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Source: (consider it) Thread: Sailorlets thread
Wet Kipper
Circus Runaway
# 1654

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quick baby related question, with regards to wind

If you should hold a baby upright to encourage burping to relieve wind, but a breastfed baby is more likely to let air out the other end (according to the HV), should we be holding the baby upside down ?

[Biased]

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- insert randomly chosen, potentially Deep and Meaningful™ song lyrics here -

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Doublethink.
Ship's Foolwise Unperson
# 1984

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In Spain they burp the baby over the knee instead of over the shoulder. Less puke down your back that way.

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All political thinking for years past has been vitiated in the same way. People can foresee the future only when it coincides with their own wishes, and the most grossly obvious facts can be ignored when they are unwelcome. George Orwell

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Leorning Cniht
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# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Wet Kipper:

If you should hold a baby upright to encourage burping to relieve wind, but a breastfed baby is more likely to let air out the other end (according to the HV), should we be holding the baby upside down ?

Well, that depends - how badly do you want a lap full of regurgitated milk?
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Dafyd
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# 5549

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I would have thought that one should hold the baby the same way as for bottle-fed babies. The geometry of human innards is such that I suspect that the position you hold the baby will make no difference to how quickly the air gets to the other end.
The Daflet liked to lie on her tummy and lifting her head to get her burbs out herself.

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we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

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the famous rachel
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# 1258

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As I understand it...

Breastfed babies usually swallow less air when feeding and hence may not need to be burped. Wind coming out the other end comes from digestive processes, and won't necessarily need to come out straight after a feed. I may have my biology all wrong though...

More practically: if your baby (breast or bottle fed) suffers with wind of the sort that comes out the bottom end, lie him or her on her back (perhaps after a nappy change, or at another convenient time but NOT just after a feed) and bring his or her knees up towards his/her chest, If he or she is comfortable, press them gently towards his/her chest. This often helps to release some gas.

All the usual caveats about my total lack of qualifications apply, but this worked for us!

Rachel.

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A shrivelled appendix to the body of Christ.

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the famous rachel
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# 1258

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Day 1 of 2nd attempt at toilet training:

10 wet pairs of pants. Aghh.

Hope everyone else is having a better weekend than me!

R.

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A shrivelled appendix to the body of Christ.

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Gwai
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# 11076

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Fall allergies suck. I mean they annoy me, but I'm frustrated enough about how they are affecting Gremlin that I'm torn between posting here and consigning our generally good pediatrician to Hell. (Reason won out, but not by much.) So Gremlin wakes up every night for at least an hour in misery with allergies. We suction his nose, but he hates it, as babies do, so then he's worked up and doesn't fusses or screams at us for an hour or so. We asked his doctor for advice at his checkup and she suggests saline. Well yes, saline is great for clearing his nose, and we have some. But I'm sort of trying to prevent the misery before it happens!

Now, obviously you all can't give medical advice, but I would dearly love whatever advice you have about what to do with babies and hayfever. Our doctor is fine with giving him benadryl, but since he's overly stuffy that doesn't help anyway. If Goblin had had this problem we'd have put her to sleep in her carseat, upright at least. Problem is that Gremlin DETESTS carseats, so that would be even worse than his crib. Help?

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A master of men was the Goodly Fere,
A mate of the wind and sea.
If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.


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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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I have dealt with chronic rhinitis and allergies all my life. Years ago, I found something I can only describe as a foam wedge. If that is placed under the mattress, it has the same effect as elevating the head of the bed. I found relief. When I didn't need it any longer (because I got an electric bed), I passed it on to someone whose young daughter had (has) a vicious gastric bile reflux. It worked for that too. Maybe that will work. (I bought mine at a medical supply shop)

[ 28. August 2013, 17:07: Message edited by: PeteC ]

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Even more so than I was before

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birdie

fowl
# 2173

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If he's still in a cot, you can get special doodads to put under the feet of the cot at the head end to elevate it. (Of course you can use books just as well, but then you have to find the ones of exactly the same thickness....)

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"Gentlemen, I wash my hands of this weirdness."
Captain Jack Sparrow

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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A doodad, just like the thingimajig I mentioned? [Biased]

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Even more so than I was before

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birdie

fowl
# 2173

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Well, similar, but the doodads go under the legs of the cot, whereas the thingimajig goes under the mattress.

Important distinction.....

