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Source: (consider it) Thread: Back to the garden
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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I'm a Darwinian gardener. I plant things, and they die. If they don't die, they stay. I plant new things in the bare spots. This policy, carried over several years, fills the garden with violently-thriving and aggressively healthy plants in a disorderly pattern. For me nasturtiums and cleome do not come back -- climate and soil are surely to blame. Lamb's ears and perennial geranium are nearly weeds, and after several attempts foxglove will reseed. Also after a few shots at it the sage finally consented to live and spread, and has now taken over a large area.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

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Don't let vinca in, unless you want it forever. Stripping it out again is painful, nearly impossible, and does a number on your skin with some sort of plant chemical. [Waterworks]

As for morning glory, in my experience the way to get this is to get a packet of seeds and toss them out the window (or similar). The more care you give them, the less chance of them sticking around. One exception is soaking--if you soak them for a day, you can probably get by without the St. Louis rains.

I'm talking about the vines (ipomoea) not the bush (convolvulus tricolor etc.)

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Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
You could use herbs as ground cover. Mint is notorious for taking over

Tell me about it. Besides that and the lemon verbena, I have an edgy relationship with the strawberries, crowfoot geranium and ragged robin - I don't mind some, but they do tend to strangle everything else.
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Nicodemia
WYSIWYG
# 4756

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I quite like ragged robin! But I actually bought, paid good money for, a Euphorbia, which would take over the garden given even the fraction of a chance. It creeps under the ground with really tough roots, and pops up everywhere. But it does look pretty in the spring!
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Chamois
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# 16204

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We had lovely weather today and I've had a good time mowing the lawn. I'm still not convinced the soil is warm enough for me to plant the potatoes, but the sprouting broccoli is sprouting magnificently. This is the first time I've tried growing it and it's definitely worth all the bother and effort required to keep pigeons and caterpillars away in the summer.

The forsythia is very late flowering around here. Has anyone else noticed this?

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Graven Image
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# 8755

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The local grocery store is selling large tomato plants. Mind you we can get frost and even snow in these parts until May, but it is tempting on this bright sun shining day. Avert your eye Look away from the plants. [Paranoid]
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Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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I am about to yield to temptation and order fifteen hyacinth bulbs. I planted ten two years ago, and I have decided I would like another row behind them. I will order five white, five blue, and five dark red. I only have space for nine; I plan to force three and see if my daughter would like the other three.

Moo

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Kerygmania host
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See you later, alligator.

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ThunderBunk

Stone cold idiot
# 15579

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Hyacinths originate from the foul marshes of hell and breathe Satan's own stench over the world.

Just so you know.

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Currently mostly furious, and occasionally foolish. Normal service may resume eventually. Or it may not. And remember children, "feiern ist wichtig".

Foolish, potentially deranged witterings

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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The large Dutch ones, I agree. Grape hyacinth have wonderful charm however. And they spread readily.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
If your climate is good for peonies (or if you select cultivars that suit your weather) they can be glorious. But they come and go too soon.
I am pleased to report that my hydrangeas did not die over the winter. I am a fan of extravagant bloom.

I think they probably grow anywhere. I live in Zone* 1b/2a and we grow them. Though we're not starting anything anytime soon. It snowed a bit again yesterday.

*hardiness zones

[ 05. April 2016, 03:24: Message edited by: no prophet's flag is set so... ]

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Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety.
\_(ツ)_/

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Celtic Knotweed
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# 13008

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Grape hyacinth have wonderful charm however. And they spread readily.

Sandemaniac has threatened murder if I ever plant any. Having seen one at the edge of the parental Knotweed's garden coming up through the tarmac where the council had resurfaced the pavement, I can see his point... (plus I know how few were originally sown in that border compared to how many came up a couple of years later, think 1:10 ratio [Eek!] )

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My little sister is riding 100k round London at night to raise money for cancer research donations here if you feel so inclined.

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jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

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But the blue, the blue! How can you resist it?

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But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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I have grape hyacinth interplanted with late daffodils, a very pretty effect. Alas, they are not spreading as thickly and fast as I would like -- my son occasionally drives over the spot which does not help. I must get a photo while the spot is at its best.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
But the blue, the blue! How can you resist it?

