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Source: (consider it) Thread: Moving
Graven Image
Shipmate
# 8755

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Over on Heaven we had a thread by Miss Amanda on suggestions for moving. She is now in her new home but as I plan to move soon and am going through the struggles, of house hunting, bank loans, and getting a house ready to sell I feel I must not be alone. So join me if you are going through a move, recovering from a move, or have advice on how to make things easier.
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Pangolin Guerre
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# 18686

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Well, I am being forced out by a rapacious landlord who has decided to take advantage of a market that has gone bonkers. I know that I have a great deal, well below market price, but I've been here eleven years (longest that I've had an address since the day I was born), and in my neighbourhood for 20. My move is attended by more than the customary nostalgia and stress, but by the stress of paying 20-50% more for a good deal less, of leaving my carbon-based social network, and having some very dark thoughts.

Fortunately, I've had enough warning that I am so packed that what remains can be be done by me, alone, in four hours. Granted, my flat is not in a condition to be in Architectural Digest, but its's serviceable. I learned years ago that physical comfort means not a great deal to me, and that's something that cuts both ways, but in this instance, it serves me well.

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Pangolin Guerre
Shipmate
# 18686

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Sorry for the double post.

To make it easier moving out:
1) Purge. Be ruthless. Easier said than done, but you can't hear that enough.
2) In purging, set goals. "Today, the office files." If you finish and still have time and energy, cast about for a small, easily addressed task: pack the small bookcase by the wingback, the liquor cabinet (perhaps the two simultaneously [Biased] ), pack some things pictures in bubble wrap.
3) Allocate areas for things packed. Books here. Art there. Donations there. Etc.
4) In selling my mother's house (where, admittedly, I did not spend a great deal of time as I was away at school), I treated the process as antiseptically as possible. It was OK to engage memories, but not to give myself over to them. They can be a drag to progress. They don't consume space, but they can consume time.

To make it easier moving in:
1) On arrival, set up the bed.
2) Set up the kitchen.
3) Order in whatever or bring something prepared, like an antipasti plate. Make sure that you have beer. And wine. And coffee/tea. And toilet paper. (Actually, you can order in while taking care of the kitchen.)
4) Eat and drink.
5) Now, being fed and watered, spirits and electrolytes replenished, you can unpack at a more civilised pace. The rest will eventually fall into place. The stress is over.

Good luck. Stay calm. Be brave. Wait for the signs.

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Graven Image
Shipmate
# 8755

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Pangolin Guerre Thank you good advice. Sorry you are having to move not of your own decision. We are moving from our home of 12 years to be nearer to family as we are approaching that age. . Also country living if we no longer drive will be hard. So it is from house to mobile home we go. Interesting inside of mobile home not so important to me as outside. Found one which backs up to a grove of trees, and looks very nice and kept up but it has many repairs needed per inspectors report, also space rent is high.
Going to see another one this weekend. space rent is low, but garden is large, perhaps to large to want to care for, but backs up to walking path which is nice. I feel much like Goldie Locks,looking for the one that is just right. Also the juggling of both buying and selling at the time time, leaves me feeling.
[Eek!]

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The Intrepid Mrs S
Shipmate
# 17002

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Master S has put in an offer on his Very First House Purchase (at 36) across the Severn Bridge.

The former Miss S and her family want to move to a larger place - you guessed it - across the Severn Bridge.

The Dowager has reluctantly consented to move into a care home (NOT across the Severn Bridge, phew)

Mr S and I are, in consequence, thinking about considering the possibility of moving across the Severn Bridge, as otherwise we'll be right out on a limb, and if I am ever to be useful as an emergency childminder that Just Won't Do.

So, no-one is happy where they are and stress levels are rising. We want to move from our home of 26 years to somewhere just as large - otherwise we'll have no space for visitors - and quieter. If we go now, that'll make us declutter, and we should still be young enough to make new friends and settle into a whole new life elsewhere. If we stay, we may just fossilise here, like the Dowager, who's been in the same house for 50 years [Eek!]

So wish us well. I will join in when there is anything to report! [Help]

Mrs. S, excited but apprehensive

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Don't get your knickers in a twist over your advancing age. It achieves nothing and makes you walk funny.
Prayer should be our first recourse, not our last resort
'Lord, please give us patience. NOW!'

