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Source: (consider it) Thread: Are You What You Planned To Be?
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:

Seriously, no-one on the Ship appears to be a tradesperson or businessperson.

It's not an either/or. I've painted, decorated, done joinery, stripped furniture, done calligraphy, made clothes, toys, furnishings, gardened, prepared and cooked upwards of 20,000 meals - but none of this came with a living wage or a pension.

Would that it had.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
orfeo

Ship's Musical Counterpoint
# 13878

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You can be a practical person, or you can spend your life on the internet.

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Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

Posts: 18173 | From: Under | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged
leo
Shipmate
# 1458

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At age 8 I wanted to be a priest or a teacher.

I became a teacher and later trained for NSM priesthood (dropped the latter as one vocation is time-consuming enough) but later became a Reader/lay minister.

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My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

Posts: 23198 | From: Bristol | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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After teaching my brother, aged 3, to read and add up, I decided I wanted to be a teacher. Which I did become - although soon discovered that not all children were able to learn as readily as my brother. I enjoyed teaching those who found learning difficult (SEN).

However, I'm not sure that I'd go into that profession now - during the 1990s something changed, there's so much distrust around now within Education.

The best example I can think of is a boy in our choir who always said he wanted to be a Weatherman. Sure enough, after two degrees in Geography and Journalism, that is exactly what he has become, working for the BBC.

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

Posts: 34626 | From: Cream Tealand | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by Chorister:


However, I'm not sure that I'd go into that profession now - during the 1990s something changed

You are quite right.

In 1990 I started a B.Ed.

Buy late 1993 I didn't want to be a teacher and didn't become one.

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17938 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
TomOfTarsus
Shipmate
# 3053

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Wow, some great stories here!

From the time I was young, I wanted to be a pilot. And I did have the eyes (20/12, full color vision, all that). And I qualified for a full 4 year scholarship, with a guaranteed pilot training slot and such.

But my personal life was in the can, and my (now) wife & I ended up making some youthfully foolish decisions, and I ended up resigning and marrying and ended up in a local steel mill for some years. Till it closed. Two years of scrambling, patching together part-time work at the university, a full-time course load, whatever benefits we could, and so on, to finish up a suspended engineering degree, and nigh 30 years on, here I sit- fat, nerdy, and boring!

But thanks to my computer, I can indulge the fantasy of being a pilot - in WWI, WWII or right up to the present!

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By grace are ye saved through faith... not of yourselves; it is the gift of God; not of works, lest any man should boast. For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath ... ordained that we should walk in them.

Posts: 1570 | From: Pittsburgh, PA USA | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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quote:
Does anybody on the Ship work at anything useful - plumber, electrician, mechanic...?
I'm an engineer - some of the time I design, and make measurements on, stuff (in a similar line to Tom, above, as it happens). But most of the time I teach, because I work in a university, so this does not perhaps count as being genuinely productive. [Big Grin]

My childhood self always enjoyed making things from thrown-away shite. And I still do - I mainline on the contents of the university skips (dumpsters). It keeps me coming to work. And also going to church, where I rent space in the boilerhouse to house some of the collection...

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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The Rogue
Shipmate
# 2275

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I never had a clue as a child what I wanted to be. I still don't know what I want to be but I am enjoying what I am doing. I'm a company accountant and the Roguelings think I play on computers all day. This is correct but, of course, I would never tell them that.

When Mrs Rogue's sister was born and a midwife came to visit she told the midwife she was going to be one when she grows up. And she is. And she is loving it.

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If everyone starts thinking outside the box does outside the box come back inside?

Posts: 2507 | From: Toton | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
moron
Shipmate
# 206

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Does anybody on the Ship work at anything useful - plumber, electrician, mechanic...?

Damn you [Razz] - I bite.

A couple of years ago it occurred to me the most pleasurable part of any job I had ever had was the driving so I obtained my CDL Class A and paid some dues. Tomorrow I will set out again hoping against hope to get another 4000 miles in the next week or so and then take as much time off as I want to do things like kayaking in Newfoundland or on the Buffalo River.

You see a lot of country and I've done less entertaining work for a lot less pay.


(I told you Ruth I was not making that up.)

Posts: 4236 | From: Bentonville | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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From the time I was tiny, I knew I wanted to be a musician. When I was two, my parents gave me a little toy piano which I immediately started playing tunes on. It was a passion that led me to practice (a real) piano for five hours a day. Then I studied organ, and now make most of my living as a church musician.

