
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I could not possibly comment.
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Piglet
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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
... my successor had to wait for her DBS ...

Like this one? That's quite a "golden hello" ... [Big Grin]

Seriously though, I hope you can find another job very soon; unemployment is horrid, and living where you do is horrendously expensive.

I quite agree with BT about the scent from A Certain Retail Chain: while I don't mind going in for long enough to buy an eye-shadow, I don't think I could work there.

Quite a busy day here today: we sang for the funeral of a lady whose husband sings in the choir (and deputises for D. when we're on holiday), then after the reception had a quick buzz round the supermarket, as Monday's the Thanksgiving holiday. After a spot of Quality Bear Time™ (i.e. a nap) I started a batch of French sticks and went for an amble while the bread-machine's doing its thing.

The trees are really beginning to put on their Autumn clothes now: all of a sudden, we've got some of the most glorious foliage imaginable, and the view from the château is getting prettier almost by the hour.

[ 07. October 2017, 19:40: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Bishops Finger
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Yes, the churchyard trees (two quite substantial planes, and three small limes) around Our Place are beginning to look colourful, though the neighbours continue to complain about the falling leaves.... [Roll Eyes]

Local council workers diligently sweep up the leaves from the street once a week, bag them, and take them away, but from the way some of the locals talk, you'd think *shock! horror!* that the trees had dared to do for the first time what deciduous trees do EVERY YEAR!

Ahem. I do apologise. Autumnal Rant Over.

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Sarasa
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# 12271

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Piglet said:
quote:
After a spot of Quality Bear Time™ (i.e. a nap)
We always call that 'Going for a read".

Glad you've got out of the horrible job CK, and I hope another better one coems along pronto.

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'I guess things didn't go so well tonight, but I'm trying. Lord, I'm trying.' Charlie (Harvey Keitel) in Mean Streets.

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
# 10688

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We went on a most agreeable amble in the woods yesterday including some picking up chestnuts, which felt pleasantly hunter-gatherer. A very delicious autumn risotto is now in the works (no edible mushrooms were found in the woods so they had to be purchased from the market this morning).

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

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Piglet
Islander
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quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
... the neighbours continue to complain about the falling leaves....

An occupational hazard when you've got trees. [Big Grin]

They are a bit of a pain - it's a pity they couldn't just turn beautifully autumnal for a few weeks but stay put, but I suppose that would upset the Grand Scheme Of Things. [Frown]
quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:
We always call that 'Going for a read".

It started out like that, but sort of morphed ... [Hot and Hormonal]

It's Thanksgiving Day here, and while they don't go in for the elaborate decoration of the church here that they did in St. John's, there was a pretty, autumnal display (with pumpkins) at the West door. We marked the occasion by singing Haydn's Little Organ Mass, which was fun.

If I'd gone completely native, we'd be tucking into turkey and all the trimmings when we get home, but as neither of us much likes turkey, we aren't: there's a chicken casserole ready to be heated up and I may well accompany it with a glass of something stronger than orange juice. [Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
... the neighbours continue to complain about the falling leaves....

An occupational hazard when you've got trees.
And even you haven't - as we dicovered at our last house. Where did they all come from?
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Bishops Finger
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Well, yes - but in the case of Our Place, the trees (the two big planes, at least) were there before the church and the surrounding houses were built!

[Disappointed]

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Bishops Finger
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Actually, I have to confess that I get rather uncharitable when the neighbours complain about our trees - lungs of Gaia that they (the trees) are.

I tell peeps that, OK, we'll cut the bl**dy things down, but that I hope they're well-insured about the subsidence that'll follow, with their houses falling down, and all.

Doesn't matter if the church falls down, cos the Body of Christ can worship anywhere, and, after all, the church building is only a canopy to protect the altar.

[Two face]

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Honest Ron Bacardi
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Curiosity killed.. wrote
quote:
This week I've also managed to see a re-imagining of Purcell's King Arthur at the Barbican, performed by the Academy of Ancient Music, singers and a chorus who were in modern dress. The music and Dryden's lyrics remained, but reordered. The words between the songs were replaced with poetry and Shakespearean speeches and it built into a unsettling feeling of confusion following Brexit. The music was brilliant, some of the poetry was amazing, but we lost some of it in the telling.
King Arthur (Or the British Worthy)* is a semi-opera, i.e. it's half play, half opera. The play's the thing, and the music is mostly commentary or other business associated with the words. I can't imagine what replacing the play with poetry readings would do to the whole thing! I did once go to another semi-opera handled in that way, and it rendered the point of the music entirely incomprehensible.

(* Its original full title. It's not about the Geoffrey of Monmouth tales.)

