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Source: (consider it) Thread: Inquire Within: general questions
Penny S
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quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
This is a case of I do not know but I almost certainly know an organisation that does. I have a friend that was involved with them at one stage. However on exploring on the web and pages I think what you need to get hold of is a copy of the Whithorn Town Trail which looks at thirty buildings around Whithorn.

I have a memory of it connecting with a family who had a role in the town, but that is vague. I would however suspect that there is a "1" missing at the front.

Jengie

Unfortunately the Whithorn Trust doesn't know. Last time I was there, they were going to mention it to an archaeologist working on this sort of thing in the town - but they forgot. I probably need to see if I can get a lead on the archaeologist.
I wonder if a herald would know? Lord Lyon King of Arms or someone like that?
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BroJames
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Yes, they might do. I can send them a picture,I believe, and they will quote me a fee for researching it.
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Penny S
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Might there be a Big Book of heraldic badges or something to be just looked through at a local reference library?

I had a thought about the stone underneath - it might not be a mortar, but could be the lower pivot (?) of a large wooden door, which would have had a vertical beam resting in it. I don't know where that idea has come from. Possibly from a film in which a giant stone door rotated in something similar, so don't take it too seriously.

[ 02. April 2014, 20:16: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Autenrieth Road

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Does anyone know if there is an iPhone app that includes the Catechism from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States of America, a.k.a. TEC? I'd ideally get the entire BCP, but I'd settle for just the Catechism.

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Truth

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L'organist
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Penny S
Some libraries may still have a copy of Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage; failing that, try Burke's Peerage.

Between the two there should be an entry for all armigerous families in the UK and Ireland - although I'm not sure whether Irish titles were kept up-to-date after partition.

Failing that, try The College of Arms or, if Scottish, the office of Lyon King of Arms.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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BroJames
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quote:
Originally posted by Autenrieth Road:
Does anyone know if there is an iPhone app that includes the Catechism from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States of America, a.k.a. TEC? I'd ideally get the entire BCP, but I'd settle for just the Catechism.

There is a link on this page that might help
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BroJames
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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Penny S
Some libraries may still have a copy of Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage; failing that, try Burke's Peerage.

Between the two there should be an entry for all armigerous families in the UK and Ireland - although I'm not sure whether Irish titles were kept up-to-date after partition.

Failing that, try The College of Arms or, if Scottish, the office of Lyon King of Arms.

Debrett's only claims to cover
quote:
Every British duke, marquess, viscount, earl, baron and baronet, and the living members of their families in the male line
not all armigerous families.

Burke's Peerage is more ambitious in scope. It claims to be
quote:
the definitive guide to the genealogy and heraldry of the Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Landed Gentry of the United Kingdom
Burke's General Armory of 1884 is freely searchable online. The only motto close to the inscription on the stone is that of the Goldsmiths' Company, but the arms are very different.
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Tubbs

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quote:
Originally posted by Mrs Shrew:
It's a long shot I guess, but a friend, surname Seal, was explaining that his (late) father was a theologian, and diocesan expert on demonology (also professor of such but I didn't catch where) from area of St Albans.

He gave me his dad's first names, and it sounded familiar, but I was very tired at the time and promptly forgot the first names, making a quick trip to Google to find out whether he truly did sound familiar, and what stuff I had read or intended to read by the mystery person impossible (because Seal is a word as well as a name I simply don't have enough to go on).

Does anyone know who my friend's dad was? He was definitely ordained, possibly methodist or free church and will have died more than about two years ago but I don't know how much more than that.

Ran this past a Minister I know in that neck of the woods and he's not sure. Based on your friend's description and the use of the word "diocesan" your friend's dad sounds like he was Anglican or Methodist, even Catholic. Free churches don't use that term at all.

Is it not possible to admit to your friend that you've managed to forget the names, but wanted to read more so could he remind you?!

