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Source: (consider it) Thread: Never Again Meals
Niminypiminy
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A pie cooked by my mother. It had various left-over vegetables in it from the many small bowls of left-overs in her fridge. There may have been swede. There were certainly baked beans.

When I say pie, you are probably thinking of something covered with pastry, or perhaps mashed potato.

Not cabbage.

This pie had been topped with cabbage leaves which had been spread over the top before putting in the oven, so by the time I ate it they were slightly burned.

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L'organist
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Thanks for the link, I'd forgotten the matchless line Remember, you're never alone with a pilchard.

It also brought back to mind one of the more revolting meals of my childhood - pilchard pie: underneath layer of pilchards in tomato sauce into which had been mixed a can of creamed sweetcorn, then a layer of mash with some leftover parsley sauce, topped off with salt and vinegar potato crisps [Ultra confused]

Deciding to finish off the meal with strawberry junket was the final straw.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Baptist Trainfan
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I really dislike pilchards. Yet I like sardines.

It must be the sauce they come in.

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

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I remember the first time I was served shrimp cocktail. It seemed like I was chewing on someone's fingers. Ditto for the second time. I've never eaten shrimp again.

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"I take prayer too seriously to use it as an excuse for avoiding work and responsibility." -- The Revd Martin Luther King Jr.

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Penny S
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quote:
Originally posted by Pomona:
Mac and cheese is just the American for macaroni cheese.

And this isn't America, so why change? That which we call macaroni cheese is just as delicious. So why change? And if changing, why not to macaroni and cheese to fit in with our West Indian community? It is the undemanded language shift I was not happy about.
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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
I really dislike pilchards. Yet I like sardines.

It must be the sauce they come in.

It's the tins. In Cornwall they catch pilchards but sell them as sardines. Brush them with oil and lemon, BBQ them and they are delicious.

Tinned pilchards are of Satan though.

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Pomona
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
quote:
Originally posted by Pomona:
Mac and cheese is just the American for macaroni cheese.

And this isn't America, so why change? That which we call macaroni cheese is just as delicious. So why change? And if changing, why not to macaroni and cheese to fit in with our West Indian community? It is the undemanded language shift I was not happy about.
Macaroni and cheese is also used in the US. And I am quite aware that it's not America, but the US terminology is being used because it's being served in the US way, ie as a side to soul food/US style BBQ etc.

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Welease Woderwick

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Macaroni cheese made with Gorgonzola and cream sauce is a Yes, please, again as often as you like meal!

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Penny S
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Not in the Sainsbury's ad, it isn't. Main meal suggestion. Obviously, in context, no problem.
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Ariel
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quote:
Originally posted by Pomona:
Macaroni and cheese is also used in the US. And I am quite aware that it's not America, but the US terminology is being used because it's being served in the US way, ie as a side to soul food/US style BBQ etc.

I wish you'd come and tell our local pubs that - they feature it as a main meal.

I expect, any day now, "cauli'n'cheese" to appear on menus (which must surely be one of the most revolting dishes known to humanity. Yet it persists).

[ 22. October 2015, 11:12: Message edited by: Ariel ]

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Albertus
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The US terminology is being used because it's being presented as funky and hip and, in the case of ready meals, because they want to sell it to young people rather than to elderly people who have it when the Meals on Wheels don't deliver - bit of a caricature but the point about advertising and marketing is what is behind it all. So they put the same stuff in the tubs but change the label a bit.

So let's, please, keep our own terminology, unless, just possibly, you're talking about the menu of a place which does wholeheartedly do that particular kind of American food (and not just the Brake Bros version of it).

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:

I expect, any day now, "cauli'n'cheese" to appear on menus (which must surely be one of the most revolting dishes known to humanity. Yet it persists).

If you don't like cauliflower or cheese, or have a particular aversion to cooked cheese, that is undoubtedly so. I enjoy it, but we usually have it with sausages and Mrs Sioni is an uncommonly good cook.

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North East Quine

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I find frying chopped bacon and adding it to the cheese sauce improves cauliflower cheese no end.

Edited to add - though if the North East Man smells bacon frying, he's disappointed if dinner turns out to be cauliflower cheese or cabbage pasta bake, another dish improved by bacon.

[ 22. October 2015, 11:51: Message edited by: North East Quine ]

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Moo

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During World War 2 when meat was rationed, we used to have macaroni and cheese as a main dish once a week.

Moo

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Penny S
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I'll add various things to both, often tomato, sometimes ham.

I don't see collard greens making an appearance. Or grits. Or chitterlings (sp?)

