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Source: (consider it) Thread: Pews or chairs?
CorgiGreta
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What are the advantages and disadvantages of each? Do you prefer one to the other? Aside from purely functional considerations, do you think that sociological/psychological, liturgical, easthetic, etc. factors influence preferences?

Greta

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Olaf
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quote:
Originally posted by CorgiGreta:
Aside from purely functional considerations, do you think that sociological/psychological, liturgical, easthetic, etc. factors influence preferences?

Absolutely, like most things that come up in Eccles. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

I think chairs in church look ugly. I wish I had a better reason, but that's it.

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Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras
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But I don't think the traditional small caned- seat chairs that hook together and are specifically made as an alternative to pews are ugly at all. However, I can immediately think of only one church in America where I have seen these. They are typical in England. I like them at least equally as much as nice pews.

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Belle Ringer
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Pews are hard, uncomfortable at best, extremely uncomfortable at worse. Really hard on friends with back problems or related problems who have to carry in a cushion to sit on, but can sit just fine on a normal padded chair.
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PD
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I have come to prefer well spaced pews with padded seats as I am a bit on the bulky side. Chairs tend to be a little low and a little narrow for me. Most modern/cheap church chairs are disaster areas. The old-fashioned cane bottomed numbers on battens are not too bad, but most modern interlocking and stacking chairs are strictly twenty-minute specials. This fact should be taken into account by those preaching and/or giving announcements.

That said, there is a certain type of sit up and beg of pew that absolutely kills my back and butt. They also seem to be the ones blessed with stretchers that stop me kneeling comfortably. I usually remain in the "Piskie squat" for most of the service when I run into those things as it is the least uncomfortable option.

PD

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by Belle Ringer:
Pews are hard, uncomfortable at best, extremely uncomfortable at worse. Really hard on friends with back problems or related problems who have to carry in a cushion to sit on, but can sit just fine on a normal padded chair.

I visited Holy Name Cathedral here in Chicago today to pray an office and see how things look after a second major months-long renovation, this time due to a fire in the cathedral's attic (the previous major renovation was due to the ceiling starting to fall to the floor). The pews have been refinished (or are possibly all new?) and seemed more comfortable somehow. I noticed that they've put gizmos on the kneelers' hinges that keep them from hitting the floor, presumably preventing loud thuds when they're dropped. Each kneeler remains a bit raised off the floor until knelt on, which is the only time it actually touches the floor. Neato. And/or it may allow cleaning of the floor whether kneelers have been raised or not.
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Chorister

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Pews are good because you can fit in as many people as necessary - at ordinary services you can spread out with lots of room, but at Christmas you can all shuffle up to make room for more. Those joiny-together seats were made in the days when most people were thinner and always seem too packed together. There is a fashion now for wider, padded seats. The colour of the wood is often pale which makes them look out of keeping with the dark wood of the church and the pale padded seats get dirty and stained, requiring regular cleaning.

Pews are also extremely useful as they have a long shelf in front so you can put your booklets, hymn books, pew leaflets, leaving them in the open position ready to read or sing from. If you have a lot of books you can spread them out. Some chairs have little book hoppers set into the back, but they are never big enough and are awkwardly placed.

In our church, the handicraft group made pew cushions so they are not so hard. The choir ones are especially comfortable (why do you think I sing in the choir? [Biased] ).

One of the main arguments for the use of chairs is so that they can be stacked and moved when a wide-open space is needed. But in how many churches does that really actually happen? I can think of several churches where the chairs have sat in exactly the same place, unmoved, for years. They might as well be pews.

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Emma Louise

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Depends partly on the church I suspect. The modern buildings I've worshipped in would look rather strange with pews, and nice comfy moveable chairs are far better. (Multipurpose worship space on an estate - with rearrangement church was also used for barn dances, wedding reception (mine), kids play space etc.
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Ogre
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Definitely chairs, preferably rush-bottomed wooden chairs as in many French churches which are not stone cold and will accommodate themselves to various body shapes. The trouble with a pew is that it is often immovable and maybe designed to accommodate six adults, but when the seventh comes along, everybody has to bunk up and be uncomfortable for an hour. [Votive]

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churchgeek

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There are those in the US who want to replace pews with chairs simply because churches in Europe have chairs. That is ridiculous, IMO.

