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Source: (consider it) Thread: Inquire Within: general questions
Palimpsest
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# 16772

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Washington state has a lovely little town on the peninsula known for being in the rain shadow of Mt Olympus. It's called Sequim
Sequim is pronounced as one syllable, with the e elided: "skwim". The name evolved from the Klallam language

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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quote:
Originally posted by Amorya:
quote:
Originally posted by Pine Marten:
I have searched in vain for this May song we used to do at school. I can remember most of the tune, and some of the words go like this:

'Come now [or Haste, haste] shepherds and neighbours...

Then come! come! come! Good shepherds all,
Good friends and neighbours, leave your labours,
Pipes and tabors are tuning their lay,
Then trip so neatly, smile so sweetly, down the meadow and back again...

Hearts are beating in tune with the music of May...'

The words are a bit screwed up, but if anyone knows this and can post some info it would save me from going completely demented. I've tried googling and so on, but with no luck. Over to you, knowledgeable shipmates.

I believe it's called Shepherd's Dance. We sang it with my old choir, I believe it's on this CD. I can't off the top of my head recall the composer (and I don't have the CD to hand at the moment I'm afraid).

Amy

Composer: Edward German. The second dance on
this YouTube clip.
The words (complete?) appear towards the end of this page

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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Just a thought about the Edward German song. I wonder if it originated as a dance (in "Henry the Eighth") and someone added the words to make it a choral number.

We did one of the Edward German light operas at Teachers' College, maybe two, one each year 1950/1951. I can't remember which one(s), only that we (third violins) played three to a desk and as there were three performances we each had a chance to watch bits of the performance.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Adeodatus
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# 4992

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quote:
Originally posted by Qoheleth.:
I'm trying to track down the source of a quotation which I first encountered on the Ship, coincidentally from a Shipmate just up thread today (Hello, Adeodatus [Smile] )

quote:
Religion may be defined as man's [sic] attempt to have a conversation with the weather.
I wonder if anyone knows of a source or attribution for this one, please?

Thanks

As a former meteorologist, I find it particularly appealing. [Biased]

I think I probably first saw it about fifteen years ago, and it was attributed to Voltaire. But I've never been able to track it down. If you're as pedantic as I am about getting attributions right, it's probably safest to go with Firenze's suggestion.

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"What is broken, repair with gold."

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Adam.

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# 4991

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Is it possible for a couple to be predisposed to create one gender of offspring over another? Quick googling only revealed conjecture based on anecdote. My anecdotal sense (which is probably clouded by umpteen cognitive biases, hence my asking) is that most large families I know show a skew one way or the other. Smaller families just aren't big enough sample sizes to show it. Any science behind this?

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Ave Crux, Spes Unica!
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Pomona
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Certainly it's more than possible to skew heavily female - genetic abnormalities which result in early (and often undetected) miscarriage tend to be in male embryos, and male embryos I think are weaker/more prone to difficulties overall. I would imagine that a genetic predisposition to finding female embryos more difficult to carry could exist. Whether or not one gets a male or female embryo is completely random - not getting any male children (for instance) is more likely to be down to very early undetected miscarriages.

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Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

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Penny S
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Random, of course, can result in long runs of the same thing. So absence of either gender may not be due to anything else at all.
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L'organist
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On the face of it both sides of my family show a marked predisposition to produce girls.

Mother one of 5, 4 girls to 1 boy who produced:
A female 2 girls, 1 boy (resulting in 5 girls at 3rd generation)
B female 4 girls, 1 boy (resulting in 2 boys at 3rd generation)
C female 3 girls, 1 boy (resulting in 7 girls 1 boy at 3rd generation)
D female 2 girls (2 girls at 3rd generation)
E male 1 girl 1 boy (4 girls at 3rd generation)

Father one of 4, 3 boys to 1 girl who produced:
A male 2 girls (6 girls 1 boy at 3rd generation)
B male 1 girl 1 boy (5 girls, 2 boys at 3rd generation)
C female 1 boy (2 boys 4 girls at 3rd generation)
D male 4 girls, 1 boy (resulting in 2 boys at 3rd generation) - with Female B above.