Tubbs

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Jengie jon

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quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
This is a case of I do not know but I almost certainly know an organisation that does. I have a friend that was involved with them at one stage. However on exploring on the web and pages I think what you need to get hold of is a copy of the Whithorn Town Trail which looks at thirty buildings around Whithorn.

I have a memory of it connecting with a family who had a role in the town, but that is vague. I would however suspect that there is a "1" missing at the front.

Jengie

Unfortunately the Whithorn Trust doesn't know. Last time I was there, they were going to mention it to an archaeologist working on this sort of thing in the town - but they forgot. I probably need to see if I can get a lead on the archaeologist.
You could try the Stranraer and District Local History Society which does cover that area (I know it should be Newton Stewart). Your best hope would be to look at M'Kerlie's "Lands and Owners in Galloway (Vol II)". It may have something in it.

However because of the Peter Stone and the Lost stone of Kirkmadrine the area has been absolutely scoured for stones of ancient origin that have been reused.

You might also like to look on the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland.

Jengie

Jengie

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Mrs Shrew

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Thanks Tubes, I shall do so. I had pretty much figured I would have to already when I suddenly had the thought that someone here might know.

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"The goal of life is not to make other people in your own image, it is to understand that they, too, are in God's image" (Orfeo)
Was "mummyfrances".

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Autenrieth Road

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Thanks, BroJames. I can't seem to find the listed BCP app in the apple store, but I've gotten the Kindle version, and that has exactly what I want: Catechism, The Sacraments, What is grace?

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Truth

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Penny S
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quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Penny S
Some libraries may still have a copy of Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage; failing that, try Burke's Peerage.

Between the two there should be an entry for all armigerous families in the UK and Ireland - although I'm not sure whether Irish titles were kept up-to-date after partition.

Failing that, try The College of Arms or, if Scottish, the office of Lyon King of Arms.

Debrett's only claims to cover
quote:
Every British duke, marquess, viscount, earl, baron and baronet, and the living members of their families in the male line
not all armigerous families.

Burke's Peerage is more ambitious in scope. It claims to be
quote:
the definitive guide to the genealogy and heraldry of the Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Landed Gentry of the United Kingdom
Burke's General Armory of 1884 is freely searchable online. The only motto close to the inscription on the stone is that of the Goldsmiths' Company, but the arms are very different.

OTOH, that device does seem like a technical sort of balance, with a means of raising and lowering carefully, such as might be required in the weighing of precious metals. A sort of precursor of the chemical balance.

[ 03. April 2014, 16:03: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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BroJames
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Yes it does, with something with two stars above it. There is strong evidence (from the title deeds) to suggest that that part of the house was built in about 1800, at which time it was owned by a merchant named Alexander Conning (who acquired in in 1768). Before him it was owned by somebody named Alexander McClelland, and before him by someone named James Broadfoot.

None of these names AFAICT are associated with arms anything like those shown on the stone.

[ 03. April 2014, 16:33: Message edited by: BroJames ]

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
OTOH, that device does seem like a technical sort of balance, with a means of raising and lowering carefully, such as might be required in the weighing of precious metals. A sort of precursor of the chemical balance.

Doesn't look like any balances I ever saw. Real or heraldic. Balances are common symbols on arms and badges and so on but usually simple ones. Representing justice or sometimes trade.

That thing seems to have tree or four pivor points one above the other, a kind of 4-shaped frame at the bottom, maybe some sort of sliding ratchet, and two star-saheped things at the top like gnurled wheels or cogs or even some sort of - I don't know what...

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Penny S
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It doesn't look like a symbol, does it, but a representation of something that existed. Someone needs to make a model of it and see what it does.
Or perhaps not - I've just been on the Dr Who thread - it affects my imagination...

[ 03. April 2014, 21:28: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Penny S
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Having had a more detailed look, I think the curved section that appears to run from the top of the incomplete 4 to the end of the left-hand arm is merely the edge of a layer that has spalled off, taking with it the left-hand bowl of the balance, for which evidence can be seen. The base of the 4 looks as though it was once symmetrical, and there seems to be evidence for a vertical completing the 4. That makes it much more simple.
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Edith
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quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

I've got to the part where he gets involved with Llanthony Priory. My question is: how should it be pronounced? I know how to pronounce the Welsh double L (and I can*), but it always looks to me as though it should rhyme with "lantern-y". Is it LlAN-thony or Llan-thO-ny? And is the O long or short?

