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Source: (consider it) Thread: Mordor: twinned with Slough
Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I picked up a pile of Georgette Heyers in a charity shop the other day, and then finally got hold of Jean Aiken Hodge's biography - The Private World of Georgette Heyer - from the library. The biog is interesting for any fan of the books because it uses them as the starting point - she was such a private person that the books were felt to be the best way to approach getting a sense of her life. You can also trace the development of her writing over the years.

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Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Freelance Monotheist
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# 8990

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I've read Life After Life and thought it was really interesting, with all the attempts at changing history/the course of one's life hinging on a few details. I'm not sure I got the ending either and was still unsure what had happened to Ursula in her life.I thought the version where Ursula plans to get a degree but ends up travelling & staying in Germany really interesting but didn't catch the references to Sylvie and/or Teddy also being able to change the course of their futures. I was, however, very annoyed at the Time review that reveals who Ursula shoots, which had me guessing as it could potentially have been another person. Thankfully I'd finished the book by then, but it still annoyed me!
On my Kindle, I'm now reading The Great Gatsby before I see the film, and so far I find all the characters pretty annoying or despicable. My paper (library book) is by Maggie O'Farrell, about a father who walks out on his wife & his 3 children come back (all with their own baggage/secrets) to help/see their mother. It's really good so far.

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Denial: a very effective coping mechanism

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Scots lass
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# 2699

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quote:
Originally posted by Freelance Monotheist:
My paper (library book) is by Maggie O'Farrell, about a father who walks out on his wife & his 3 children come back (all with their own baggage/secrets) to help/see their mother. It's really good so far.

I'm guessing that's her most recent one, as the plot doesn't sound familiar! I really enjoy her books, so will have to track that down.

Currently I've abandoned my efforts to read Antonia Fraser's The Weaker Vessel (about women in 17th century England). It's interesting and readable, but I needed a minimal effort book so I'm on Georgette Heyer's The Quiet Gentleman, which I've read before. Gentle humour and romance, ideal fluffy reading whilst still being good quality writing!

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Ariel
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# 58

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Finished Alison Weir's historical novel "The Captive Queen", about Eleanor of Aquitaine. This was a lively account of a spirited personality and an era of history I wasn't that familiar with. I read this on the commute and it kept me interested; one of those books which almost make you wish the commute was a bit longer so you could finish it in one go.

It was easy to read, though it switches quite suddenly throughout from faux archaic to modern and back again - "You think she's hot, don't you?" "Father, do not impugn the lady's honour."

Fun to read, would look out for more by this author.

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Heavenly Anarchist
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# 13313

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Finished Alison Weir's historical novel "The Captive Queen", about Eleanor of Aquitaine. This was a lively account of a spirited personality and an era of history I wasn't that familiar with. I read this on the commute and it kept me interested; one of those books which almost make you wish the commute was a bit longer so you could finish it in one go.

It was easy to read, though it switches quite suddenly throughout from faux archaic to modern and back again - "You think she's hot, don't you?" "Father, do not impugn the lady's honour."

Fun to read, would look out for more by this author.

I don't tend to like her historical fiction but love her biographies. Her biography of Eleanor is one of my favourites [Smile]

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'I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.' Douglas Adams
Dog Activity Monitor
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Heavenly Anarchist
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# 13313

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The last comment has just reminded me that I had meant to post in here about Alison Weir. I've just re-read her 'The Princes in the Tower', prompted by the discovery of Richard the Third's body. It was interesting reading it in light of the discovery, and it was great to go over the background to their story. Not everyone might agree with her conclusions but her examination of the circumstances is thorough. I'm not quite at the end but will miss it when I've finished.

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'I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.' Douglas Adams
Dog Activity Monitor
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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I really disliked Alison Weir's Princes in the Tower, but I can't remember why now. I remember objecting to her logic, but perhaps it was just that I disagreed with her conclusions... [Biased]

It was interesting to see her and Philippa Gregory on that Anne Boleyn thing on BBC2 last night. Neither of them looked how I imagined, which shows how much attention I pay to author photos.

Anyway, I'm currently rereading a German thriller "Das Kindermädchen" by Elisabeth Herrmanns, which looks at the role of forced labourers from Eastern Europe for childcare in Nazi Germany.

