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Source: (consider it) Thread: Crafty Stuff
Heavenly Anarchist
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# 13313

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Folkwear tend to do historic or 'world' patterns, though some of the latter are folky. I'm trying to think of a folk pattern manufacturer but most of my unusual patterns are historical costume. What sort of pattern are you interested in?

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Drifting Star

Drifting against the wind
# 12799

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I'm finding it very difficult to describe - which is probably why Google hasn't been much help, not understanding me when I say 'Stuff like that little shop I use to go to 15 years ago...'

The best I can say is that it might be called ethnic in a very generalised way - the sort of things that are often made in batik fabrics, or tie dyed. Gathered skirts, loose tops, padded cotton jackets. Much embroidery (although embroidery can, of course, be added to anything).

Folkwear do sort of touch on it, but their patterns are more themed than I really want. They might be the link I remembered though, with the haze of time over it.

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The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Heraclitus

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Drifting Star

Drifting against the wind
# 12799

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I've just figured out that the word I'm looking for is hippy! Hippy style clothes. [Smile]

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The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Heraclitus

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Heavenly Anarchist
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# 13313

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[Smile] There's a term I recognise - I live in homemade maxi dresses made from early 1970s patterns, vintage Laura Ashley style!

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Thyme
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# 12360

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quote:
Originally posted by Drifting Star:
A year or so ago someone on the Ship talked about making clothes from a particular manufacturer's patterns. They were lovely, unusual, folky/ethnic clothes, and Google is not my friend and won't dig them out for me.

I've also been trawling through Oblivion without any success. I thought it might have been Firenze, but my trawling suggests she uses mostly Vogue patterns, so maybe it was someone else.

I vaguely remember that thread, and I think it was the Folkwear site that was mentioned. For that sort of clothing you can probably adapt mainstream patterns, because it is as much the fabric and embellishment that creates the look as the designs which tend to be quite basic, as you say, gathered skirts, kaftan type tops etc.

Butterick and McCalls have uniform and costume sections with a variety of patterns with a historic feel that could be adapted.

McCalls and Butterick

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Drifting Star

Drifting against the wind
# 12799

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I trawled through the entire catalogues of Butterick, McCalls, Simplicity and Vogue for dresses and skirts and found virtually nothing that would work. Skirt C on this pattern is a possibility, but most of the dresses are quite fitted and smart, or trendy (I have decided to kick 'trendy' into the long grass unless it suddenly starts to meet me on my terms).

I have just bought the most fantastic piece of material - cream coloured cotton lawn with heavy cream embroidery all over - and I want a cool and easy feel-good summer dress, not something dressy - but I do want it to fit! It's looking as though I'll have to create a pattern from parts of old patterns and my imagination.

Heavenly Anarchist - yes! Just the thing! I have such fond memories of long, flowing Laura Ashley dresses with the lace edging showing at the bottom.

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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Hmm. One only needs a pattern if you indeed seek dressy, fitted, etc. The whole point of folk costume and hippy clothing is that it is easy to make. Hippies did not do tailoring.
Does the pattern on your fabric (which sounds yummy) run sideways, from selvedge to selvedge? Could you just gather one selvedge edge into a waistband or a drawstring and wear it? If it is floaty and voluminous enough you might not need to hem it, just run a side seam to make the fabric into a tube before adding the waistband/drawstring.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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If you do find a mother lode of such patterns, let us know.

I wish I could find patterns for the kind of clothes I occassionally see going past - usually on the streets of Paris on a soigné lady du un certain age. They are loose - all dropped shoulders and asymmetric hems - muted colours and either linen or coarse weave cotton. They look simple and effortless and are probably neither.

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Drifting Star

Drifting against the wind
# 12799

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[Cross-posted wit Firenze - sounds wonderful! I'll let you know if I ever find anything... ]

The fabric has a scalloped edge at both selvedges which will need trimming when finished, but the design isn't graduated.

I'm slightly wary of drawstring waists because I'm not the best shape for them. I'm thinking that I've got a pattern with a loose-ish bodice that nevertheless has darts. Then the skirt can be simple and gathered and make the most of the embroidery.

I'll have to have a think about sleeves/not sleeves. (I'm slightly pushed with the quantity of fabric - I bought all they had, but it was about a foot short of what I wanted, although it is quite wide - about 55in.)