(The book itself carries an ex libris sticker showing that it once belonged to a person delighting in the name of Seraphim Newman-Norton.)

*(although perhaps not to the satisfaction of a native Welsh-speaker)

He's a neighbour of mine, lives down the road, known also as Abba Seraphim, retired teacher of English, active member of our local community and a very nice chap indeed.

--------------------
Edith

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Jengie jon

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quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
Yes it does, with something with two stars above it. There is strong evidence (from the title deeds) to suggest that that part of the house was built in about 1800, at which time it was owned by a merchant named Alexander Conning (who acquired in in 1768). Before him it was owned by somebody named Alexander McClelland, and before him by someone named James Broadfoot.

None of these names AFAICT are associated with arms anything like those shown on the stone.

Right it is a Merchant Mark. The next source in your hunt is the source of that picture.

Jengie

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Lothlorien
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I want to send some good chocolate, perhaps some flowers too, to someone in the UK whom I know from another place. Where would be a good place in UK where I can shop from down here and have it posted/delivered to her. She's been having a really rough time lately.

PM would probably be best, please, as answer. Or perhaps something else if anyone has any bright ideas. I don't know her age but she has grandchildren.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Baptist Trainfan
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I'm not sure if you can get chocolates and flowers delivered together. Flying Flowers and Flowers by Post (both from the Channel Islands) are good, otherwise look at Interflora which is a network of florists around the country.

Fortnum & Mason will do chocolates - at a price! Selfridges deliver too, so do Harrods - both are big London stores.

Otherwise Ocado is a high-quality supermarket-style delivery service but I don't know if they cover the entire country.

What I don't know is whether you can order from overseas with these firms.

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ElaineC
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I'm sure you can do a postcode check on the Ocado site to see if they deliver to your required destination.

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Music is the only language in which you cannot say a mean or sarcastic thing. John Erskine

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by Edith:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

He's a neighbour of mine, lives down the road, known also as Abba Seraphim, retired teacher of English, active member of our local community and a very nice chap indeed.
Can't be the same chap, as Ignatius died in 1908. - you must be thinking of someone else.

Can't help with the pronunciation, but Llanthony is an amazing place with a great pub in the middle of the ruins (unless it's closed since I was last there, some years ago).

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Baptist Trainfan
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quote:
Originally posted by ElaineC:
I'm sure you can do a postcode check on the Ocado site to see if they deliver to your required destination.

Yes, but do they take orders from someone outside the UK?
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St. Stephen the Stoned
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quote:
Originally posted by Edith:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

I've got to the part where he gets involved with Llanthony Priory. My question is: how should it be pronounced? I know how to pronounce the Welsh double L (and I can*), but it always looks to me as though it should rhyme with "lantern-y". Is it LlAN-thony or Llan-thO-ny? And is the O long or short?

(The book itself carries an ex libris sticker showing that it once belonged to a person delighting in the name of Seraphim Newman-Norton.)

*(although perhaps not to the satisfaction of a native Welsh-speaker)

He's a neighbour of mine, lives down the road, known also as Abba Seraphim, retired teacher of English, active member of our local community and a very nice chap indeed.
Thank you, Edith. Do you think he wants it back? I've no idea how the book came to be on our shelves. I can't remember if I bought it or if it belonged to my partner's late partner.

There's an interesting (for some value of 'interesting') emendation. The title of a photograph in the book (plate 7b, facing p. 208) of Joseph René Vilatte has been altered in biro to read 'Bernard Mary Williams'. The picture is the same as one that comes up on Google under 'images for joseph rene vilatte', and does not resemble any images I can find of Bernard Mary Williams. I wonder if it was altered by your neighbour or by another.