Where the third generation have begun to have children guess what - girls are outnumbering boys on both sides.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Cathscats
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# 17827

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When at school I was taught that the sex of a child is determined by the father's part in procreation, my first reaction was to wonder where all the girls came from!

Later, as I undrstood marginally more (no one would call me a scientist) I was given to understand that some men produced more or stronger sperm of either male or female predisposition. So some families will tend, but only tend, to have more girls or boys. I have one of each, so I guess that if any of this is right it means that my husband is perfectly balanced. [Biased]

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"...damp hands and theological doubts - the two always seem to go together..." (O. Douglas, "The Setons")

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Adam.

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# 4991

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
On the face of it both sides of my family show a marked predisposition to produce girls.

Mother one of 5, 4 girls to 1 boy who produced:
A female 2 girls, 1 boy (resulting in 5 girls at 3rd generation)
B female 4 girls, 1 boy (resulting in 2 boys at 3rd generation)
C female 3 girls, 1 boy (resulting in 7 girls 1 boy at 3rd generation)
D female 2 girls (2 girls at 3rd generation)
E male 1 girl 1 boy (4 girls at 3rd generation)

Father one of 4, 3 boys to 1 girl who produced:
A male 2 girls (6 girls 1 boy at 3rd generation)
B male 1 girl 1 boy (5 girls, 2 boys at 3rd generation)
C female 1 boy (2 boys 4 girls at 3rd generation)
D male 4 girls, 1 boy (resulting in 2 boys at 3rd generation) - with Female B above.

Where the third generation have begun to have children guess what - girls are outnumbering boys on both sides.

Running some numbers, the second bunch of data isn't that surprising. The chances of that or something as or more surprising happening are 23% (2*prob(less than or equal to 13 boys out of 34 trials).*

The first set, less than or equal to 8 of the less well represented gender out of 42 trials is significant. The chances of something that surprising happening by chance were the probabilities to be 50/50 are 0.007%. Now, things with a 0.007% chance of happening do happen sometimes (7 times out of 100 000 in the long run). But, there's pretty good reason to think your mother's family produces more girls. Pomona's explanation sounds pretty plausible.

--
* The 2* as it would be just as surprising to have the asymmetry the other way around.

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Ave Crux, Spes Unica!
Preaching blog

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Penny S
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# 14768

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I believe there has been some evidence that the time of the month at which sex takes place can have an influence, with increased frequency making it more likely that boys will be conceived, because it is more likely that the occurrence will hit that window. This hypothesis was used to explain the higher ratio of boys to girls in the initial post-war bulge (and indeed the lower ratio of boys to girls born during WWII - which is a partial explanation of my failure to find one).

I don't have a complete set of data from my family, where, on my father's side, there have been more girls born, in his generation, possibly in his mother's, in my generation, and in the next. (I'm not going to do a breakdown because of the lack of completeness). There's Dad, his nephew, two grandsons, and I think a couple of other nephews we never had anything to do with. 15 females, possibly other nieces.

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Zacchaeus
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# 14454

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A very long time ago when I was at school, I was taught that over the whole population there were more boys than girls born but that infant mortality was higher in boys, so that generally the sexes evened out. Something else I also read was that the more children of one sex you had the more likely the next birth was to be of that sex..

On an individual basis I know a lot of families with a larger percentage of one sex, even over several generations.

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Palimpsest
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I recall reading about one family where the women always produced girls for three or four generations.
There' been some been some theories like the Shettles Method for timing insemination around the date of ovulation, but these are challenged by other studies.

On a darker note, there's a significant sex selection bias that happens in China and India. This is caused by using sex determination on the embryo and aborting females. This has been causing significant problems of unequal gendered populations.

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Leorning Cniht
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# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Adam.:
My anecdotal sense (which is probably clouded by umpteen cognitive biases, hence my asking) is that most large families I know show a skew one way or the other.