I also (somewhere) have a list I made for someone else about non-medication things to do about hayfever, from when I had it really badly but was pregnant. I'll look it out and pm it, Gwai, if you think it would be helpful.

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"Gentlemen, I wash my hands of this weirdness."
Captain Jack Sparrow

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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Some translations here doodahs and thingimajig.

Jengie

[ 28. August 2013, 18:29: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

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Gwai
Shipmate
# 11076

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I will look at doodads and thingamajigs, and probably rig one or the other up for tonight!

And yes, I would love the list of non-medication things to do for hayfever, if you do find it. He's still at the age where medications are usually either Don't or See Your Doctor.

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A master of men was the Goodly Fere,
A mate of the wind and sea.
If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.


Posts: 11914 | From: Chicago | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
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# 17338

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Sorry to hear about the allergies - dreadful for all.

Try treating the snotty-nosed bit as a normal cold:

1. Try elevating the cot - can't harm and may help.

2. Smidgeon of vick on the back between the shoulder blades.

3. Wring out a hand-towel in hot water with a few drops of Olbas Oil added and hand in front of the open window.

4. If you own a vaporiser then use it - not necessarily with Coal Tar liquid but just to generate some steam.

Good luck.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

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Olbas Oil can give some children (and adults) terrible headaches - it's worth being aware of this. If so, Karvol capsules might be a more effective help.

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Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

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Bullfrog.

Prophetic Amphibian
# 11014

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For now, you may define "doodad" as "daddy's old Constitutional Law textbook," and "thingamajig" as "The Federalist Papers."

We'll see how this affects the gremlin's development.

ETA: OK, so perhaps both are doodads, as Gwai advises me.

[ 29. August 2013, 02:53: Message edited by: Bullfrog. ]

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Some say that man is the root of all evil
Others say God's a drunkard for pain
Me, I believe that the Garden of Eden
Was burned to make way for a train. --Josh Ritter, Harrisburg

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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Actually Bullfrog, I think the papers are a "wotchamacallit."

My sons used to respond to being propped up as suggested already and a vaporiser, place well out of reach.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Gwai
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# 11076

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As of Birdie's post they were doodads because they went under the legs of the crib, and they seem to have helped. We still had to suction him, but he wasn't miserable enough to be already wide awake, so after some fury, he went back to sleep.

--------------------
A master of men was the Goodly Fere,
A mate of the wind and sea.
If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.


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Kasra
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# 10631

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New question (on re-awakened thread!)

I have a 2.5yo son. My MiL recently told me that he was undisciplined. What appears to have happened is that she took him to a wedding, where he ran around a lot. Factor in a missed nap, lots of chocolate cake and the excitement of seeing his cousins, and we have a recipe for over-excited toddler, who runs around and resists suggestions that he should sit quietly.

The above is the best that I can piece together from others at the scene -I'm too incoherent with rage at MiL (see TICTH) to have a civilized chat with her right now.

So with that background, my first question is: What makes a truly "undisciplined" two year old boy? What should I be looking for, to see if this is (as I suspect) a perfect storm of factors creating one bad situation, or a real problem?

Little one is not in regular trouble at daycare, that I'm aware of, 90% of time obeys me or his father...

And then, what could I DO to encourage little one to be even more obedient? We do time outs, sometimes with limited success, I'm not opposed to spanking but would save for really severe situations (which this isn't, IMHO) and I've tried some attempts at rewards for good behavior... what else could I try?

Thanks!
Kx

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Can you spare $13.10 to help find a cure for Leukemia, Lymphoma and Myeloma? http://pages.teamintraining.org/ne/kc12/cburberqb8#home

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Caissa
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# 16710

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Your 2.5 year old sounds normal to me.
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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Sounds normal to me, too. We used to have the problem of small children on a grandparent-induced sugar rush behaving badly at the grandparents. I think many, many parents will recognise this.
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birdie

fowl
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quote:
Originally posted by Kasra:

Little one is not in regular trouble at daycare, that I'm aware of, 90% of time obeys me or his father...


90%????! Sounds angelic to me - want to swap?

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"Gentlemen, I wash my hands of this weirdness."
Captain Jack Sparrow

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

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Actually, I was reminiscing with a cousin recently about visits to our grandparents. Granny used to buy in supplies of luminous green fizzy limeade and a reddish fizzy drink called "Moray Cup."