The book also contains a press cutting (undated) about efforts to raise money for the restoration of Fr. Ignatius' tomb.

Fr. Ignatius seems to have been a fascinating if deeply flawed character. If God was working through him, 'mysterious ways' hardly comes close!

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Do you want to see Jesus or don't yer? Well shurrup then!

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St. Stephen the Stoned
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I've just found out that Anna Calder-Marshall, the daughter of the author, was one of my partner's late partner's students at Bristol University Drama Department.

So maybe that's how we got it.

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Do you want to see Jesus or don't yer? Well shurrup then!

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Rev per Minute
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# 69

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quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

I've got to the part where he gets involved with Llanthony Priory. My question is: how should it be pronounced? I know how to pronounce the Welsh double L (and I can*), but it always looks to me as though it should rhyme with "lantern-y". Is it LlAN-thony or Llan-thO-ny? And is the O long or short?

(The book itself carries an ex libris sticker showing that it once belonged to a person delighting in the name of Seraphim Newman-Norton.)

*(although perhaps not to the satisfaction of a native Welsh-speaker)

Standard Welsh pronunciation would have the emphasis on the penultimate syllable, so Llan-TOE-nee would be correct. Given the Anglicisation of that area since about 1150, most locals would use an English L rather than a Welsh LL (see Lliswerry* in Newport)

* When I say 'see', I don't mean actually come and look - there's nothing there except housing and industrial estates. It is quite close to the Wetlands Reserve though...

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At the end of the day, we face our Maker alongside Jesus. RIP ken

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
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quote:
I'm not sure if you can get chocolates and flowers delivered together. Flying Flowers and Flowers by Post (both from the Channel Islands) are good, otherwise look at Interflora which is a network of florists around the country.

Thanks for this. I had heard of Flowers by Post so have used them.

--------------------
Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Matt Black

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Does anyone know (I have tried Googling umpteen times and haven't been able to get a straight answer) when the Samsung Galaxy S4 Mini is likely to get Android 4.4 (Kit-kat) via EE?

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"Protestant and Reformed, according to the Tradition of the ancient Catholic Church" - + John Cosin (1594-1672)

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BroJames
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# 9636

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
Yes it does, with something with two stars above it. There is strong evidence (from the title deeds) to suggest that that part of the house was built in about 1800, at which time it was owned by a merchant named Alexander Conning (who acquired in in 1768). Before him it was owned by somebody named Alexander McClelland, and before him by someone named James Broadfoot.

None of these names AFAICT are associated with arms anything like those shown on the stone.

Right it is a Merchant Mark. The next source in your hunt is the source of that picture.

Jengie

Eureka Jengie! Thank you.

The source of the picture in the 'Proceedings of The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland' is available at http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-352-1/dissemination/pdf/vol_036/36_280_463.pdf. Sadly the author's researches did not extend into Galloway.

Looking at the stone again, the word above the numerals could be 'Broadfoot', and the space before it is about right for 'James'. And this Scottish Archive record suggests connections between the families I mentioned in my earlier post.

I'll keep poking around for more info on merchants' marks.

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North East Quine

Curious beastie
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Originally posted by Bro James:
quote:
Vivat in æternis?
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Vive memor leti
quote:
Vive memor mortis
It's been raining all day, so I took Penny S's good advice to look at it when wet. There are three faint vertical lines which might be "in" or might be "m" so all three phrases are possible. I think Vive memor leti is least likely because I think the phrase is longer than that.

I'll take a look in other conditions, but I'd like to thank you all for your help.

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Edith
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# 16978

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quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Edith:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

He's a neighbour of mine, lives down the road, known also as Abba Seraphim, retired teacher of English, active member of our local community and a very nice chap indeed.
Can't be the same chap, as Ignatius died in 1908. - you must be thinking of someone else.

Can't help with the pronunciation, but Llanthony is an amazing place with a great pub in the middle of the ruins (unless it's closed since I was last there, some years ago).

