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Source: (consider it) Thread: Crowdsourcing Baby Names
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
... Then there is Bridie, from Bridget ...

There was a Bridie in my class at school (I don't think it was short for Bridget - she was never addressed as anything but Bridie). I found it a bit odd, as where I come from a "bridie" is a kind of sausage roll ... [Big Grin]

I've heard it said that if you want to test the "classiness" of a name, say it with a regnal number after it (like Elizabeth the First or Henry the Eighth). If it doesn't sound silly, you're on the right lines.

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alto n a soprano who can read music

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Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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Nowadays, you will have to tell people how to pronounce Penelope. Absence of classical literary education means it is connected with stationery and African ungulates. You will also have to stop abbreviation to single syllable writing implements.
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Ariel
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# 58

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People are probably still familiar enough with the name of the actress Penelope Keith, though the name has probably taken on the image that went with her. You don't find many girls called Felicity either; Felicity Kendal is the only one I've ever heard of.
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Zacchaeus
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# 14454

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I've come across quite a few Penny's which i always assumed were Penelopes, but none of them used penelope
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Penny S
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# 14768

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I do for formal matters.

Oddly, I have never felt quite properly confirmed, because, without asking, and ignoring the name on my baptismal certificate, I got done as Penny.

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Amos

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# 44

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InigoB--In your alphabetical list, surely 'Quinn' should be 'Queenie.'

The upper middle class English 'Florences' are now at university: the name's been back in vogue for about 20 years now. The Sophies are in their thirties, many of them--and when I was young, Sophie was a name for great-aunts. There are heaps of Georginas and Georgianas, lots of Lucys and a few Lauras.

Amongst the old-fashioned names sported by little girls of my acquaintance are Theodora, Adelaide, Anastasia, and Mary. There are scads of little Graces and Isobels. There are lots of Rubys, and a fair few Fenellas. There are Violets, Maisies, Zoes, and Daisies, and a Lois or two.

Remembering how unlikely it seemed that there would ever be a new generation of Freds, Alfs, and Archies, I'm happy to bet that the next generation of middle-class kids will rehabilitate Hilda and Gwladys. And after that Doris and Dawn.

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Net Spinster
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# 16058

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Ruby seems to have been most popular in the US during the 1910s.


I had a great aunts called Camilla, Gloria, and Julia which fit the ending requirement but my great-grandparents did not choose names for popularity at the time.

Looking at the Social Security web site for info on popular baby names in let us say 1915 and paring down a bit (I'm going for two syllable names) and current popularity (top 1000)

Helen - 402 and becoming less popular
Ethel - off the list since 1975
Hazel - 175 in 2012 but was 942 in 1998
Edna - off the list since 1991
Clara - 136 and becoming more popular
Agnes - off the list since 1972

I note Violet is trending up rapidly (89 now but coming out of no where but not so popular there will be 7 in the classroom) but wasn't too common back then but Viola which was about 50 back then (and off the chart now) is similar.

So
Ruby and Hazel
Ruby and Clara
Ruby and Viola
Ruby and Violet

Viola is the main character in Twelfth Night
Clara Barton is the founder of the American Red Cross

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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Edie ?

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Wild Organist
Apprentice
# 12631

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Not a name ending with an 'a', but certainly congruent with Ruby: Heather. Also, I can't think of an abbreviation for it (not that that would stop some kids trying).

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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I would guess that Hetty or Heth are both possible abbreviations for Heather.

Actually I think they are doomed to failure if they want something that cannot be abbreviated. In Sixth form I had a friend who was named Zoe for that reason. Her name was abbreviated to Zo or if we were feeling in a generous mood Zozo.

Ruby can be abbreviated to Rube. Equally people have managed to do it with mine, one form of it is the first part of my username. This is despite my actual name being only four letters long.

Jengie

[ 02. March 2014, 12:06: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]

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Ariel
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# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by Amos:
Remembering how unlikely it seemed that there would ever be a new generation of Freds, Alfs, and Archies, I'm happy to bet that the next generation of middle-class kids will rehabilitate Hilda and Gwladys. And after that Doris and Dawn.