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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As the regulars on other threads here will know, D. and I moved last year from Newfoundland to New Brunswick.

The most stressful thing about our move was the atrocious state of the housing market in Newfoundland: we had to accept an offer on our old house of about half what the rates assessors said it was worth. [Mad]

Once we sold the old place and (almost immediately) found the new one, things began to look up. We were house-sitting for some friends for three months at the beginning of the year, and we got the keys to the new house about half-way through that time. When we got our belongings out of storage, we actually had a few weeks to get everything sorted out before we moved in, which turned out to be a very good thing. We'd go to the new house most days for an hour or two, and do a bit of unpacking and sorting, and when our house-sitting stint was over, we had the place looking very much as we'd like it and all we needed to move at the last minute was our suitcases, a few bits and pieces of kitchenalia and a large teddy bear. [Smile]

One word of advice I'd offer to anyone who's selling: don't make an offer for your new place until you've got the cash for your old one in your possession. We thought we'd sold the old house - contracts had been exchanged, D. had gone back to Newfoundland to pack everything up and the movers had taken it away - and our buyer* kept asking for extensions to the closing date, finally pulling out of the deal after keeping us on a string for nearly a month. This meant that we had to pull out of the deal on a house we'd offered for, and we hated treating the sellers the way we'd been treated.

* may he rot [Two face]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19318 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I have just moved my daughter twice in three months. First time unplanned and in an emergency, which was instead of a planned holiday at half term.

She's very allergic and cannot safely share a kitchen. The way her landlord had got around this for eight months was to leave her in an empty flat. But come June and pre-sessional students enrolment, they gave her three days notice of moving pre-sessional students in. Now pre-sessional students come to learn English so they can study in September. Allergies that had deteriorated to anaphylaxis and sharing a kitchen with students with no English when nuts and shellfish are going to kill her did not seem a safe option. Her doctor agreed.

We were in Scotland, on the boat back from Arran when we found out. I was rearranging a trip that was to be around Arran and Islay, as seashores also have enough shellfish to trigger anaphylaxis, or so we found. This was Wednesday. Thursday we were back in her university town, viewing studio flats, after spending the night in Glasgow. Friday morning she signed the contract as I finished packing up her flat. Friday afternoon we booked the van to move her. Friday night and Saturday morning we unpacked. Saturday afternoon I went home.

That contract was for three months, to the end of August, so daughter organised a new flat and picked up the keys ready for last weekend. I came up on the Saturday, arrived early afternoon, saw the flat, then went to the old, via a purchase of two plastic crates, and packed up again. We booked the van to move her that evening and finished unpacking in the new place on Sunday. I left Sunday evening to be home for w*rk on Monday.

Advice: make sure you can lift anything easily. I really struggled to carry the box I'd packed her kitchen equipment and food into up the stairs to the first new flat. My toenails bear evidence of me dropping it at least once. The second time the kitchen stuff went into two smaller boxes.

Purging is good, sadly we did this after we moved the first time.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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I haven't sold my condo; hope to by Christmas. I may be moving soon however, and thankfully, thanks to an old thread on the Ship, circa 2006, I have purged. This morning I purged my trousers and t-shirts (partly due to my luggage missing in England, I have rather more clothes than I would heretofore) Now I am casting my beady eyes over my kitchen, and will purge tins that I know for sure I will not eat or use before I leave.
Sometime this weeks I am going to organise an indoor rummage sale to attempt to sell a lot of things at fire sale prices.

This is because moving is inevitable. Planning a bit ahead.

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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I tried an interesting experiment on my recent move and it turned out to be successful.

Rather than wrapping dishes, glassware, fragile ornaments, etc. in paper before boxing them, I wrapped them in clean furniture throws, t-shirts, towels, etc. It worked beautifully, and there was that much less wrapping material to discard after unpacking.

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"We're not in Wonderland anymore, Alice." – Charles Manson

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
Rather than wrapping dishes, glassware, fragile ornaments, etc. in paper before boxing them, I wrapped them in clean furniture throws, t-shirts, towels, etc. It worked beautifully, and there was that much less wrapping material to discard after unpacking.

