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Source: (consider it) Thread: Ignatian Spirituality and the Daily Examen
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I was reminded of the daily examen spiritual exercise method of prayer by the BBC Radio 4 Sunday Service today and realised that this was one of the ways I had been taught to pray, and one of the ones that actually stuck. The service is from Heythrop College and the Society of Jesus and is celebrating 400 years training RC priests.

From the linked Ignatian Spirituality website:
quote:
This is a version of the five-step Daily Examen that St. Ignatius practiced.
1. Become aware of God’s presence.
2. Review the day with gratitude.
3. Pay attention to your emotions.
4. Choose one feature of the day and pray from it.
5. Look toward tomorrow.

Has anyone else come across the daily examen? How useful have you found it?

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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Martin60
Shipmate
# 368

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I like it, but (ah HAH!) I can't help but compulsively deconstruct nowadays. (1) is metaphoric. God is present, yes, but we cannot be aware of Him as He manifestly ... doesn't manifest. He's as close as our carotids as the Muslims say. In the universe next door. The awareness is ours. Us. Think David Tennant Dr. Who yearning with Rose separated forever with a hermetic gulf a Planck length between them.

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Love wins

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MrsBeaky
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# 17663

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I've been trying to do this for several years.

I use http://www.sacredspace.ie/
and I've found the discipline has held me safe in troubled times and also been of great benefit in more peaceful seasons!

[ 05. October 2014, 09:56: Message edited by: MrsBeaky ]

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"It is better to be kind than right."

http://davidandlizacooke.wordpress.com

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Adam.

Like as the
# 4991

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May daily examen is the following:

  • Thank you: what is at least one thing I'm grateful for from today, and how does that reveal God's providence?
  • Sorry: what do I need to repent of from today? How is God acting to draw me out of that?
  • Wow: how has God amazed me today?
  • Please: What do I need to get through tomorrow?

It corresponds (in a different order) to the Baltimore Catechism's breakdown of prayer into Adoration, Confession, Thansgiving, Supplication (Prayer ACTS).

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Ave Crux, Spes Unica!
Preaching blog

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Martin60
Shipmate
# 368

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Sorry to chunter on, picking at the Dr. Who metaphor. He is omnipathic of each of us as if we were His only child yet we can't directly feel Him, see Him, know Him. Six years ago I saw the hand of Jesus in my mind's eye reaching down to ruffle an old ram's head. Me. I love it yet. But it was and is me. Even though He endorses it, nods in the fog.

There's the awesomest bit in Greg Bear's awesome Darwin's Children where a pure nulltheist scientist encounters God. She just asks in utter gutted meaningless hopelessness ... and He silently says 'Yes'. Twice.

It's even more beautiful than my 'vision' to me now. That must be feeding my Zen 'sense'.

I don't mean to distract from the Examen, which I appreciate and want to integrate. But it's late [Smile]

It's an interesting time brothers and sisters. Summat's up. In my very woolly old head and beyond. I've been stirred up multiply with work unpleasantness intruding Friday night and this morning at church all with The Eighth Day.

Good night.

[ 05. October 2014, 22:32: Message edited by: Martin PC not & Ship's Biohazard ]

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Love wins

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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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Just a late post to echo Mrs Beaky - I use the Irish Jesuits' sacredspace.ie too, aiming for daily. In fact, that's just where I'm off to now.

(This crosses over into the 'liturgical prayer for private use' stuff elsewhere on this board. I've found phrases which crop up a lot on that site, start to pop up in my head. "God is not foreign to my freedom. Instead, the spirit gives life to my most intimate desires". It's good, and formative.)

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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Fineline
Shipmate
# 12143

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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:

From the linked Ignatian Spirituality website:
quote:
This is a version of the five-step Daily Examen that St. Ignatius practiced.
1. Become aware of God’s presence.
2. Review the day with gratitude.
3. Pay attention to your emotions.
4. Choose one feature of the day and pray from it.
5. Look toward tomorrow.

Has anyone else come across the daily examen? How useful have you found it?
I have St Ignatius's book but I haven't read it yet. i didn't know about these five steps. But this is sort of how I pray anyway, although I pray in writing, rather than in my head. But these are my focuses, although not in such a structured way and not in any particular order. And I choose several features of the day, if there are several to deal with. I have to start by focusing on God. And I always have to consciously process my emotions, because if I don't, they don't process. So I always do this, and I pray for God to guide me. I often do gratitude for broader things than the day - I review my life, and thank God for food and a home and books and the internet and things like that.

I like the list. I will read the book sometime soon.

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Amir Emrra
Apprentice
# 18100

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I understand that St Ignatius' book is a terribly dry, dense read and best avoided, at least by beginners. An Ignatian spiritual director is, apparently, the way to go, of which there are very many in the UK, e.g. see St Bueno's & Mount St Jesuit Centre.

Personally, I found the daily podcast Pray as You Go to be the perfect introduction. In fact, I've been using it for years, and have never felt the need to "move on" to the 40 days of spiritual exercises!

[confession]
Actually, I'm Benedictine
[/confession]

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Anesti
Apprentice
# 18259

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I am a big fan of Pray as You Go too. [Cool]

Followed it for about four years now.

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leo
Shipmate
# 1458

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It's good - I listened to it for the first time today - about Ss Simon and Jude.

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My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

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Pancho
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# 13533

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My connection to Ignatian Spirituality begins with my devotion to the Sacred Heart which, though it began much earlier, has had a connection with the Jesuits since the time of St Claude de la Colombière, the confessor of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque (see "The Jesuit who fostered devotion to the Sacred Heart"). I also frequently attend a parish that used to be run by the Jesuits. While they were there I discovered that they are excellent confessors. There were a number of good homilists among the Jesuits who served there particularly a young energetic one who, to me, is a sign of hope for the order.

About a year and a half ago I did an online version of the Spiritual Exercises (now found here: The Spiritual Exercises Blog). I've also used the resources from Creighton University (a Jesuit school) in the past and I've used the Sacred Space website a few times. I don't know if they still do but Sacred Space use to come out in a print version which I thought was nice.

The Ignatian Examen is a part of a larger tradition of examinations of conscience. Lots of saints recommend making one each day and Catholics are taught to make one before going to confession. I do like the Ignatian version but I don't do it regularly because I always forget to do so (or I put it off for later).

I also like reading and hearing and watching stuff from the late old-school Jesuit Fr. John Hardon and Fr. Mitch Pacwa from EWTN.

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“But to what shall I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the market places and calling to their playmates, ‘We piped to you, and you did not dance;
we wailed, and you did not mourn.’"

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Kelly Alves

Bunny with an axe
# 2522

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Still a topic of interest when the Kempistry board closed, so transferring to Ecclesiantics for further discussion.

Kelly Alves, Admin/ Kempistry Host.

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I cannot expect people to believe “
Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
Kelly Alves, somewhere around 2003.

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