As we didn't get fizzy drinks at home we used to drink bottles of the stuff, start fighting amongst ourselves and then throw up.

At this point Granny would start wringing her hands and asking what was wrong with us, while our parents tried vainly to restore order.

Thirty years later, our parents were doing exactly the same as their parents, but with less artificial colours. And although they knew exactly why we were behaving badly, when they were the aggrieved parents, they appear mystified as why our children behaved badly.

Go figure.

[Disappointed]

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Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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Yup. Sugar rush, big occasion, tired, parents absent, granny present. Any two is often enough, three makes loud, boisterous and potentially tearful virtually certain, and I'll bet that's as far as it went.

You m-i-l probably feels terribly let down by her grandchild, but the child is, first and foremost, yours. Coping with grandparents is no less difficult than coping with a child. If in doubt, use similar strategies (eg, lots of hugs and rewards etc, when they do things right).

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Gwai
Shipmate
# 11076

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Thankfully my mother never does this, but I'm totally dreading Thanksgiving at the in-laws where my husband's grandmother who is quite old and not all there will insist on putting my daughter in front of TV all day--we don't have one at home and ration screen Very hard. I'll hardly see my daughter all vacation and she'll be misbehaving when I do. Sigh.

--------------------
A master of men was the Goodly Fere,
A mate of the wind and sea.
If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.


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Kasra
Shipmate
# 10631

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I appreciate the reassurance, thank you. I'm often quite "tiger-mom" protective of my son & needed to work out whether I was overreacting. I have a hair-trigger temper, unfortunately, and was already incandescent with rage at MiL...

Just to be sure, I'm going to talk to little one's daycare teacher tonight.

Thank you again

K //less enraged now!

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Can you spare $13.10 to help find a cure for Leukemia, Lymphoma and Myeloma? http://pages.teamintraining.org/ne/kc12/cburberqb8#home

Posts: 309 | From: Lincoln, NE | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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For the M-i-L, practice rolling your eyes. You're never going to win that one. I expect
Mary heard it from Joseph's mother.

For the wee one, consider boredom as a kind of ramped-up time out. For a lot of little ones, nothing is worse than boredom--they'd rather be eaten by a tiger than bored. So what I did was, wherever we went, I took care to find a good boring corner somewhere--preferably painted plain white with no knobs or signs or even a vaguely interesting baseboard. And of course away from people. Then, when LL misbehaved, I took him over to the corner and sat behind him, holding him so he was facing straight into the boring corner and had nothing to look at. Oh noes! Nothing to see, nothing to do (he was held), nothing to hear (because I wouldn't respond to any of the temper tantrum). Complete.Boredom.

We stayed there until he got over it. This was usually about two or three minutes. I'm darn sure it would have taken much longer if there had been anything at all to distract him--even a patterned wallpaper. But there wasn't, because I am an Evil Mom™.

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

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Zacchaeus
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# 14454

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Try saying to MIL how strange! he never behaves like that with me, what did you do to him? [Big Grin]
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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
# 10422

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Did you find his favouritist toy which naughty Granny misplaced?

Sounds like a perfectly normal little guy to me, at least from my recollections and observations.

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Even more so than I was before

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Kasra
Shipmate
# 10631

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LC - I want a membership to the Evil Mommy Club!

Daycare teacher reports that Little One is a perfectly normal and actually reasonably well-behaved boy at school. Phew!

Sadly, the favorite toy has not been located yet, MiL currently denying all knowledge of same (!) and she and my partner had an interesting and loud discussion of boundaries on the doorstep! However, bedtime trauma was reduced by excitement over alternate toy (replica of Daddy's grain truck which we'd been saving for Special Occasion of Good Boy but decided to break out last night given the circs) and peace is somewhat restored. I've had to forbid the hauling of soybeans/corn in the bedroom - has anyone ever trodden on a pile of soybeans in bare feet in the dark?! Don't!

Is it permitted to lock MiL in closet for 100 years?

Kx

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Can you spare $13.10 to help find a cure for Leukemia, Lymphoma and Myeloma? http://pages.teamintraining.org/ne/kc12/cburberqb8#home

Posts: 309 | From: Lincoln, NE | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
the famous rachel
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# 1258

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Hi All,

We are once again in the throes of potty training, having already given up twice - third time lucky? The famous toddler's nursery (daycare in US terms) is being less than helpful: the first day he was there in pants he had one (dirty) accident and they put him back in nappies for the whole rest of the day. Does anyone have any experience of how nurseries usually handle this issue, or ideas of how I can encourage ours to be more cooperative?