Because I'll be the one who'll have to dig the fuckers up when they take over!

Actually, I rather like them myself, but they do spread like herpes in a whorehouse. We don't have enough space... maybe the other side of the concrete wall?

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

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Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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Grape hyacinths are practically impossible to dig out of a garden where they've taken over. Those little additional bulbs they produce are so small.

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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Chamois
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# 16204

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So far I've managed to keep grape hyacinths confined to one bed by hand-weeding. When the newly seeded plants first sprout you get one thin stem. They're easy to pull up at that stage, but it is a game of patience.

However, they are worth having for the colour and the scent and because bumble bees love them. Mine are planted with primroses - the pale yellow with the deep blue is stunning.

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The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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Alas, mine are not spreading as I would like. Nor are the bluebells. There is one, count them, one bluebell. No more.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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Whatever you do, Firenze, do not plant goutweed (I think it's also called Bishop's Weed). Can be very pretty, and grows in total shade. But short of digging all roots out to a depth of 18 inches, you will never, never be rid of it.

Maybe in a concrete planter with walls at least 3 inches thick, and an intergral base...

John

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Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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My leeks and onions are spprouting!

Gods only knows what I'll do when we go away next week...

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

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Nicodemia
WYSIWYG
# 4756

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London Pride will spread in satisfying thick mats, provided you want it everywhere! Easily pulled up though if it overreaches its boundaries!
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Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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Creeping Jenny makes great ground cover and is very easy indeed to remove from the places you don't want it.

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Garden. Room. Walk

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Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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Grrr. Just about to start a vigorous afternoon of gardening, and the heavens opened. Bloody April showers!

On the bright side, got compost and stuff sorted instead, and have found a good source of water butts.

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

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Penny S
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# 14768

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quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Creeping Jenny makes great ground cover and is very easy indeed to remove from the places you don't want it.

But needs it done a lot.
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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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<slow drumbeat> Today could be the day for hoeing the dug bit and putting down the grass seed.

Though it would be nice if there were a little sunshine and maybe a temperature creep into double figures.

Talking of grass, I was surprised yesterday, on going to large local garden centre, to find they didn't stock lawnmowers, which seem to me a fairly basic bit of kit. Online it is then. Hover, lightweight, nothing fancy.

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Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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After yesterday's failings todayu was very busy, and we have got a shedload done. The yellow stuff that isn't Hypericum has been hacked to the ground, opening up a big space that I didn't realise was there, dug said space as best the Leylandii roots would allow, and a Buddleia has gone in next to it. I realise that this is trouble, but the intention (see you in Hell...) is that thay will be hacked to the vground every year, so lots of fresh shoots for flowers butterfiles etc. I've got rid of two rather miserable Euonymus bushes and moved a gorgeous ice-white hollyhock and a peony (colour unknown - it just sprouted!)into their places. I've mowed the postage stamp, got some spuds in bbags planted, and have got almost everything sorted on my to do list other than get some guttering on the greenhouse. I've even bought three 220L olive drums to turn into water butts, just need to install taps and a diverter.

All that and cricket nets too - my body is not so muych telling me "Enough!" as "AAAAARRRRRRGGGGHHHHHJEEEEESSSSSSSUUUUSSSSSYOUBASTARDIT HURTSDON'TMAKEMEDOANYMORE!"

Owwwww.....

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

Posts: 3574 | From: The wardrobe of my soul | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged
Landlubber
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# 11055

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[Help] please. I am having to learn all my husband's garden jobs in a hurry. I grow veg and shrubs; he has always minded the fruit and the grass. I have beaten the mower into submission but the raspberry canes have beaten me. I have never liked them and this is their revenge. Mr Ll had them double cropping. I am not going to have the time to cope with this (or the inclination to get scratched twice). In any case, I did not have time to cut them back this February. So if I let them all do their own thing this year and cut them all back next February, can I rescue them? (Digging them out is not an option; he's already mad at having to let me take things over.)

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They that go down to the sea in ships … reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man

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quetzalcoatl
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# 16740

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I never learn. We bought about 40/50 different veg plants, planted them with great enthusiasm, went away for a week, came back, all gone.

