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Source: (consider it) Thread: What's in a pub name?
Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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Oxford also has a Wetherspoons named for a lad who grew up and began his career locally. It's called the Four Candles.

Saffron Walden's Wetherspoons is the Temeraire, after the mount of local lad made good Admiral Sir Eliab Harvey.

Adrian

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blackbeard
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On the topic of Wetherspoons ...
not often that one gets a pub named after a woman (other than royalty), after a civil servant, an engineer or a motorbike racer.

Our latest local Wetherspoons is named the "Tilly Shilling", who was all these things and a local character.

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Sandemaniac
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If it's the Miss Shilling I think, she also had a famous orifice - is that so?

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

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Spike

Mostly Harmless
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quote:
Originally posted by TonyK:
I would like to offer Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem.

It claims to be the oldest pub in England (any challengers?) and is an intriguing place with some bars partially in caves in the cliff.

I've been there! With the bars dug into the caves, it's necessary to put a beer mat over your pint when not actually drinking it to stop the debris from the rock falling into it.

Another place that claims to be the oldest pub in England is the Coopers Arms in Rochester.

[ 14. October 2013, 14:05: Message edited by: Spike ]

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ArachnidinElmet
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I have a vague recollection of a Wig and Pistle in Norwich. Suspect the area may be a rich seam of interesting pub names.

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blackbeard
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# 10848

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quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
If it's the Miss Shilling I think, she also had a famous orifice - is that so?

AG

Indeed so. It limited the fuel flow in a Merlin engine, permitting our aircraft to perform negative-g manoeuvres, thus enabling them to engage German aircraft effectively
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Meerkat

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May I be permitted to ass some to the list?

The Volunteer Rifleman's Arms in Bath
The Salamander in Bath
The Skyrack in Headingley, Leeds

I cannot guarantee that they still exist, but they were well-visited by me....... as was 'The Haunch' in Salisbury, the City being my place of birth. I went back there only about six weeks ago and the pub was still as I remember it from the previous visit.

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Heavenly Anarchist
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We've lost several pubs here in Trumpington in the last decade, all with good old-fashioned names. The Coach and Horses, a seventeenth century coaching inn (I'm guessing Trumpington was the last stop before Cambridge on the coach route from London), is now the very busy Wok and Grill and The Volunteer (our village name gives away a history as an old camp ground) is a little visited Indian restaurant which has changed hands several times. We still have 3 pubs though, The Green Man is the more upmarket one and gets the professionals and foodies, The Tally Ho is a locals pub and The Unicorn has annoyingly rebranded itself as The Lord Byron in an attempt to get some tourist trade from Byron's Pool - the locals now refer to it as the Unibyron.

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tessaB
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Our local in our holiday place is the Bell . Not terribly interesting but we've been told that pubs with bell or bells in their name were called after the number of bells in the local church. So a small village with a small church might have a Bell Inn, whereas a large town with a church with a big tower might have the Eight Bells.

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tessaB
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Pre-cambrian
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There are a number of pubs (and used to be more) in Grantham with Blue in the name: Blue Pig, Blue Man, Blue Bull. Blue used to be the colour of the local Liberal Party and the pubs date back to the time when drink was used to encourage the voters (or the hecklers).

There was also a Blue Nag which an ex-Shippie commented must have referred to Margaret Thatcher.

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ken
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
The Bear and Ragged Staff in Crayford transmogrified into the Orange Kipper, losing its lovely wrought iron sign. The manager off-handedly suggested it had gone into the skip. But it got its name, and the sign, back. (I have never known what the connection with the earldom of Warwick was.)

The usual story, probably entirely made up by some late Victorian journalist, is that pubs would be named after famous generals and admirals (or their badges) by old soldiers retiring to a peaceful life with their variously-gotten gains. And they would tend to be around port towns, or on the roads to the Channel ports, because that's where said soldiers would find themselves when shipped back to Blighty - or perhaps that's where they would want to set up shop to get trade from the next genertion of sailors and soldiers. Hence all those Marquises of Granby from the 18th century and Lord Nelsons from thr 19th - and Bears and Ragged Staffs from the 15th.