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Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

Posts: 2407 | From: A Fine City | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Twilight

Puddleglum's sister
# 2832

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Rules of Civility by Amor Towles

This takes place in Manhattan during 1937, beginning on New Year's Eve when our protagonist and her roommate pool their last few dollars and go out on the town. They end up sharing a table with the most elegant, handsome young man either has ever met. It's a three way infatuation-at-first-sight situation. He has never met such smart, good looking, witty women and they have never met anyone at all from his upperclass world.

Before the year is out they have all three grown much older and experienced tragedy and disillusionment, but it's all told with such vivid descriptions and atmosphere you won't want it to end.

The title comes from a guidebook on proper manners written by George Washington when he was sixteen.

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LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

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I just started reading De intrede van Christus in Brussel ('Entry of Christ into Brussels') by Belgian writer Dimitri Verhulst.

Of course, it is inspired by the 1888 painting by James Ensor, but Verhulst took it quite literally.

Jesus announces that He'll return to Earth on July 21st. In the city of Brussels. Verhulst describes in hilarious detail the reaction of various people to this news, giving a poignant image of Belgian society.

I really like Belgian writing like this.

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I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

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Paul.
Shipmate
# 37

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Finally got around to reading Kate Atkinson's Started Early, Took My Dog. This is the 4th Jackson Brodie "Case Histories" book. bought it after watching the Jason Isaacs TV adaptations last year and thought I'd jump in on the one that hadn't been made for TV yet. Except now it has so that pushed me to actually read it - which was good because it got me out of a short spell where I hadn't been reading.

It was interesting to read this after having read Life After Life. It's a very different style of writing. Also quite dark - it concerns a historic murder that was thought at the time to be related to the Yorkshire Ripper. Not as dark as David Peace's 1977 but has some tough stuff in it. It also has a fair bit of humour and a protagonist that Atkinson clearly likes - the prose takes a lighter, wryer tone whenever it's his POV.

I like my crime fiction a little less convoluted I guess but this was fun all the same. I may read the next one but I'm not sure I'll go back and read the first three. I will however watch the adaptation of this which is sitting on my DVR.

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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Just finished Emily Purdy's "A Court Affair". I've been reading through a stack of historical novels lately, most are one-offs that I wouldn't read again, but this is rich, descriptive, vivid and with excellent characterization. It's advertised on its cover as a "Sunday Times bestseller" and deservedly so.

It's the story of Amy Robsart, Robert Dudley and Elizabeth I. Most of it's told from Amy's perspective in retrospect in her final days of suffering from breast cancer. She is a likeable young woman most at home in the country, married to an increasingly abusive, sometimes violent husband who is infatuated with Elizabeth. Elizabeth is a real coquette - you can see both her parents, Anne Boleyn and Henry, in her character. Privately, she has a lot of sympathy for Amy and sees straight through Robert. The deterioriating relationship between Amy and Robert is portrayed with a lot of insight.

Very well written, better even than Philippa Gregory. One to keep a copy of.

[ 30. May 2013, 18:34: Message edited by: Ariel ]

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
# 10688

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Needed to be in the right frame of mind for this, but I am feeling brave so I'm going in.

I have attacked Notre Dame de Paris*. In French. 10% into the book I am starting to understand just why it is so long (Quasimodo only just made his appearance).

*Which for some reason that doesn't really make sense to me is translated in English as The Hunchback of Notre Dame

[ 31. May 2013, 08:57: Message edited by: la vie en rouge ]

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

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Sir Kevin
Ship's Gaffer
# 3492

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I've got it in English; dunno how far I got into it, but abandoned it years ago. Did see the old black and white film though...


I'll get me coat.

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If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction Dietrich Bonhoeffer
Writing is currently my hobby, not yet my profession.

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LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

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Is it ok to ask for book recommendations here?

I'm interested in reading historical novels, but ones that are set in time periods we don't know an awful lot about. So not something from the Tudors or the late Renaissance, but something from the Babylonian era, or the darker parts of the Middle Ages for example.

Preferably not books of the kind "passive woman finds out she needs a man who can give her a sense of security" (I'm looking at the Book Groop right now [Biased] )

Does anyone have an idea?