Dawn is very Sixties (along with Jacqueline, Joanne, Lisa and Michelle). Before that happens I'd expect to see the Fifties names of Trevor, Nigel, Frank, Brian, Jean, Wendy, Gayle and Pamela make a resurgence.

There was a fashion during the 18th century for girls' names ending in -inda so I thought I'd throw that into the mix. Some of the best-known few that have survived to the present day are Lucinda, Belinda, Melinda, Rosalinda (Linda never made it into the list), and some less well known ones are Annabelinda, Florinda, Verinda, Clorinda, Aurinda, and Dorinda.

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Tree Bee

Ship's tiller girl
# 4033

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quote:
Originally posted by Wild Organist:
Not a name ending with an 'a', but certainly congruent with Ruby: Heather. Also, I can't think of an abbreviation for it (not that that would stop some kids trying).

My niece Heather , so called as she was born in an ambulance in a lay by in Hethersett, is called Hev. Not by me though. [Ultra confused]

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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Effie - could also be spelled Ephie as it's short for Euphemia, I believe. That could cover either the a or the ie ending.

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cygnus
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# 3294

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quote:
Originally posted by Drifting Star:
The (very few) people I've known called Patsy were Patricias - not that that rules it out as a nickname for Martha.

I had a client whose name was "Pat"- but short for Cleopatra!
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LutheranChik
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# 9826

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We got a call from the kids this weekend asking DP to re-explain her ethnic heritage (Irish, Welsh and English by way of Canada)...so we may be seeing a tilt toward Celtic or Anglo-Saxon names; as long as the spellings aren't too strange (Siobhan -- pretty name, impossible spelling to try and explain to teachers, peers, etc.).

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
People are probably still familiar enough with the name of the actress Penelope Keith, though the name has probably taken on the image that went with her. You don't find many girls called Felicity either; Felicity Kendal is the only one I've ever heard of.

There was a Penelope (known as Penny) in my class at school, and I used to work with a Felicity, who was known as Felix.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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Sian is at least short if you're going to have to keep spelling it out...

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Boogie

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# 13538

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My grandma had a lovely name -

Lydia

[Smile]

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Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
People are probably still familiar enough with the name of the actress Penelope Keith, though the name has probably taken on the image that went with her. You don't find many girls called Felicity either; Felicity Kendal is the only one I've ever heard of.

There was a Penelope (known as Penny) in my class at school, and I used to work with a Felicity, who was known as Felix.
I can beat that. In a private school, with a smallish class (14?) there were three of us. All of whose parents had chosen the name because it was uncommon. In a year when Deanna Durbin appeared in a role with that name.
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L'organist
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# 17338

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I know of two children called Paris - one male, one female [Snigger]

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Pomona
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# 17175

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
I know of two children called Paris - one male, one female [Snigger]

I don't quite understand the [Snigger] . Paris has been a gender-neutral name for a long time.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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Nenya
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# 16427

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quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
My grandma had a lovely name -

Lydia

A lovely name indeed. I work with a 25 year old who has it, so I hope it's making a comeback. [Smile] My grandmothers were Mary and Alice and I have a cousin once removed who is Alice. I think if I'd called my daughter that I'd be constantly singing "Living Next Door To Alice" to her and to myself.

I was at school with several Felicitys, who were mostly called Fliss. I do find it interesting how what used to be shortenings are now names in their own right. I know a Jenny who is not Jennifer and of course these days no Jack is really John, nor Harry Henry.

I always thought Hetty was short for Henrietta - there's a lovely name you don't hear these days. I think Tabitha is lovely too, though I guess you'd go through life as Tabbie. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - Alice? Who the heck is Alice...?

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Zacchaeus
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# 14454

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
I know of two children called Paris - one male, one female [Snigger]

I know Mackensie's of both sexes as well
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basso

Ship’s Crypt Keeper
# 4228

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The usual rude transformation of Heather (a name I like) is Heifer.

