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Source: (consider it) Thread: What were they thinking?! - Food disasters..
LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

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quote:
Ariel: Yes, the canteen cook I mentioned in a previous post used to get the chips cooked by 8 am. They were set aside in a tray to cool, then heated up in hot oil for lunchtime. If you came in late to lunch, around closing time, he’d obligingly re-heat the re-heated chips in some more hot oil for you.
Or in the same oil?

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I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

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Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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On this very day, Monday 13th January 2014, our office restaurant has "Sauteed Pork Coq au Vin" on the menu.

Our restaurant manager must be using this thread for inspiration.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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Am confused by the name "salad" for these vegetables and other stuff in various jellies. There are traditional names for such things - galantines, terrines, (in Britain those words don't neccessarily imply meat as I think they might do in carnivorous France) aspics and so on. But what on earth have they got to do with salad?

The word salad implies a dish of lots of bits of (usually) uncooked food. These are solid lumps (well, wobbly lumps) of cooked food. How is that a "salad"? You might was well call a Christmas cake a salad. It's made of lots of bits of fruit embedded in some sort of matrix. Or call pâté salad. Or soufflé.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
... When she arrived at 8AM, her first task was to put the cabbage on to boil for lunch.
Moo

The head cook at the refectory of the college where I used to work did that with the pasta. [Eek!] When she was off work for six weeks having surgery, the refectory takings shot up ...

re: tomato jelly/aspic - there's someone who always brings a tomato jelly to Cathedral pot-lucks, and it's absolutely delicious.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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georgiaboy
Shipmate
# 11294

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The quite-nice-actually restaurant where we almost every day have breakfast after mass had a special omelette today which had a filling of cheddar cheese and tomato 'pudding.' There are no words appropriate to Heaven to describe this mess.
Turns out that tomato pudding was tomatoes stewed with bread cubes and sugar (and God knows what else). It looked dreadful (sort of like leftovers from surgery) and tasted much, much worse. I took two bites and sent it back to the kitchen.

In ref to the link in the OP, I can report that in my younger days I had most all of those dishes (except the one with Spam), at least once and survived to a healthy old age. (I rather fancy that erotic banana candle!) [Big Grin]

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You can't retire from a calling.

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Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
# 2522

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quote:
Originally posted by Cottontail:
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Basically, blanche 4 cabbage leaves; boil 4 whole peeled parsnips, cook the chopped onion, chopped red pepper, lemon juice and maple syrup in butter, add the mashed bananas. Cut the parsnips to resemble legs ( [Paranoid] ), place the 4 parsnips on the 4 cabbage leaves, spoon the banana-ey mixture between the parted parsnip "legs" ( [Paranoid] ), serve to the people whose idea of Valentines Day is getting together as a foursome to experience erotic parsnips.

I just thought of an improvement to that recipe. It involved not mashing the banana, but perhaps adapting the idea of the banana candle.

I am filled with self-loathing now and am off to scrub my brain with carbolic soap.

We need to hang. [Big Grin]

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I cannot expect people to believe “
Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
Kelly Alves, somewhere around 2003.

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Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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If you don't hang together you will assuredly hang separately. [Devil]

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
The word salad implies a dish of lots of bits of (usually) uncooked food. These are solid lumps (well, wobbly lumps) of cooked food. How is that a "salad"? You might was well call a Christmas cake a salad. It's made of lots of bits of fruit embedded in some sort of matrix. Or call pâté salad. Or soufflé.

It seems you've missed out on potato salad, pasta salad, tuna salad, ham salad, egg salad, salat Oliver, salade Niçoise, Waldorf fruit salad, Watergate salad, funeral salad, rice salads, and pretty much everything listed as a "composed salad" in The Way to Cook. Also, perhaps less unfortunately, the majority of what's been given that name during mid-century fancy dinners. I've always thought it was the composition that made a salad, not the raw-ness—and the common parlance is to refer to those molded things as "molded salads" or "Jello salads." I think the Jello is thought of as something covering the salad, something adding elegance, as much as an integral ingredient to the salad itself.

[ 14. January 2014, 03:55: Message edited by: Ariston ]

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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Gee D
Shipmate
# 13815

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Am confused by the name "salad" for these vegetables and other stuff in various jellies. There are traditional names for such things - galantines, terrines, (in Britain those words don't neccessarily imply meat as I think they might do in carnivorous France) aspics and so on. But what on earth have they got to do with salad?