Must remember, slug pellets, slug pellets, slug pellets. Start again.

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I can't talk to you today; I talked to two people yesterday.

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quetzalcoatl
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# 16740

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quote:
Originally posted by Landlubber:
[Help] please. I am having to learn all my husband's garden jobs in a hurry. I grow veg and shrubs; he has always minded the fruit and the grass. I have beaten the mower into submission but the raspberry canes have beaten me. I have never liked them and this is their revenge. Mr Ll had them double cropping. I am not going to have the time to cope with this (or the inclination to get scratched twice). In any case, I did not have time to cut them back this February. So if I let them all do their own thing this year and cut them all back next February, can I rescue them? (Digging them out is not an option; he's already mad at having to let me take things over.)

I don't think that you have a problem really. We have done all kinds of weird things with raspberries, including ignoring them, cutting them to the ground, cutting them half-way up, blah blah, and they just carry on. As to getting the max crop, then pruning at the right time will help. The problem we have is stopping them spreading.

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I can't talk to you today; I talked to two people yesterday.

Posts: 9878 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I hate slug pellets with a passion because of the damage they do to wildlife. The active ingredient is poisonous to all wildlife. Toads, frogs, thrushes, blackbirds and hedgehogs are all killed by eating poisoned slugs and snails.

Which left me in a quandary when I had a vegetable plot and my very helpful neighbours put them down for me around my bean plants. (While I was wandering home to find eggshells)

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

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quetzalcoatl
Shipmate
# 16740

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quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
I hate slug pellets with a passion because of the damage they do to wildlife. The active ingredient is poisonous to all wildlife. Toads, frogs, thrushes, blackbirds and hedgehogs are all killed by eating poisoned slugs and snails.

Which left me in a quandary when I had a vegetable plot and my very helpful neighbours put them down for me around my bean plants. (While I was wandering home to find eggshells)

I know. When we first got an allotment, we were full of high hopes of gardening organically. Well, I remember sowing rows and rows of French beans, and gorgeous little plantlets came up, and got eaten.

So, it's either use slug pellets, or give up.

You can get round it to an extent by buying larger veg plants from a nursery, but as above, we did this, bought a ton of them, every single one of them gone.

And there are some veg that slugs don't seem to like, e.g. chard, cavalo nero, Jerusalem artichokes, onions. But last week, rows of leeks were gobbled up.

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I can't talk to you today; I talked to two people yesterday.

Posts: 9878 | From: UK | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged
Chamois
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# 16204

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Originally posted by Landlubber:

quote:
I have beaten the mower into submission but the raspberry canes have beaten me. I have never liked them and this is their revenge. Mr Ll had them double cropping. I am not going to have the time to cope with this (or the inclination to get scratched twice). In any case, I did not have time to cut them back this February. So if I let them all do their own thing this year and cut them all back next February, can I rescue them?
Don't worry, they should be fine. You probably won't get the maximum crop this year but it won't have done them any harm.
Posts: 978 | From: Hill of roses | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

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Came home after a week away. My self-seeded primulas are still marching in full flower towards the midday sun, and I've discovered even more patches of self-seeded violets in blossom. AND we've had two days of clear skies and sunshine. [Smile]

On the other hand, maybe that's it till next year [Waterworks]

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But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

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Landlubber
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# 11055

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Thank you for the reassurances re raspberries. (Yes, they are spreading. One of the reasons I'm against them is that they have turned up in one of my veg beds.)

Hurrah for self-seeded colour, jacobsen.