And Waitrose had fallen, too.

It's like the spread of the American pronunciation of the last syllable of figwort, liverwort, and so on, which crept in via St John's Wort. I heard the botanist James Wong use the British form after speaking with a British botanist, but creeping back to the wart version.

And the spread of "gifted" as a verb instead of "given".

I'm developing fogeyism.

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Drifting Star

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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
...
I'm developing fogeyism.

Right there with you. [Disappointed]

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Stercus Tauri
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A painful memory of cuisine écossaise is deep fried pizza. Can someone please assure me that it doesn't exist outside chip shops? Deep fried haggis, on the other hand, is not so bad.

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Ariel
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Has anyone tried the famous deep-fried Mars Bar? I did once out of curiosity when on holiday in Portsmouth. One bite was enough. If you like your Mars Bars half melted into greasy, crisp batter, this is for you.

Come to think of it, the Stilton ice-cream I once had at a food fair was something else I wouldn't want to repeat. But if you like frozen sweet cheese, this may be right up your street.

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Has anyone tried the famous deep-fried Mars Bar? I did once out of curiosity when on holiday in Portsmouth. One bite was enough. If you like your Mars Bars half melted into greasy, crisp batter, this is for you.

The repertoire of chip shops in South Wales is similar to that associated with Scotland. Not only can you get the deep-fried Mars bar, but you can get deep-fried Topic and Snickers too!
quote:


Come to think of it, the Stilton ice-cream I once had at a food fair was something else I wouldn't want to repeat. But if you like frozen sweet cheese, this may be right up your street.

We once, and only one, bought Stilton with Port chocolates. Maybe the Belgians or French can do it, but not this place in Cardiff.

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Curiosity killed ...

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There was a chip shop in the Lakes selling deep fried Mars bars and a selection of other deep fried chocolate bars - Marathon and Twix, iirc. So yes, I've tasted deep fried Mars bar and deep fried Marathon. One of each between eight of us was plenty, just enough to try them. And we'd been walking all day, so were hungry.

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Kelly Alves

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Pomona:
Macaroni and cheese is also used in the US. And I am quite aware that it's not America, but the US terminology is being used because it's being served in the US way, ie as a side to soul food/US style BBQ etc.

I wish you'd come and tell our local pubs that - they feature it as a main meal.

I expect, any day now, "cauli'n'cheese" to appear on menus (which must surely be one of the most revolting dishes known to humanity. Yet it persists).

Here in the US the term began as a way to prompt kids to beg their parents for boxed meals with an easy to pronounce catch phrase, so I agree that sounds stupid on an adult pub menu. Probably just space-saving.

Interesting that we keep the "and" and y'all drop it, though. (In the adult version.)

[ 22. October 2015, 23:51: Message edited by: Kelly Alves ]

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Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
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Kelly Alves

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My never- again meal is lutefisk, of course. Thought it was mashed potatoes and piled it on my plate at a Lutheran potluck. My cruel stepfather made me eat every bite, while he snickered.

If you haven't had the pleasure-- cold fish custard.

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I cannot expect people to believe “
Jesus loves me, this I know” of they don’t believe “Kelly loves me, this I know.”
Kelly Alves, somewhere around 2003.

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Lothlorien
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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:

I expect, any day now, "cauli'n'cheese" to appear on menus (which must surely be one of the most revolting dishes known to humanity. Yet it persists).

If you don't like cauliflower or cheese, or have a particular aversion to cooked cheese, that is undoubtedly so. I enjoy it, but we usually have it with sausages and Mrs Sioni is an uncommonly good cook.
My eldest son says the only reason for the creation of cauliflower is for it to become cauliflower with cheese sauce. I love it but love cauliflower in its many incarnations. Cauliflower cheese is winter comfort food for my family.

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Welease Woderwick

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Most of the brassicae are good but cauliflower is wonderful! We don't have it enough here. Cauliflower cheese is probably not something that would appeal to Himself and Herself but, hey, that would mean I'd have to eat it all!

[Big Grin]

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What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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basso

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I like the brassicas when cooked, but I'll give them a pass when raw.

Cauliflower is wonderful roasted - something I learned from Amazing Grace.

I'm surprised we got to page 3 before somebody mentioned lutefisk. I've heard Kelly's lutefisk story, and I thought of it when I saw the thread.

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Leorning Cniht
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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I wish you'd come and tell our local pubs that - they feature it as a main meal.