IMO it's also obscene to replace perfectly good pews with chairs unless you have a really good reason or the pews are worn out beyond all use (which is pretty rare in the US - pews generally last a long time!). If you've got the money to waste on throwing out your pews and replacing them with chairs, I can give you the address of at least one church that could use your money for more important things, like paying clergy or heating the sanctuary in winter.

There are also those who want to replace pews with chairs because chairs are more versatile, and, of course, we're supposed to be postmodern and all that - we should be moving the chairs into circles, or collegiate seating, regardless of the architecture (some would do this, e.g., in a Gothic cruciform building!). Or the versatility is desired so that chairs can be added or subtracted for different services/events and they'll all match (as opposed to adding folding chairs behind or alongside pews). These reasons are more palatable for me, but not thoroughly convincing. See above about better ways to spend money. If, however, you're just starting out instead of replacing perfectly good pews, these reasons might be good enough to select chairs.

It should be weighed against the fact that pews don't prescribe what size a person should be and how close they should be to the person next to them. People will skip chairs in order to leave space between themselves and a stranger, whereas in a pew, a little less space might be left and more people might fit into the pew length than in a comparable length of chairs. Also, pews can be padded! In the US, many are made with pads on the seats and the backs; it's better to buy separate pads that can be replaced more easily or removed to be cleaned individually if need be.

Also, chairs are more individualistic and individualizing - there's something psychologically different, I think, between having your own chair and sharing a pew with someone. I may be splitting hairs here.

As a verger, let me add this: Functionality is important. You will want to take into consideration whether the chairs will be moved around for any reason, and if so, they should not be too heavy. Also, you should note whether you want to be straightening chairs constantly. Chairs that don't lock together (and if they do, why not just have pews?) will always move a little bit when anyone sits in them and will always look disarrayed. You will have to be willing to commit staff (or volunteer) resources to straightening chairs and/or kneelers. These considerations are often not considered important compared with the creativity of the liturgical planners who think it would be great to move the chairs this way for this service and back that way for the next, but believe me, they are important. It's a matter both of stewardship (what you're paying staff to do with their time) and charity (what you're making the staff who are probably on the bottom of the totem pole do for reasons that may not be important enough to require the heavy lifting by the "help"). There's also usually less work involved in cleaning/dusting pews than in cleaning/dusting chairs.

Someone's sense of aesthetics isn't a good enough reason in itself to do anything in church, much less something that will waste money (if you're replacing pews), waste staff resources or possibly strain them physically, etc. So those considerations are actually quite important, I think. At the same time, it may be that your staff has plenty of time to be doing all these things - maybe they need something to do (I'm not saying this sarcastically, though it may come off that way). Or maybe there are volunteers who would find it calming to spend time in the church dusting and straightening chairs. I'm just saying all these factors really need to be considered.

Chairs also break more easily and often, so be sure to budget money for replacements and repairs. I have no idea which is more expensive initially - but that's a consideration too. Another deciding factor might be whether you can get one or the other from sustainable/green sources.

And if you're buying pews, think about having some shorter so that wheelchairs can fit in. That's one advantage to chairs - they can be removed so a wheelchair can fit in anywhere, not just in a designated spot where a pew is shorter than the others.

(I've often joked that what we need is pews that pop up from the floor like 3rd row seating in a minivan, so we can have chairs when we want them and pews when we want them. Or have the chairs/kneelers on strong electromagnets run through the floor so at the flip of a switch you can straigten them out... [Razz] )

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dj_ordinaire
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Nice fulsome leather armchairs after the manner of those sometimes found in 'squire's pews' in the eighteenth century would be splendid.

However, the tightly-packed wooden chairs that one often encounters are a massive trial. I am hardly a stout party (although somewhat moreso than before my holiday and Christmas, admittedly) but I generally find them a tight squeeze. If I am wearing a winter coat or carrying a bag or something then they just become a nightmare unless I use up a little row of three of them.

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
One of the main arguments for the use of chairs is so that they can be stacked and moved when a wide-open space is needed. But in how many churches does that really actually happen? I can think of several churches where the chairs have sat in exactly the same place, unmoved, for years. They might as well be pews.

In two of the three churches where I have served, the worship area was multipurpose and used for lots of other things during the week. So stacking chairs were a "must". And we didn't always have them in the same layout on Sundays, either.

It was a pain having to put them out and remove them each time, mind you!

By the way, the "linking" thing, at least in Britain, is a Fire Regulations thing, so that, in an emergency evacuation of the building, the chairs don't get scattered everywhere and become a trip hazard. But (a) yes, they are usually too close together and (b) I think the linking bits may make it harder to move quickly! I remain unconvinced.