In the mid 1960s my husband and I moved to Belfast, NI for a few years. I decided to take my spices with me, so I wrapped the separate items in my husband's underwear. Unfortunately the top came off a jar of curry powder; the powder got all over his underpants, and the color and smell would not come out completely. We spoke of his 'curried underwear'.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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The last time I moved I used paper plates to cushion my dishes. Much as I don't like to use disposables, it was nice not to have to wash dishes the first few days in the new place.

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Don't keep calm. Go change the world.

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I use the tea towels, dishcloths and kitchen sponges plus things like bags of flour to pad and pack around dishes and plates.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
... the curry powder got all over his underpants ...

[Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!] That is all.

When D. was packing up our stuff, he used some of our large collection of teddy bears as padding. I don't think they minded. [Big Grin]

As it happened, the only things that got broken were a few plates and dishes* that the professional movers packed up when they were getting antsy about getting everything finished and offered to help ... [Roll Eyes]

* fortunately, not any of our favourite ones

[ 27. August 2017, 15:23: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19318 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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We intend to move to a community about two hours away from here. We are still getting our financial ducks in a row to make this happen, but that will be happening soon, and we want to be ready to house- hunt in earnest.

What advice do you have for long- distance house- hunting? We have been skimming through Zillow and Realtor.com, but strongly suspect that there are more properties out there than what we can find there. Also: What are some things you wished you had asked about the last time you bought or rented?

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

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Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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Get a real,decent house inspector who doesn't have his head where the sun don't shine. We took the guy recommended by the realtor and he missed approximately 20,000$ worth of repairs needed.

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

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Graven Image
Shipmate
# 8755

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I second the inspector and read the report before falling in love with any place. You need to think with head not heart when buying a home. Well maybe a little heart, but you can almost always make any house your home style.

Location, location, location. You can not change the location so make it a priority. Ask if you are on a flood plane.

Graven Image who is off today to look at two mobile homes. Fingers crossed.

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no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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There's house inspection, then there's structural engineering and also hydrology (water drainage). Depending on what you're buying and where it is you can need all three. I have learned to ask if they have insurance, which means if they are negligent, there is money to get to fix it.
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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Also, depending on where you are, whether the building is rated for earthquake-resistance. If it is anywhere near a body of water, find out if you need flood insurance and how much it would cost you. And many realty listings now have a walkability number, if that is of interest to you.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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Yeah, the "am I in a flood plain" thing is huge.

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Especially this week. The flood-insurance people can always tell you if a site has ever been flooded -- they keep track of these things. But this week Houston has had the highest water ever. I would hesitate to ever invest in real estate in any Gulf state. Rent, visit, but never buy.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Graven Image
Shipmate
# 8755

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Putting in a bid, depending on home inspection report. Also going to get a separate roof inspection. Home looked so much better in person then it did in the ad. I have found it is usually the other way around.

Beautiful garden on three sides that backs up to a walking path.
Nice glassed in garden room.

fingers crossed inspections come back with little repair needed.

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Oh, another tip: if it's a hurricane area, be sure that the roof has hurricane straps built into it. (To hold the roof on, when the wind tries to take it off.)

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:
... What advice do you have for long- distance house- hunting? We have been skimming through Zillow and Realtor.com ...

When we were looking for somewhere in Fredericton (a city we didn't know at all) we started with Realtor.ca and then engaged the services of a local estate agent who found the house we eventually bought.

A few days after we'd exchanged contracts on our old house, she told us she'd found just the house for us. It was so newly on the market it wasn't on the web-site yet; she took us to see it, we loved it and put in an offer straight away.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19318 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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I'm not very materialistic at all, so maybe that's why I just don't get it - but why do so many people these days expect everything in a house (kitchen, bathroom, carpets, decor) to be spanking new, before they will consider buying? If I was going to put in a new kitchen or bathroom, it would be so I could get the use out of it, not so that I could immediately sell and risk the next person ripping it right out again!

I would value any thoughts from other movers as to what they would consider essential to look for in a house as opposed to what are extravagant 'extras'.