Mac and cheese is also one of the stalwarts of the kids menu in many eating establishments, where it forms a main meal.
quote:

I expect, any day now, "cauli'n'cheese" to appear on menus (which must surely be one of the most revolting dishes known to humanity. Yet it persists).

I've never really seen the point of cauliflower. To my mind, it's a vegetable suitable for eating if you can't obtain tasty vegetables.

Still, I suppose if you have a person who likes both cauliflower and covering random foodstuffs in a cheese sauce, it's reasonable to have them get it all out of their system in one dish, which you can then avoid [Snigger]

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Ariel
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quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
I've never really seen the point of cauliflower. To my mind, it's a vegetable suitable for eating if you can't obtain tasty vegetables.

Quite. It may possibly have some flavour of its own but as it usually seems to be boiled to soft blandness it's hard to tell. I suspect the cheese is the main attraction of cauli'n'cheese.
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balaam

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
I've never really seen the point of cauliflower. To my mind, it's a vegetable suitable for eating if you can't obtain tasty vegetables.

Quite. It may possibly have some flavour of its own but as it usually seems to be boiled to soft blandness it's hard to tell. I suspect the cheese is the main attraction of cauli'n'cheese.
Even then it can be improved by substituting broccoli for cauliflower.

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balaam

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Tinned pilchards are of Satan though.

Sir, you are a prophet.

I'd like to add to the delicious fresh, disgusting tinned list. — Tuna.

If I am served tinned tuna it goes straight into the cat.

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Welease Woderwick

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If we are out before we ever order a mushroom dish we check whether it is tinned mushrooms or fresh ones - tinned ones have no flavour and are a complete waste of space! They also include, at no extra cost, a sort of unpleasant slimy texture.

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Drifting Star

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
We once, and only one, bought Stilton with Port chocolates. Maybe the Belgians or French can do it, but not this place in Cardiff.

We had those too - quite a few years ago now. Even the dog wouldn't eat them, and he loved both chocolate and cheese.

ETA I think ours came from Waitrose.

[ 23. October 2015, 09:34: Message edited by: Drifting Star ]

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Moo

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quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
I've never really seen the point of cauliflower. To my mind, it's a vegetable suitable for eating if you can't obtain tasty vegetables.

I don't like it cooked, but it's very good raw with a suitable dip.

Moo

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Erik
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This thread has reminded me of a meal from my student days. My room-mate had heard of steak and ale stew. We had some chicken and he decided that Guinness was close enough. There may be ways of making a good sauce from Guinness but pouring it into a pan with some chicken and leeks and leaving it to cook for about an hour is not it.

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Penny S
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Has anyone tried cauliflower rice - ie, cauliflower broken into its smallest fractal pieces, cooked and served instead of the carbs part of the meal? I haven't, though I like cauli enough to grow it.
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no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Has anyone tried cauliflower rice - ie, cauliflower broken into its smallest fractal pieces, cooked and served instead of the carbs part of the meal? I haven't, though I like cauli enough to grow it.

Yes.

The cauliflower doesn't really seem at all like cauliflower when made like this. You can also mix with an egg and make a gluten free pizza crust, which is a Celiac/Coeliac recipe.

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by Erik:
This thread has reminded me of a meal from my student days. My room-mate had heard of steak and ale stew. We had some chicken and he decided that Guinness was close enough. There may be ways of making a good sauce from Guinness but pouring it into a pan with some chicken and leeks and leaving it to cook for about an hour is not it.

I'm pretty sure that Carbonnade Flamande works with Guinness.

It's a Nigella recipe, but none the worse for that and variations exist.

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Albertus
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Yes. And Mrs A used to make a pretty good mushroom pie which involved Guinness.
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Ariel
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Yes - steak, mushroom and Guinness pie has long been one of my very favourite things. The difference is that steak can take the darker, stronger flavour of Guinness better than chicken, which usually has a more delicate flavour. Also, the Guinness needs to be mellowed a bit by other ingredients when used in cooking. If Erik's friend had diluted it a bit with stock and seasoning it might have been a happier story.

But that's student cooking for you: those days of happy experimentation [Biased]

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Stercus Tauri
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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
I've never really seen the point of cauliflower. To my mind, it's a vegetable suitable for eating if you can't obtain tasty vegetables.

Quite. It may possibly have some flavour of its own but as it usually seems to be boiled to soft blandness it's hard to tell. I suspect the cheese is the main attraction of cauli'n'cheese.
In its defence, cauliflower, lightly fried in olive oil, can be the basis of a most delectable vegetable curry - I make it often.