You have to be careful of selection bias. A non-trivial number of families want one of each sex, so it's not uncommon to see N of one sex, followed by one of the other. If that kind of couple got a boy and a girl as their first two, they'd stop, but give them two boys and they'll keep trying to "get their girl".
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Heavenly Anarchist
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# 13313

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quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I believe there has been some evidence that the time of the month at which sex takes place can have an influence, with increased frequency making it more likely that boys will be conceived, because it is more likely that the occurrence will hit that window. This hypothesis was used to explain the higher ratio of boys to girls in the initial post-war bulge (and indeed the lower ratio of boys to girls born during WWII - which is a partial explanation of my failure to find one).

There are physical reasons behind this. The acidity of the uterus varies throughout the month and the male sperm is weaker but quicker and the female is stronger but slower. At the beginning of the cycle the female is more likely to survive but in the middle the male has an increasing survival rate and can swim quicker so is more likely to reach the egg first. The variance is only slight, I think it is 60:40 chance of a boy at day 14 (I'll have to try and find my gynae books to confirm the stats). Societies which ban sex during the menstrual cycle have slightly fewer girls than those that don't have such a taboo.

My parents managed to produce a well balanced 4 boys and 4 girls.

[ 16. February 2015, 08:25: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]

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'I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.' Douglas Adams
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Penny S
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# 14768

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Our RC neighbours had four daughters, then a son, and then no more.
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Ariel
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# 58

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Twelve posts on this topic looks like a possibility for a Purgatory thread of its own. Anyone fancy starting one?
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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
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I have been reading a lot of nineteenth century history and fiction lately, and there's something I'm wondering about, the economics of owning a horse and carriage. I hope someone can point me toward a book or other source of information.

I gather it was quite expensive to keep a horse. How much did it cost to feed a horse as compared to the cost of feeding a human being? How much did the other expenses, such as stabling and grooming cost?

I'm also interested in the cost of "keeping a carriage". What was the additional expense?

I would appreciate any pointers toward sources of information.

Moo

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See you later, alligator.

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Gwai
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# 11076

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I do not have a useful source to point you to, but I think part of the issue isn't just the feeding of the horses*--though I do think that is already higher considerably than feeding humans--but horses also require a coachman and grooms. More than one groom or he'll never have a day off as one would scarcely groom and feed one's own horse. I have also heard that the liveries for the coachman were insanely expensive. And if you live in London some of the year--as such people did--then you have to have space for stables in a city where space is of course also expensive.

*And I think it was generally horses plural if you had carriage.

[ 18. February 2015, 13:25: Message edited by: Gwai ]

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A master of men was the Goodly Fere,
A mate of the wind and sea.
If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.


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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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If you are willing to be patient, I have asked Judith Tarr (fantasy author and horse owner) and she says she will blog about it.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Ariel
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# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
I gather it was quite expensive to keep a horse. How much did it cost to feed a horse as compared to the cost of feeding a human being? How much did the other expenses, such as stabling and grooming cost?

Horses featured in all walks of life, from those owned by the nobility, including thoroughbreds and racehorses, to those owned by workmen. Their lifestyles would have varied accordingly from pampered and well-treated to subsistence level and costs would have varied accordingly, but one thing was certain: they weren't cheap to run. Costs will also have varied depending on whether you are looking at early 19th century/Regency or late Victorian. Horses could be more expensive to keep than the staff who looked after them. They've always been high-maintenance animals and that's still true today.

Especially as you often had to replace them. The life expectancy of a horse in 19th century London was usually fairly short: pulling as heavy a load as they could manage, or heavier, through stony streets, rarely or never seeing pasture and green fields, many horses just dropped dead after a short while. London was full of horses (several hundred thousand at any one time, at its peak) and the turnover was high. The horses of wealthy owners did better, but veterinary care wasn't as as developed as it is now and if a horse had to be put down, which was often the remedy, then there'd be the expense of getting a replacement.