Best wishes,

Rachel.

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A shrivelled appendix to the body of Christ.

Posts: 912 | From: In the lab. | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gwai
Shipmate
# 11076

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When you talk to the nursery what do they say? Do they expect children not to have accidents? Do they think s/he is not ready? Do they have a one-accident-per-day policy (Would be weird, IMO) Just plain lazy? I think reading between the lines on what they say could be very helpful.

--------------------
A master of men was the Goodly Fere,
A mate of the wind and sea.
If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.


Posts: 11914 | From: Chicago | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Zacchaeus
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# 14454

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How old is he?
Posts: 1905 | From: the back of beyond | Registered: Jan 2009  |  IP: Logged
the famous rachel
Shipmate
# 1258

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quote:
Originally posted by Gwai:
When you talk to the nursery what do they say? Do they expect children not to have accidents? Do they think s/he is not ready? Do they have a one-accident-per-day policy (Would be weird, IMO) Just plain lazy? I think reading between the lines on what they say could be very helpful.

They seem to have suddenly developed a "only one pair of soiled underwear" per day policy, which last time we were trying to toilet train the boy they didn't have. They've also gone from saying "We'll try and implement whatever potty-training strategy you are following at home" to essentially "you should keep him at home til he is trained", which is utterly impractical.

To be honest, I suspect I know what the problem is: the famous toddler does disgusting large sloppy poos. After several months of repeated visits to the GP, it has been concluded that there's nothing wrong with him from a medical perspective. It's just the way he is. Certain people at nursery just don't want to deal with it. To be honest, I'd rather not have to deal with it myself, but he can't be in nappies forever. (He's nearly 3).

However, he brilliantly circumvented the problem today at nursery by not having any accidents at all! Hooray! (Now for the inevitable regression...).

Best wishes,

Rachel.

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A shrivelled appendix to the body of Christ.

Posts: 912 | From: In the lab. | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sarkycow
La belle Dame sans merci
# 1012

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quote:
Originally posted by the famous rachel:
To be honest, I suspect I know what the problem is: the famous toddler does disgusting large sloppy poos. After several months of repeated visits to the GP, it has been concluded that there's nothing wrong with him from a medical perspective. It's just the way he is.

Sounds like what they call 'toddler diarrhea'? Which translates as "Look, some toddlers just have softer poos than others." They apparently grow out of it by 5 or so.

My daughter had fairly soft poos, so her bottom was a delight to clean when she was in nappies. Once she started pooing on the toilet her bottom was very easy to clean, and she seemed able to get to the toilet before pooing, rather than being caught out (so although soft, it didn't just slide out, IYSWIM [Biased] ). So it's probably in the nursery workers' best interests to help get him quickly toilet trained, rather than keep having messy nappies to clean up [Big Grin]

My daughter is stubborn, so she had to decide to toilet train rather than mummy and daddy encouraging/telling her to do it. What appeared to help was her having some older friends - a couple of 6yr olds - that she played with at church. Then I harped on about them all being big boys and girls and wearing knickers, rather than being babies like her little sister and wearing nappies. After about a week of me mentioning this at every opportunity, she announced that she wanted to be a big girl with big girl knickers, so we went for it. She got it pretty much straight away, so maybe had 2 accidents in the first week, which confirmed for me that the little darling had been ready for a while, but couldn't be bothered! She was 2yrs 10 months, so your boy being just short of 3 doesn't seem late for potty training. I'd say talk about it, have potty and pants ready, and wait for him to choose to do it seems to be the best approach.

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“Just because your voice reaches halfway around the world doesn't mean you are wiser than when it reached only to the end of the bar.”

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the famous rachel
Shipmate
# 1258

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quote:
Originally posted by Sarkycow:
Sounds like what they call 'toddler diarrhea'? Which translates as "Look, some toddlers just have softer poos than others." They apparently grow out of it by 5 or so.to choose to do it seems to be the best approach.

Thanks Sarkycow! It's a relief to hear someone say this is normal. I've been under a certain amount of pressure from nursery to spot a food intolerance, but the GP actually said the same as you! However, not knowing any other kids with this issue (they mostly seem to be constipated!) it is difficult to know how to cope with it.