Well, its a nice story. I have no idea if there is any evidence.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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ken
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And a bit further into London - I've known of only five pubs called "The Tiger's Head", and all of them are in the bit of suburban south-east London that used to be the north-west end fo Kent. Two in Bromley (one now closed), two in Lee (facing each other over a street. known as the Old Tiger's Head, and the New Tiger's Head) and one in Catford (now closed, demolished, and turned into flats)

Anyone know if thre are any anywhere else? Or if the name has any special connection with SE London or North Kent?

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Penny S
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The Blackboys Inn at - er - Blackboys in Sussex does not claim descent from Charles II. The current etymology put forward by Harveys is that it was named for the charcoal burners associated with the iron industry who used to drink there. My mother lived in the village in her youth and had not heard that one. It is definitely older than the Stuarts, though, as a Richard de Blakeboys is recorded in the 14th century. I've seen, but simply cannot find, a derivation from the French for wood, which I think my mother had found during research when she was at college.
(ken, do you have access to the Victoria County History for Sussex?)

[ 14. October 2013, 17:51: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Morlader
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The Bucket of Blood, Hayle, Cornwall is said to be the only pub in England* with that name, officially. There are other pubs with that nickname because of bare-knuckle fights which took place in them.

TBoB got its name because of a story about the landlord drawing a BoB from the well because a corpse had been dumped there. But I suspect it may be a corruption of a Cornish name, long forgotten.

*Cornwall is not really England, of course, but joins it at the Tamar (tangentially, one might say).

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Albertus
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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
And a bit further into London - I've known of only five pubs called "The Tiger's Head", and all of them are in the bit of suburban south-east London that used to be the north-west end fo Kent. Two in Bromley (one now closed), two in Lee (facing each other over a street. known as the Old Tiger's Head, and the New Tiger's Head) and one in Catford (now closed, demolished, and turned into flats)

Anyone know if thre are any anywhere else? Or if the name has any special connection with SE London or North Kent?

Interesting. Didn't one of them- possibly the Catford one- change its name for a time after a shooting in, I suppose, the 60s or early 70s? Possibly to the Governor-General, or that may be another pub altogether.
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Bene Gesserit
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In Leicester, near the railway station, there's a pub called The Last Plantagenet.

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ken
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:

(ken, do you have access to the Victoria County History for Sussex?)

Might be a copy in the college library - but their online index doesn't have any hits for Framfield or Uckfield so it might be they haven't got to that part yet.

quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
Interesting. Didn't one of them- possibly the Catford one- change its name for a time after a shooting in, I suppose, the 60s or early 70s? Possibly to the Governor-General, or that may be another pub altogether.

There was a Governor-General pub in Downham which was closed by the police in the 1990s. I went there a few times but I don;t know if had a previous name. The one I was thinking of was at the bottom opf the hill near the pool on the Ravesnbourne where the big Sainsbury's Homebase is now. Cornr of Southend Lane and Bromley Road, near Bellingham and beckenham Hill stations. It was a (huge) modern building built on the site of an older pub. Also had a bit of a reputation for nasty goings-on. I know an ex-landlord of it.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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betjemaniac
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In my RN. Days I was an habitué of the wonderfully named Still and West of England Inn. Other good Pompey names were The Ship Leopard and The Spice Island.

Kidderminster has The King and Castle, but only those in the know would appreciate this is after the two classes of locomotives of those names built by the Great Western Railway.

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balaam

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We have T'Old Steam Pig in Huddersfield, the name celebrates old woolen mill machinery. Going further back, and celebrating the Luddite heritage of the town, is the Croppers Arms.

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Pomona
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Isn't the bear with a ragged staff the county symbol for Warwickshire?

Blackbeard, I used to live in Farnborough (attended the Church of the Good Shepherd) so know the Tilly Shilling well.

In Eastbourne there is a pub called The Lamb Inn which dates from 1180 - the sign is the haloed lamb with flag. The church next door is almost as old, and used to have a tunnel connecting it to the pub.

