homepage
  roll on christmas  
click here to find out more about ship of fools click here to sign up for the ship of fools newsletter click here to support ship of fools
community the mystery worshipper gadgets for god caption competition foolishness features ship stuff
discussion boards live chat cafe avatars frequently-asked questions the ten commandments gallery private boards register for the boards
 
Ship of Fools


Post new thread  Post a reply
My profile login | | Directory | Search | FAQs | Board home
   - Printer-friendly view Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
» Ship of Fools   »   » Oblivion   » Authors you would like to meet (Page 2)

 - Email this page to a friend or enemy.  
Pages in this thread: 1  2 
 
Source: (consider it) Thread: Authors you would like to meet
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Both dead, alas, but:

1. Wilkie Collins, younger contemporary and friend of Dickens. Collins invented wonderful devices for murdering his characters, and actually built at least one...to see if it would work [Eek!]


Goodness! Where, when? Details!

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 6378 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
Bishops Finger
Shipmate
# 5430

 - Posted      Profile for Bishops Finger   Email Bishops Finger   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Ah....my apologies.....I've given incorrect information, having failed to check my sources beforehand.

In his labyrinthine and mysterious melodrama Armadale, Collins does indeed have one of the characters attempt to murder another by introducing poison gas into a sealed bedroom.

The author and a friend saw something similar attempted on a dog 'for the edification of tourists' whilst on a visit to the Grotto di Cane near Naples in 1853. Collins recorded in a letter to his brother that he had, out of compassion, had the experiment cut short before the dog died.

William Wilkie Collins (1834-1897) is best known for The Moonstone and The Woman in White , but wrote numerous other novels, some of which are easier to read than others. Well worth the attempt, though, IMNSHO.

Ian J.

--------------------
Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

Posts: 10151 | From: Behind The Wheel Again! | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Bishops Finger
Shipmate
# 5430

 - Posted      Profile for Bishops Finger   Email Bishops Finger   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Sorry to double-post...Wilkie Collins' dates are 1824-1889, not as I quoted above.

Another of his novels - Jezebel's Daughter - also includes murder by poison (potions rather than gas).

Ian J.

--------------------
Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

Posts: 10151 | From: Behind The Wheel Again! | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I have Armadale on my Ipad, also Salummbo by Gustave Flaubert, but haven't had time to read either.

Assuming one could get past the language/cultural barriers, I would love to talk to John (of Revelations). That's a man with one crazy imagination.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 6378 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
Bishops Finger
Shipmate
# 5430

 - Posted      Profile for Bishops Finger   Email Bishops Finger   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I think you might need to eat magic mushrooms (or something) to converse with St. John!

Another author I'd like to have met is H. P. Lovecraft (IIRC someone else mentioned him upthread). Quite why I seem to like authors who dispose of their victims in rather ghastly and eldritch (a good Lovecraftian word) ways, I know not...

Ian J.

--------------------
Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

Posts: 10151 | From: Behind The Wheel Again! | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
It is a mistake to know too much about authors; Lovecraft was like many of his period an anti-Semite. Many writers are very unsatisfactory people in real life.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 6378 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Of course, because you'd like to meet someone doesn't necessarily mean you think you'd like them as a person. I'd have been very interested to meet Hitler and Stalin (both of whom I suppose do count as authors of a kind), but probably just the once would be enough. Also, though not a comparable person, Barbara Cartland, simply because I heard her being interviewed on the radio and she came across as so gloriously and battily and self-confidently larger than life.

[ 18. October 2016, 15:21: Message edited by: Albertus ]

Posts: 6498 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Or Philip of Macedon. They excavated his party service in Greece, and he seems to have been quite the kegger.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 6378 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
andras
Shipmate
# 2065

 - Posted      Profile for andras   Email andras   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Robertson Davies for starters; he taught me to write (not literally, but what a wonderful exemplar he was). Read The Manticore if you don't know how good he is!

Then Ursula le Guin, Plum, Trollope, Swift, Virgil, and the unknown author of Gawain. Should be quite a bash!