[ 08. October 2017, 16:10: Message edited by: Honest Ron Bacardi ]

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Anglo-Cthulhic

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
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The music was good, but yes, this re-imagining of King Arthur was a bit odd - the director felt that "when you take away the texts these works are marvellously open-ended". Fairest Isle was performed at the beginning and at the end - to start with as an affirmation of Britain before Brexit and at the end as a reprise at the end when it was intended to be "less a statement of identity than a question". The readings were "a variety of poems each of which has a strong and vivid view on the central topics of nationalism and identity - some are strongly for it, some against, and some undecided." So the readings included All Around the Country from Autumn by Ali Smith, predictable chunks of Henry V, TS Eliot's The Hollow Men, Bukowski, a range of mostly modern poetry.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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Oh dear, maybe it's just me, but I find these re-imaginings of classics just a bit wearing ...dunno why, and clearly YMMV.

Now, minimalist renderings of Shakespeare, Jonson, Webster et al, that's different altogether....

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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Today’s soap is rose and geranium with almond milk and, once again, it looks good enough to eat! The fragrance is subtle, not ‘lush’ [Smile]

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Garden. Room. Walk

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Penny S
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# 14768

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BF, I continue to be astonished by the number of dendrophobes who move next to trees on other's land and then expect that they will be removed to suit their opinions. We had it at my last place where there were lovely limes which had been there since Victorian times, and which protected the most recent houses during the '87 storm. (The identical ones where there were no trees had their gable ends sucked out.) But the protected people still wanted them cut, and would carry out guerilla "trimming" beyond the overhanging limbs when they felt like it.
Where I am now, designed with "fingers of the Kent countryside coming into the built environment of the village" we still get it. Move in, demand removal.
Sense of entitlement and then some. If they were close to the church, they'd demand the bells be silenced. Luckily, we are one of those villages where the church is separate from the village (old or new), being close to the big house.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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I have a neighbor who believes she is entitled to everything she wants. There was a tree barely on my side of the property line. It wasn't a particularly nice tree, and if she had asked me I would have given permission for her to have it cut. However, she didn't ask me; she just had it cut.

Given the fact that I really didn't care about the tree, I decided not to protest. I think that anything I said would have had no impact.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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Penny S
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# 14768

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They probably count on people not protesting - after all, the tree can't be brought back, and it's civil law, so expensive. I did try to invoke criminal trespass once, but the police wouldn't bite. They did stop the felling, though, once the partly sawed through trunk had been dealt with, no more was cut (multiple trunks). The tree feller thought that because our neighbour had given him permission, he was OK.
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Bishops Finger
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Yes, I know we're not the only church with dendrophobic neighbours.

Fortunately, none of them have been so stupid as to get up on ladders to trim the said trees illegally (if they did, they'd probably fall off the ladder, and then sue the PCC....)!

The PCC has in the past been a little lax in keeping the trees regularly trimmed, but even so, we can hardly be blamed for the leaves falling, and the birds pooping on peoples' cars... [Two face]

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
The music was good, but yes, this re-imagining of King Arthur was a bit odd - the director felt that "when you take away the texts these works are marvellously open-ended".

The reviewer in my newspaper gave it 2 starts (out of 5) and said, "It was enthusiastic, earnest, and shone lights in our faces to make sure we got that it was reflecting us, but thought-provoking relevance is rarely achieved by joining dots with a wax crayon". He liked the music but pointed out that's it's a play with musical accompaniments, not the other way round.

[ 09. October 2017, 13:13: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
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Do not talk about Street Trees in Sheffield. It has been added to the list of topics which produce major rancour.

Jengie

p.s. the link is my attempt to find a 'neutral voice'.

[ 09. October 2017, 16:47: Message edited by: Jengie jon ]

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Walking 18 miles to help Refugees get an education.

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Curiosity killed ...

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# 11770

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Baptist Trainfan, I think I gave it three out of five, most of those for the delight of seeing the Academy of Ancient Music in action.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13491 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
Do not talk about Street Trees in Sheffield ...

As many of you know, where I grew up in Orkney, trees are something of a rarity. However we do have a venerable sycamore in Kirkwall called the Big Tree. About 35 years ago, it was becoming very unwell, and the local council decided that it would benefit from being pollarded. This caused quite a controversy, with people coming down on the pro- or anti-pollarding side.