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Ariel
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# 58

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I have had it in a curry and it works all right in that, but that's basically because the curry has a lot of flavour. There are some foods that are mostly just vehicles for sauces, cauliflower seems to be one of them.
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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I like cauliflower, but not as it often arrives, overcooked and watery, rendered tasteless before coating in fairly nasty cheese sauce. I eat it raw, curry it with chick peas, use a Delia recipe pan roasting it with cumin and cook it in tomato sauce, which I thought was a Spanish recipe, but when I googled it came up as Afghani or Mediterranean.

None of these recipes boil cauliflower.

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Penny S
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# 14768

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One of my historic recipe books ordered what we would consider extreme overcooking for all brassicas as essential for health. Or something. It was only when I read about the characteristics of the ancestral seakale that I realised where this came from. Seakale seems to come from the how to cook a galah cookbook. "Boil with a stone, and when the stone is soft, throw the bird away" as I recall. (I have not tried seakale.) I wonder how recently the brassicas have been given the ability to be rapidly cooked al dente.
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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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One thing I am adamant about is that brassicae should never be boiled - sometimes they can be lightly steamed but mostly a quick saute is enough. No wonder they are tasteless if boiled, all the goodness is then in the water!

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Ricardus
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# 8757

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quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
A painful memory of cuisine écossaise is deep fried pizza. Can someone please assure me that it doesn't exist outside chip shops? Deep fried haggis, on the other hand, is not so bad.

According to Wikipedia, it exists in Italy as well, especially in Naples.

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Stercus Tauri
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# 16668

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quote:
Originally posted by Ricardus:
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
A painful memory of cuisine écossaise is deep fried pizza. Can someone please assure me that it doesn't exist outside chip shops? Deep fried haggis, on the other hand, is not so bad.

According to Wikipedia, it exists in Italy as well, especially in Naples.
Interesting - I didn't know that. The best chip shops (and ice cream shops) were all run by Italians when I was a little younger, so perhaps that's the explanation.

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Penny S
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# 14768

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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
One thing I am adamant about is that brassicae should never be boiled - sometimes they can be lightly steamed but mostly a quick saute is enough. No wonder they are tasteless if boiled, all the goodness is then in the water!

Curiously, during the food science portion of my Applied Science mains course at college (thinly disguised science for gurlies, related to the domestic science and needlework courses the others were doing, but successfully disguised, because I didn't notice until much much later) when I boiled up sprouts and tested the resulting veggies and their water for ascorbic acid, I did not find that it was all in the water. There was some concern about this from the staff, but that was my result.

I have bought a reduced pack of cauli and broccoli couscous from Waitrose - instructions either to microwave or quickly fry. Can't do the first - think I'm going for omelette.

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Athrawes
Ship's parrot
# 9594

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quote:
Originally posted by Ricardus:
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
A painful memory of cuisine écossaise is deep fried pizza. Can someone please assure me that it doesn't exist outside chip shops? Deep fried haggis, on the other hand, is not so bad.

According to Wikipedia, it exists in Italy as well, especially in Naples.
Sort of explains Vesuvius, then. Perhaps someone should tell them before it's too late!

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Explaining why is going to need a moment, since along the way we must take in the Ancient Greeks, the study of birds, witchcraft, 19thC Vaudeville and the history of baseball. Michael Quinion.

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Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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The Arizona State Fair is going on right now (I haven't gone to it in many years). All sorts of strange foods are sold, but especially anything deep-fried. Here are a few highlights from this year's Fair.

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"...that is generally a matter for Pigwidgeon, several other consenting adults, a bottle of cheap Gin and the odd giraffe."
~Tortuf

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Pomona
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# 17175

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quote:
Originally posted by Erik:
This thread has reminded me of a meal from my student days. My room-mate had heard of steak and ale stew. We had some chicken and he decided that Guinness was close enough. There may be ways of making a good sauce from Guinness but pouring it into a pan with some chicken and leeks and leaving it to cook for about an hour is not it.

Replace the Guinness with some blonde beer (Belgian wheat beer for instance) and it'd be lovely - the Belgians often cook chicken with blonde beers and it's lovely, like a coq au riesling without riesling.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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marzipan
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# 9442

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Thinking about student meals, we had a recipe for spinach and ricotta cannelloni which my housemate was attempting to cook, only she couldn't find ricotta or cannelloni in the shop, so we substituted lasagne and cheddar cheese. It was fine but nothing like how the actual recipe would have turned out!

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formerly cheesymarzipan.
Now containing 50% less cheese

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