--------------------
God's on holiday.
(Why borrow a cat?)
Adrian Plass

Posts: 544 | From: Tregaron | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged
Schroedinger's cat

Ship's cool cat
# 64

 - Posted      Profile for Schroedinger's cat   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
H.G Wells, George Orwell and Aldous Huxley. That would be my dinner party.

I would expect some arguments.

--------------------
Blog
Music for your enjoyment
Lord may all my hard times be healing times
take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

Posts: 18859 | From: At the bottom of a deep dark well. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Bishops Finger
Shipmate
# 5430

 - Posted      Profile for Bishops Finger   Email Bishops Finger   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Brenda, HPL was indeed a racist of his time. So too were Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers - I daresay there are/were many others.

I think I'd enjoy discussing the Great Old Ones with HPL over dinner, though!

Ian J.

--------------------
Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

Posts: 10151 | From: Behind The Wheel Again! | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

 - Posted      Profile for Brenda Clough   Author's homepage   Email Brenda Clough   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
You can meet Le Guin any time -- she lives in Oregon, although she is pretty frail now. Yet another of those writers who should live forever.

--------------------
Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

Posts: 6378 | From: Washington DC | Registered: Mar 2014  |  IP: Logged
Sandemaniac
Shipmate
# 12829

 - Posted      Profile for Sandemaniac   Email Sandemaniac   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I'd quite fancy getting Gildas to the table, if only to ask him why the hell he didn't get any real history in,instead of just having a rant.

AG

[ 18. October 2016, 19:03: Message edited by: Sandemaniac ]

--------------------
"It becomes soon pleasantly apparent that change-ringing is by no means merely an excuse for beer" Charles Dickens gets it wrong, 1869

Posts: 3574 | From: The wardrobe of my soul | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged
The Phantom Flan Flinger
Shipmate
# 8891

 - Posted      Profile for The Phantom Flan Flinger   Author's homepage   Email The Phantom Flan Flinger   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Tea & cake with Marian Keyes would be fun [Smile]

--------------------
http://www.faith-hope-and-confusion.com/

Posts: 1020 | From: Leicester, England | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Chorister

Completely Frocked
# 473

 - Posted      Profile for Chorister   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Stephen Leacock. But they'd better not serve soup at this dinner party, or there'd be way too much spluttering!

--------------------
Retired, sitting back and watching others for a change.

Posts: 34626 | From: Cream Tealand | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

 - Posted      Profile for Welease Woderwick   Email Welease Woderwick   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Joshua Slocum would have some amazing tales to tell.

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
Eigon
Shipmate
# 4917

 - Posted      Profile for Eigon   Author's homepage   Email Eigon   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I'm told Alan Garner tends to hide from visitors when his house is open to the public, but if you could get him to a dinner table I bet he'd be a fascinating guest.
And while I'm thinking of children's authors, I'd like to have Rosemary Sutcliff, Henry Treece and Geoffrey Trease at the same table to compare notes on children's historical fiction! Geoffrey Trease used to live in Malvern and was reputed to be quite a gentleman - and I once met a man who knew Henry Treece, who told me that he had been diagnosed with a weak heart - so he'd given up his job, packed his family into an old car, and careered around Europe for a year!

--------------------
Laugh hard. Run fast. Be kind.

Posts: 3710 | From: Hay-on-Wye, town of books | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Teekeey Misha
Shipmate
# 18604

