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Source: (consider it) Thread: I remember... (For older shipmates?)
Doone
Shipmate
# 18470

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My career was in Further Education and in the late 1980s I had to teach IT [Ultra confused] ! In those days hardly anyone in FE was qualified in anything to do with computers, apart from programming, so guess who drew the short straw for teaching word processing, spreadsheets and databases! I started teaching using BBC computers (yes, really!), moving on to Apricots, then Amstrad. For ages any program needed a floppy disk to run. Commands to search or sort in 'dbase 2' needed a line of programming typed in to work. Does anyone remember Wordstar, Framework (one of the first integrated packages) or SuperCalc?
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Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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If Wordstar was the one that needed an extra chip fitted in the BBC, it ate my homework.

Whichever wordprocessor it was, it required the user editing their work to load up a page at a time to the monitor, and then save the edited page to a new file. It proceeded automatically through the document until finished, leaving the file the document had come from empty.

I had been working on a 2000 word piece for the OU on the possible reopening of a gold mine in Wales. Part of it was on paper to start with. I borrowed the school machine on several occasions. The keyboard/computer part, and the monitor - huge cubic thing - and anything else it needed, like the printer, and lugged the lot upstairs to my living room.

I had set up two files, "gold" and "mine", and worked from one to the other in turn. At 11.30 pm, the night before the assignment was due in, I inadvertently asked it to work in the wrong direction, and to my horror, saw it load the empty file into the full one. Unlike doing things with jugs of liquid, this resulted in two empty files.

Working frantically from the paper draft I got up to where that finished by the small hours. Woke early, lugged everything back to the small room in the school it lived in, and spent every spare moment recovering from the wetware what I had done the night before. I did manage to do it, and drive it to the tutor's home in the evening, but that was my BACKUP!!!! lesson learned. And taking note of where everything is.

(I had wangled to be the ICT person, so I could be a bit cavalier with the equipment, in order to familiarise myself with it.)

[ 07. February 2016, 13:33: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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I was just thinking of the time my teenage best friend and I spent the afternoon at her newly married sister's house. The sister and husband were out at work but they'd said it was fine for us to cook ourselves lunch so long as we cleaned up afterwards.

She had a freezer and a microwave. I'd heard about these but it was the first time I'd ever seen one. We picked out lunch from the freezer and heated it up in the microwave in seconds. Quite incredible. No more leaving stuff out overnight to defrost and cooking it the next day.

I was also amazed to discover that instead of taking hours to steam a Christmas pudding, it could be done in literally seconds in a microwave.

There were of course scares about irradiated food and radio waves giving you cancer, but the microwave seems to have settled in as an essential part of the British kitchen these days.

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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Remember writing term papers for school?

You used the encyclopedia as a starting ground (Americana or Britannica, please -- World Book was infra dig) -- and then branched out to books suggested by the encyclopedia entry.

Perhaps you consulted the Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature to find some recent magazine articles on your topic.

And finally you found a pithy epigram or two in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations to introduce your paper.

Nowadays it's Google and Wikipedia.

[ 07. February 2016, 15:33: Message edited by: Amanda B. Reckondwythe ]

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"I take prayer too seriously to use it as an excuse for avoiding work and responsibility." -- The Revd Martin Luther King Jr.

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Lothlorien
Ship's Grandma
# 4927

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quote:
Originally posted by Doone:
My career was in Further Education and in the late 1980s I had to teach IT [Ultra confused] ! In those days hardly anyone in FE was qualified in anything to do with computers, apart from programming, so guess who drew the short straw for teaching word processing, spreadsheets and databases! I started teaching using BBC computers (yes, really!), moving on to Apricots, then Amstrad. For ages any program needed a floppy disk to run. Commands to search or sort in 'dbase 2' needed a line of programming typed in to work. Does anyone remember Wordstar, Framework (one of the first integrated packages) or SuperCalc?