It's Henry William Seraphim Newman-Norton I'm speaking about. Known as Bill on the street.

--------------------
Edith

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Margaret

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# 283

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I believe Bill is also known more grandly as Metropolitan Seraphim of Glastonbury.
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Pomona
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# 17175

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Do Anglican ordinands graduating from theological college (in England) get an academic hood or is it different for theological colleges? If they do get a hood, what happens now for those studying outside Durham, now all the degrees are coming from there? Do they get the academic hood of Durham or where they study?

Asking because somewhat unusually for mainstream denominations, it's not a requirement to have a degree to be accepted for ordination in the CoE (I don't know about elsewhere in the Anglican Communion) - so if theological college doesn't provide an academic hood, many priests would presumably not have one.

[ 05. April 2014, 13:27: Message edited by: Jade Constable ]

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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Pomona
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# 17175

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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I want to send some good chocolate, perhaps some flowers too, to someone in the UK whom I know from another place. Where would be a good place in UK where I can shop from down here and have it posted/delivered to her. She's been having a really rough time lately.

PM would probably be best, please, as answer. Or perhaps something else if anyone has any bright ideas. I don't know her age but she has grandchildren.

Moonpig and Funky Pigeon are best known for delivering customisable cards, but they also deliver flowers and chocolate and can deliver both together. M&S do also.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Do Anglican ordinands graduating from theological college (in England) get an academic hood or is it different for theological colleges?

If you get a degree you are entitled to wear the appropriate hood. Of course most graduates never do, apart perhaps from hiring one for the day if they go to the graduation ceremony (which many don't).

If you don't get a degree there is no hood.

Simple.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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leo
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# 1458

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quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Do Anglican ordinands graduating from theological college (in England) get an academic hood or is it different for theological colleges? If they do get a hood, what happens now for those studying outside Durham, now all the degrees are coming from there? Do they get the academic hood of Durham or where they study?

Asking because somewhat unusually for mainstream denominations, it's not a requirement to have a degree to be accepted for ordination in the CoE (I don't know about elsewhere in the Anglican Communion) - so if theological college doesn't provide an academic hood, many priests would presumably not have one.

Not sure what you mean about all degrees coming from Durham.

Each university has its own hoods - different depending on arts'/science, bachelor, master or doctor.

You can either hire or buy them from Ede & Ravenscrofts.

I wear my Leeds hood with choir dress. I used to wear it for school speech days.

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My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

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Pomona
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# 17175

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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Do Anglican ordinands graduating from theological college (in England) get an academic hood or is it different for theological colleges? If they do get a hood, what happens now for those studying outside Durham, now all the degrees are coming from there? Do they get the academic hood of Durham or where they study?

Asking because somewhat unusually for mainstream denominations, it's not a requirement to have a degree to be accepted for ordination in the CoE (I don't know about elsewhere in the Anglican Communion) - so if theological college doesn't provide an academic hood, many priests would presumably not have one.

Not sure what you mean about all degrees coming from Durham.

Each university has its own hoods - different depending on arts'/science, bachelor, master or doctor.

You can either hire or buy them from Ede & Ravenscrofts.

I wear my Leeds hood with choir dress. I used to wear it for school speech days.

I meant all degrees from theological college being awarded by Durham now instead of eg Trinity graduates getting Bristol degrees. I realise that different university departments have different hoods but that doesn't apply to my question, which was regarding ordinands who do not have a secular university degree. My question was whether or not theological colleges have academic hoods.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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Zacchaeus
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# 14454

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Not sure about currently, but I know people 5 years ago with a theological certificates but not degrees from theological colleges, who were given hoods..
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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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When preparing a service sheet for 16 March I looked on line for a good picture of Abraham or of the Transfiguration for the front of the service sheet.
I stumbled across a brilliant site where someone had assembled links to dozens of religious art sites of all kinds: traditional, modern, b/w, colouring-in, etc etc.
I thought I'd bookmarked it, but found later that I'd bookmarked one of the artists, and had no way by then of going back.
Does anyone have what I'm looking for???