I do have another pattern, which is a very simple two pieces plus sleeves, but I think I would have to try it out with another fabric to be sure it would look OK on me.

[ 10. July 2015, 14:27: Message edited by: Drifting Star ]

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Thyme
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# 12360

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There is 'The Kings Daughters' which does patterns for 'plain dress' but which might have something along the lines you are looking for.

The King's Daughters

Also a quick search for vintage hippy clothing patterns threw up a few possible sites.

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Penny S
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# 14768

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I'm slightly bemused by the idea of "modest dress" under the title of "The King's Daughters".

Look at us, aren't we modest...

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Heavenly Anarchist
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# 13313

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I usually just search ebay for 1970s maxi dress patterns and adapt them (note they come up small).
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
If you do find a mother lode of such patterns, let us know.

I wish I could find patterns for the kind of clothes I occassionally see going past - usually on the streets of Paris on a soigné lady du un certain age. They are loose - all dropped shoulders and asymmetric hems - muted colours and either linen or coarse weave cotton. They look simple and effortless and are probably neither.

These
patterns are pricey but good for producing loose linen dresses.

This is probably my favourite asymmetrical dress pattern and great in single plain weaves or mixed fabrics.

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Heavenly Anarchist
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# 13313

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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I'm slightly bemused by the idea of "modest dress" under the title of "The King's Daughters".

Look at us, aren't we modest...

When I had a stall at Greenbelt selling my clothing and jewellery I met some women who wore 'modest' dress. They wore long skirts, tunics and scarves rather than prairie style though and they dropped by to chat because they noticed I was wearing pantaloons under my prairie dress and they thought I might be modest [Big Grin]

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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A little googling will reveal to you sites that sell 'modest' everything from soccer uniforms to swim suits. These are purchased not only by polygamists in the Utah desert, but women in the Middle East.

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Doublethink.
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# 1984

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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I'm slightly bemused by the idea of "modest dress" under the title of "The King's Daughters".

Look at us, aren't we modest...

They don't seem to have patterns for boys.

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Lamb Chopped
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# 5528

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To be fair, it's probably because you buy "modest" boy clothing off the rack (just make them wear long pants, sleeves, etc. at the wrong time of the year). It's not quite so easy to do that for girls when maxi-dresses are not in fashion.

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Doublethink.
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# 1984

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Trousers, long sleeve shirts ...

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All political thinking for years past has been vitiated in the same way. People can foresee the future only when it coincides with their own wishes, and the most grossly obvious facts can be ignored when they are unwelcome. George Orwell

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Penny S
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# 14768

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Muslim modest dress for males does cover more than most boys' clothes do.

I do feel that the prairie styles could have the effect of drawing the eye to the wearer (not in a sexual way, of course) and thus are not really modest. And certainly not plain.

Which is wholly irrelevant to the search for hippy patterns.

Have you thought of ebay? I've seen a couple of things I like, but the wrong size. Just searched for dress patterns 1970s.

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Lamb Chopped
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# 5528

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quote:
Originally posted by Doublethink.:
Trousers, long sleeve shirts ...

That's assuming they allow girls to wear trousers.

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Kitten
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# 1179

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There may be some useful patterns Here

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Pomona
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# 17175

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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Muslim modest dress for males does cover more than most boys' clothes do.

I do feel that the prairie styles could have the effect of drawing the eye to the wearer (not in a sexual way, of course) and thus are not really modest. And certainly not plain.

Which is wholly irrelevant to the search for hippy patterns.

Have you thought of ebay? I've seen a couple of things I like, but the wrong size. Just searched for dress patterns 1970s.

Modesty in terms of religious dress varies quite a bit. Most Conservative to 'Modern Orthodox' Jewish women for instance will cover collarbones, elbows and knees (and head if married), and that is modesty enough for them. Mormon women just need enough to cover their temple garments (essentially a t-shirt and boxer shorts). Cape dresses for Plain dressers don't vary from prairie dresses a huge amount, and Mennonites often wear small prints and are still considered Plain, as do Hutterites. Plain with a capital P is not the same as plain.

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Drifting Star

Drifting against the wind
# 12799

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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Have you thought of ebay? I've seen a couple of things I like, but the wrong size. Just searched for dress patterns 1970s.

I've had a quick look on Ebay (so many search terms, so many items, so little time...) I've also found quite a lot on Etsy, although so far all the ones I've liked have been very small sizes, and that's without factoring up because they're older.