The word salad implies a dish of lots of bits of (usually) uncooked food. These are solid lumps (well, wobbly lumps) of cooked food. How is that a "salad"? You might was well call a Christmas cake a salad. It's made of lots of bits of fruit embedded in some sort of matrix. Or call pâté salad. Or soufflé.

Alan Bennet's definition of an English salad is a sardine lurking under a lettuce leaf.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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Bit all those other salads you mention are bits, mostly uncooked, with maybe some sort of dressing. Not a block of jelly or paste you could slice with a knife.

And anyway, those jelly things have perfectly good names that have been in use for centuries. Why take a name from some other food in the first place?

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Ariston
Insane Unicorn
# 10894

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Bit all those other salads you mention are bits, mostly uncooked, with maybe some sort of dressing. Not a block of jelly or paste you could slice with a knife.

And anyway, those jelly things have perfectly good names that have been in use for centuries. Why take a name from some other food in the first place?

There's a name for people who eat uncooked ham or egg salad: "dead from food poisoning." I'd imagine uncooked rice salad would break teeth, and all those with potatoes or mayonnaise would really benefit from a good bit of heat—to say nothing of the fruit salads, which mostly involved canned fruits and cooked confectionary.

If it helps you any, just think of the gelatin as a substitute for really thick mayonnaise holding together everything else.

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“Therefore, let it be explained that nowhere are the proprieties quite so strictly enforced as in men’s colleges that invite young women guests, especially over-night visitors in the fraternity houses.” Emily Post, 1937.

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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I did say "mostly"!

Its still not salad...

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Pomona
Shipmate
# 17175

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Russian salad is hardly unheard of in the UK!

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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Palimpsest
Shipmate
# 16772

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Am confused by the name "salad" for these vegetables and other stuff in various jellies. There are traditional names for such things - galantines, terrines, (in Britain those words don't neccessarily imply meat as I think they might do in carnivorous France) aspics and so on. But what on earth have they got to do with salad?

The word salad implies a dish of lots of bits of (usually) uncooked food. These are solid lumps (well, wobbly lumps) of cooked food. How is that a "salad"? You might was well call a Christmas cake a salad. It's made of lots of bits of fruit embedded in some sort of matrix. Or call pâté salad. Or soufflé.

Oh shush and eat your ambrosia They're called salads because they are served as a salad course. Next you're going to be telling me that ketchup is not a vegetable.
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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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My dictionary defines a salad as "a cold dish of various mixtures of raw or cooked vegetables or herbs, usually seasoned with oil, vinegar, etc, and eaten with or including cold meat, fish, hard-boiled eggs, etc." Since then, fruit salad has been invented, and even served hot on occasion, and pasta salads have become mainstream. Having said that, they probably wouldn't be pasta salads if they were served hot with no mayonnaise and a tomato sauce instead.

I believe it was Sine who used to refer to jellied salads as "congealed salads".

quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Alan Bennet's definition of an English salad is a sardine lurking under a lettuce leaf.

Stereotypically an English salad is a few limp lettuce leaves, half a tomato and a dollop of salad cream. This still exists in many pubs, usually as a sort of garnish on a plate otherwise occupied by a large portion of something fried. The luxury version is a few limp lettuce leaves, half a tomato, a dollop of salad cream, and a sprinkling of cress.
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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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You forgot the raw onion rings!

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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True. In some places they substitute a dollop of coleslaw.
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Gee D
Shipmate
# 13815

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Raw onions are an abomination before the Lord and are specifically outlawed in the Bible - see 2 Leviticus 3, 5-7. St Paul in Romans also condemns the practice and his language makes it clear that he is condemning it for all time, not just to rituals dedicated to Daphne.

Such a clear prohibition did not stop one of the name chefs here devise a breakfast - breakfast!!! - for a domestic airline, which had smoked salmon with raw onion rings, and the then obligatory drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil at its centrepiece. The front of the plane stank barely 15 minutes out of Sydney

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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Onions, raw or cooked, are what make a snack into a meal!

I'm about to buy some now to put into my salad sandwiches to take to work for tomorrows lunch.