It's certainly not a way to get rich, but the joy of making music and directing choirs brightens my days! A side benefit is that every week, I get to do new things!

My niece always knew she would be a doctor, and today she is. My sister has always envied us somewhat. She teaches geography in a university, but still doesn't know what she wants to be when she grows up. [Biased]

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 18017 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kaplan Corday
Shipmate
# 16119

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quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Does anybody on the Ship work at anything useful - plumber, electrician, mechanic...?

IT Systems Engineer
Ah, but can you fix a blocked loo?

Seriously, no-one on the Ship appears to be a tradesperson or businessperson.

Is that your definition of "useful"?

As it happens, I can fix a blocked bog (I fitted our entire bathroom suite, I've added radiators, fitted new valves, etc.) but I'm not sure being able to fix and implement the sort of computer systems that we all depend on now is any less "useful" than plumbing or wiring a ring main.

You are quite right, of course, and I imagine I would miss doctors and nurses "that we all depend on now", also.

I even believe that teaching kids history is also "useful" in giving them cultural literacy and some semblance of a sense of proportion.

And yes, we all have a few practical skills.

I too have dealt with a blocked loo, and I can change tap valves, fuses and tyres (as well as my socks, opinions and, sometimes, a fifty dollar note).

It still seems noteworthy, however, that the demographic which has emerged from this thread is heavy on doctors, nurses, clergy, engineers, IT specialists, librarians teachers, social workers, public servants and psychologists.

Nobody seems to have done an apprenticeship and followed a career in carpentry or bricklaying, and nobody seems to be a business executive, or even a small business proprietor, and nobody seems to be a shop assistant.

This would appear to suggest that the Ship's demographic, for better or worse, does not conform to that of most Western societies.

[ 26. April 2013, 03:17: Message edited by: Kaplan Corday ]

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CuppaT
Shipmate
# 10523

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I did my apprenticeship as a bookbinder. I did not complete it, due to raising a family, but I nearly did. I would be hire-able anywhere with my skills in paper repair, old books repairs, and fine bindings. There are not many of us around. It was good and I liked it. But no, I never thought of it as a child.

I think, when the last is finally raised, I will not go back to bookbinding though. I will perhaps move on to being a lactation consultant. My skills have changed.

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Stand at the brink of the abyss of despair, and when you see that you cannot bear it any longer, draw back a little and have a cup of tea.
~Elder Sophrony

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Kaplan Corday
Shipmate
# 16119

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quote:
Originally posted by CuppaT:
I think, when the last is finally raised, I will not go back to bookbinding though. I will perhaps move on to being a lactation consultant. My skills have changed.

It would be an interesting challenge to work out a way of combining the two.
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Desert Daughter
Shipmate
# 13635

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quote:
Originally posted by TomOfTarsus:

From the time I was young, I wanted to be a pilot.

Same here. The problem was that in Germany at that time girls could not get airline scholarships. So I went to the US for my flight training. During that, I found that I much loved flying eights around a cactus (I trained in Arizona) and tinkering with the Cessna's engine, but the thought of an airline pilot's life (wearing a uniform, working to strict schedules) was not at all what I wanted to do. So, I kept flying little Cessnas over the desert as a hobby while switching to a degree in Business (big mistake!) and eventually returned to Europe. My business degree opened the doors of Hell (a.k.a. Corporate Life) for me, and I spent several miserable years working for airlines and manufacturers, travelling business class, pretending to be a cool executive and hating every second of it.

The thing that had been nagging at me for a long time was that I loved to read, loved to play with ideas, and I spent a lot of my spare time in University libraries (**nerd alarm**).

When I was about to turn 30, time came to be honest with myself. The firm I worked for in the UK had fired me because they said I had an "attitude" problem (i.e., I did not go to office parties & preferred to work alone) took my savings & severance package, went to live in Finland (I love empty places and was fed up with people, anyway) and did a PhD to become an Academic. Since then my life has been a happy one, because I get paid for shutting myself away with a stack of books and play with ideas. And I discovered another love: that of teaching. I never thought I'd enjoy it so much, but I do. That discovery was a late, but welcome, gift.

So no, I am not what I planned to be, but I possibly am becoming what I am meant to be.