It doesn't mean that workmen didn't care about their horses, some did, but as often as not they were just a tool of the trade that got basic maintenance.

I have seen a figure of £30 quoted for the cost of maintaining a horse in Regency times, which would have been more than the groom's annual wages. It's fairly meaningless in today's times though I suppose you could put an extra few zeros on the end to give an idea of what it might cost these days. It would probably be equivalent to a bit more than the average annual salary.

quote:
I'm also interested in the cost of "keeping a carriage". What was the additional expense?
Obviously you'd need staff. As well as the groom and stable boy, there would need to be a driver and likely at least one footman or similar to open doors, help passengers in and out, assist with luggage, ensure people were secure (carriages didn't usually have springs and roads weren't yet paved, which made journeys often quite bumpy and those who suffered from motion sickness really suffered), and depending on era and journey, the footman/men would possibly act as bodyguard in case of highwaymen.
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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Gwai:
And if you live in London some of the year--as such people did--then you have to have space for stables in a city where space is of course also expensive.

Or Edinburgh. The New Town was built for the carriage trade and that is imprinted in the town planning: there are the wide main thoroughfares and between and behind the smaller streets, with a lane running between the back of both. These provided the stabling and the coach houses and the accommodation for the stable boys and grooms and coachmen - you wouldn't want them in the main house - my dear, the smell! (There are a number of pointed Victorian allusions to such servants being pressed into roles as extra footmen during a big dinner and bringing the whiff of the stables into the dining room).

In the 19th Century expansion of the wealthy into stone-built villas in the then countryside of Newington or Morningside, you can still distinguish servant's quarters, mews - and, of course, gate lodges, which was a further level of horse-related expense.

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Sipech
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# 16870

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I have a week off next week. I should be on my first overseas holiday in 5 years but my bank screwed up my cards so I'm stuck here with a week off. So instead, I planned a pilgrimage around London's bookshops. I've got a few on my list to visit (anything down Cecil Row/Charing Cross Road, Daunt, Persephone, Lutyens & Rubenstein, London Review, Belgravia Books, Bookmarks, Book Warehouse, Black Gull Books, John Sandoe, Bookseller Crow on the Hill, West End Lane Books, The Owl Bookshop, Housmans, Review - Peckham, Foxed, Hatchards, Church House).

Are there any great bookshops in London I've missed?

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Ariel
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# 58

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If bookshops are your thing you might enjoy looking through The Matilda Project, a blog by a London woman who loves bookshops, to see if it gives you any ideas.
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Sipech
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# 16870

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That is amazing, Ariel. Thank you.

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I try to be self-deprecating; I'm just not very good at it.
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Laud-able

Ship's Ancient
# 9896

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Moo: re: Horses and carriages

This site is more about carriages, and is specific to the time of Jane Austen, but it does give some useful and interesting information about horses and carriages.

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'. . . "Non Angli, sed Angeli" "not Angels, but Anglicans"', Sellar, W C, and Yeatman, R J, 1066 and All That, London, 1930, p. 6.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
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Thanks very much. It answers some of my questions.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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quote:
Originally posted by Gwai:
And if you live in London some of the year--as such people did--then you have to have space for stables in a city where space is of course also expensive.

This site, which Laud-able linked to, says that some stables in London were underground. I wonder what that did to the lifespan of the horses.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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Abigail
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# 1672

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How long can I reasonably expect a fridge to last? I bought mine in 2003 and until a few weeks ago had never had any problems with it. Then it stopped working. The repair man said it needed a new thermostat, which he fitted, but although the fridge is working again it's not getting as cold as it should. I've always assumed appliances like a fridge should last 15-20 years, but the few people I've mentioned it to seem to think 5-10 years is more realistic.

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The older I get the less I know.

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Sparrow
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# 2458

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I've recently been sorting through a box of bits and pieces of jewellery that belonged to my late mother, and among them are several crucifixes and medallions on chains that have got inextricably tangled up together. Can anyone advise on a way of untangling them?