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

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Graven Image
Shipmate
# 8755

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My needs are good structure. No termite or water damage not repaired.
Most other stuff can be upgraded or replaced. If things are not in good shape, example I looked at one house where kitchen cabinets were really in bad shape as was the counter top and would need refinish or replace. Much more then a simple coat of fresh paint, In such a case I would expect to get discount on price.

I would look for clean house as that is a sign that people care about their home and have most likely taken care of it. Cleaning costs nothing and makes a place show better.

On the other hand you painted your living room day glow green. No problem I would simply paint over it

Older appliances fine if they work but do not expect to get the same price as a home with all new appliances. If I liked the house and the price was right I would be happy with older ones.

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Talk to your realtor about this. If you're selling, you do what you have to do to get it to sell, depending on your market. If you're buying and mention these concerns, your realtor will appreciate the guidance. There are people who insist on everything new, and there are those like us who don't much care.
Not every buyer/seller can distinguish between the things that can be fixed (paint, carpet) and the things that are immutable (location, weather, commute distance).

[ 28. August 2017, 23:21: Message edited by: Brenda Clough ]

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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I moved recently, and am having some major refurbishment done on the new place — a new laundry room and a new fitted bedroom, plus having air conditioning installed. The laundry room was a significant job — the room in question had water supply, but no waste outflow pipe. Turns out that, when the house was extended, the waste pipe was rerouted and now goes nowhere near that room.

So, they dug up the concrete floor of my dining room to lay a new pipe.

I'm nearing the end of the project now, touch wood: the cabinets are in, I'm meeting a carpet fitter tonight, and the painter will be along soon. Which is good, I want my house back!

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Graven Image
Shipmate
# 8755

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[Overused]

So impressed that you were able to remain sane while living in the house during such a major remodel.

Posts: 2588 | From: Third planet from the sun. USA | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Given the headlines in today's paper, it would be worth considering this sort of thing if you're buying a house anywhere near the coast in the US.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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The Intrepid Mrs S
Shipmate
# 17002

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We wouldn't *necessarily* expect to have everything 'just so', but it can be really hard to see past the decor in online ads. For instance, wildly patterned carpets (Bill Bryson described them as looking like woven vomit [Projectile] ); far too much furniture, crammed in just everywhere; the mandatory guitar/drum kit combo, and a telescope in every conservatory.

Plus, every house I see has a kitchen exactly like the one I finally managed to replace 2 years ago *sigh*

Everything *can* be changed, but it all costs money!

In other news, Master S and his wife have had their offer on a house they love accepted - it's a court-ordered sale as part of a divorce settlement so I hope nothing goes wrong [Eek!]

Mrs. S, crossing everything

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Don't get your knickers in a twist over your advancing age. It achieves nothing and makes you walk funny.
Prayer should be our first recourse, not our last resort
'Lord, please give us patience. NOW!'

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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I can understand both sides of the "just-so" spectrum. Our last house was a bit of a fixer-upper (and in 13 years we didn't get everything done that we'd have liked), so it was rather refreshing to move into our present one, which needs nothing except the colour of the paint in the kitchen changed (and that's only because I don't like yellow).

I don't know how old the appliances are, but they all seem to be in good working order, and everything that I'd want is there - stove, fridge, dishwasher and laundry machines. If I'd had a choice, I'd have had a stove with a ceramic top, but that's going to have to wait until the current one goes phut, which may be after I do ...

[Killing me]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 19318 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
We wouldn't *necessarily* expect to have everything 'just so', but it can be really hard to see past the decor in online ads. For instance, wildly patterned carpets (Bill Bryson described them as looking like woven vomit [Projectile] );

Everything *can* be changed, but it all costs money!

Mrs. S, crossing everything

Mrs S, down here those are known as club carpets for precisely the reason you mention.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
[Overused]

So impressed that you were able to remain sane while living in the house during such a major remodel.

Luckily, one reason I chose this house is the amount of space. It has a converted garage which is a self-contained flat (2 beds, kitchen, lounge, bathroom): I'm living there while the work is done in the main house!
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The Intrepid Mrs S
Shipmate
# 17002

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Master S's offer on the house was accepted [Yipee] now comes the roller-coaster of surveys, mortgage deals, and scraping together every last penny.