I used Wordstar and whatever the other word processing programme was called. However, floppy discs were a vast improvement on trying to load such a programme from a cassette. Programme would have been saved several times in the cassette. What loaded one day, may not have worked the next. Sheer bliss was the later development of a plugin with the programme on it.

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Buy a bale. Help our Aussie rural communities and farmers. Another great cause needing support The High Country Patrol.

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sharkshooter

Not your average shark
# 1589

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The first laptop I had for work was a T1200 .

quote:
The Toshiba T1200 was a laptop manufactured by the Toshiba Corporation, first made in 1987. It was an upgraded version of the Toshiba T1100 Plus.

It was equipped with an Intel 80C86 processor at 9.54 MHz, 1MB RAM of which 384kB could be used for LIM EMS or as a RAMdisk, CGA graphics card, one 720kB 3.5" floppy drive and one 20MB hard drive (Some models had two floppy drives.) MS-DOS 3.30 was included with the laptop. It was the first laptop with a swappable battery pack. Its original price was $6499.

I was lucky, I got the one with the 20MB hard drive. [Smile]

I remember a friend in high school (1976) bought a new calculator - an HP67. Learned to love Reverse Polish Notation! This calculator sold for about $450 and actually read a magnetic card, on which you could write programs.

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Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O LORD, my strength, and my redeemer. [Psalm 19:14]

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LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

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In the mid-eighties, we could borrow an Acorn Electron for a week from our public library.

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I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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Someone's friend came round to our college in a Sinclair C5 electric car one day. It ran out of charge when he got there and it was stranded on the quad for nearly a week.

Electric cars still haven't really taken off.

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Stercus Tauri
Shipmate
# 16668

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It was like Liberation Day when we were all given IBM PS2s at work, complete with WordPerfect 5.0. Freedom from the tyrannical secretary at last! Very useful for producing a good looking CV, too. I finally threw out my own WP discs and manual a few weeks ago.

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Thay haif said. Quhat say thay, Lat thame say (George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal)

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
However, floppy discs were a vast improvement on trying to load such a programme from a cassette. Programme would have been saved several times in the cassette.

My first computer was a Commodore VIC-20, which used a cassette. I wrote a little program in BASIC to help me balance my checkbook. It saved checkbook entries as DATA statements in the program itself, rather than to a separate file.

At the end of the month I would write out checks to pay my bills, and then save the program while I walked out to the mailbox (some distance from my apartment) to post the checks. When I got back, the program was still saving!

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"I take prayer too seriously to use it as an excuse for avoiding work and responsibility." -- The Revd Martin Luther King Jr.

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Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:

At the end of the month I would write out checks to pay my bills, and then save the program while I walked out to the mailbox (some distance from my apartment) to post the checks. When I got back, the program was still saving!

I had a friend with a Commodore 64 - the only child we knew with a computer. (At the time, I think my school owned a grand total of two BBC micros, used mostly for writing LOGO to control a turtle.) We used to go to his house after school to play games, set the game loading from tape (twinking screen 'cause the tape driver used the video memory as a buffer), and walk to the supermarket to buy sweets and fizzy drinks. Sometimes when we got back, the game had loaded. Other times, there had been some data corruption and we'd have to rewind the tape and try again.
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mark_in_manchester

not waving, but...
# 15978

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I used to use my Mum's 'Pye' radio-cassette to load games onto a Dragon 32. The setting of the 'tone' control was crucial!

That sound - (low)waaah-(high)BAP; (low)waah-(high)waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh..............

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"We are punished by our sins, not for them" - Elbert Hubbard
(so good, I wanted to see it after my posts and not only after those of shipmate JBohn from whom I stole it)

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Galloping Granny
Shipmate
# 13814

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We started with an Atari 400. I formed a company called Classroom Computers (about 1983) and demonstrated them in school staffrooms. Didn't sell many as teachers at that stage just wanted to know what a computer was, and I met older staff who couldn't be persuaded to touch the thing.
A year or so later the high school where I was a relief teacher engaged me to teach the English Dept staff word processing on their newly acquired Apples; I also taught Logo to a night class.
It was a few years later thatI supervised a double period in a room full of PCs when the computers had been made available for any kids who had work to complete on computers. Five minutes before the bell there was a power glitch – I bet none of those students ever forgot to SAVE regularly again!
Bt that time a teacher with a year two class would have a computer in the classroom and a 6-year-old who knew better than the teacher how to handle it.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Galloping Granny
Shipmate
# 13814