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They that go down to the sea in ships … reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man

Posts: 383 | From: On dry land | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Chamois
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# 16204

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My raspberries are determined to take over the gooseberry bed. Sneaky devils! But the fruit is so delicious I'm more than prepared to put up with their little ways.
Posts: 978 | From: Hill of roses | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

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Today, despite the sleety snow which melted e'er it touched the earth, I spent a good half hour removing the dead bits of plants, e.g. last year's fennel, the remains of dead annuals in the planters, and the dead branches which the winter storms throw over the hedge from the trees in the park into my garden. It all looks much neater, but my hands were frozen and my denims soaked to the knee. Still, the spring flowers are no longer overshadowed by the mess. [Yipee]

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But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

Posts: 8040 | From: Æbleskiver country | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
Og, King of Bashan

Ship's giant Amorite
# 9562

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I chose a similarly sleety morning today to divide and move some coreopsis into its new place in my in-the-works xeric perennial bed. My mother-in-law gave the plant to us a few years ago when she had her garden re-done, and I just tossed it in a random hidden spot along the property line, to see what it would do. Despite quite a bit of neglect, it seems to have thrived in our clay soil and year-round dry conditions, so I think it earned a place of honor.

The bed is going along the street on the (east facing) front of my house, in a spot where the grass hasn't ever really taken. (I think it used to be a driveway.) It's a 9 foot by 9 foot spot, which I intend to fill with mass-ish plantings of coreopsis, flowering sedum, and ornamental grass, with bulbs to fill in the bare spots in the spring. The eventual objective is to remove as much lawn and sprinkler line as possible, in hopes of cutting down on water use. I figure if I go 81 square feet at a time, it should keep me entertained for quite a few years.

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"I like to eat crawfish and drink beer. That's despair?" ― Walker Percy

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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I have raspberry bushes from which I have never harvested a berry. I think my lot is too shady for them.
I did move the solomon's seal a mere six feet away, over to the other side of the driveway. It had been a meek and downtrodden plant on the one side, languishing like a Victorian maiden. Over on the other, it is revealed to be a Goliath, striding across the bed like a colossus. And extremely handsome.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 6378 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
Chamois
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# 16204

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Originally posted by Brenda Clough:

quote:
I have raspberry bushes from which I have never harvested a berry. I think my lot is too shady for them.
I would have guessed Washington DC is too warm a climate for raspberries. I associate them with cold winters. In the UK raspberries do best in Scotland.

We had a glorious day here yesterday and I had a good time mowing the lawn. Third cut, so it's now starting to lose its wintertime clumpiness. Then I started attacking the dandelions but eventually gave up and just sat enjoying the sunshine.

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The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases

Posts: 978 | From: Hill of roses | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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quote:
Originally posted by Chamois:
In the UK raspberries do best in Scotland.

Last year my half dozen canes gave me more fruit than I knew what to do with. Most of them got dug up this year and hastily replanted - but nevertheless they are leafing vigorously so we shall see.

It continues cold and wet here. I got a couple of hours in over the weekend, but only time to put some herbs in pots.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Og, King of Bashan

Ship's giant Amorite
# 9562

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quote:
Originally posted by Chamois:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:

quote:
I have raspberry bushes from which I have never harvested a berry. I think my lot is too shady for them.
I would have guessed Washington DC is too warm a climate for raspberries. I associate them with cold winters. In the UK raspberries do best in Scotland.

The best wild raspberry patches I know grow at around 9000 feet in the mountains, meaning the bushes are currently still buried in snow- so yes, you might say cold winters.

Nonetheless, I believe that you can find cultivators that are suited to warmer climates, although you will still need to give them lots of sun, from what I have read, to get berries.

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"I like to eat crawfish and drink beer. That's despair?" ― Walker Percy

Posts: 3259 | From: Denver, Colorado, USA | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Sandemaniac
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# 12829

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Well, I spent so much time digging yesterday, desperately trying to catch up now that I can't get to the plot on weekday evenings, that I buggered myself up - to the point where I had to have a mid-afternoon nap today because I was stumbling around like a drunk I was so knackered. I have parts of my body that I didn't even know I had until they started to hurt...

On the other hand, it's finally warm enough for seeds to get going, and even the Knotweed is showing signs (eg putting up her sweet pea wigwam, and pricking stuff out) of being converted to the Church of Gardening. Result!

I have also been enormously satisfied today by four inches in my butt. [Snigger] I've never had a water butt before, so was most chuffed to find that the piping I'd rigged up to the greenhouse gutters is doing its job. I've now got to sort out the ones on the house downpipes in the interests of using free water for watering. I've got three of these babies for considerably less than the cost of buying a purpose-made water butt, and just need to get the bits together to connect them up. They'll also help hide our back gate from the road so I'm not worried that they are butt ugly (sorry). Hopefully will give me plenty of water (no doubt a drought will start the day I get them set up...).