[ 26. April 2013, 06:42: Message edited by: Desert Daughter ]

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"Prayer is the rejection of concepts." (Evagrius Ponticus)

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Ad Orientem
Shipmate
# 17574

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As a little kid I wanted to be lots of things, all pie in the sky stuff, like an airline pilot, an astronaut etc. When I was a teenager I didn't know what I wanted to do and I hated school. Had you asked me then though if I would like to work in a warehouse for the rest if my working life I doubt I would have answered yes. So no, I'm not what I planned to be.
Posts: 2606 | From: Finland | Registered: Feb 2013  |  IP: Logged
Kater Murr
Apprentice
# 17479

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I never thought much about a profession that would suit me perfect. Maybe that was wrong and I should have... but I didn't. So I went around and did lots of things, some of them seemingly annoyed me to death, some places where I worked where quite okay and decent. From all of my jobs I took something with me, something I learned about people and so on. The thing I'm doing now seems quite okay for me. If it stays that way, it's still not my dream job, for the reason a dream job doesn't exist for me (<- Just looking for a place to get some money out of, which I'm going to use to buy me things I like and things I need, without getting to much in trouble). But my job now is decent and can be fun some time.

But since I was 12 or so I had this naive dream of becoming singer in what I imagined back then as a great rock band... [Big Grin] And that's something I became in some way. Okay, it's not really a rock band, and we will probably not go down in musical history, but it's fun, we play small concerts in galleries and studios now and then, and that's something I love and so I'm really grateful for that opportunity.

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"the madcap laughed at the man on the border"

Posts: 15 | From: Germany | Registered: Dec 2012  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Does anybody on the Ship work at anything useful - plumber, electrician, mechanic...?

IT Systems Engineer
Ah, but can you fix a blocked loo?

Seriously, no-one on the Ship appears to be a tradesperson or businessperson.

Is that your definition of "useful"?

As it happens, I can fix a blocked bog (I fitted our entire bathroom suite, I've added radiators, fitted new valves, etc.) but I'm not sure being able to fix and implement the sort of computer systems that we all depend on now is any less "useful" than plumbing or wiring a ring main.

You are quite right, of course, and I imagine I would miss doctors and nurses "that we all depend on now", also.

I even believe that teaching kids history is also "useful" in giving them cultural literacy and some semblance of a sense of proportion.

And yes, we all have a few practical skills.

I too have dealt with a blocked loo, and I can change tap valves, fuses and tyres (as well as my socks, opinions and, sometimes, a fifty dollar note).

It still seems noteworthy, however, that the demographic which has emerged from this thread is heavy on doctors, nurses, clergy, engineers, IT specialists, librarians teachers, social workers, public servants and psychologists.

Nobody seems to have done an apprenticeship and followed a career in carpentry or bricklaying, and nobody seems to be a business executive, or even a small business proprietor, and nobody seems to be a shop assistant.

This would appear to suggest that the Ship's demographic, for better or worse, does not conform to that of most Western societies.

No, but I'd be willing to bet it matches better the demographic of most Western churches.

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17938 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kaplan Corday
Shipmate
# 16119

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quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
No, but I'd be willing to bet it matches better the demographic of most Western churches.

Very unlikely, I would have thought.

The Ship’s demographic is atypical - more like that of a fairly homogeneous middle-class church, or a church in a university town.

In my church of about 300 members we have one or more doctors, lawyers, engineers, meteorologists, dentists, vets, teachers, IT people, pilots, psychologists, social workers and nurses.

However we also have one or more business owners, accountants, shop-keepers, technicians, policemen, tradespeople, cleaners, gardeners, drivers, heavy equipment operators and pensioners.

Two of the most glaring omissions are no-one in the armed services, and no-one full-time in the arts (music, painting, writing).

[ 26. April 2013, 09:48: Message edited by: Kaplan Corday ]

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orfeo

Ship's Musical Counterpoint
# 13878

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I think I learnt a great deal more about myself from the jobs that didn't fit me well than the ones that did fit. You tend to notice when a job is not suiting you.

I'm very thankful that I was able to use that information to reason my way towards jobs that were more suitable. And now find myself in a profession that fundamentally feels like it's a good fit. I enjoy what I'm doing - yes, okay, it has its crappy days but I enjoy the nature of the major tasks - I think I'm good at it and other people keep telling me I'm good at it as well.

I couldn't say that I'd planned to be there, but I'm very happy with where I've arrived and have no plans to move to any other field. It's already the longest job I've had.

--------------------
Technology has brought us all closer together. Turns out a lot of the people you meet as a result are complete idiots.

Posts: 18173 | From: Under | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
No, but I'd be willing to bet it matches better the demographic of most Western churches.

Very unlikely, I would have thought.