Consider carefully...

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Ariel
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# 58

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I've yet to meet a Heather who suited the name. But that might be a subject for another thread.

quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
I always thought Hetty was short for Henrietta - there's a lovely name you don't hear these days. I think Tabitha is lovely too, though I guess you'd go through life as Tabbie. [Roll Eyes]

The German form is Tabea, which was quite popular relatively recently.
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Nenya
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# 16427

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I've yet to meet a Heather who suited the name. But that might be a subject for another thread.

It would be an interesting discussion, though very subjective of course. The first Heather I ever knew had a very distinctive look and was, shall we say, not the brightest bulb on the chandelier. Any Heather who doesn't fit that description is just not a proper Heather. [Biased]

I've never heard of Tabea. How do you pronounce it?

Nen - whose online and real life names are both straightforward to pronounce.

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IngoB

Sentire cum Ecclesia
# 8700

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quote:
Originally posted by Amos:
InigoB--In your alphabetical list, surely 'Quinn' should be 'Queenie.'

Nope, 'Quinn' is apparently a valid female name. Though I have to admit I don't know how far back it has been that. Frankly, I find 'Queenie" ridiculous and I couldn't find anything else female starting with a 'Q' that wasn't Arabic...

Of my suggestions, I like 'Mabel' best. Though I would probably fancy that up and have the full 'Amabel' as the official first name - which is poetic sounding (pronounced AM-a-bell) - and then use the comfy abbreviation 'Mabel' in the everyday.

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They’ll have me whipp’d for speaking true; thou’lt have me whipp’d for lying; and sometimes I am whipp’d for holding my peace. - The Fool in King Lear

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L'organist
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# 17338

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posted by Jade Constable
quote:
Paris has been a gender-neutral name for a long time.
Err, no.

Paris has been used for girls by parents with no understanding of the origin of the name.

Doubt it? Just ask a Greek.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Pomona
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# 17175

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
posted by Jade Constable
quote:
Paris has been a gender-neutral name for a long time.
Err, no.

Paris has been used for girls by parents with no understanding of the origin of the name.

Doubt it? Just ask a Greek.

I'm quite aware of the name origins thanks (and Paris was Trojan, not Greek), but language (and therefore naming) changes over time. Paris has been gender-neutral for a long time whether you like it or not, almost certainly influenced by it being a girls' name in Urdu which is unrelated to the Greek myth. Lots of names started out as single-gender and have become gender-neutral or even crossed over to another gender, it's just a part of language development.

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L'organist
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# 17338

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The Iliad is written in Homeric Greek - not Trojan...

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Come to that, Florence was a male name in Ireland until relatively recently - as witness the character of Flurry Knox in the Irish RM stories.

How and why names migrate between genders would be an interesting study. I have a suspicion that it is always a male to female transition. Anyone think of any instances going the other way?

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
The Iliad is written in Homeric Greek - not Trojan...

And yet the city of Paris is nowhere near Asia Minor.

Let's just agree that names can arise variously, shall we?

Firenze
Host and Well-known Italian City

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Originally posted by IngoB:
quote:
'Quinn' is apparently a valid female name. Though I have to admit I don't know how far back it has been that.
I cannot imagine why any parent would give a girl a name which could so easily be misread as "quim. "
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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
How and why names migrate between genders would be an interesting study. I have a suspicion that it is always a male to female transition. Anyone think of any instances going the other way?
A lot of the Scottish "mother's maiden name" names, which were unisex or possibly tended towards female, are now unambiguously male. I know of instances of women called Scott, Bruce, Innes and Graham; all are unisex male names now. Cameron, once predominantly female, at least in my corner of Scotland, is now male here though Cameron Diaz suggests that it is still female elsewhere.

None of these names were ever exclusively female, though, so it's a "unisex to male" shift, rather than a "female to male" shift.