The stamp duty alone is just ho-rrendous [Mad]

Mrs. S, apprehensive

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Prayer should be our first recourse, not our last resort
'Lord, please give us patience. NOW!'

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
It was rather refreshing to move into our present one, which needs nothing except the colour of the paint in the kitchen changed.

I don't know how old the appliances are, but they all seem to be in good working order, and everything that I'd want is there - stove, fridge, dishwasher and laundry machines. If I'd had a choice, I'd have had a stove with a ceramic top, but that's going to have to wait until the current one goes phut...

Much the same for us: the previous owners left the place in good order. We have just changed the oven though as the old one took about three weeks to heat up and then didn't maintain a constant temperature. The first one we ordered was supposed to fit but didn't, so we got another one which works beautifully and was £100 cheaper! The hob we inherited, on the other hand, is great. The biggest "problem" is the garden, which needs a big makeover. However it's very small!
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Ethne Alba
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# 5804

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Well this year alone, four home moves on our street have involved the drama of watching bathrooms and a kitchen being hauled out and new ones installed.
Sale goes through.
Brand New Kitchens and bathrooms get ripped out and new ones are installed.

Our local skip companies are raking it in!

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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[tangent ON]
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
... the old [stove] took about three weeks to heat up ...

The oven on ours heats up so quickly I can almost forgive the hob for not being ceramic - the first time we used it I didn't quite believe it when it bleeped to let us know it had reached the desired temperature!

Looks like I'm stuck with it ... [Big Grin]

[/tangent OFF]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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Our hob is gas ... which we prefer, even to ceramic.
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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
Our hob is gas ... which we prefer, even to ceramic.

I used to think that, until I was persuaded to splash out for an induction hob when we were replacing the old gas cooker we inherited in this house (with a dreadful oven that didn't work properly).. I soon became convinced that the induction hob has all the advantages of gas (easy to control, heats up fast) but is also so easy to keep clean (no nooks and crannies for spillages to seep into) ... and for us since we have solar panels, it makes sense to cook with electricity rather than gas, as we can get free energy that way on a sunny day. The only downside was having to replace most of the pans we had before with ones that are suitable for induction hobs.

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Graven Image
Shipmate
# 8755

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Sorry I need to ask [Confused] What is a hob? I gather it is some kind of a cooking stove, but is it unique in some way?
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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
Sorry I need to ask [Confused] What is a hob? I gather it is some kind of a cooking stove, but is it unique in some way?

I translate that in my mind to stovetop, burners or elements, what have you.

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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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Yes: like this. Perhaps this is a difference between UK and US practice, but in Britain many kitchens have the hob built into the worktop, with the oven built into a cabinet. In our present kitchen the hob is directly above the oven, but they were quite separate in our last one. We have a gas hob and an electric oven.

GR: I've never used induction; my niece has and swears by it too. She too had to change her cookware!

[ 01. September 2017, 05:39: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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Leorning Cniht
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# 17564

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What Brits call a hob is what Americans call a cooktop, I think. As BT says, they're pretty common in the UK.

The big advantage is that you can put the oven(s) higher up, so you don't have to bend down to put things in and out.

(Also note that normal British ovens are much narrower than American ones - about 2/3 of the width.)

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Pangolin Guerre
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# 18686

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Actually, I've noticed that configuration of oven and stove top being separate is becoming increasingly common in upscale kitchen renovations in Canada. My have a range unit is soooo prole.

Why is it that you need different cookware for induction? What sort of material is the new cookware?

[ 01. September 2017, 14:03: Message edited by: Pangolin Guerre ]

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Leorning Cniht
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# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Pangolin Guerre:

Why is it that you need different cookware for induction? What sort of material is the new cookware?

An induction hob works by inducing electric currents in the pan, which heats the pan because if its electrical resistance.

It's basically a transformer - the hob is a coil of wire under some kind of glass ceramic surface. High frequency (many kHz) alternating currents make a changing magnetic field, which induces eddy currents in the base of the pan. You want a base with fairly high magnetic permeability so you have a small skin depth - iron or some stainless steels are the normal choices.