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betjemaniac
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# 17618

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quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Isn't the bear with a ragged staff the county symbol for Warwickshire?

.

Yes, which was the badge of Warwick the Kingmaker - hence why there are so many of them around in middle England where his levees came from. It is also worn today by Warwickshire County Cricket Club (spit).

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St. Stephen the Stoned
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In Bristol there's a pub called The Bear and Rugged Staff, which always annoyed me. As did some of the customers.

[ 15. October 2013, 07:48: Message edited by: St. Stephen the Stoned ]

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Penny S
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The New Tiger's Head at Lee is now defunct, but has seemed to have some odd occupants - not your usual squatters, more Eastern European, and families. Only saw them once, though. I usually try to avoid that route because the traffic is vile at that junction.

The Rose of Lee has transmogrified into The Dirty South.

The Paxton at the bottom of the hill below the Crystal Palace mast spent a bit of time as something gothic and painted black (Dungeon? Crypt?) but now celebrates Paxton again.

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Penny S
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# 14768

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I found this on the Lee Tigers' Heads - no real history of the origin of the big cat association.

Look down the Page

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Penny S
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Here's the Catford one.

The dead cat, now demolished.

The Bromley, Mason's Hill, one was first mentioned in 1706.

There's one in Mildenhall, Suffolk. First publican recorded in 1830.

Here's one in Chiselhurst - apparently the tiger's head was the crest of the Walsinghams, who owned a lot of the area. The site has been an inn since the 15th century. Interestingly, it shares with the Lee inns an association with out of town gaming.

Chiselhurst's tiger - watch out for pop ups

There's one in Norley, Cheshire.

So, the South London scatter seems related to the Walsingham estates - I can't find any such connection for Cheshire and Suffolk.

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hanginginthere
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What would The Cricketers (in North Finchley, London) score in pub cricket?

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Marvin the Martian

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quote:
Originally posted by Meerkat:
The Skyrack in Headingley, Leeds

I cannot guarantee that they still exist,

The Rack is still there, or was as of last year. It was a favourite haunt of mine back in my student days [Big Grin] .

We don't have too many weird and wonderful pub names round here, but The Old Contemptibles is a fairly uncommon name. The Old Joint Stock is appropriately named, as it's in a former bank. And I've always liked the rustic charm implied in The Old House At Home.

There's some Civil War history in the area, as seen in pubs like The Fairfax and The Camp (near where the said parliamentarian general's army stayed during the brief siege of a local royalist fortification).

But my favourite, sadly now gone the way of so many other pubs, was The Jolly Fitter. It was one of the drinking houses of choice for workers at the Austin car factory (now also sadly departed), hence the name.

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betjemaniac
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quote:
Originally posted by Marvin the Martian:
quote:
Originally posted by Meerkat:
The Skyrack in Headingley, Leeds

I cannot guarantee that they still exist,

The Rack is still there, or was as of last year. It was a favourite haunt of mine back in my student days [Big Grin] .

We don't have too many weird and wonderful pub names round here, but The Old Contemptibles is a fairly uncommon name. The Old Joint Stock is appropriately named, as it's in a former bank. And I've always liked the rustic charm implied in The Old House At Home.

There's some Civil War history in the area, as seen in pubs like The Fairfax and The Camp (near where the said parliamentarian general's army stayed during the brief siege of a local royalist fortification).

But my favourite, sadly now gone the way of so many other pubs, was The Jolly Fitter. It was one of the drinking houses of choice for workers at the Austin car factory (now also sadly departed), hence the name.

The Old Contemptibles and the Old Joint Stock are both old haunts of mine from 6th form days (and, indeed, 14 years later, Christmas reunion drinking) - as is the equally left-field named Tap & Spile. The OC in particular is a lovely pub, dripping with history (and purveyor of excellent pies). We also used to frequent the Gun Barrels (after Birmingham's gunmaking heritage) but only because it was the closest pub to school, not because it was in anyway good....

The Old House At Home sounds rustic, but then you realise it's in Blakedown and the illusion rather crumbles. Still, it's a better pub than the Swan I suppose.

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by hanginginthere:
What would The Cricketers (in North Finchley, London) score in pub cricket?