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Ariel
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# 58

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Had you thought about checking your browsing history?
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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Had you thought about checking your browsing history?

I've never tried to go that far back but I'll investigate.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Had you thought about checking your browsing history?

I've never tried to go that far back but I'll investigate.

GG

It goes back one month which might be the right day but clicking on an image that I used doesn't take me to further sites connected to the image. I think the exploration that led to the site might have been a few days earlier.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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lily pad
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# 11456

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Another option would be to go look at the textweek.com site and see if any of the art links are the ones you were looking at. Every week they list art that is related to the lectionary scriptures. You could narrow it down by going to the scriptures that you used that week or, if you used the lectionary, going to the suggestions for that week. Feel free to pm if that doesn't make sense. [Smile]

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Sloppiness is not caring. Fussiness is caring about the wrong things. With thanks to Adeodatus!

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Ariel
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# 58

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If you have one of the artists' names, maybe try a search for that artist and see if one of the sites that comes up is the one you want.
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Lothlorien
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# 4927

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This lectionary site has art associated with each day's readings. Perhaps you may find it or similar there.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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quote:
Originally posted by lily pad:
Another option would be to go look at the textweek.com site and see if any of the art links are the ones you were looking at. Every week they list art that is related to the lectionary scriptures. You could narrow it down by going to the scriptures that you used that week or, if you used the lectionary, going to the suggestions for that week. Feel free to pm if that doesn't make sense. [Smile]

It makes sense but that's where I started; I know that at the time I followed a lead from an illustration that interested me but going back I don't recognise any.
Don't have artists' names unfortunately.
The site I bookmarked does have an interesting collection of interesting pictures so I've emailed the blogger to see if he knows where his site might be listed.
The one I'm looking for doesn't have actual pictures, just many web addresses listed in categories with helpful comments.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Vulpior

Foxier than Thou
# 12744

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Many, many years ago, I read a book or two consisting of columns by Keith Waterhouse. In one of these columns he recounted buying some Wensleydale from Family Purvis Grocer (that's what it said across the front of the shop: Family PURVIS Grocer).

I'd love to track down a copy of this particular article. Google gives me nothing. If anyone recognises it from the description and has the book containing it on their shelves, I'd be grateful to know which book it is, so I can go shopping online.

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I've started blogging. I don't promise you'll find anything to interest you at uncleconrad

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Lothlorien
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# 4927

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Up the thread, I asked about sending flowers to someone in UK. I used Flowers by Post who grow their flowers so send after picking a couple of times a week. I have just had a lovely reply from the recipient for the thought and their service. So thanks for the recommendation.

[ 09. April 2014, 10:30: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Vulpior:
Many, many years ago, I read a book or two consisting of columns by Keith Waterhouse. In one of these columns he recounted buying some Wensleydale from Family Purvis Grocer (that's what it said across the front of the shop: Family PURVIS Grocer).

I'd love to track down a copy of this particular article. Google gives me nothing. If anyone recognises it from the description and has the book containing it on their shelves, I'd be grateful to know which book it is, so I can go shopping online.

I half-remember that line too, and I think it came from a collection titled "Mondays, Thursdays". It might be worth tracking down.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Vulpior

Foxier than Thou
# 12744

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Vulpior:
Many, many years ago, I read a book or two consisting of columns by Keith Waterhouse. In one of these columns he recounted buying some Wensleydale from Family Purvis Grocer (that's what it said across the front of the shop: Family PURVIS Grocer).

I'd love to track down a copy of this particular article. Google gives me nothing. If anyone recognises it from the description and has the book containing it on their shelves, I'd be grateful to know which book it is, so I can go shopping online.

I half-remember that line too, and I think it came from a collection titled "Mondays, Thursdays". It might be worth tracking down.
That's the one! I searched for the book by author and title, and was able to search inside the book using Google Books. I will now return and obtain myself a copy.

Thank you!

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I've started blogging. I don't promise you'll find anything to interest you at uncleconrad

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