 - Posted      Profile for Teekeey Misha     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Who would I invite to my dinner party of the vanities?
  • George Orwell and Josef Conrad are the authors of my three favourite books, so they're a must.
  • Dornford Yates, because I own all his works (almost each of them in first edition, because I am that sad person about whom you've heard.)
  • Dorothy L. Sayers, because I do like a good murder mystery and DLS is Agatha Christie with brains.
  • Graham Greene (or anyone who's written decent spy stories/thrillers - except Dan Brown and Ian Fleming, neither of whom the butler at Misha Dvorets would allow over the threshold.)
  • Anthony Hope, because one day I will be offered the throne of a Balkan kingdom.
  • Someone classical but I'd limit myself to one and I can't decide if I'd prefer Tacitus, Livy or Seutonius. (I think Pliny would be a bit of a bore/boor.)
  • Anthony Flew, just because.
  • Dostoyevsky, because I'd like a bit of Russian input.
  • Some latter day historian - Mary Beard is, sadly, out because I've already done classicals and I wouldn't want her hogging my other classical guest, so any of the other decent modern historians who isn't David Starkey (whom I'm sure I'd have to kill before the soup was cleared.) Maybe that Diarmaid MacCulloch because I enjoyed his "Cranmer" and he's good on the telly.
I can only fit nine other people round the dining table. Now, if it were to be a garden party, I could invite dozens of authors I'd love to meet; I might want to meet some of them only fleetingly, perhaps just long enough to say "That book stank - what were you thinking..?" but there are others I'd lock in the library and keep here to talk to ad saecula saeculorum.

--------------------
Misha
Don't assume I don't care; sometimes I just can't be bothered to put you right.

Posts: 296 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2016  |  IP: Logged
Boogie

Boogie on down!
# 13538

 - Posted      Profile for Boogie     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I met the children's poet Wes Magee - he asked me out!!

In fact he invited me to his cottage stay with him. I acted ignorant and gently put him off!

[Eek!] [Hot and Hormonal]

--------------------
Garden. Room. Walk

Posts: 13030 | From: Boogie Wonderland | Registered: Mar 2008  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

 - Posted      Profile for Curiosity killed ...   Email Curiosity killed ...   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I met Geoffrey Trease; he came to my school to talk about his books and I suspect I got to show him around, because I remember talking to him individually and finding it awkward because I hadn't read any of his books.

--------------------
Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
leo
Shipmate
# 1458

 - Posted      Profile for leo   Author's homepage   Email leo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Teekeey Misha:
Diarmaid MacCulloch because I enjoyed his "Cranmer" and he's good on the telly.

He's always good fun.

(Code fix)

[ 31. October 2016, 14:50: Message edited by: Firenze ]

--------------------
My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

Posts: 23198 | From: Bristol | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

 - Posted      Profile for jacobsen   Email jacobsen   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I've no idea what the mix would be like, but Jane Austen, if we could get her to unbutton, J.K.Rowling, Jane Duncan (Scottish author of adult and children's fiction) and a now probably forgotten writer of children's fantasy/historical fiction, Marjorie Phillips. Also Ursula Le Guin.

The common factor for me is their humanity, which shines through their writing, and the affection they show for their characters.

--------------------
But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

Posts: 8040 | From: Æbleskiver country | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Apropos of nothing much: in Czech they add the female suffix to foreign names. So there she's J K Rowlingova.
Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

 - Posted      Profile for Huia   Email Huia   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Thanks Firenze - it gave me a giggle,

Another one wanting to meet Ursula Le Guin. I'd also like to meet Sophie Hannah to ask her to stop writing crap stories about Poirot and go back to writing her own brilliant murders.

Does anyone else loathe and detest "sequels" of favourite authors written by other people?

Huia

--------------------
Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

Posts: 10382 | From: Te Wai Pounamu | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

 - Posted      Profile for Moo   Email Moo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Does anyone else loathe and detest "sequels" of favourite authors written by other people?

YES!!!

Moo

--------------------
Kerygmania host
---------------------
See you later, alligator.

Posts: 20365 | From: Alleghany Mountains of Virginia | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Welease Woderwick

Sister Incubus Nightmare
# 10424

 - Posted      Profile for Welease Woderwick   Email Welease Woderwick   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Me too.

I love Eoin Colfer but his Douglas Adams spin-off leaves me cold.

--------------------
I give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way.
Fancy a break in South India?
Accessible Homestay Guesthouse in Central Kerala, contact me for details

What part of Matt. 7:1 don't you understand?

Posts: 48139 | From: 1st on the right, straight on 'til morning | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

 - Posted      Profile for jacobsen   Email jacobsen   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
On the other hand, the Gill Paton Walsh Whimsey continuations are very good. She has managed to bring them up to post WW2 and a second generation with a good deal of panache. But I'll be sorry when the Dowager Duchess pops it.