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Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
I cannot imagine why any parent would give a girl a name which could so easily be misread as "quim. "

Fanny?

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

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IngoB

Sentire cum Ecclesia
# 8700

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
I cannot imagine why any parent would give a girl a name which could so easily be misread as "quim. "

Perhaps because they live or are from somewhere else than the UK? (I had to look this up. The Ship is always educational...)

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They’ll have me whipp’d for speaking true; thou’lt have me whipp’d for lying; and sometimes I am whipp’d for holding my peace. - The Fool in King Lear

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Tree Bee

Ship's tiller girl
# 4033

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quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:
We got a call from the kids this weekend asking DP to re-explain her ethnic heritage (Irish, Welsh and English by way of Canada)...so we may be seeing a tilt toward Celtic or Anglo-Saxon names; as long as the spellings aren't too strange (Siobhan -- pretty name, impossible spelling to try and explain to teachers, peers, etc.).

Don't dismiss the name Siobhan too quickly.
My granddaughter is Niamh ( pronounced Neeve) and neither she nor her teachers or friends have problems with it.
You could go for the simple and beautiful name Erin, as I did with my younger daughter. (No crocs in sight).

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— Woody Guthrie
http://saysaysay54.wordpress.com

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Roseofsharon
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# 9657

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
I cannot imagine why any parent would give a girl a name which could so easily be misread as "quim. "

That wouldn't have occurred to me at all.
But then, I am constantly appalled by the number of perfectly innocent words (and names) that are now considered only fit for sniggering at

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Amos

Shipmate
# 44

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quote:
Originally posted by IngoB:
quote:
Originally posted by Amos:
InigoB--In your alphabetical list, surely 'Quinn' should be 'Queenie.'

Nope, 'Quinn' is apparently a valid female name. Though I have to admit I don't know how far back it has been that. Frankly, I find 'Queenie" ridiculous and I couldn't find anything else female starting with a 'Q' that wasn't Arabic...

Of my suggestions, I like 'Mabel' best. Though I would probably fancy that up and have the full 'Amabel' as the official first name - which is poetic sounding (pronounced AM-a-bell) - and then use the comfy abbreviation 'Mabel' in the everyday.

You wouldn't have found Queenie Leavis ridiculous. You'd have found her terrifying.

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At the end of the day we face our Maker alongside Jesus--ken

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by IngoB:
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
I cannot imagine why any parent would give a girl a name which could so easily be misread as "quim. "

Perhaps because they live or are from somewhere else than the UK? (I had to look this up. The Ship is always educational...)
Last time I heard it uttered was by the character of Loki in Avengers Assemble - so possibly not generally understood in certain airts
Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
IngoB

Sentire cum Ecclesia
# 8700

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quote:
Originally posted by Amos:
You wouldn't have found Queenie Leavis ridiculous. You'd have found her terrifying.

I was talking about the name itself, not about any specific person of that name. But I'm mildly curious why you think that I would have found her "terrifying"? Terrific is a lot more likely...

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They’ll have me whipp’d for speaking true; thou’lt have me whipp’d for lying; and sometimes I am whipp’d for holding my peace. - The Fool in King Lear

Posts: 12010 | From: Gone fishing | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
SvitlanaV2
Shipmate
# 16967

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quote:
Originally posted by IngoB:
Frankly, I find 'Queenie" ridiculous and I couldn't find anything else female starting with a 'Q' that wasn't Arabic...


My mum's name is Quita, which is Spanish, apparently. It gets misspelt a lot, to her irritation. I think she would have liked a less unusual name, but Quita suits her and it can also be shortened to Kitty, which is quite sweet.
Posts: 6668 | From: UK | Registered: Feb 2012  |  IP: Logged
IngoB

Sentire cum Ecclesia
# 8700

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Last time I heard it uttered was by the character of Loki in Avengers Assemble - so possibly not generally understood in certain airts

Here, towards the end... well, if it's in a Hollywood movie, then presumably it's known in the USA as well. Sorry, it's probably just me, I'm not a native speaker after all. (That movie also had the best ... practical ... comment on sub-Creator gods ever: here. LOL.)