[ 20. February 2015, 14:27: Message edited by: Sparrow ]

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For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life,nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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Patience (lots of it!), a light touch with medium-length fingernails and possibly something slightly pointy like a medium-sized knitting-needle to wiggle in between the knots. Also, setting your bundle of chains on a table with a good light-source will help.

Good luck! [Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Sioni Sais
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# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Patience (lots of it!), a light touch with medium-length fingernails and possibly something slightly pointy like a medium-sized knitting-needle to wiggle in between the knots. Also, setting your bundle of chains on a table with a good light-source will help.

Good luck! [Smile]

I've read that these help:
- work on a hard surface, like a mirror
- use baby oil, to enable chains to slip
- undo any clasps

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Sparrow
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# 2458

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Thanks, I did wonder about some kind of oil, maybe olive oil, but perhaps baby oil would be better. My other idea was liquid soap or washing up liquid .. ?

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For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life,nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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Straight pins can help if the chains are fine enough. Alternately, find a bored teenager or student who has to sit in class quietly for a few hours...

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

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no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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I'd recommend against oil or dish soap (washing up liquid), or anything else so liquidy. Doesn't help much and makes a mess, unless it is rusted. If you really need lubricant, some silcone lubricant works better, or some wax that is soft at room temperature. Beeswax can serve or wood polishing wax if not full of additives you don't want on your fingers. You just dab small bits on with a toothpick exactly where you want it.

I'd recommend to get one of those magnifying glasses on an adjustable arm with a bright light. Very pointy tweezers, perhaps two, and elevate the table top or desk so your neck and shoulders don't get too sore.

Something to use as a "fid", like a darning needle also helps, or several different sized needles. You insert gently in amongst the knots in chain as you free them.

It can also sometimes help to put a chain in a plastic container and gently agitate it flat on a table top to loosen it.

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Posts: 11498 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

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# 15560

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quote:
Originally posted by Abigail:
How long can I reasonably expect a fridge to last? I bought mine in 2003 and until a few weeks ago had never had any problems with it. Then it stopped working. The repair man said it needed a new thermostat, which he fitted, but although the fridge is working again it's not getting as cold as it should. I've always assumed appliances like a fridge should last 15-20 years, but the few people I've mentioned it to seem to think 5-10 years is more realistic.

Today, 10 years is pretty much the lifespan in my experience. The general quality is less. Mostly people replace versus repair due to repir costs. Appliances in general are lower in quality I feel.

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Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety.
\_(ツ)_/

Posts: 11498 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:


Something to use as a "fid", like a darning needle also helps, or several different sized needles. You insert gently in amongst the knots in chain as you free them.

Consider having a piece of Styrofoam or cardboard or corkboard under the mass as you try to disentangle it. As you draw loops out, you can pin them in place with a needle to prevent them getting drawn back into the mess as you wiggle and maneuver other bits free.

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

Posts: 20059 | From: off in left field somewhere | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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I'd also advise against oil. You won't be able to get a grip on the chains. A magnifying glass if the chains are quite fine, so you can see exactly how the knots are composed, a large needle to hook into the the rings and pull gently at the right place, and lots of patience.

It may also help to "crumble" the knot gently between your fingers.

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Tree Bee

Ship's tiller girl
# 4033

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quote:
Originally posted by Abigail:
How long can I reasonably expect a fridge to last? I bought mine in 2003 and until a few weeks ago had never had any problems with it. Then it stopped working. The repair man said it needed a new thermostat, which he fitted, but although the fridge is working again it's not getting as cold as it should. I've always assumed appliances like a fridge should last 15-20 years, but the few people I've mentioned it to seem to think 5-10 years is more realistic.

My Mum's fridge made the national papers when it was 50 years old. It reached 55 before it died.
That probably doesn't help.

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"Any fool can make something complicated. It takes a genius to make it simple."
— Woody Guthrie
http://saysaysay54.wordpress.com

Posts: 5257 | From: me to you. | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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I don't know, but in my experience fridges last forever (where forever is probably a value between 15 and 40 years). My family usually ends up giving them away during a major move or something, before they wear out. I think we've only ever had one repair, and after that the thing went on just as usual for years.