The Ship’s demographic is atypical - more like that of a fairly homogeneous middle-class church, or a church in a university town.

In my church of about 300 members we have one or more doctors, lawyers, engineers, meteorologists, dentists, vets, teachers, IT people, pilots, psychologists, social workers and nurses.

However we also have one or more business owners, accountants, shop-keepers, technicians, policemen, tradespeople, cleaners, gardeners, drivers, heavy equipment operators and pensioners.

Two of the most glaring omissions are no-one in the armed services, and no-one full-time in the arts (music, painting, writing).

That's why I said "better" and "most", because I knew someone would have a contradictory example.

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17938 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Heavenly Anarchist
Shipmate
# 13313

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
No, but I'd be willing to bet it matches better the demographic of most Western churches.

Very unlikely, I would have thought.

The Ship’s demographic is atypical - more like that of a fairly homogeneous middle-class church, or a church in a university town.

In my church of about 300 members we have one or more doctors, lawyers, engineers, meteorologists, dentists, vets, teachers, IT people, pilots, psychologists, social workers and nurses.

However we also have one or more business owners, accountants, shop-keepers, technicians, policemen, tradespeople, cleaners, gardeners, drivers, heavy equipment operators and pensioners.

Two of the most glaring omissions are no-one in the armed services, and no-one full-time in the arts (music, painting, writing).

That's an interesting point, being in Cambridge my large church does have more than it's fair share of academics, medics and scientists. But we do have tradespeople, gardeners and shop workers, though less so. We have several people who work in the arts as well; photographers, dancers, musicians and a clothing designer, though that may be influenced by being a chari church (where it is acceptable to dance in the aisle or bring forward a word in song and which has a monthly gallery of art by a featured church member).
I don't think there are any ex-military, though there was at St Helen's, including the rector. Location makes a lot of difference, St Helens, being in the City of London and with a professed outreach to the city, had loads of lawyers and accountants and office workers in general.
Given the ship's profile and it's emphasis on debate I'm not at all surprised by the demographics.

[ 26. April 2013, 10:33: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]

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'I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.' Douglas Adams
Dog Activity Monitor
My shop

Posts: 2831 | From: Trumpington | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Pomona
Shipmate
# 17175

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I'm sure to most Shippies I still count as a foetus, but when I was small(er) I wanted to be an archaeologist, a German teacher (!), a translator and a pub owner.

I didn't anticipate being at university and failing at it and still being single at 24, no. I also wanted to be living in London (sorry Karl, I love the country but no thanks to living there) and owning my own home [Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me]

On the other hand, I didn't anticipate the existence of Pointless so Current Me wins there.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

Posts: 5319 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2012  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

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quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
I also wanted to be living in London ... and owning my own home [Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me]

[/QB]

The latter ambition is relegated to [Killing me] status because of the first.

There's not just London and Countryside in the UK you know.

Like - erm - Northampton.

[ 26. April 2013, 12:24: Message edited by: Karl: Liberal Backslider ]

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Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17938 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pomona
Shipmate
# 17175

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Northamptonshire is pretty rural though - a lot of Northampton is made up of villages shoved together so on the outskirts there are still lots of little villages as well as the smaller towns elsewhere in the county.

I'm from Coventry so used to non-London cities but Coventry is just so grey. I love Yorkshire though so actually I could live in Leeds quite happily.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

Posts: 5319 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2012  |  IP: Logged
Pomona
Shipmate
# 17175

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(The most annoying place I have ever lived is Chichester - beautiful but so, so inconvenient and hideously expensive. Everyone wears Boden.)

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

Posts: 5319 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2012  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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The Where can be as unplanned as the What.

I was sure I didn't want to stay in Ireland. It wasn't just the being bombed and shot at, it was more that too much was known about you. Cohesive traditional social networks have their downside.

I might have been happy to stay in Wales, but there were limitations career wise if you didn't speak Welsh.

The London option came up - but that was just more City than I could cope with.

So Scotland it is. Edinburgh more by accident than design - but large enough to provide a range of employment, but not so large as to suffocate.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
BessLane
Shipmate
# 15176

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Nobody seems to have done an apprenticeship and followed a career in carpentry or bricklaying, and nobody seems to be a business executive, or even a small business proprietor, and nobody seems to be a shop assistant.
[/QB]

When I was very little, I would play at restaurant, making up little menus and serving my parents breakfast etc. I so badly wanted to be a waitress. Then when I was eight or nine, I remember going out to dinner with my grandparents and having to wait at the bar for our table to be available. I fell in love. Flash forward 30+ years and I now own my own bar. Everything else I've done in my life - college, seminary, pre-school work, service industry, accounting and theatre production - prepared me quite nicely for what I do now.