As for "salad course" service a la Russe belongs in history books and 19th century novels. These days salads are either the whole meal, or a vegetable that goes with the main course. And either way, they ought to have onions in them. Salad without onions would be like low-alcohol lager, or mild cheddar, or non-contact rugby, or X-factor boy bands. Bland, cheap, and pointless. [Razz]

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I believe it was Sine who used to refer to jellied salads as "congealed salads".

My grandmother used to call them that, and IIRC my mother did also. (My grandmother made them far more frequently.) I think it's a Southernism.

Moo

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See you later, alligator.

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Gee D
Shipmate
# 13815

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Ken, there's no prohibition on cooked onions. They're the base of any casserole from every cuisine I know of, and are useful in a wide variety of sauces. The ban is on raw onions.

If you think for a moment, what gives onions their bite? It's sulphur, and of course sulphur features in all fire and brimstone sermons. The nature of the sulphur in onions is made acceptable by cooking, but those suffering the fires of Hell will know no such comfort.

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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I am so glad to find that the abhorrence of the raw onion rings is not something I am alone in.* They are so frequent that I thought I was the only one. What about the raw peppers?
I note the absence of cucumber in the descriptions above.
*Mind you, I'm perfectly happy about spring onions, and/or chives.

[ 14. January 2014, 21:27: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Raw onions are an abomination before the Lord and are specifically outlawed in the Bible - see 2 Leviticus 3, 5-7. St Paul in Romans also condemns the practice and his language makes it clear that he is condemning it for all time, not just to rituals dedicated to Daphne.

But St. Paul didn't know about hamburgers. What's a hamburger without lettuce, tomato, pickle, raw onion, ketchup and cheese? Served on a nice big bun, of course. [Razz]

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"I take prayer too seriously to use it as an excuse for avoiding work and responsibility." -- The Revd Martin Luther King Jr.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
But St. Paul didn't know about hamburgers. What's a hamburger without lettuce, tomato, pickle, raw onion, ketchup and cheese? Served on a nice big bun, of course.

You forgot the beetroot. [Big Grin]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Athrawes
Ship's parrot
# 9594

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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:

If you think for a moment, what gives onions their bite? It's sulphur, and of course sulphur features in all fire and brimstone sermons. The nature of the sulphur in onions is made acceptable by cooking, but those suffering the fires of Hell will know no such comfort.

Because their onions will be burnt. [Razz]

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Explaining why is going to need a moment, since along the way we must take in the Ancient Greeks, the study of birds, witchcraft, 19thC Vaudeville and the history of baseball. Michael Quinion.

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Leaf
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# 14169

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Ok, I've got this: turnip granita.
It is my mother-in-law's specialty. I've never seen the recipe, but it must be thus:

  • Put turnips through a woodchipper.
  • Soften the turnip chippings slightly until they resemble damp particleboard.
  • Pack in a casserole and freeze solid, at least a week before serving.
  • When turkey or other roasted meat is withdrawn from the oven, stick the frozen solid casserole in the oven to warm from the residual heat, for about five minutes.
  • Serve in great triumph, as this is The Veg for the meal.
  • Enjoy the gritty scraping of frozen turnip against your teeth, as well as the extra turnippy bitterness that seems to be induced by this method.
  • Do this for fifty years in a row.

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
You forgot the raw onion rings!

And the beetroot, especially if it's leaching its juice all over the potato salad (restaurants get 25 extra points from me if they put the beetroot into a separate bowl).

In some parts of Newfoundland they get round this problem by putting beetroot juice into the potato salad (which is always made of mashed potatoes), turning it the most alarming shade of magenta. [Eek!]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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At least it shows a certain consistency Leaf (as well as sounding disgusting).

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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Beetroot coleslaw is delicious ... and pink.

Don't judge a dish by its colour.

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Last ever sig ...

blog

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Banner Lady
Ship's Ensign
# 10505

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Meat loaves are really unfashionable these days, aren't they? Like quiche, just one of those things you don't see on a menu any more.

I can guarantee 'Meat Loaf' will be on the menu at most aged care facilities. But in suburbia, one now does a 'terrine'. Often seen here in Oz during summer while the back yard bbq party & beach picnic season is in full swing.

Same thing as meat loaf, really. Except you can take a terrine Glamping, while meat loaf is for the nannas.

[ 15. January 2014, 04:02: Message edited by: Banner Lady ]

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Women in the church are not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be enjoyed.