AG

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"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

Posts: 3574 | From: The wardrobe of my soul | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged
Chamois
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A lovely day in the garden today. The main crop potatoes are just showing their first leaves above ground. My three new tomato plants are looking very happy in their pots, the raspberry canes are about a foot high and the gooseberries are forming on the bushes.

It looks as though spring is finally here at last. [Smile]

Posts: 978 | From: Hill of roses | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged
Landlubber
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quote:
Originally posted by Chamois:
...
We had a glorious day here yesterday and I had a good time mowing the lawn. Third cut, so it's now starting to lose its wintertime clumpiness. Then I started attacking the dandelions but eventually gave up and just sat enjoying the sunshine.

You shamed me into it. I did the second cut yesterday. Even more shaming, I have not touched the edges at all. Soon. After I've done all the jobs I enjoy more. Doing the edges ranks with tying in the raspberry canes in my book.

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They that go down to the sea in ships … reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man

Posts: 383 | From: On dry land | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

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Today I did my tomato, aubergine, bean and courgette pots, and as many pots of bedding plants as were not still using up the last of the flowering bulbs. There will be in time a search and destroy campaign against the dandelions, but I did sit with my tea and a book and just enjoy the garden and the weather. After all, that's why we put in all that work, isn't it? [Razz]

[ 08. May 2016, 18:16: Message edited by: jacobsen ]

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But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

Posts: 8040 | From: Æbleskiver country | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
Chamois
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The dandelions you will always have with you; but sunshine you will not always have with you.

(Or words to that effect…………..) [Devil]

Posts: 978 | From: Hill of roses | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged
cattyish

Wuss in Boots
# 7829

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The little plastic tent greenhouse I acquired from my mother-in-law is looking increasingly handy. There are seeds putting up green shoots all over the place and I'm ready for any late frosts with a well-protected paraffin heater. I have only one living tomato plant having got too enthusiastic too early, but there are chilli plants and flowers sprouting. The maximum temperature in there was 47 degrees yesterday. Perhaps I need to open the door in the morning to let the temperature down a bit.

Cattyish, another Darwinian gardener.

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...to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived, this is to have succeeded.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Posts: 1794 | From: Scotland | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

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My weeding arms is uncommonly sore - and covered in scratches from a particularly belligerent hedge.

Vast tracts of border remain unweeded - shortly to be joined by the ex-vegetable patch where the grass seed is making poor headway against the long established buttercup, wild strawberry, dandelion, dock, bindweed, chickweed, weedweed etc etc

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Og, King of Bashan

Ship's giant Amorite
# 9562

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One should have never ending garden tasks, just to remind oneself that nature will always win in the end. My friends in the South have stories about their father's annual attempts to take out the kudzu in the back 40 with anything from concentrated roundup to diesel fuel.

My nemesis that will surely outlive me is a nasty patch of Tree of Heaven, an invasive East Asian tree that sends out shoots, sprays seeds everywhere, and regenerates from pruning at an alarming rate. The things grow through asphalt, and have a distinct and unpleasant smell that will stick to your hands for a day after you attack them. There are (no kidding) a number of them around the city of Hiroshima that survived the bomb.

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"I like to eat crawfish and drink beer. That's despair?" ― Walker Percy

Posts: 3259 | From: Denver, Colorado, USA | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Landlubber
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# 11055

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quote:
Originally posted by Chamois:
The dandelions you will always have with you; but sunshine you will not always have with you.

(Or words to that effect…………..) [Devil]

We did not. It rained all day today. Did you summon it up to prove yourself right?

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They that go down to the sea in ships … reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man

Posts: 383 | From: On dry land | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

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I've been planting up my containers today. This year my theme is white, purple and pink.

So far we have lavender, nemesis, petunias and violas [Big Grin]

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Garden. Room. Walk

Posts: 13030 | From: Boogie Wonderland | Registered: Mar 2008  |  IP: Logged



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