--------------------
But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

Posts: 8040 | From: Æbleskiver country | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
# 619

 - Posted      Profile for Firenze     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Nevertheless, they are All Wrong. There's an underlying modernity about their attitudes that makes me feel they are not really an aristocrat with an Edwardian childhood and a middle class 1930s bluestocking, but a couple of Guardian-reading sociologists in disguise.

I see there are also continuations of the Campion canon. Half a page was enough to convince me those were massively cloth-eared.

Posts: 17302 | From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

 - Posted      Profile for jacobsen   Email jacobsen   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
But the Whimsey continuations feature people who have been through two world wars and both travelled extensively, and are, if children of their time, aware that times are changing. Harriet was, after all, in with the 'artistic' crowd as well as the academic one, and Peter was blown up in WW1 and experienced hunger, cold and extreme danger in WW2. There is also a good deal of discussion about the old, indulged,leisured life which is acknowledged to be a thing of the past.

One of the threads running through the continuations is the adaptation Harriet makes, first to combining work and wealth, and then to the demands of wartime conditions, followed by the post war changes. There is an ongoing comparison of the old states of things with the new.

If Harriet seems to have a sociological stance on some subjects, it's worth bearing in mind that she has known real poverty -arranging meals on fourpence a day, as she comments in The Attenbury Emeralds. And Peter would not be the only well-born chap who was uncomfortable with the idea of inherited privilege.

Heavens, I can feel an essay coming on. [Big Grin]

--------------------
But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

Posts: 8040 | From: Æbleskiver country | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

 - Posted      Profile for Curiosity killed ...   Email Curiosity killed ...   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Those Jill Paton Walsh continuations of the Wimsey genre are still all wrong. (I have/had relatives who went through all that and the whole thing jars. My grandfather was blown up in WW1 and came back a Colonel.)

She's another one I wish would go back to writing more Imogen Quy books - her own detective heroine.

Can we want to meet people to persuade them not to continue writing poor imitations?

[ 01. November 2016, 18:57: Message edited by: Curiosity killed ... ]

--------------------
Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

 - Posted      Profile for jedijudy   Email jedijudy   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Apropos of nothing much: in Czech they add the female suffix to foreign names. So there she's J K Rowlingova.

Quotes file!
[Smile]

--------------------
Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 18017 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tubbs

Miss Congeniality
# 440

 - Posted      Profile for Tubbs   Author's homepage   Email Tubbs   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Nevertheless, they are All Wrong. There's an underlying modernity about their attitudes that makes me feel they are not really an aristocrat with an Edwardian childhood and a middle class 1930s bluestocking, but a couple of Guardian-reading sociologists in disguise.

I see there are also continuations of the Campion canon. Half a page was enough to convince me those were massively cloth-eared.

I think that’s the problem. (I read way too much Golden Age Crime fiction. Yay for reissues!)

Paton Walsh does an excellent job, there are a few things that jar with the attitudes expressed in the Sayers books and the cultural commentary is off. However good the historical research and however familiar you are with the characters, you wear your own set of cultural blinkers. And Paton Walsh’s aren’t the same as Sayers.

However, if you treat the books as standalones with a new set of characters, they are really good. I haven’t bothered with other redo’s though.

The fact that Paton Walsh’s own work is difficult to get is really annoying. Paton Walsh seems rather sniffy about her children’s books, but I really liked them. I’d love an e-book version of Parcel of Patterns. My old copy got lost several house moves ago.

Tubbs

--------------------
"It's better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than open it up and remove all doubt" - Dennis Thatcher. My blog. Decide for yourself which I am

Posts: 12701 | From: Someplace strange | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged



Pages in this thread: 1  2 
 
Post new thread  Post a reply Close thread   Feature thread   Move thread   Delete thread Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
 - Printer-friendly view
Go to:

Contact us | Ship of Fools | Privacy statement

© Ship of Fools 2016

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0

 
follow ship of fools on twitter
buy your ship of fools postcards
sip of fools mugs from your favourite nautical website
 
 
  ship of fools