So, I guess my answer is yes, I am doing what I dreamed of doing as a small child (although the 8 year old me did not begin to imagine what a bunch of drunken farmboys can do to a restroom on a Saturday night [Eek!] )

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It's all on me and I won't tell it.
formerly BessHiggs

Posts: 1388 | From: Yorkville, TN | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
Evensong
Shipmate
# 14696

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Great to read everybody's stories. [Smile]

I think my youngest memory was wanting to be an engineer (tho I don't think I had the faintest idea what one was). Then vet came up cos I loved animals so much.

My friends in the early teens thought I would be a comedienne.

Had no idea what I wanted to do after leaving school so did a biological sciences degree because I was rather good at Biology. Swapped all over the place during the first year and a half of my degree (law, accounting, politics) then stopped when I had children. Returned to Uni for a bit to do Human Resource management when my youngest was about 4 but he didn't like childcare and it wasn't particularly grabbing me.

Started studying theology at age 26 and am still studying theology and loving it. [Yipee]

Currently training for ordained ministry and high school teaching but still not sure what I want to be when I grow up.

I'm 38 tho....and stressing...... I should have this sorted by now..... [Help]

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a theological scrapbook

Posts: 9481 | From: Australia | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged
Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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I wanted to stay in Creamtealand, which is what happened, not because of my own strength of will (as I grew older I'd have been prepared to travel) but because Mr. C. wouldn't live anywhere else. He's travelled and worked all over the world, but on Friday evenings he's almost always hopped back on the plane or the train to spend the weekend back in Pastyland. Consequently, he's hardly seen any of the places where he's worked, and I've seen more of them when taking a holiday to go out and visit him!

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

Posts: 34626 | From: Cream Tealand | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

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quote:
posted by Jade Constable
(The most annoying place I have ever lived is Chichester - beautiful but so, so inconvenient and hideously expensive. Everyone wears Boden.

Don't know about the Boden, but lots of Lands End, Rodan and Quiksilver...

Know the place well. Appalling traffic - railway gates always down. A27 around 2 sides supposed to act as a ring-road but clogged with lorries. Don't go near the place when there's anything on at Goodwood - the place sets solid.

Inside the city they have this curious arrangement that allows buses through but nothing else so front of Army & Navy is a de facto bus station...

Festival Theatre had some good shows but expensive.

If in that area and want somewhere quaint or appealing you're better off heading to Arundel.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4950 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

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Are you what you planned to be? NO

But then I know people who are and [Snore]

At the moment I'm busy trying to turn myself into super-organised (!) parent of uni student children who really can get to grips with the Probate system and other horrors. Churchwise, I'm trying hard to be patient with people who think wearing a cope means a PP is off to Rome on the next bus [Killing me]

Useful skills I've gained in life: well, I can play a complete Widor or Vierne symphonie, do percussion for an orchestra, play the 'Cello (badly), tap dance and sing at the same time, Plumb-in a dishwasher, put together a fitted kitchen, do simple bricklaying, drive a forklift, make a Croque en bouche, sew a wedding dress, bake bread, kill plants with just one look, use a chainsaw, and make jolly fine sloe gin. But not all at the same time. [Yipee]

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4950 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
I'm from Coventry so used to non-London cities but Coventry is just so grey. I love Yorkshire though so actually I could live in Leeds quite happily.

<tangent> Coventry is dire. Even on a sunny day. Try other parts of Warwickshire instead - Warwick or Stratford maybe. Stratford is where I'd go if I won the lottery. And there's always something going on in Birmingham. </tangent>
Posts: 25445 | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:


Nobody seems to have done an apprenticeship and followed a career in carpentry or bricklaying, and nobody seems to be a business executive, or even a small business proprietor, and nobody seems to be a shop assistant.
.

I have had a lot of jobs while being a church musician and between churches. For five years, I was a cashier at a hardware store. I also did construction clean up with my mom for a few years. (The stories I could tell you about construction workers.) I was a hot line cook at a restaurant at Disney World. And there was that short period of time that I cared for a quadriplegic young man. All to supplement my music habit! [Biased]

Fairly useful jobs, all. But not my passion by any means.