Jamie is also stubborn and unwilling to do things except in his own time. However, currently he is very keen to be in pants and very engaged with the process. We're currently averaging one accident a day - usually poo-related unfortunately. However, he generally tells me as soon as it happens, and as far as I'm concerned it's no worse than changing a nappy. Overall, I'm pretty impressed with how he's getting on, and really want to capitalise on progress this far. I'm hoping nursery don't jeopardise this!

I'm making nursery sound awful - which is a shame, as Jamie loves it there, and they're great about almost everything that doesn't involve poo, and have been very supportive during a difficult year. (The Famous Husband spent 6 months overseas, amongst other things...)

Best wishes,

Rachel.

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Keren-Happuch

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KGlet1 was just over 3 and KGLet2 just under when they got out of nappies. Just depends on the child so don't feel pressurised by time/age. No advice re nursery though as that wasn't something we had to deal with.

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Zacchaeus
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My niece was wee trained very quickly but wouldn’t poo train.
She had a ‘thing’ about pooing in the toilet, she would come and demand a nappy to poo in and as soon as she was finished would want it taken off. She did eventually grow out of it….

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Sarkycow
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Apparently for some kids pooing feels like a part of them falling out, which it kinda is when you think about it. Hence it's disturbing for them as they don't understand fully, and all try know is that it used to feel fine, cos the nappy held it close so it didn't drop away, and now it feels like a bit of them falling out. They do get used to it, but it takes time, lots of explanations to them, reassurance, etc.

Rachel, if he's pooing most days, is it often at a similar time? If so, could you prompt him around that time - get him to sit on the toilet and push a bit, see what happens?

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the famous rachel
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quote:
Originally posted by Sarkycow:
Rachel, if he's pooing most days, is it often at a similar time? If so, could you prompt him around that time - get him to sit on the toilet and push a bit, see what happens?

He's not terribly regular, but seems to be getting the hang of it anyhow. Today nursery managed to forget that he is egg-intolerant, and let him eat a scoth egg. He pooed about 6 times in the course of the afternoon as a consequence, but only had one and a half accidents (the half being a case where he got to the loo but didn't wait for someone to wipe his bottom afterwards, so his pants got dirty even though he'd done the main thing right!) I have little sympathy with the nursery staff in this case! I reckon currently 95% of wees and 50% of poos are going in the potty, which I'm quite impressed with!

Hope all is well with the other sailorlets.

Rachel.

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Gwai
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I hate hate hate the fall time change.

I doubt you all have any solutions--feel free, to suggest, if you do--but I think I need to share.
My son is a very scheduled little baby and changing his natural schedule is a surefire recipe for misery. (No oatmeal for breakfast? Is Outrage!) I tried to spread that extra hour out, but trying to keep him up late yesterday only provoked tears. I'll spare you the novel, but Gremlin sets his clock by when he's allowed to wake me up and nurse, he will push the clock a few minutes every day if I let him, so when mommy pushed the time back by half an hour? Major Anxiety Attacks, Batman! The fact that he didn't spend most of that half an hour screaming is as much a testament to a rare stoic effort on his part as it is to my talking to him almost constantly from my bed (shhh shhh, time to sleep. No, not yet. Shhh, soon. Try to sleep. Shhh... ad nauseam.) So of course like clockwork he also wakes up half an hour early two and a half hours after he nursed. I absolutely refuse to get up before 5:30am unless there's a fire involved, and even a soothing mommy could only keep him from infant misery for 15 minutes that time. Poor thing basically cries for 15 minutes then, and yet if I get up he'll do it every single day...

I'm not assuming it'll be better for days either. Poor pudgy-cheeked fellow has gotten SOOO much better at sleeping, and then life throws him this sort of stupidity. It's not major, life-changing, or important, but it's totally unfair.

[ 04. November 2013, 14:44: Message edited by: Gwai ]

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the famous rachel
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Hi Gwai,

Sorry - I'm no help on the time-change issue. The Famous Toddler never converts to summer time, so returning to GMT makes things easier for us, as it means he at least occasionally goes to sleep at a reasonable time.

Update from the potty-training front: I think he is basically there. He managed very nearly a week (six and three quarter days) without any accidents, and then it all fell apart for an afternoon, but now things are back on track. We'd promised him a special gift, something he really wanted, for managing a week, and it felt churlish to prohibit this because of that one afternoon, so we have bought him the object of his desires.