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

Posts: 20059 | From: off in left field somewhere | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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I don't remember us replacing the fridge freezer since we moved to this house - so that means it's been chuntering away for the last 25 years. I rather think the washing machine is the same vintage.
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leo
Shipmate
# 1458

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The achillees heel is the freezer drawers. Replacements are so expensive that it is cheaper to buy a new appliance.
Posts: 23198 | From: Bristol | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

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Refrigerators: IME if it is a 'good' brand its more likely to last a long time.

Our 'bought in a hurry as a stopgap and we'll replace when we do the kitchen' is still chugging away at 18 and I can't bring myself to replace something that isn't dead yet. Rather annoying since the children (and they were little when it arrived) managed to break the flap for the highest freezer shelf when it was just over a year old and ever since its needed fiddling to get the thing to fit and stop the damn thing icing up.

My super-organised friend reckons appliance life at 10 years and so puts into a separate account 1/9th of the purchase price of every major electrical every year.

As for oldest appliance, my last-but-one dishwasher made 34 (we got it second-hand). Kettles are another matter: we average a new one every 18 months or so.

And I was less than thrilled to have a replace a Mira electric shower less than 4 years after fitting - was told by the company it was unreasonable to expect them to last more than 5 years [Mad]

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Abigail
Shipmate
# 1672

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Thank you for the replies. I'm hoping the fridge won't have to be replaced just yet but it’s definitely not quite right. I've got it on maximum at the moment and it's only just cold enough so I'll have to wait and see how it goes. I haven’t got a freezer compartment in the fridge – I've got a separate freezer which was bought at the same time and that's still working perfectly I'm pleased to say.

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The older I get the less I know.

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LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

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When I was living in a students house, the fridge had been there since before fridges had been invented.

[ 21. February 2015, 12:41: Message edited by: LeRoc ]

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I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

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Hedgehog

Ship's Shortstop
# 14125

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FWIW, a few years ago when I had an appliance repair man in to fix my dryer, he noticed the fridge and commented "That's an old war horse. Keep it. The new ones with their energy efficiency and energy saver stuff break down in ten years. That one [indicating the war horse] can go forever."

Not that I am suggesting newer fridges are crap...no, wait. I'm wrong. That IS what I am suggesting.

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

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Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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Abigail, I think what you describe WAS the one single repair we've ever needed, after which the thing went on forever. You might Google for possible causes and then get an estimate on repairs.

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

Posts: 20059 | From: off in left field somewhere | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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Not sure if it applies to fridges, though I suspect it does. Many appliances are simply slapped together components that manufacturers source parts from. Hence, for example, Kitchen Aid, Kenmore, Whirlpool, Hobart, are actually all be the same thing, just branded and packaged, though Kenmore could be any number of other repackaged brands. LG was making Kenmore recently. The same goes for car tires, where I think there's only really about 5 really different companies.

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Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety.
\_(ツ)_/

Posts: 11498 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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Regarding tangled chains, too bad you aren't close to me! I am the chain detangler of my family and friends. That's probably because I have perfect up-close vision, (but can't see beans farther away than eight inches) which makes it easy to see the knots, so perhaps a good lit magnifying glass like no prophet suggested.

I also agree that the older appliances last much longer than the new, fancy versions. As Scotty said: " The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain."

My fridge is old, ugly and runs like a champ. I'm sure it was original to my home when it was built in 1978, and I've been using it since 1989, so, over 25 years. And it's never needed a repair. (Should I knock on wood?) I wouldn't trust a new one to be of such good service.

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 18017 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

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Is there a polite, collective term for people of India and Pakistan? Something you could use to describe someone if their ancestry was probably from that area? Without giving offense?

I suppose you could say "from the Indian sub-continent", but that seems rather formal and unwieldy.

Thanks. Just something I've been wondering for a long time.

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

Posts: 18601 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged



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