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Margaret

Shipmate
# 283

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quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Beetroot coleslaw is delicious ... and pink.

Don't judge a dish by its colour.

Pink isn't really a great colour for lasagne, though. There was what used to be rather a good wine bar here, which went downhill with every change of owner. On our last visit I ordered three-bean lasagne, which sounded interesting, only to find myself confronted by a dish of bright pink pasta. The kitchen had obviously run out of beans and decided to substitute beetroot. Well, it starts with the same letter...
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Palimpsest
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# 16772

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quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Ken, there's no prohibition on cooked onions. They're the base of any casserole from every cuisine I know of, and are useful in a wide variety of sauces. The ban is on raw onions.

If you think for a moment, what gives onions their bite? It's sulphur, and of course sulphur features in all fire and brimstone sermons. The nature of the sulphur in onions is made acceptable by cooking, but those suffering the fires of Hell will know no such comfort.

The solution in the US is to eat raw Vidalia onions. They're grown in a place which is low in sulphur and taste sweet. It's too bad the season is so short.
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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Palimpsest:
The solution in the US is to eat raw Vidalia onions. They're grown in a place which is low in sulphur and taste sweet. It's too bad the season is so short.

I have a refrigerator which is much larger than I need (25 cubic feet for one person). When Vidalia onions are in season I buy a year's supply. After about nine months some of them spoil, but I usually have enough good ones left.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Palimpsest:
The solution in the US is to eat raw Vidalia onions. They're grown in a place which is low in sulphur and taste sweet. It's too bad the season is so short.

Using the word "solution" implies that there is a problem! (And all onions taste sweet. They are packed full of sucrose - plain ordinary sugar. Its just that the other wonderful flavours they have add an extra layer of complexity above and beyind the simple sweetness of a spoonfull of sugar.)

But the only problem is that finicky delicate picky-eating onion-refusers (and their cousins the garlic-refusers and leek-refusers) miss out on some of the wonderfullest-tasting foods.

The obvious one to start with is cheese and onion. One of the great taste combinations of the world. . [Yipee] And at its best it has to be good, honest, strong, mature cheese - ideally an strong Cheddar - paired with good, honest, flavourful, raw and crunchy onion. It is a sadness, if not quite a sin, to deny such harmless pleasures! One of the all time classic flavour combinations Up there with bacon and eggs, cheese and pears. fish and chips, gin and tonic, mushrooms and spinach (and cheeeeese.... though goats cheese or halloumi better for this one), peanut butter and jam, potatoes and garlic, strawberries and cream, strawberries and dark chocolate, strawberries and red wine, strawberries and cream and dark chocolate and red wine, toast and marmalade, toast and marmite, tomato and basil (pretty much anything and basil, especially if there is olive oil and garlic as well) Why would anyone want to deny themselves the glorious taste of ripe cheese and raw onion? It seems such a shame. Like never listening to Bach. [Frown] [Disappointed] [Frown]

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Pomona
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# 17175

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I hate raw onion. I hate all onion unless it has been softened down to mush. It's a textural thing - I hate the wet crunch. Similarly I also hate cucumber and raw tomato. I'm not terribly keen on salad in general though, excepting a nicoise - I just prefer cooked vegetables to raw. My favourite vegetables are cruciferous, green, leafy vegetables which is possibly why.

I don't think I've ever listened to any Bach either....

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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Gee D
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# 13815

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In the meantime, think of those around you before you eat a raw onion sandwich at lunch. The smell is nearly as bad as that of the kim chi eaters getting onto the morning train

If you choose to disregard the clearest of Biblical teaching and eat raw onion, that is your choice and you will have to answer for it yourselves in due course. St Peter will wilt as you speak and be unable to open the pearly gates.

[ 15. January 2014, 20:12: Message edited by: Gee D ]

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Not every Anglican in Sydney is Sydney Anglican

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Pomona
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# 17175

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My housemates have a student cookery book, published in 1993. It includes a recipe for 'lamb creole' - cream of tomato soup mixed with dried mixed herbs, poured over lamb chops and baked. Describing that as 'creole' is possibly the saddest recipe I have ever seen.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Was 1993 the date of first publication? Or was it revised edition? I study the bibliographic information on cookbooks keenly, because it's a clue to evolving fashions in British food. Firstly, it will (in those days) have taken a year or so to reach print; the authors will have been (you hope) established chefs whose style will have been established maybe a decade or so previously. By these means I can see how a quintessentially '70s recipe ended up being published in the early 90s.