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Of course now they all have their own laptops, and nothing's as simple as it was 30 years ago.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

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When I was doing my first year of sixth form, a group of us self-taught our way through O-Level computer science (mainly - we had one teacher who helped and supported us and gave us some of the structure). We knew more than the teaching staff by a long way.

We all passed of course.

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Blog
Music for your enjoyment
Lord may all my hard times be healing times
take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Someone's friend came round to our college in a Sinclair C5 electric car one day. It ran out of charge when he got there and it was stranded on the quad for nearly a week.

Electric cars still haven't really taken off.

Not sure, I saw an electric van in use delivering food yesterday.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

Back to my blog

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Galloping Granny
Shipmate
# 13814

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When I was very small and we lived way out in the country my Dad had a big square Rover car. He was the young schoolteacher who did all the maintenance on his car himself and was rumoured to have done sixty miles an hour on the K*******n straight. Unsealed roads, of course

As long as he had it, I travelled sitting on a cushion between my parents, in the middle of the front (bench) seat.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

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Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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Dad's first car was a Hillman Husky, which he had as part of his work involved driving round to farmers to advise them on their accounting systems. It came somewhere between a van and an estate car, and was up to unmade up farm drives. (One piece of advice was that there were tax breaks for farmers tarmacing their drives!) He had to keep scrupulous records of business and personal use. The back seat was a bench one, and the three of us daughters would sit on it - except when we were driving my mothers' parents in it, when two of us would cram into the space behind the seat!
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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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So who remembers simulcasts -- when you tuned your FM radio to a certain station and positioned it to the left of your TV set so that certain special broadcasts could be heard in (gasp) stereo!

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"I take prayer too seriously to use it as an excuse for avoiding work and responsibility." -- The Revd Martin Luther King Jr.

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
... I travelled sitting on a cushion between my parents, in the middle of the front (bench) seat.

The first car I remember my dad having was a Singer Gazelle estate with a bench-seat in the front, and my seat was on the arm-rest. No straps, no restraints ... [Eek!]

Elfin Safety would have a pink fit. [Big Grin]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Piglet
Islander
# 11803

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... the microwave seems to have settled in as an essential part of the British kitchen these days.

It was just becoming that when we got married (1988) and we bought one with some of our monetary wedding presents.

As I recall, its chief use at first (apart from de-frosting) was baking potatoes, and one evening I had just put a couple of potatoes in to bake when we had a power cut. The house had a coal fire (the only time I've ever lived in a house that did) and I wrapped the potatoes in a couple of layers of tin-foil and put them in the embers underneath.

They took quite a while to bake but they were delicious - much nicer than they'd have been from the microwave.

[ 12. February 2016, 14:43: Message edited by: Piglet ]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
There were of course scares about irradiated food and radio waves giving you cancer, but the microwave seems to have settled in as an essential part of the British kitchen these days.

When we finally got a microwave when I was young, we kept it in the garage. Which was its own building some distance from the house. All the convenience was outweighed by having to put shoes on and fumble with the key, etc…
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Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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That Singer was a close cousin of our Husky - I didn't post image links because I couldn't quite get my mind about their period appearance. Clunky, weren't they? We went on to Minxes, and I did my driving practice on one with American type wings.

[ 12. February 2016, 15:41: Message edited by: Penny S ]

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Carex
Shipmate
# 9643

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quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
So who remembers simulcasts -- when you tuned your FM radio to a certain station and positioned it to the left of your TV set so that certain special broadcasts could be heard in (gasp) stereo!