As encouragement to anyone else in a similar situation: this time round it took less than a fortnight for things to be approximately under control, and dealing with slightly sloppy poos is now much easier than it was when he was in nappies. He's also now very quick to tell us when he does have an accident, so it's usually no trouble to sort him out As far as I can tell, sorting out potty training is first and foremost a matter of choosing the right time for your child (and in our case, not letting nursery screw things up). This comes with all the usual caveats about things being likely to go horribly wrong again at any moment, of course.

Best wishes,

Rachel.

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Josephine

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On the time change -- for my kids, the adjustment took about a week, and I never did figure out anything to make it easier.

One thing I might have tried, if I'd known as much then as I do now about daylight, and circadian rhythms, and seasonal affective disorder, and related things, is getting them outside during daylight as much as possible during the days after the time change. Even when it's cloudy, being outside in daylight has an effect. It might not work with babies, but, next year, when you go through this again, it might be worth a try.

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In response to Gwai's question on another thread about toddlers sleeping through the night.

The Dafling used to sleep between 8pm and 5am - clearly all down to our brilliant parenting. Then she started teething, about a year ago. Ever since she has woken up between about 11pm and 2am and needs to be either settled or brought into bed with mum or dad. Settling has to be repeated an hour or two later, so she usually shares the bed.
A couple of nights ago she managed to get up and wander into the corridor before letting us know she'd woken up.

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Gwai
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That's rather the way Gremlin has been sleeping too except for the not in our bed part, because if we let that sweet limpet sleep in our bed on a regular basis, he'd be in Kindergarten long before we got him out.

He was doing a little better, but our room is super-cold right now as the heaters are not working reliably, so I think that's disrupting his sleep. (I seem to be the only person in this family who can just sleep peacefully under a blanket without curling up it in or throwing it off the bed etc.)

We're also travelling for Thanksgiving, something like 10 hours over two days, so I'm seriously hoping that all his car-screaming has been related to nausea. As non-car owners, we almost never put him in a car, and this may be interesting if he screams most of the trip...

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Gwai
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(Left unsaid, but assumed that if Gremlin's problems relate to nausea then we can solve them with an over the counter solution.)

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If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
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Dafyd
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The Dafling gets travel sick too. Her mother swears by travel bands. You can get them in toddler size.

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we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

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Moo

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quote:
Originally posted by Gwai:
He was doing a little better, but our room is super-cold right now as the heaters are not working reliably, so I think that's disrupting his sleep. (I seem to be the only person in this family who can just sleep peacefully under a blanket without curling up it in or throwing it off the bed etc.)

Have you tried a blanket sleeper? Our girls slept in those until they were about six.

Moo

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Gwai
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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Gwai:
He was doing a little better, but our room is super-cold right now as the heaters are not working reliably, so I think that's disrupting his sleep. (I seem to be the only person in this family who can just sleep peacefully under a blanket without curling up it in or throwing it off the bed etc.)

Have you tried a blanket sleeper? Our girls slept in those until they were about six.

Moo

Interesting that we share a country, but I have never heard them called that. However, we do have those, and he does usually sleep in them. It was just too cold even for them. Seriously, it was lower 50s at best in that room when the door was shut. I am very warm-natured, and I was wearing two pairs of pajamas and still waking up with cramps in my legs from curling up into a ball so tightly. However, they have now fixed the heaters, and since then Gremlin has been sleeping much better. Thanks [Smile]

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A mate of the wind and sea.
If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.


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the famous rachel
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quote:
Originally posted by Gwai:
However, they have now fixed the heaters, and since then Gremlin has been sleeping much better. Thanks [Smile]

If the problem occurs again, you might want to consider a baby sleeping bag:
something like this

Gremlin could wear his "blanket sleeper" inside a sleeping bag and then he would be well insulated and unable to kick off the covers and get chilly. My son also found the feeling of being surrounded by the sleeping bag very comforting so they may be helpful in general if Gremlin is a clingy little person. They are very common in the UK these days, and the famous preschooler used them until about 3 months ago, but I am not sure if they are common in the US. (I had assumed that when American people referred to a blanket sleeper, this was roughly what they meant, but it seems I was mistaken.)

Best wishes,

Rachel.

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