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I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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Curiously enough I was just wondering about starting a thread on this very topic, as I'm looking for the same kind of thing. How about if I do so, and we can see what comes in?
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LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

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Great!

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I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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Done! looking forward to some recommendations being posted there.

I'm just about to read "Time's Echo", by the way, thanks to the book group [Biased]

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I've just finished Zbinden's Progress by Christoph Simon which was very enjoyable. It's one of those monologuey things with no plot but an engaging, garrulous narrator in his 80s looking back over his life and trying to enthuse anyone in earshot with his love of walking.

I'm about to start Véronique Olmi's Beside the Sea and not exactly looking forward to it: "a haunting and though-provoking story about how a mother's love for her children can be more dangerous than the dark world she is seeking to keep at bay". But I'm going to an event with the publisher and translator on Wed and feel the need to have read it first!

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Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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I'm currently reading 'The Lay Clerk's Handbook' by Robert Dufton. Although the book is written in a somewhat naïve style (the author was 24 when he wrote it), and the proof reader - if there was one! - fell asleep on the job, the author has good experience of being a Lay Clerk himself, and is therefore well-placed to advise other current and potential Lay Clerks of the requirements, and pitfalls, of the job.

It would be a good gift to give a sixth-former thinking of spending his (and, more frequently, her) gap-year in a Cathedral choir but also for someone singing, or planning to sing, in a good church choir, as many of the sections would be equally applicable to the amateur SATB chorister.

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

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chive

Ship's nude
# 208

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I've just read A Time for Machetes by Jean Hatzfield and I cannot recommend it highly enough. I've been fascinated by the genocide in Rwanda for a long time and read many books on the subject but this was far and away the best.

It's written by a French journalist who goes to a prison in Rwanda and interviews people who were involved in the genocide. People who murdered lots and lots of people. Reading it is sobering, saddening and horrifying. It's clear that although the perpetrators have pleaded guilty and confessed what they did during the genocide, they have no concept of the emotional impact of what they did.

It is also horrifying in its showing of the banality and normality of evil. One quote that summed the whole thing up for me was, 'For me it was strange to see the children drop without a sound. It was almost pleasantly easy.' These people weren't killing people they didn't know, these were their neighbours, people they drank with, people they went to church with.

It was interesting that most of the killers regarded themselves as Christians but managed to put their faith 'on hold' during the genocide. 'During the killings, I chose not to pray to God. I sensed that it was not appropriate to involve Him in that,' says a church deacon.

The book was horrifying but I think it is one of the few books that I feel it was important for me to read. There are very few books where someone sits down, interviews people like this and then publishes their words. To read this is to understand them a bit better and maybe understanding them might lead to preventing them in future. Or maybe that's just wishful thinking.

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'Edward was the kind of man who thought there was no such thing as a lesbian, just a woman who hadn't done one-to-one Bible study with him.' Catherine Fox, Love to the Lost

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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Finally got my long-awaited copy of "Boneland", Alan Garner's conclusion to the Weirdstone trilogy, set 50 years on. Different people will have different opinions, but I disliked this book.

Essentially, the story is about Colin, now a bearded astrophysics professor aged around 60, who can't remember anything before the age of 13, and who's mentally unstable. He lives in a shack in a quarry and never leaves the Edge, which he must always keep in sight. He's haunted by looking for his sister who disappeared one night. He hears her voice from time to time, and has counselling sessions with Meg, who is trying to get him to remember. As well as the mental instability, Colin is described in the book as a bit Asperger's, and he's obsessed with birds. It's interspersed with the story of a nameless shaman who is trying to cut the image of a woman into a rock to bring her to life.

In between Colin hears his sister's voice (she's never named) and this is far removed from the Susan that you might expect from the earlier books. This one can be mocking and malicious and there are some distinctly creepy moments.

It wasn't a comfortable read. It felt more disconnected and stranger than "Thursbitch", and like peeking into the mind of someone suffering some kind of mental illness.

I think it probably is quite a clever book. It is a multilayered story with a lot of echoes of the earlier stories, and the end is quite clever... but I didn't enjoy it. If you're a Garner fan who hasn't read this, it's very different from the earlier novels so be prepared for something of a jump in perception and approach.