Our local Public Broadcasting station was TV Channel 6, which was just below the FM broadcast band. Once my father had upgraded to a stereo receiver, they would tune the radio down to the far left end of the dial and pick up the TV audio directly, with much better sound than what came from the small speaker on the front of our TV.
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Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

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My dad's first car (he was a policeman) was an ex-police car painted white. Police cars in our area were white with an orange stripe along the side, and were hence called "jam butty cars" because they looked like jam between two slices of white bread.
No idea of the make, but it did come complete with the "Police Stop" sign in the back window, which still worked. There were odd occasions when dad was driving us to or from the caravan site where we had our holidays and, when another driver particularly annoyed dad, he was known to draw ahead of the annoying one and flash the "Police Stop" sign at him - to the bemusement of the other driver, since dad's car was also loaded up with luggage and with two little girls in the back!

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Laugh hard. Run fast. Be kind.

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LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

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This may be the wine speaking, but your dad is cool.

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I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

Posts: 9474 | From: Brazil / Africa | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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It probably wasn't all that long ago, but today I was remembering airline tickets, often hand-written, with red carbon paper between the copies. And if you happened to lose your ticket or show up at the airport without it, heaven help you! It took much time and a hefty fine to get a replacement.

Now I'm old fashioned because I print out my boarding pass at home. More and more people just flash their smart phones at the scanner.

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"...that is generally a matter for Pigwidgeon, several other consenting adults, a bottle of cheap Gin and the odd giraffe."
~Tortuf

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Kittyville
Shipmate
# 16106

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Funny you mention that, Pigwidgeon - a friend pointed out that it wasn't sooo long ago that we had those paper tickets, when I was complaining earlier this week about checking in online and having to print a boarding pass, because the website wouldn't send it to my phone. It also makes me think of the old lottery of trying to check in early enough at the airport to get a decent seat, instead of just preselecting one online.
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Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

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I've still got the wodge of little ticket booklets from my round the world trip in 1998!

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I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

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Palimpsest
Shipmate
# 16772

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Carbon paper, whiteout correction fluid, and old manual typewriters with metal rims on the keys that would hurt if you hit them wrong.

Card decks, paper tape, 8 inch floppies and 18 inch hard disk cartridges.

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Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

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I am watching Saturday Kitchen, and they have just had a food sieve thing that squashes food through a sieve. It sat on top of a bowl, and you turned a handle to squash the food. I have no idea how to describe it any better.

We used to have one. I suspect my mum still does somewhere. I used to love using it when we made soup.

--------------------
Blog
Music for your enjoyment
Lord may all my hard times be healing times
take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

Posts: 18859 | From: At the bottom of a deep dark well. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
ThunderBunk

Stone cold idiot
# 15579

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quote:
Originally posted by Schroedinger's cat:
I am watching Saturday Kitchen, and they have just had a food sieve thing that squashes food through a sieve. It sat on top of a bowl, and you turned a handle to squash the food. I have no idea how to describe it any better.

We used to have one. I suspect my mum still does somewhere. I used to love using it when we made soup.

I think it's usually called a food mill in English, which is a near-translation of its French name, a mouli-legumes. It's a French gadget, originally made by Moulinex, whose original gadget it presumably was.

Millions of babies have been fed with them. I use one to make mashed potatoes - you can get different sizes of holes, and the coarser one makes fabulous mash. Finer one for true purees and for smooth soups.

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Currently mostly furious, and occasionally foolish. Normal service may resume eventually. Or it may not. And remember children, "feiern ist wichtig".

Foolish, potentially deranged witterings

Posts: 2208 | From: Norwich | Registered: Apr 2010  |  IP: Logged
Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

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ThunderBunk - yes, that is it! What struck me is that the one shown is identical to the one my mum had. I guess it might have been a wedding present, making it 55 years old.

How many gadgets today would last that long?

--------------------
Blog
Music for your enjoyment
Lord may all my hard times be healing times
take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

Posts: 18859 | From: At the bottom of a deep dark well. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

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ThunderBunk - yes, that is it! What struck me is that the one shown is identical to the one my mum had. I guess it might have been a wedding present, making it 55 years old.

