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Source: (consider it) Thread: New Leader for British Baptists
Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by Polly:
The point about being a 'Covenant Community' is for me the most important part (acknowledging this is not unique to Baptists) of being Baptist.

...

But my lament is that we have lost what this means and perhaps if we re-captured the essence of what this means things may be different?

I'd also like to make one small change in your statement. I like Nigel Wright's suggestion that we are to be a 'gathering people rather than a gathered people'.

Fair enough. I was on the committee that redid the Draft Church Constitution about 10 years ago and we tried to adopt similar wording with "Church Meetings" - i.e. implying the "gathering together to seek Christ's mind" rather than just static "things". But it wasn't easy unless we used language like "the Church meeting together in Church Meeting" which is rather cumbersome!

I think it is also true that we need to make a distinction between "gathering together" (in faith, for worship and service) and being "gathered from" the world (i.e. huddling together like cold penguins and turning our backs on that big nasty world around us).

When Myra Blyth was Deputy General Secretary she was great at promoting both the Five Core Values and the notion of Covenanting and I think we became poorer when she left that post (ergo when it was reorganised out of existence).

[ 13. May 2013, 13:32: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]

Posts: 9750 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
ExclamationMark
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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
[QUOTE] I was on the committee that redid the Draft Church Constitution about 10 years ago

Trainfan - your sins must have been legion for you to have drawn that straw.
Posts: 3845 | From: A new Jerusalem | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged
SvitlanaV2
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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by SvitlanaV2:
I think the Baptist Church has largely retreated from public consciousness, but this has been the fate of most Nonconformist churches. It's not a uniquely Baptist problem.

This is why the Baptists, Methodists and URC formed the Joint Public Issues Team - which recently made headline news with its stance on poverty and attitudes to it. It has also some good work on the ethics of Drones but that has not attracted the same attention.

Have you noticed, by the way, that Nonconformist ministers never feature in TV dramas unless they are raving fundamentalists? (There was a Methodist in "The Village" but they portrayed him more as a High Church Anglican).

Yes, Nonconformist ministers (or laity) almost never appear in popular contermporary culture, although I believe there was a Methodist minister on 'The Island Parish' a few years ago.

I hadn't heard of the Joint Public Issues Team. It's obviously time I started reading 'The Methodist Recorder' again! Nevertheless, I think the numbers and the awareness have declined so much that it would be hard to claim that a distinctively 'Nonconformist voice' , even a joint one, was backed up by a powerful constituency. Such a voice would have to align itself with Anglican or secular voices on issues such as poverty, in order for anyone to pay serious attention. Nowadays, it seems that the CofE has to pave the way on these social matters; the others follow.

Secondly, the distinctions between these churches and the rag-tag catch-all that is the CofE now seem very blurred. Despite the idiosyncrasies and very different institutional structures, the URC and the Methodists would appear to fit in at the MOTR and/or liberal end of the CofE, and the Baptists the MOTR and/or evangelical end. (This is not to discount the importance of the more liberal Baptists on these messageboards!). To some outsiders they must all seem like paler versions of the CofE - but with uglier churches! Perhaps it's less confusing for a secular society (and ill-informed media) simply to turn to the CofE if it wants moral leadership.

This isn't to say that a Baptist leader can't offer 'another way', as Polly it. Out of the Baptists, Methodists and the URC, the Baptists have the best hope of success, in my opinion.

Posts: 6668 | From: UK | Registered: Feb 2012  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by ExclamationMark:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
I was on the committee that redid the Draft Church Constitution about 10 years ago

Trainfan - your sins must have been legion for you to have drawn that straw.
Yes, but they have been forgiven.
Posts: 9750 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
ExclamationMark
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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by ExclamationMark:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
I was on the committee that redid the Draft Church Constitution about 10 years ago

Trainfan - your sins must have been legion for you to have drawn that straw.
Yes, but they have been forgiven.
Amen! Hallelujah (assorted revival-style shouting follows).
Posts: 3845 | From: A new Jerusalem | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged
Enoch
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Before I forget, could I say thank you to all those Baptists who responded to my question about the different options of what being a Baptist is all about.

--------------------
Brexit wrexit - Sir Graham Watson

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Ondergard
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My wife and I had lunch today with our local Baptist and Anglican colleagues, and funnily enough he was telling us that the first female Baptist minister in the country was ordained in 1921 in his chapel, little old Pisgah in Cresselly. Her name was Lodwick, I think he said.

She was called by the elders because she had been street preaching, with the local Baptist minister's permission, and her preaching had borne fruit with several people making a decision for Christ and pitching up at Pisgah Baptist Chapel: a year later, the incumbent Baptist dropped dead, and the elders decided they could do no more than call ?? Lodwick (?) since it was clear God had spoken powerfully through her preaching.

She was minister there for a few years, and then gave up ministry when she contracted breast cancer, although she returned to preaching a few years later.

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hatless

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Violet Hedger was trained at the Oxford college (called Regent's Park - it started out in London!) and sought settlement in 1924, finally being called to Littleover, Derby, in 1926. There were a few others who entered ministry by various routes, including Edith Gates who was recognised as a probationer in 1918, but I believe Violet Hedger was the first to go to college and settle in the 'usual way.'

--------------------
My crazy theology in novel form

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