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no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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Flat ceramic/pyrex cooktops are the best in my opinion. Gas is okay but not as even. Convection oven with steam injection for baking is an absolute must for me (I bake all the bread we eat).

But back to moving: determine your habits and practice and get what you like and fits you!

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Maybe I should stop to consider that I'm not worthy of an epiphany and just take what life has to offer
(formerly was just "no prophet") \_(ツ)_/

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Yes, if the kitchen is large enough splitting the cooktop from the oven is fashionable. You can then get 2 ovens. Kitchen design is a constantly evolving thing.

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Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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quote:
Originally posted by Ethne Alba:
Well this year alone, four home moves on our street have involved the drama of watching bathrooms and a kitchen being hauled out and new ones installed.
Sale goes through.
Brand New Kitchens and bathrooms get ripped out and new ones are installed.

What a terrible, terrible waste. As long as the kitchen and bathroom are serviceable, I'd stick with it - for several years at least. What I look for in a home is a comfortable, cosy, lived-in one, where I can leave my hiking boots and wellies in the porch. But maybe this is what, in the market, is called 'niche'.

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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It's wasteful for the homeowner, but it's their money, after all. And the appliances/cabinetry can be donated to places like the ReStore, which sells homebuilding stuff to benefit Habitat for Humanity.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Tukai
Shipmate
# 12960

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The Marama and I have twice had to buy a house as part of move interstate (long distance), and I have a few tips on that. We have also moved three times internationally, which is another order of complication, but unless someone asks, I won't go into that here.

I should say that, like many posters on this thread, we look for somewhere available and liveable, not for a "perfect" dream home.

The interstate moves were because I got a new job in the new place. Since I had to go to the new place (call it X) for an interview , I arranged to stay a day or two beyond the interview to look over the house market there. As my father (an army officer) had taught me "time spent on reconnaissance is never wasted".

Step 1 was to get a map and identify areas (suburbs) that were not too far from the new workplace - no point in setting up a long-distance commute if you don't have to. Then I looked at the classified ads (now it would be real estate websites) to see what sort of houses were in each suburb and what sort of prices they commanded (websites may only give broad ranges but that info is better than none ). . If possible take a drive around some of these neighbourhoods, ideally with a friendly real estate agent who can answer questions as you go and knows the way, but even a taxi or rental car would do, to check out shopping, schools (if relevant) , parks, etc.

Step 2: Back at home, discuss the finances, allowing for the place you propose to sell (for which banks will give you some credit even if that sale does not go through ahead of your purchase, although it's best to sell first as Piglet noted upthread. If there's time, a mortgage broker or banker can give you a rough figure for what they might lend.

Step 3: Pack up your stuff and get a removalist to store it for a month or so until you're ready to receive it(can be near your old or new place). This is the first serious cost. All major moves have costs! Other posters have given advice on packing.

Step 4: a week or so before your new job starts, arrive in the destination city. Rent a serviced (or at least furnished) apartment , for that time (renewable if possible) . This gives you a time margin. You don't need to move your stuff in to this place so it can be quite small, but a hotel room is a bit too restrictive , in our experience.

Step 5. Spend a whole day or two with your agent seriously looking at houses that are for sale and essentially ready to move into . Look inside the more promising ones. You can do 20 or so in one day, and once you've given him some guidance ("that one was too small/ too expensive/ had features we don't need/ or didn't have something we do need / too derelict/" etc) they will all be reasoanable prospects, at least for people (like us) who are not too fussy. On each occasion, on day 2 , after careful thought overnight, we went back to the 2 or 3 most promising and then made an offer - subject of course to structural inspection and finance.

Step 6: If the house is already vacant , you can move into it as a renter as soon as you're ready, or you can line up any necessary tradesmen to do minor work, or purchase missing appliances.

Step 7: now get the removalists to deliver your stuff and move in.

We were lucky on each occasion that it went so smoothly, as many things can go wrong, e.g. contracts fall through, finance insufficient (which means you need to pull back or look elsewhere) or prevailing sales by auction (which can make it hard to get what you want when you want it, especially as auctions are more common in rising and competitive property markets).

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A government that panders to the worst instincts of its people degrades the whole country for years to come.

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