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 18017 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
geroff
Shipmate
# 3882

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Mainly yes.
I wanted to be an architect but you know school didn't quite work out right and then I went to work in a builders design office and by the time I was 20 I had worked out the architects didn't draw or design much but mainly did paperwork. And so here I am 30 years or so on, a senior technician in an architects office doing all the technical drawing (on a computer nowadays) and designing stuff most days and I get to talk about and see great architecture and stuff, so yeah I suppose its worked out OK.

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"The first principle in science is to invent something nice to look at and then decide what it can do." Rowland Emett 1906-1990

Posts: 1172 | From: Montgomeryshire, Wales | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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I'm in business. Never expected to be. I didn't expect politicians to destroy the middle class dream in the 1980s either (the British destroyer just recently died).

Before that, I got three degrees, just expected to get one, but they gave me a scholarship and then I was awarded a 4 year fellowship so I got a third one.

During that, got married. Did expect to do that, and have kids. It is actually the most important thing, to be married and to be a parent. Education and work seemed important at the time, particularly when money was tight. But they are certainly not in the longer term.

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Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety.
\_(ツ)_/

Posts: 11498 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Matt Black

Shipmate
# 2210

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Does anybody on the Ship work at anything useful - plumber, electrician, mechanic...?

IT Systems Engineer
Ah, but can you fix a blocked loo?

Seriously, no-one on the Ship appears to be a tradesperson or businessperson.

Is that your definition of "useful"?

As it happens, I can fix a blocked bog (I fitted our entire bathroom suite, I've added radiators, fitted new valves, etc.) but I'm not sure being able to fix and implement the sort of computer systems that we all depend on now is any less "useful" than plumbing or wiring a ring main.

You are quite right, of course, and I imagine I would miss doctors and nurses "that we all depend on now", also.

I even believe that teaching kids history is also "useful" in giving them cultural literacy and some semblance of a sense of proportion.

And yes, we all have a few practical skills.

I too have dealt with a blocked loo, and I can change tap valves, fuses and tyres (as well as my socks, opinions and, sometimes, a fifty dollar note).

It still seems noteworthy, however, that the demographic which has emerged from this thread is heavy on doctors, nurses, clergy, engineers, IT specialists, librarians teachers, social workers, public servants and psychologists.

Nobody seems to have done an apprenticeship and followed a career in carpentry or bricklaying, and nobody seems to be a business executive, or even a small business proprietor, and nobody seems to be a shop assistant.

This would appear to suggest that the Ship's demographic, for better or worse, does not conform to that of most Western societies.

I'm a small business proprietor

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"Protestant and Reformed, according to the Tradition of the ancient Catholic Church" - + John Cosin (1594-1672)

Posts: 14304 | From: Hampshire, UK | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Macrina
Shipmate
# 8807

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There is a photo of me when I was about 4-5 dressed up in a nurses outfit. I don't wear the uniform now but I am still a nurse and I think I pretty much always did want to do something caring related.

I never, ever, expected to end up working in Addictions, it was the only bit of mental health nursing that my Dad saw as a complete waste of time. But I really enjoy it and am never ever bored.

I also never saw myself living on the wrong* side of the Midlands but still finding that I could settle and be welcomed by a community of people who have taken me in.

*this is relative.

Posts: 535 | From: Christchurch, New Zealand | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Should we expect this to be typical of the population in general? I mean the ship is self selecting and I would imagine self selects on a number of specific elements. I suspect that the ship attracts
  • Christians (for all we say ITTWACW)
  • people who enjoy intellectual engagement (well debate does seem to draw many people to this site)
  • people who are fairly computer literate (we are happy to communicate through the internet)
  • people who are better off (access to computers/internet costs money)

The jobs we do will also be related to some of these sort of factors.

Jengie

--------------------
"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sandemaniac
Shipmate
# 12829

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
<tangent> Coventry is dire. </tangent>

Ask the locals.

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

Posts: 3574 | From: The wardrobe of my soul | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged
kingsfold

Shipmate
# 1726

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Are you what you planned to be?

God, no. Not in the least.

First off, I wanted to be an archaeologist. I can't remember why or at what point this hit the buffers but... probably when I went to secondary school and history in the first couple of years or so was dull.

Anyhow, my next grand plan was to speak multiple languages and to either a) join the diplomatic service or b) join the UN as a translator.

[tangent]we do seem to have had a large number of nascent translators or archaeologists..[/tangent]

Anyhow, the whole languages thing sort of stalled during English Lit O-level and my frustration at having to say the same thing several times to make the point (say it, quote it, refer to text - what's the point? I said it first time), and languages at A level were to a large degree lit based... Also I got kind of interested in chemistry.