There are quite a lot of vintage patterns out there when you start to look. [Smile]

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Banner Lady
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# 10505

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Feeling stupidly pleased with myself that I have managed to recycle some old artificial wire flower stems and a box of gathered lace into pretty flowers. These will be laid across napkins folded heart shape for a dinner party for 60 women. The result was better than I hoped for the cost of the glue for the glue gun.

I always wondered what I was going to do with that lace!

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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As to patterns, keep in mind what bits are easy to alter and what aren't. It is easy to make the thing longer or shorter, either by adding at the bottom or slicing in the middle of the paper pattern and taping in two inches worth of extra paper. Adding an inch or two to the waist is not difficult, to the bust rather harder.

Getting things to fit across the shoulder or the seat of the pants is much more difficult, and I would not mess with a neckline unless I had no other option.

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Drifting Star

Drifting against the wind
# 12799

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The dress is nearly done! I used a pattern that I've had for about 15 years, two sizes too small, and sized it up (yes, bodice and all - I made a mock-up in spare material first). Nice and loose. Then I added the skirt, and it pulled the bodice down and made the top completely shapeless. Although the fabric is cotton lawn, the embroidery makes it heavier than you'd expect. So I took the bodice in by about the amount I'd added to it, fiddled with the darts, and it fits beautifully now.

As I was doing it I remembered that this is the way I always made my clothes (I've done very little for about 15 years) - make 'em too big, then take 'em in.

The one thing I haven't got, though, is the loose, cool summer dress I wanted - this is much more fitted and proper. Nice though. I haven't quite finished, because I'm waiting for some fabric to arrive to make a loose lining for the skirt - it looked fine until I stood in front of the window!

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Thyme
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# 12360

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quote:
Originally posted by Drifting Star:
The dress is nearly done! I used a pattern that I've had for about 15 years, two sizes too small, and sized it up (yes, bodice and all - I made a mock-up in spare material first).

[Overused] [Overused]

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The Church in its own bubble has become, at best the guardian of the value system of the nation’s grandparents, and at worst a den of religious anoraks defined by defensiveness, esoteric logic and discrimination. Bishop of Buckingham's blog

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Heavenly Anarchist
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# 13313

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Well done [Big Grin]

Manic sewing time here. My WW1 re-enactment is on Saturday so I'm checking over my costume (Red Cross trained nurse on leave from the Front) and that of my youngest who is playing a hall servant. My apron is now well starched and stands independently [Smile]
The deadline for Tudor costume approval is this week and in the last few weeks I made a new kirtle (basic dress) with detachable sleeves and 2 gowns. I ended up making a second gown as my first looks lovely but will probably be judged as too 'aspirational' for the character I play. The internal seams are machine sewn but external ones have to be hand finished so lots of hand sewing of eyelets on the front and shoulders of the kirtle.
This is my gown pattern, my posh gown has puffed, paned sleeves, the other plain short ones. My kirtle is front fastening similar to this one so my gown fastens all the way down the bodice with hooks to cover up the kirtle lacing.

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Drifting Star

Drifting against the wind
# 12799

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Those are amazing HA. They must be very satisfying to make - I always find sewing fitted things very pleasing (although I prefer to wear loose things), probably because of the chance to make something that's fitted to me rather than to what the manufacturer thinks is right.

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The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Heraclitus

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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*bump*
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Surfing Madness
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# 11087

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Hoping someone can offer some advice. I've just started felting, I want to make a bathmat. I'm trying to work out what backing to put on the felt so as to make it non slip. Any thoughts? Thanks

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Drifting Star

Drifting against the wind
# 12799

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You could try this - there are others available more cheaply, but this is the one I've tried. I would think it might work well if the floor underneath is vinyl or tile.

[ 24. November 2015, 19:09: Message edited by: Drifting Star ]

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The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Heraclitus

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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You can buy a liquid rubber to paint onto the back of the finished mat. Don't know how well it holds up under wash and dry, however. Another idea is to simply get and use a separate nonslip rug underlayment like one of these. If the rug is not big then you can pic up the rug itself for washing, and pick up the underlayment when you feel like mopping or vacuuming the floor.

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Penny S
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# 14768

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I have a sort of rubberised net which lies under rugs on my kitchen floor, and which could easily be cut to shape and stitched on the back of a felt mat. I can't find it online easily, but IKEA have something called STOPP which looks likely.
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