There is one church near here which is quite long and narrow. The chairs are squashed together as tightly as possible with a centre aisle. Whenever I preach there, I feel I am in a railway carriage (but wider)!

[ 29. December 2009, 09:40: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
I've often joked that what we need is pews that pop up from the floor like 3rd row seating in a minivan, so we can have chairs when we want them and pews when we want them.
I did see a cartoon which had the pews mounted like the steps on a Travolator. At the start of the service the Minister pressed a button, they moved forward, the unoccupied ones at the front disappeared and everybody ended up nearer the front of the church than when they'd sat down!

Why does everyone always want to sit at the back?!!

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St Everild
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Our building (built in the 1950's, originally as the hall in the plan with a church to be addded later and never was as building costs spiralled)never had pews. The original hard wooden chairs have been replaced sometime during the last 15 years by chairs which look perfectly OK and can be moved as desired.

Yes, they are a pain to keep straight, yes, they are a pain as they have nowhere to put books etc down...their biggest disadvantage to me is that although kneeling pads are provided the chairs are not suitable for the purposes of propping your bottom against when kneeling for prayer etc as the slide on the wooden floor - but I wouldnt swap them for pews because of their versatility.

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Christian Agnostic
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If you have little kids, pews are the answer. It let our girls kind of sprawl when they got tired or bored etc. I'm not comfortable with kneelers and chairs, but I think the bps of tec want to ban kneeling anyway. [Paranoid]

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Words to the wise: Don't read Kierkegaard when you're 16, and always set B.S. detectors to 11. "How can I sing a strange song in the Lord's land?"

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Mark Wuntoo
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quote:
Originally posted by Christian Agnostic:
If you have little kids, pews are the answer. It let our girls kind of sprawl when they got tired or bored etc. ...

Now I know why I left the church - we had chairs not pews. [Snigger]
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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by Christian Agnostic:
If you have little kids, pews are the answer. It let our girls kind of sprawl when they got tired or bored etc. ...

You can also station an adult at each end and keep the kids in check. They can wriggle between and under chairs (I do speak from experience!)
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Corvo
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We have chairs and try to make sure the number out is close to the number we expect to attend a given service. This is confidence building (or a good trick) for it means the local rag (and the Mystery Worshipper - should s/he ever visit) has to report "There was standing room only at . . . or Extra seats were needed at . . . ".

We have also successfully tried Richard Giles 'Philadelphia' style arrangements on special occasions.

We feel blessed not to have pews.

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Baptist Trainfan
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I'm puzzled. Is the Philadelphia arrangement something only available to those with higher gnosis of chair configuration?
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Corvo
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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
I'm puzzled. Is the Philadelphia arrangement something only available to those with higher gnosis of chair configuration?

Well, it's not open to those with pews. Incidentally, you may be interested to hear that the absence of pews also meant a vicar in the 1950s could set out his large model railway in the nave.

[ 29. December 2009, 12:21: Message edited by: Sacred London ]

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Zach82
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I prefer pews. Maybe it's just the brand of chair, but the chairs in my parish's choir and chapel are far less comfortable than the pews.

I haven't heard many good reasons for switching to chairs. For all their versatility, they are almost always simply linked up in rows just like pews anyway!

Zach

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Don't give up yet, no, don't ever quit/ There's always a chance of a critical hit. Ghost Mice

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Incidentally, you may be interested to hear that the absence of pews also meant a vicar in the 1950s could set out his large model railway in the nave.

Now you're talking!!! Not enough of them around, IMHO.

And Methodist Central Hall for many years hosted the annual London Model Railway Exhibition - I never knew it was a church until later!!!

[ 29. December 2009, 12:41: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

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Corvo
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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Incidentally, you may be interested to hear that the absence of pews also meant a vicar in the 1950s could set out his large model railway in the nave.

Now you're talking!!! Not enough of them around, IMHO.

And Methodist Central Hall for many years hosted the annual London Model Railway Exhibition - I never knew it was a church until later!!!

I wonder if there are any churches with model railways permanently set up. We are probably on the wrong board now and I expect we'll be shunted.
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M.
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A bit of a tangent, I'm afraid.