How many gadgets today would last that long?

--------------------
Blog
Music for your enjoyment
Lord may all my hard times be healing times
take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

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LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

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quote:
ThunderBunk: I think it's usually called a food mill in English, which is a near-translation of its French name, a mouli-legumes.
Mwah.

[ 13. February 2016, 12:03: Message edited by: LeRoc ]

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I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

Posts: 9474 | From: Brazil / Africa | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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Remember when railroad conductors punched your ticket, each conductor having a punch that made a unique cutout? I can't speak for European railroads, but on Amtrak they simply scan the ticket electronically now.

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"I take prayer too seriously to use it as an excuse for avoiding work and responsibility." -- The Revd Martin Luther King Jr.

Posts: 10542 | From: The Great Southwest | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Leorning Cniht
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# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
I can't speak for European railroads, but on Amtrak they simply scan the ticket electronically now.

Our local commuter rail still uses physical punches.
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Ariel
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# 58

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On one line I'm a regular traveller on, they still scribble on your ticket with a pen as they don't usually seem to have hole punches.
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Baptist Trainfan
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# 15128

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And, while you're about it, conductors with ticket machines on London buses.
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TonyK

Host Emeritus
# 35

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Sorry, Baptist Trainfan - I go back further...
Conductors used these! Sorry I couldn't just get the picture.

I remember the new machines coming in and thinking how neat they were.

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Yours aye ... TonyK

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Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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Just watched BBC2's "Back in Time for the Weekend", which was focusing on the 1960s in this episode. The teenage daughter and her brother discovered a phone box and how to make a call.

What surprised me was that it was one of those where you just put money in the slot, and apparently this cost sixpence. My memory of phone boxes from the era was of phones that were a bit more complicated, with Buttons A and B, and you had to get the sequence right of dialling, pressing and putting money in, or you lost your money. I don't remember it costing sixpence, though perhaps it did. I used to turn up to phone boxes in the 70s with a handful of copper coins - though that of course was after decimalization.

The other thing that surprised me was that apparently women didn't wear knickers with their miniskirts. I never heard that before. Some probably didn't but I'd be surprised if that was universal.

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Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
The other thing that surprised me was that apparently women didn't wear knickers with their miniskirts. I never heard that before. Some probably didn't but I'd be surprised if that was universal.

I certainly, as did everyone I knew. And we wore pantyhose (aka tights) in cool or cold weather. I think miniskirts became popular when pantyhose replaced stockings and garter belts (aka suspenders), so shorter skirts were possible.

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"...that is generally a matter for Pigwidgeon, several other consenting adults, a bottle of cheap Gin and the odd giraffe."
~Tortuf

Posts: 9835 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Penny S
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# 14768

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So did I. Remember the person who claimed no knickers was Sandy Shaw, in show business, not exactly like the rest of us.

Briefly, before tights, there were things like cycle shorts made of Bri-nylon jersey and in fancy colours, which covered the gap above the stockings. I had a pair with a tartan pattern on - what was I thinking? Couldn't wear miniskirts with them, though.

The phone box thing - I once missed a train at Liverpool Street and had to ring the college to alert the tutor on duty to my late arrival. I had to amass 2/6 worth of change, and put it in after she had lifted the phone, and press button B. And the ******** woman had put the phone down. And I had no more change. Just enough to call again from Colchester. (The rest of that night and morning are etched on my memory, and may have influenced my college career.)

And they never read books, and they never listened to the radio in the 50s, and the company insisted that they SMASHED A PIANO. Well done the family for leaving it to Coren.

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Ariel
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# 58

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And as for the only evening entertainment available for women in the 60s being bingo or else being chained to the kitchen sink - what rubbish. I never knew anyone who went to bingo. Most people I knew went to the cinema. The Sixties had a spate of good films at reasonable prices. And they were in colour, and not played deafeningly loud.
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Penny S
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# 14768

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I think there is a class issue being played out, with their data set being derived from the working class.