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They’ll have me whipp’d for speaking true; thou’lt have me whipp’d for lying; and sometimes I am whipp’d for holding my peace. - The Fool in King Lear

Posts: 12010 | From: Gone fishing | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
georgiaboy
Shipmate
# 11294

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quote:
Originally posted by IngoB:
quote:
Originally posted by Amos:
InigoB--In your alphabetical list, surely 'Quinn' should be 'Queenie.'

Nope, 'Quinn' is apparently a valid female name. Though I have to admit I don't know how far back it has been that. Frankly, I find 'Queenie" ridiculous and I couldn't find anything else female starting with a 'Q' that wasn't Arabic...


A young bank exec of my acquaintance is identified on his name-plate, business cards, etc. as 'Quinn' surname. Which seemed logical; I assumed it was a family name. And then I saw a framed official document (college diploma, perhaps) which gave his name as George Washington surname V. It took a little while for the penny to drop, and then I had a good laugh. A clever way of avoiding all those tiresome 'father of his country' jokes.

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You can't retire from a calling.

Posts: 1675 | From: saint meinrad, IN | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
Rev per Minute
Shipmate
# 69

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quote:
Originally posted by IngoB:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Last time I heard it uttered was by the character of Loki in Avengers Assemble - so possibly not generally understood in certain airts

Here, towards the end... well, if it's in a Hollywood movie, then presumably it's known in the USA as well. Sorry, it's probably just me, I'm not a native speaker after all. (That movie also had the best ... practical ... comment on sub-Creator gods ever: here. LOL.)
I'm not sure how much control Tom Hiddleston (who played Loki) had over the script, but his use of the phrase "mewling quim" was described by him as a Shakespearean insult. I think he was pleased to get the comment past the editors, so perhaps it's not a word generally known in the States.

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"Allons-y!" "Geronimo!" "Oh, for God's sake!" The Day of the Doctor

At the end of the day, we face our Maker alongside Jesus. RIP ken

Posts: 2696 | From: my desk (if I can find the keyboard under this mess) | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Rev per Minute:
I'm not sure how much control Tom Hiddleston (who played Loki) had over the script, but his use of the phrase "mewling quim" was described by him as a Shakespearean insult. I think he was pleased to get the comment past the editors, so perhaps it's not a word generally known in the States.

It was my assumption that he - or someone - had snuck that one under the radar. I can't see any of the more well-known synonyms getting into a 12A rated film.

[ 04. March 2014, 20:25: Message edited by: Firenze ]

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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"Quim" is used in Eskimo Nell, the sine qua non of pre-internet teenage sex education.

According to this, people who have a daughter Ruby tend to name another daughter Amber, Amelia, Ava, Charlotte, Eliza, Ella, Grace, Hannah, Hazel, Jade, Lily, Lucy, Maisie, Molly, Olivia, Sadie or Stella.

Several of those have the desired -a or -ie ending and are not too cumbersome to combine with a hyphenated name.

Posts: 6414 | From: North East Scotland | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
anoesis
Shipmate
# 14189

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quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
A lot of the Scottish "mother's maiden name" names, which were unisex or possibly tended towards female, are now unambiguously male. I know of instances of women called Scott, Bruce, Innes and Graham; all are unisex male names now.

Just to be a pain in the arse (or ass, depending on provenance), I know a woman whose given name is Innes...

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The history of humanity give one little hope that strength left to its own devices won't be abused. Indeed, it gives one little ground to think that strength would continue to exist if it were not abused. -- Dafyd --

Posts: 993 | From: New Zealand | Registered: Oct 2008  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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Near enough to Inez to pass, I would have thought.
Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
# 2522

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Inez is supposedly Spanish for Agnes! [Big Grin]

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I cannot expect people to believe “
Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
Kelly Alves, somewhere around 2003.

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