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Cara
Shipmate
# 16966

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Hmm that's interesting, Ariel. I have the book but haven't read it yet. Thanks for the warning that it's a different kettle of fish.

Heard Alan Garner speak at the Cheltenham Festival of Lit last year and he was absolutely riveting. He spoke about his life as a writer, and read a bit from this latest book, raising goose-pimples. I think he is extraordinary. I was a Weirdstone of Brisgamen fan at 14 and now I am, well, considerably older than that; most other writers I loved at that age are no longer with us...it was wonderful to go and hear him and get the new book signed, lo these many years later!

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Pondering.

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comet

Snowball in Hell
# 10353

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Reading on the death of Iain Banks, and I'm interested. have not read his work. Where do I start?

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Evil Dragon Lady, Breaker of Men's Constitutions

"It's hard to be religious when certain people are never incinerated by bolts of lightning.” -Calvin

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by comet:
Reading on the death of Iain Banks, and I'm interested. have not read his work. Where do I start?

If you don't mind space opera, read Consider Phlebas. Or any of the "Culture" novels, but that was the first published and sets up the scene quite well. Or for a taster, the short stories in the collection State of the Art. Some people think Use of Weapons is the best of the Culture novels. Other people don't. They are all good.

If you think that Serious Literature mustn't have spaceships in it, then any of the books which don't have an "M" in his name on the cover. (They did it deliberately as a clue to readers - I think he regretted it a little after a while) All those novels are independent of each other, there is no series or sequence, so no particular reason to read any before any other. The first published was The Wasp Factory which must be one of the weirdest (and in some ways ickiest) novels that ever got onto the shelves of mainstream bookshops without being branded as horror or fantasy. Its very funny though. The Crow Road is perhaps the best-known or most popular of these novels, though not my favourite, I think I liked the Bridge best.

But, apart from the Culture books which are a loose series set in the same imagined universe, all his books are very unlike each other. That's one of the good things about them. There is almost no repetition The ones I've read are almost like books written by different authors, written in different styles in different genres. And almost all very good. So read any of them first! And then read the rest.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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QLib

Bad Example
# 43

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My favourite Banks novel is Whit, but I haven't read them all. I've been rather put off The Wasp Factory but now I know it's supposed to be funny, I might give it a go. Whit features a rather flaky religious community; the heroine is delightful and the whole book is both funny and thought-provoking.

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Tradition is the handing down of the flame, not the worship of the ashes Gustav Mahler.

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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Cara, I am so envious. I will definitely be getting this book. It would be cheaper for me to download on my kindle, but my brother in Miami wants to read it too so I think a tree book is the way to go.

My favourite Alan Garner book is Red Shift .

Ariel, I'll come back and read your review when I read the book, but thanks for posting it otherwise I may have missed out.

Huia

[ 10. June 2013, 08:13: Message edited by: Huia ]

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Haydee
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# 14734

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My favourite Iain Banks is Espadair Street - lots of very funny moments and an intriguing back story.

I loved Whit as well though - the naïve heroine who misunderstands while the reader does understand!

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
My favourite Alan Garner book is Red Shift .

I think that is the best one, but my favourite one is The Moon of Gomrath! I guess I read it at about the right age to appreciate the sentimental and nostalgic character of it - a few years later maybe I'd not have liked it so much. I also loved the appendix which listed his sources - I went to the library and read most of them.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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I treated myself to a basic Kindle the other day, and as an inaugural read, chose Sylvia Townsend Warner's Lolly Willowes. The writing is beautifully evocative, and the bits about the suppression of women's lives as pertinent as ever they were.
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Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

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I got Red Shift as a school prize once - I chose it because I loved Wierdstone of Brisingamen and the Moon of Gomrath, but I didn't really understand it.
I've just treated myself to a copy of Boneland - which I will be approaching with caution after Ariel's review!

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Laugh hard. Run fast. Be kind.

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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I hope people who have yet to read "Boneland" will post and say what they think. I'd be most interested to hear some other perspectives. I read it a second time and understood it better, but can't say that I like it.
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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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I've just finished reading Life After Life by Kate Atkinson after a very long wait for a library copy. It was very good, but I need to let it settle a bit before I can write about it.