Originally posted by Oblatus:
quote:
I noticed that they've put gizmos on the kneelers' hinges that keep them from hitting the floor, presumably preventing loud thuds when they're dropped. Each kneeler remains a bit raised off the floor until knelt on, which is the only time it actually touches the floor. Neato. And/or it may allow cleaning of the floor whether kneelers have been raised or not.

I'm not sure what you mean by this - the kneelers' hinges? The only kneelers I know of are like this

No hinges, just like cushions. I've never seen kneelers on a hinge - do they flap down from the bottom of the pew in front then? (Sorry if this is a silly question from someone who has only started attending a church with any kneelers at all in the last few years.)

M.

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Christian Agnostic
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Our church has kneeling benches, which
I love. [Yipee]

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Words to the wise: Don't read Kierkegaard when you're 16, and always set B.S. detectors to 11. "How can I sing a strange song in the Lord's land?"

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Quam Dilecta
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Whenever a church has considerable variations in attendance, there is something to be said in favor of a combination of fixed and movable seating. Enough pews can be provided for the normal Sunday congregation, and extra chairs can be added for the major feasts or other special events. Such an arrangement encourages people not to spread out too thinly, and lends an air of spaciousness which is lost when all the floor space is crammed with pews. It is also useful to have a limited number of chairs with arms available at all times to accomodate those who have trouble getting back up from a seated position.

The comfort (or lack thereof) of church seating is also a subject for debate. Time was when cushioned seats and sloping backs were confined to churches with sermon-centered worship. Roman Catholics, Anglicans, and Lutherans stood or knelt during most of the mass, sitting only during the epistle, offertory, and (relatively short) sermon. Moreover, at early "communion" masses and on weekdays there was usually no sermon. Under these circumstances, those who objected to hard seats could be dismissed as whiners. Nowadays the makers of pews and chairs peddle the same designs to all comers. Most of the pew designs offer excessively-tilted backs; many feature upholstered backs as well as padded seats. A parish which prefers to encourage kneeling rather than lounging must make this preference clear when ordering new pews.

In the case of churches with numerous seats, the inevitable re-upholstery of uphostered pews or chairs will be both costly and disruptive. The disruption can be minimized by using loose seat cushions, but they are more expensive. The choice between bare wood and padding also affects the acoustics of a church, and expert advice should be sought before changes are made.

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Cottontail

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My last church removed the pews. They were ugly dark wood things, made the very plain Victorian church dark and dingy and cramped. Moreover, we didn't have much by way of halls, and the church layout was totally unsuitable for our children's church (held on Fridays) and our more contemporary Sunday evening services.

So we replaced them with chairs, refurbishing the whole sanctuary in the procress. Not everyone was in favour - some were worried that it would look more like a church hall than a sanctuary space. But the end result is lovely. The church has a light, airy feel, while still looking traditional. It now has a central aisle, which it never did before, as well as side aisles, making access much easier (and pleasing brides!). There are still some pews right at the back for those who prefer them, and about one-tenth of the chairs have arms, making it easier for elderly people to stand up and sit down.

Also, the space is incredibly flexible. And yes, they do move the chairs around all the time, every week. They are in traditional rows for the Sunday morning service; for Sunday evenings they are grouped in more of a cluster at the front, while the rest are cleared away, making the extra space available for 'alt. church' type activities. Small communion services feel more intimate and prayerful. At the Children's Church, the children sit around tables, and the extra space is utilised for crafts and games. Vitally IMO, this means that the children are not banished to the inadequate hall space, but get to worship in the Sanctuary. And lastly, the space is used throughout the week by Brownies, Boys' Brigade, and various other community groups. It means a lot of work shifting the chairs around, but the benefits make it worth it. And as for straightness: every church needs our old church officer with his measuring stick!

However, I agree that it wouldn't work in every church. My current church is a beautifully designed 200-year-old church, where the original pew layout is imaginative and appropriate: to remove these would be a sacrilege. But the utilitarian Victorian box that was the other church has benefitted greatly from the change, both aesthetically and practically.

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Mamacita

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quote:
Originally posted by M.:
A bit of a tangent, I'm afraid. <snip>
I'm not sure what you mean by this - the kneelers' hinges? The only kneelers I know of are like this

No hinges, just like cushions. I've never seen kneelers on a hinge - do they flap down from the bottom of the pew in front then? (Sorry if this is a silly question from someone who has only started attending a church with any kneelers at all in the last few years.)

M.

Here's an example.