I expect it would score 22 for eleven players, although if the sign showed a game in play I'm sure someone would claim 26, to include the batsmen.

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Dal Segno

al Fine
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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by hanginginthere:
What would The Cricketers (in North Finchley, London) score in pub cricket?

I expect it would score 22 for eleven players, although if the sign showed a game in play I'm sure someone would claim 26, to include the batsmen.
The Cricketers scores 4 points. If the number is not specified, then you assume two of the thing. So Horse and Hounds is 12 points, 4 for the horse and 2x4 for the hounds. Coach and Horses is 8 points, Fox and Hounds is 12 points, The Swan is 2 points, The Swans is 4 points, The Seven Swans is 14 points.

The Cricket Team, however, is 22 points.

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Marvin the Martian

Interplanetary
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quote:
Originally posted by betjemaniac:
as is the equally left-field named Tap & Spile.

I thought of mentioning that, but it's not that left field - a tap is a device used to get beer out of a cask, and a spile is a device used to control the flow of air into a cask.

quote:
We also used to frequent the Gun Barrels (after Birmingham's gunmaking heritage) but only because it was the closest pub to school, not because it was in anyway good...
If you mean the one in Selly Oak, that's gone now as well [Frown] .

quote:
The Old House At Home sounds rustic, but then you realise it's in Blakedown and the illusion rather crumbles. Still, it's a better pub than the Swan I suppose.
I was thinking of the one between Harborne and Bearwood, but the same comment applies in either case!

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Sighthound
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The Q Inn is a very strange name (Stalybridge).

Personally, I'm always surprised at how many White Harts there are, given that Richard II (whose badge it was) was deposed in 1399 and is commonly supposed to have been unpopular. Perhaps his Cheshire Archers all went off and opened pubs.

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Penny S
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# 14768

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quote:
Originally posted by Sighthound:
The Q Inn is a very strange name (Stalybridge).

Personally, I'm always surprised at how many White Harts there are, given that Richard II (whose badge it was) was deposed in 1399 and is commonly supposed to have been unpopular. Perhaps his Cheshire Archers all went off and opened pubs.

I suppose it might be pertinent to ask who he was unpopular with.

There's an odd thing about King John who "was not a good man, who had his little ways" (A A Milne). When the French invaded, with the support of the barons for the Dauphin to usurp the throne, he called out the tradition armed bands of the common people (the old Saxon fyrd). He had no means to enforce this. But they came. And fought. And defeated the French for him. And, further, when the Pope imposed interdict on the whole nation to bring the possibly atheist John to heel over the choice of ABC, the populace, expected to rise in outcry about being denied the sacraments, and burial in consecrated ground, did nothing of the sort and went calmly on doing whatever they did. So who was John unpopular with?

Perhaps the same applied with Richard. After all, if he had not been popular, inns suggesting support would not have done good business, whoever set them up. I imagine they would not have been popular with Henry IV, though.

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Earwig

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We've got some goo pub names in York, as you might expect.

The Hansom Cab is so named because the cab's inventor, Joseph Hansom was born in York.

When the York Brewery opened its first three pubs, they all had names that riffed around the theme of hanging.

The Three Legged Mare is the stool you stood on before it was kicked out from under you, The Last Drop Inn refers to the drop that killed you, and The Rook and Gaskill refers to the last two men hanged in York.

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L'organist
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I'm not sure if its still there - it was in 2010 - but there's a pub in Pembroke called The Cross Saws Inn. I've never encountered another of the name, have you?

It served a decent pint and standard ham roll on a hot summer day.

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birdie

fowl
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Naming new pubs can be contentious too. There's a pub in town which opened last year, and was initially going to be called The Sanderling, which is a seabird which we don't have around here [Roll Eyes] .

However the brewery saw sense and the pub is called The Starling Cloud, in reference to the starlings which roost on the pier.

I think it's a lovely name, although it's a shame it's in English rather than Welsh.

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"Gentlemen, I wash my hands of this weirdness."
Captain Jack Sparrow

Posts: 1290 | From: the edge | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged



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