Board games, Hornby, Meccano (with Dad "helping"), reading, Women's Institute. Townswomen's Guild, the Cinema. Reading, reading, reading. The radio.

My mother wouldn't have dreamed of going to bingo!

Had a discussion with a fellow retired colleague - like the friend I watched the 50s with - rubbish. Why don't they ask the people who were around? We aten't dead yet.

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Galloping Granny
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# 13814

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quote:
Briefly, before tights, there were things like cycle shorts made of Bri-nylon jersey and in fancy colours, which covered the gap above the stockings. I had a pair with a tartan pattern on - what was I thinking? Couldn't wear miniskirts with them, though.
Would that be Witches' Britches?

Wasn't it Button A to talk if you got through, and B if you didn't and could get your money back?

I remember in the UK, probably 1958-59 or 5 years later, if you were waiting at a railway station where there were banks of phone boxes, you went along pressing Button B in case someone hadn't done it. Sometimes we got lucky, and even collected half-crowns.

GG

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The Kingdom of Heaven is spread upon the earth, and men do not see it. Gospel of Thomas, 113

Posts: 2629 | From: Matarangi | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged
Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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Well, whichever button it was, I pressed it, and heard all my small change dropping through, and then was connected to nobody. I then had to sprint to the train.

At Colchester I got through, and informed the tutor of my problem, then walked over to the bus station, and got the last single decker to Clacton. It wound round all the villages, picking up and dropping drunks, until it finished at the Clacton bus station, on the edge of the town. I hefted my luggage along through the town, having to deal with a kerb crawler, until I got to the house of the landlady where I had been put. She had a number of girls billetted on her in half of a large pair of semidetached houses, the other half of which was used for holiday makers.

I went in the door and aimed for the phone to report in, but was grabbed away from it by an older student and hauled into the kitchen, where I faced a situation like that painting of "When did you last see your father". The large figure of the landlady sat on the other side of a large kitchen table, flanked by the other students.

I was told that under no circumstances was I to phone in. The ********* tutor had rung the place IMMEDIATELY after my call from Colchester and asked if I had signed in. Without checking the book, and because I was always in on time, the student at the phone had said that I was! The ****** tutor had then instructed that I was to see her first thing in the morning.

The landlady was desperate that she not be exposed as not checking the book, because she would not be able to afford to live without the income from housing students. They had cooked up a story that I had been seen by her daughter and given a lift from Colchester, and insisted that this is what I told the tutor in the morning.
Which, I am sorry to say, I did, because of the concern for the landlady, and it was perfectly obvious that I wasn't telling the truth.

Nobody ever challenged me, but I fear that this lay behind the attitude of the staff to me afterwards, and the suspicion that I was up to no good, the placing of me next to a tutor (got out of that one), and the Hall Tutor listening outside my door when I read a letter from my mother to a friend.

Nothing was written in the records I finally got hold of, but they had been weeded. so I still hear those coins dropping fatally in the phone. I can't remember the name of the ******* idiot tutor.

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Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

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The back in time series take a particular image and perspective of times. It is interesting to see how some people lived - my family didn't live quite like that, but as it gets to times I remember, I can relate.

The phone box was far too new - it should have been one of the old ones. I don't remember the Button A/B thing, but then we had a phone in the house, so I didn't use public phones until later.

Sandy Shaw may not have worn knickers, and I am sure there were many others who didn't. That doesn't mean it was universal. It is all a snapshot.

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Blog
Music for your enjoyment
Lord may all my hard times be healing times
take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

Posts: 18859 | From: At the bottom of a deep dark well. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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quote:
Originally posted by Schroedinger's cat:


Sandy Shaw may not have worn knickers, and I am sure there were many others who didn't. That doesn't mean it was universal. It is all a snapshot.

What I do remember about Sandie Shaw is that she wore no shoes. Maybe that helped keep her skirt in place.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

Posts: 24276 | From: Newport, Wales | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Penny S
Shipmate
# 14768

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I don't know anyone who has thought the programme got it right. In RL or online.
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