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Travesty, treachery, betrayal!
EXCESS - The Art of Treason
Nea Fox

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LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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I just finished a murder mystery by Susan Wittig Albert. Her protagonist, China Bayles, is a sleuthing Southern herbalist. The series hasn't yet "caught" me in the way that some of my other favorite mystery writers have, but I'm going to go on and read another of her books.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

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Sir Kevin
Ship's Gaffer
# 3492

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Debunking 9/11 Myths: Why Conspiracy Theories Can't Stand Up to the Facts is the book I am currently reading. It is researched and published by the editors of Popular Mechanics magazine, a popular periodical about engineering for the layman. It recruited some of the best scientists, structural engineers and demolition experts in the world for its report. I am reading it on Nook.

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If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction Dietrich Bonhoeffer
Writing is currently my hobby, not yet my profession.

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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In the bookshop the other day I spotted a book called Entry from Backside Only by Binoo K John which looks at the emergence of a distinct Indian English, or perhaps a family of Indian English. It's good fun.

and yes, it was the title that grabbed me first. [Roll Eyes]

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
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What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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I've borrowed a gem of a book from a friend - 'Lost Treasures of Britain' by Roy Strong. It shows in full colour many of the mediaeval treasures which have been lost to the country or damaged due to deliberate acts or accident eg. the Reformation, Civil War, Fire of London, World War 2. Strong's argument is an interesting one - that, although these treasures were special and it is a huge shame that they were destroyed, the various waves of destruction paved the way for future innovators to produce their own contemporary art and architecture which, over time, has come to be valued as much as that which they replaced.

He argues that the wish to preserve the past, in a sentimental way, is a fairly recent phenomenon and one which would have been alien in many periods of history, where iconoclasm and recycling of building materials was the dominant ethos.

Were these people of history being wanton vandals or merely being practical and 'green'?

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I hope people who have yet to read "Boneland" will post and say what they think. I'd be most interested to hear some other perspectives. I read it a second time and understood it better, but can't say that I like it.

The copy I reserved became available at the library today. I also read an online review by Ursula Le Guin. It does seem to be a book that requires a bit of effort, and possibly more knowledge of English myths than I have. I'll take the plunge in the weekend and see how I go.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 10382 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

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I just picked up a copy of Captain Marvel: In Pursuit of Flight today - and I do hope there's more stuff like this out there. The superheroine has a sensible costume without showing acres of bare flesh, she's not someone's girlfriend, and the plot (a time travel one) takes in the women pilots who ferried planes around for the RAF and USAF in the Second World War, and the Mercury 13 women who trained to be astronauts and were denied access to the programme anyway. I thought it was brilliant stuff, and I'm adding Carol Danvers/Captain Marvel to the list of people I want to be when I grow up!

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Laugh hard. Run fast. Be kind.

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Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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I recently finished another Billy Connolly travel book, this time the book that accompanied the series he did a few years ago riding the length of Route 66 on a trike. I didn't enjoy it as much as the other one I read a few months ago (when he travelled the North-West Passage in Canada), but that was mainly because the Canada book had millions more pictures and better quality paper [Smile] The actual writing was charming, as with the Canada book he just meets interesting people and finds the good in them, muses about life, reminisces about life in Scotland, raves about quirky art, and just throws himself into the trip. He's definitely a great travel companion.

Now I've just started my first ever Agatha Christie novel, "The Mystery at Styles" (it's a Poirot mystery). Each summer rather than choose a single book that we all read, my book group chooses a theme and then we all find random books that fit the theme and discuss them. This year the theme is the 1920s - although this book is set during WW1, it was published in the 1920s so that's a good enough link for me. I've only read the first chapter so far, and she's introduced so many characters - all of whom could have 'done it' - I might have to reread it just to get my head round who's who. The characters are mostly really posh - one man keeps referring to his mother as 'the mater' which made me laugh.

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"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
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Posts: 5767 | From: the land of the deep-fried Mars Bar | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:

Now I've just started my first ever Agatha Christie novel, "The Mystery at Styles" (it's a Poirot mystery).

Originally The Mysterious Affair at Styles but snazzied up for a modern readership I suppose.

I'm currently reading Colin Watson's Snobbery With Violence which is a study of 'tec fiction c 1890s to 1970s and he discusses Poirot, and why he is Belgian, how is 'foreignness' is made acceptable to the readership etc.