We have - or had - a Marguerite Patton cookbook which was published in the 60s, but in fact reflected the cuisine of the 40s with recipes for Whole Roasted Spam and something that consisted of cold mashed potato topped with cream cheese and cornflakes.

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Pearl B4 Swine
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# 11451

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A local specialty (SE Penna: Amish, Brethren, Mennonite- or just plain German origin) is "beet eggs". Hard boil eggs, peel, put into a big jar of pickled beets and sliced onions. Let soak at least a whole day. Beautiful beet color leached into the egg white, and into the onions too. Delicious. When you buy them at a market stand you're always asked "Do you want beets too, or not?"

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Oinkster

"I do a good job and I know how to do this stuff" D. Trump (speaking of the POTUS job)

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Pomona
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# 17175

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Was 1993 the date of first publication? Or was it revised edition? I study the bibliographic information on cookbooks keenly, because it's a clue to evolving fashions in British food. Firstly, it will (in those days) have taken a year or so to reach print; the authors will have been (you hope) established chefs whose style will have been established maybe a decade or so previously. By these means I can see how a quintessentially '70s recipe ended up being published in the early 90s.

We have - or had - a Marguerite Patton cookbook which was published in the 60s, but in fact reflected the cuisine of the 40s with recipes for Whole Roasted Spam and something that consisted of cold mashed potato topped with cream cheese and cornflakes.

1993 was the date of first publication, which surprised me somewhat too. Certainly by 1993, tastes were more sophisticated than that!

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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Pomona
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# 17175

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This is the book in question. 1993 is indeed the date of publication.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Ah, I see it is aimed at students - hence the tinned stuff (I notice from the index there's quite a few things you can do with baked beans as well).

I think that's what gives it the dated feel. It's not that we don't use tinned food, but ISTM it's for different categories of food - pulses, say, or tomatoes - not for sauces or desserts.

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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When my son went to Uni, I offered him my student cookbook, Marguerite Patten's Bedsitter Cookery. However , a quick glance showed that it was hopelessly out of date. One recipe, for Goulash, reads "Open a small tin of tomatoes, blend with 1-2 teaspoons paprika in a saucepan and heat with a can of stewed steak. Served with heated canned spaghetti."

Many of the "cheap" fish dishes would not be cheap at today's prices, and the "cheap" meat products recommended - sweetbreads and offal - not readily available today.

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Pearl B4 Swine
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# 11451

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:

Many of the "cheap" fish dishes would not be cheap at today's prices, and the "cheap" meat products recommended - sweetbreads and offal - not readily available today.

My tattered Betty Crocker cookbook, vintage WW2, advises, "If chicken is too expensive, you may substitute veal". There are also plenty of 'creative' molded salad recipes, most of which contain plenty of shredded cabbage.

(Code fixed)

[ 16. January 2014, 15:21: Message edited by: Firenze ]

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Oinkster

"I do a good job and I know how to do this stuff" D. Trump (speaking of the POTUS job)

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
My housemates have a student cookery book, published in 1993. It includes a recipe for 'lamb creole' - cream of tomato soup mixed with dried mixed herbs, poured over lamb chops and baked. Describing that as 'creole' is possibly the saddest recipe I have ever seen.

Be grateful it isn't described as "Provencale".

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Ariel
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# 58

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It will be.
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ChaliceGirl
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# 13656

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OMG, that page made me nauseous!

Making your food into shape, nor adding the word "salad" or "casserole" does not make it appetizing!

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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The most discouraging word for any savoury dish is the suffix "bake".

Moussaka, Lasagna, Shepherd's pie and Cauliflower cheese are all "bake"s but no one would ever label them thus. "Bake" in this context indicates "a contrived recipe to fill space in the duller kind of women's magazine". Just so long as it stays on the page, that's OK, just don't feed them to me. They are to cooking what Tuesday is to the week, and I'm sure you all know what I think of Tuesdays.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Another ominous word in the name of a dish is 'Surprise'. Usually code for 'not a terribly good idea'.
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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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So the final winner would be something like "Spaghetti Bake Surprise Provencale"?

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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