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carpe diem

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Sober Preacher's Kid

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My theory about the preference for back-row seating is that it is a legacy from the times when churches charged pew-rents. The public pews which were free were at the back, and the personal ones were up front. It would be terribly rude to take someone else's pew, and the stewards would be along shortly to put you right.

I know of one church in Peterborough, ON that still has its pew price diagram and many old churches still have the numbering tags on the pew ends for keeping track of rents.

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by M.:
I'm not sure what you mean by this - the kneelers' hinges? The only kneelers I know of are like this

No hinges, just like cushions. I've never seen kneelers on a hinge - do they flap down from the bottom of the pew in front then? (Sorry if this is a silly question from someone who has only started attending a church with any kneelers at all in the last few years.)

Sorry; I guess it depends on where you are. Most kneelers I've experienced are long upholstered affairs that serve the kneeling needs of two or more people: typically the section of a pew between two vertical supports that anchor the pew to the ground. There's a hinge at each end, and when you need to kneel, you pull the kneeler down from its upright position (which keeps it out of the way for easier walking between pews) and rest it on the floor (it has a rubber-covered foot at each end and maybe additional feet along its length).

Yes, they flap down from the pew in front.

[ 29. December 2009, 15:40: Message edited by: Oblatus ]

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leo
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Chairs are best because you can move them for alt.worship events.

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
My theory about the preference for back-row seating is that it is a legacy from the times when churches charged pew-rents. The public pews which were free were at the back, and the personal ones were up front.
Some years ago my organist and I worked out a not-too-serious scheme for modern-day pew rents. The back pews would be the most expensive, while the church would actually pay the occupants of the front two rows! Needless to say, it went no further.
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Enoch
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Incidentally, you may be interested to hear that the absence of pews also meant a vicar in the 1950s could set out his large model railway in the nave.

A continuous run symbolises eternity. An end to end layout symbolises life's pilgrimage. A triange would symbolise the Blessed Trinity but cause electrical problems. There are all sorts of meanings that can be read into the electricity. Two rail might represent the two natures and three rail the three persons. There's even the hand in the sky that reach down and intervene when a train derails. Yes, I think not installing a model railway in ones church might be grounds at least for suspension if not actual excommunication.

Or am I in the wrong thread?

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Belle Ringer
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quote:
Originally posted by Oblatus:
Most kneelers I've experienced are long upholstered affairs that serve the kneeling needs of two or more people... you pull the kneeler down from its upright position (which keeps it out of the way for easier walking between pews) and rest it on the floor (it has a rubber-covered foot at each end and maybe additional feet along its length).

Yes, they flap down from the pew in front.

Yup. As long as a whole pew (short pew) or half a pew.

In one choir the gal next to me was so heavy even though she chose the end of the pew (near where the support is on the kneeler) it would sag so much when she knelt I kept expecting it to break, and chose to stay seated rather than risk adding my weight to the kneeler. Church I grew up in had individual slightly padded kneelers, shoved under the pew ahead when not in use. I liked that better. (One could also shove the purse under the pew ahead.) But it does require having enough cushions for as many as might crowd in on the busiest day.

(I admit pews have some flexibility chairs don't in terms of spreading out or squeezing in. Still, I've been in some awfully uncomfortable pews, back at right angle to the seat, narrow seat, forces the body into an utterly upright position, maybe that's supposed to keep you awake and attentive?)

Mostly I don't kneel anymore, getting old, creaky knees and a bit of an effort to get up again while trying to switch books and flip pages to find the hymn that starts immediately after the prayer.

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Carys

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quote:
Originally posted by Sober Preacher's Kid:
I know of one church in Peterborough, ON that still has its pew price diagram and many old churches still have the numbering tags on the pew ends for keeping track of rents.

We still have our 'All pews free' sign in the west porch!.

That said we don't necessarily have pews these days. We still have our pews but mostly they live round the side walls and we use chairs. This gives us the flexibility needed for the church to be used as a rehearsal space during the week, but we can still use pews when more seating is needed or a more traditional look is called for. The pews are currently out at the moment for Midnight Mass. But we did make sure that there are a couple of places where we have short pews not by pillars (where they are designed for) to leave space for a wheelchair (or for the thurifer to stand at the gospel). One woman who has back problems put one of our chairs into one of those spaces on Sunday as that obviously suited her back better than the pews.

I think it does very much depend on the design of the church, the pews and the chairs which work best. Llandaf Cathedral has horrible narrow wooden chairs fixed together by lengths of wood and they don't allow for having shoulders with the consequence they are very uncomfortable.