They went ahead, and although (as pointed out in the link) the tree is held up by internal supports, it at least gives the appearance of flourishing. It did look rather sad after it had been pollarded, but I think it was worth it, especially as it's now been short-listed for Scotland's Tree of the Year. [Smile]

[ 10. October 2017, 01:15: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19421 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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I cried when an oak tree was taken down behind us, I used to enjoy it every day [Frown]

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Garden. Room. Walk

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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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The trees at Our Place are all on our land i.e. within the churchyard fence - they are not, fortunately, street trees as such.

I gather that a horse-chestnut in the adjacent Vicarage garden, close to the street, is in a dangerous condition (rotting from the inside), and really needs to come down before it falls down (or branches fall off, at least - and that would be bad enough).

It's the responsibility of the Diocese, not the parish, though the neighbours don't seem to be able to comprehend the difference. The Diocese (which is perennially short of £££) regards the tree as a 'low priority' - not so sure that's a Good Idea, given the damage to life and property a falling tree can do.

[Disappointed]

I like the Big Tree in Kirkwall. It would make a nice Bush down yer... [Two face]

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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When we were house-sitting earlier in the year, just before our friends got back I looked out the window to see some blokes in high-vis jackets in the back garden taking chain-saws to one of the silver-birch trees.

I nearly had a conniption, as I knew our friends were very fond of the trees, but discovered that they were just untangling them from the overhead wires, which our friend had been requesting for some time.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19421 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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BF, I trust the Diocese has adequate insurance cover in case something falls on a person with serious consequences, and which will apply if they have ignored the knowledge of its rotten state.
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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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So do I.

Perhaps I should point out that the tree is not yet in imminent danger of falling to bits, but...

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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In other news, the palace washing line has, this very morning as ever is, fallen to bits, causing the episcopal underwear etc. to spread itself around the curtilage. [Waterworks]

Fortunately, however, the Useful Rail on the kitchen stove now comes into its own, socks etc. for the drying of. [Big Grin]

Also, PIE for the cooking of - time for lunch! [Yipee]

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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Bishops Finger
Shipmate
# 5430

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(in the oven, that is - the Useful Rail is full of socks, and, besides, the PIE would fall off it).

IJ

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The future is another country - they might do things differently there...

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ArachnidinElmet
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# 17346

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If the weather is anything like here in the Triangle it wouldn't have dried anyway. There's some persistent precipitation combined with strong wind out there.

I'm sat in the library watching inside-out umbrellas and a precariously swaying crane through the window. Fingers crossed for no accidents.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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We had trouble with wind yesterday. A couple of trees plus substantial parts of others fell into the staff car park. No one was injured but some cars were damaged, a couple so that they couldn't be driven.

Unfortunate for the car owners, but if one builds on a flood plain next to a lake with trees round it you shouldn't be surprised.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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It's been a beautiful Autumn day here; not all that warm (14°) but gloriously sunny.

D. was invited to give a talk to the ACW* of St. Peter's Church (which would geographically be our parish church if we weren't at the Cathedral) and I was asked too, so we pootled along, had a very nice lunch with them (and the clergy of the local deanery, who were having a meeting there), then D. spoke to the ladies about what led him into church music and brought us here.

Then he entertained them (by request) with his transcription of the Henry Wood Sea Songs (as done at the Last Night of the Proms). Following that, the parish priest gave a talk about Canadian nurses in the First World War, which was much more interesting than I expected it to be.

It was such a nice day, and the trees were looking so stunning, I took the tablet with me on my amble and took a few pictures. Those of you who know me on the Book of Face can see them - I'm not quite sure about how to put them up here, as they're on the tablet rather than on the home computer.

* Anglican Church Women - equivalent of the Mothers' Union or Ladies' Guild.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19421 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
ArachnidinElmet
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# 17346

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
..Following that, the parish priest gave a talk about Canadian nurses in the First World War, which was much more interesting than I expected it to be...

Ooh, spooky. I was at my local Historical Society lecture last night, about front line mobile nursing at Passchendaele, by author Christine Hallett, with mention made of Canadians and Australians. She had access to diaries and letters of the nurses, including one from the Rhubarb Triangle. Really very illuminating.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

Posts: 1825 | From: the rhubarb triangle | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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So did the priest - there were several letters from one particular nurse from New Brunswick.

He had just published a previous book on the subject, when someone came up to him and said, "my great-aunt P. was a nurse in the Great War and we've got a box of her letters".

He's now working on another book, incorporating the letters.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19421 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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Met Yangtze last night at the Young'uns gig at the Union Chapel, that one was totally unplanned, but fun.

I also saw The Barber of Seville at the ENO on Tuesday, and confess to not being enthralled. I know I am tired, but I had no problems staying awake for the Young'uns or The Magic Flute, not so much for The Barber of Seville. That might have been partly affected by an understudy playing the barber.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13491 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged



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