Even so, I then fondly imagined I would go into drug development and run a laboratory/drug discovery team (Well, after first thinking I'd be an analytical chemist: work experience in this field was somehow simultaneouly interesting and deadly repetitive). So I ended up working in radioactive chemistry for medical imaging, by way of industry, academia and now the NHS. Even with a chemistry degree, I didn't know such things existed...

Fortunately however, I seem to have wound up doing something that actually suits me very well and I can't quite imagine what I would do if I didn't do this. Whilst I still enjoy different languages and the challenge of the way they're put together etc, and would love to be able to speak several fluently, it's entirely fair to say (with the benefit of hindsight) that the life of a diplomat or a translator, forever on the move, would probably have been really bad for me.

[ 26. April 2013, 22:43: Message edited by: kingsfold ]

--------------------
I came to Jesus and I found in him my star, my sun.
And in that light of life I'll walk 'til travelling days are done


Posts: 4473 | From: land of the wee midgie | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Timothy the Obscure

Mostly Friendly
# 292

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quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
No, but I'd be willing to bet it matches better the demographic of most Western churches.

Very unlikely, I would have thought.

The Ship’s demographic is atypical - more like that of a fairly homogeneous middle-class church, or a church in a university town.

In my church of about 300 members we have one or more doctors, lawyers, engineers, meteorologists, dentists, vets, teachers, IT people, pilots, psychologists, social workers and nurses.

However we also have one or more business owners, accountants, shop-keepers, technicians, policemen, tradespeople, cleaners, gardeners, drivers, heavy equipment operators and pensioners.

Two of the most glaring omissions are no-one in the armed services, and no-one full-time in the arts (music, painting, writing).

We are an over-educated bunch. We have had a couple of ex-military shipmates I recall, and we have a few people who seem to make some kind of living writing, though they haven't shown up on this thread. It's a self-selected sample, with all the attendant biases.

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When you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion.
  - C. P. Snow

Posts: 6114 | From: PDX | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
MSHB
Shipmate
# 9228

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Never really had a driving passion to be one thing. I liked learning, so perpetual student was a career I pursued for quite a while. In primary school one thought was the armed forces. During high school I toyed with ideas like astrophysicist and (after conversion) minister. I specifically remember rejecting teacher and librarian as careers (e.g. I had seen how we students treated teachers and knew I wouldn't cope). I ended up choosing to do a degree in social work, but had to give that up part way through when I kept failing the professional subjects (it is difficult being a social worker when you cannot "read" other people and have an undiagnosed social communication disorder). Still the aborted social work, now Arts, degree gave me a grounding in social sciences, which I enjoyed.

Armed with a generic Arts degree majoring in random social sciences, I drifted into public sector office work, where I came across those new-fangled micro computer thingies which I really liked, and eventually ended up in IT - which didn't exist in anything like its current form when I were a lad. Now I run several websites that have a national and even international reputation in their narrow field, and I supervise several junior programmers/IT staff.

For many decades I continued to wonder what I would eventually be when I grew up, but - as I never really grew up - that has just morphed (in my middle fifties) into wondering what I will do with my gradual transition to retirement. Currently I am exploring a bit of voluntary work while continuing my IT career 4 days a week: I am teaching a bright young teenager with special education needs how to program computer games. He has a similar diagnosis to mine. So far that has been fun, and I have to teach myself new skills in order to show him the next logical step in making games.

So I am living out my current ideals and plans (a bit) to continue using my IT skills while doing something within the community of people with similar psychological conditions to mine. And in any case, I would much rather watch my life unfold bit by bit than have a fixed plan - I just can't do it that other way.

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MSHB: Member of the Shire Hobbit Brigade

Posts: 1522 | From: Dharawal Country | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
M.
Ship's Spare Part
# 3291

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Although I am a lawyer, as I wanted to be for a long time (see post up thread), this was my own desire. The only careers advice we had at school was one session in the 5th form (age 16), and my session fell on the day there was a trip to see a play (can't remember which, Macbeth probably), so I was kept back, much to my chagrin. The careers adviser asked whether I had thought about a career and when I said 'lawyer', suggested social work.

It turned out she suggested social work to everyone.

However, it never occurred to me that I was supposed to take the careers advice seriously, (any more than it occurred to me that I was supposed to take sermons seriously), so no harm done. Except that I missed out on Macbeth.

M.