Carys

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Comper's Child
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Chairs are vasty superior liturgically - except that they allow for the possibility of the "Philadelphia Arrangement" and other atrocities.
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leo
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What's the Philadelphia Arrangement?

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Shadowhund
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I detest Richard Giles-style arrangements, but agree that chairs are superior over nice neat boring rows of regimented people.

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Comper's Child
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
What's the Philadelphia Arrangement?

Richard Giles seems to prefer choir-wise seating with the congo wandering from west to east - a continual "pilgrimage"...
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geroff
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When researching this subject for a church reordering I came across these. They are a cross between chairs and pews which are easy to move and stack and are also beautifully made.
They retain the main advantage of pews in that you can all squash up for carol services or spread out if you need a bit more width than a stacking chair.

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PD
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quote:
Originally posted by geroff:
When researching this subject for a church reordering I came across these. They are a cross between chairs and pews which are easy to move and stack and are also beautifully made.
They retain the main advantage of pews in that you can all squash up for carol services or spread out if you need a bit more width than a stacking chair.

I rather like the look of those. Has anyone MW'ed St. George's Bloomsbury (a beautiful church IMHO) and given them "the butt test?"

PD

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geroff
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I noticed some of these at Rochester cathedral at Christmas.

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Curiosity killed ...

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I worship at a Bodley church that's never had pews, which slightly fazed the English Heritage man when he came to check the listing recently:
'You know you'll have to put the pews back?'
'But it was designed without pews, we have the plans.'
It originally had the rush seated chairs but now has upholstered chairs that link together.

We move the chairs all the time - to set up Toddler Church every week, to run big events in the church nave, including an annual tree festival, Bright and Light party, parish parties, harvest supper ... We turn a section of the church around for smaller alt worship type services or the whole church around for teaching events when we have one of the school years in. We move the chairs to make room to lay the labyrinth out monthly. The other huge advantage is being able to move chairs to fit wheelchairs in wherever we want, and we've got four or five wheelchair users attending regularly. We can make more space for an orchestra when there are concerts by taking out a row or so of chairs at the front. This is the first church I've worshipped in regularly with chairs not pews, and I prefer the flexibility.

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Shadowhund
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Wasn't there a post-war (50s?) English fad of installing in bombed-out churches BIG quire stalls for the congregation where there weren't ayn before? I seem to remember that St. Bride's, Fleet Street may have been one of them, along with several others.

Interesting how fads come and go....

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Bishops Finger
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Some of the City churches in London were indeed rebuilt post-WW2 with 'collegiate' seating for the congo - St. Vedast, Foster Lane, is another, IIRC - which does seem odd. It's most uncomfortable if you're trying to focus on the altar.

Our place has pews in the nave, and they are not only remarkably comfortable but also moveable ! Not that we shift them around that much (they are quite heavy), but at least we can if we need to.

The aisles are completely clear of seating (lots of room for processions!), but we do have some nice chairs we can put out in the north aisle (where the Font is) for smallish Baptism parties.

Ian J.

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by Comper's Child:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
What's the Philadelphia Arrangement?

Richard Giles seems to prefer choir-wise seating with the congo wandering from west to east - a continual "pilgrimage"...
Well, that is a good way to do liturgy. Giles is a bit precious at times but his basic ideas are sound.

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My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

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Comper's Child
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by Comper's Child:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
What's the Philadelphia Arrangement?

Richard Giles seems to prefer choir-wise seating with the congo wandering from west to east - a continual "pilgrimage"...
Well, that is a good way to do liturgy. Giles is a bit precious at times but his basic ideas are sound.
[Roll Eyes] [Projectile]
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M.
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Thanks to all those who answered me.

M.

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Angloid
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quote:
Originally posted by Comper's Child:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
Giles is a bit precious at times but his basic ideas are sound.

[Roll Eyes] [Projectile]
I agree with leo. Why the vomit?

Maybe we had a thread on this some time ago. Any mileage in starting a new one?

[Code fix - T²,Eccles Host]

[ 29. December 2009, 22:00: Message edited by: Think² ]

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Graven Image
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One church that I attend has a mix of both. Chairs in the first rows pews in the back. It works well. Chairs with arms makes it easier for some older people to get up and down. They can be moved out of the way to make room for special events. Pews for families with children and for those who like that type of seating.
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