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venbede
Shipmate
# 16669

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Is that the Colin Watson who wrote the lovely Inspector Purbright and Miss Teatime at Flaxborough comedy crime novels? Quite wonderful.

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Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

Posts: 3201 | From: An historic market town nestling in the folds of Surrey's rolling North Downs, | Registered: Sep 2011  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by venbede:
Is that the Colin Watson who wrote the lovely Inspector Purbright and Miss Teatime at Flaxborough comedy crime novels? Quite wonderful.

The same.

I'm glad to see those are now available for Kindle.

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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Thanks venbede and Firenze - another author to follow up.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 10382 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:

Now I've just started my first ever Agatha Christie novel, "The Mystery at Styles" (it's a Poirot mystery).

Originally The Mysterious Affair at Styles but snazzied up for a modern readership I suppose.
Or rather, that I got the title wrong [Hot and Hormonal] "The Mysterious Affair at Styles" is correct.

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"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
wiblog blipfoto blog

Posts: 5767 | From: the land of the deep-fried Mars Bar | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Pancho
Shipmate
# 13533

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I am currently reading "The Great Gatsby" after having first read it a very long time ago and I am also reading "The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin". I am enjoying both of them a lot.

[ 13. July 2013, 07:06: Message edited by: Pancho ]

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“But to what shall I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the market places and calling to their playmates, ‘We piped to you, and you did not dance;
we wailed, and you did not mourn.’"

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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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My bedtime book for the last few days has been Fannie Flagg's Fried Green Tomatoes at Whistle Stop Cafe which I finished last night - it really is a great read. The murder and cannibalism is amusingly done and the euthanasia bit is light and gentle. Poor Sipsy, she had a heck of a life!

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
que sais-je
Shipmate
# 17185

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Found "The Gift" by Lewis Hyde (first pub 1979) in a charity shop. Perhaps not quite 'a masterpiece' (Margaret Atwood) but one of those books which makes you want to change your life a bit.

It begins as a work of anthopology: how gifts work in various tribes: S Pacific Islanders, N American Indians, Black 'Projects'. The subtitle "How the creative spirit transforms the world" is about art as gift giving and to be honest I didn't think the arty sections were as good as those on how gift giving supports communities.

I'd never heard of it before. Has anyone out there read it?

[corrected typo]

[ 18. July 2013, 11:36: Message edited by: que sais-je ]

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"controversies, disputes, and argumentations, both in philosophy and in divinity, if they meet with discreet and peaceable natures, do not infringe the laws of charity" (Thomas Browne)

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TurquoiseTastic

Fish of a different color
# 8978

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I have really been getting into Douglas Hofstader's "I Am A Strange Loop", which is about consciousness and personality (but with all sorts of connections to e.g. Godel's theorem).

I was never able to make it through "Godel, Escher, Bach" by the same author (which my best friend used to rave about), not because I didn't like it but because it was too... well, I suppose too rich might cover it. It's extremely readable, but there's so much in it that it takes some time to digest it.

Anyway, I feel a Purgatory thread on consciousness coming on... but not until I've finished the book... otherwise it feels a bit like "posting a reply before you've read the rest of the thread"....

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Sir Kevin
Ship's Gaffer
# 3492

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Currently reading Moon Shot, the true story of the events leading up to and including landing on the moon in 1969. I remember the day vividly as Deke Slayton and Alan Shepard were instrumental in getting the US there first. Introduction by a man who walked on the moon, Neil Armstrong. It's a good chronicle of a very exciting time.

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If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction Dietrich Bonhoeffer
Writing is currently my hobby, not yet my profession.

Posts: 30517 | From: White Hart Lane | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Jack the Lass

Ship's airhead
# 3415

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I'm reading Roger Lovegrove's "Islands Beyond the Horizon" - he takes 20 obscure islands from around the world and talks about the past and present human contact/habitation and the impact of that and other influences (eg volcanic eruptions) on the flora and fauna of each island. It's introducing me to several islands I'd never heard of before, and I've found it fascinating.

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"My body is a temple - it's big and doesn't move." (Jo Brand)
wiblog blipfoto blog

Posts: 5767 | From: the land of the deep-fried Mars Bar | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged



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