Posts: 2303 | From: Lurking in Surrey | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Evensong
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# 14696

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quote:
Originally posted by MSHB:
I liked learning, so perpetual student was a career I pursued for quite a while.

If I didn't have to earn money, I think perpetual studenthood would be my ideal. [Angel]

Did you know the Queen of Denmark has five degrees?

My idol. [Big Grin]

--------------------
a theological scrapbook

Posts: 9481 | From: Australia | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged
Scots lass
Shipmate
# 2699

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I wanted to be lots of things, but never anything enough to put all my efforts into it. When I got to careers advice in my last year of school the adviser basically said "oh, you're going to university, they have good careers advice there" and left me to it. I then spent 4 years still not knowing what I was going to do when I left, and the careers advice didn't help much. Several temp jobs later (including some I would happily have done permanently) and I found a career possibility, did a masters and became an archivist.

I love a lot about my job, but it's not one I would ever have thought about when I was little! From the sound of it, it's the kind of job a lot of people would love on this thread. You get to do bits of research, there's lots of history involved, there's a lot less of the crowd control you get in libraries and every so often you spend a whole day carrying boxes around. I'm actually kind of surprised I seem to be the only archivist on board!

Posts: 863 | From: the diaspora | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Desert Daughter
Shipmate
# 13635

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quote:
Originally posted by Evensong:
If I didn't have to earn money, I think perpetual studenthood would be my ideal. [Angel]

Did you know the Queen of Denmark has five degrees?

My idol. [Big Grin]

Same here. [Big Grin] Oh, why can't they give me, say, 5000 Euros a month and just leave me alone with my books?

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"Prayer is the rejection of concepts." (Evagrius Ponticus)

Posts: 733 | Registered: Apr 2008  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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quote:
Originally posted by Evensong:
quote:
Originally posted by MSHB:
I liked learning, so perpetual student was a career I pursued for quite a while.

If I didn't have to earn money, I think perpetual studenthood would be my ideal. [Angel]

Did you know the Queen of Denmark has five degrees?

My idol. [Big Grin]

Hmm,

Perhaps not, although give me a decade or so and an interest in another direction and maybe.

But I do have to earn my keep as well and raise the money to pay the tuition fees (well for the last two anyway).

Jengie

--------------------
"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Heavenly Anarchist
Shipmate
# 13313

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quote:
Originally posted by Evensong:
quote:
Originally posted by MSHB:
I liked learning, so perpetual student was a career I pursued for quite a while.

If I didn't have to earn money, I think perpetual studenthood would be my ideal. [Angel]

Did you know the Queen of Denmark has five degrees?

My idol. [Big Grin]

I've been studying part time whilst working for most of the last 20 years, for 6 years I was working full time as a nurse whilst also studying for a degree. Now I have my ideal situation, as the OU pays me as an associate lecturer for a few hours work a week and lets me study with them for free [Smile] the history degree I'm doing at the moment is purely a hobby and to feed my addiction to study.

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'I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.' Douglas Adams
Dog Activity Monitor
My shop

Posts: 2831 | From: Trumpington | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Zacchaeus
Shipmate
# 14454

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quote:
Originally posted by M.:
Although I am a lawyer, as I wanted to be for a long time (see post up thread), this was my own desire. The only careers advice we had at school was one session in the 5th form (age 16), and my session fell on the day there was a trip to see a play (can't remember which, Macbeth probably), so I was kept back, much to my chagrin. The careers adviser asked whether I had thought about a career and when I said 'lawyer', suggested social work.

It turned out she suggested social work to everyone.

However, it never occurred to me that I was supposed to take the careers advice seriously, (any more than it occurred to me that I was supposed to take sermons seriously), so no harm done. Except that I missed out on Macbeth.

M.

I had one session with a carears advisor when I was leaving uni. He suggested accountancy
[Eek!] I have an absolute inabilty to read a balance sheet.

It turned out he suggested accountancy to everybody.

Posts: 1905 | From: the back of beyond | Registered: Jan 2009  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Desert Daughter:
quote:
Originally posted by Evensong:
If I didn't have to earn money, I think perpetual studenthood would be my ideal. [Angel]

Did you know the Queen of Denmark has five degrees?

My idol. [Big Grin]

Same here. [Big Grin] Oh, why can't they give me, say, 5000 Euros a month and just leave me alone with my books?
Many years ago there was a student at the University of Virginia who had an MD, a law degree, and several PhD's. He was working on still more PhD's.

Someone's will had left him an income which would cease as soon as he had completed his education. He resolved never to complete it.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged



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