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Source: (consider it) Thread: Holy Week begins
Gee D
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Agree, as does the Rector - hence not just kneeling during the Passion readings, but then the lengthy pause for reflection.

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dj_ordinaire
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quote:
Originally posted by stonespring:
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
quote:
Originally posted by stonespring:
I was at an Anglo-Catholic Palm Sunday service, being used to RC ones, and I noticed that people knelt at the words "at the name Jesus every knee should bend" in the Epistle (which I was not used to) but that when Christ breathed his last in the reading of the Passion no one knelt, although silence was kept (whereas I was used to everyone kneeling at this time). Is this typical in Anglican Churches? In Anglo-Catholic Churches? Does anyone know the history or the origin of kneeling during that particular Epistle (is it only on Palm Sunday)?

We don't genuflect at the Epistle, but kneel and the reading stops for a minute or so reflection in the Passion reading on both Palm Sunday and Good Friday as Christ gives up his spirit.
It seems asymmetric to kneel at that Epistle, although it is a pretty important Epistle, but not at the most important moment in the Passion reading.
That seems odd to me as well. I know there is an old tradition of kneeling at 'every knee shall bow' when it is read as the Epistle on the Feast of the Holy Name but had never heard of it associated with the Passion.

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Zappa
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quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
quote:
Originally posted by Ceremoniar:
No "demand" involved. He is the bishop, and it is the cathedral.

Oh, but rights can be requested or ordered.
In fact he turned up and got into the sprit of Maundy Thursday quite well - until he decided to preach a sermonette while washing feet with an assistant helping [Roll Eyes]

Still, I think he was gobsmacked by the liturgy ("quite moving", he said, which is his equivalent to "OMFG") and that at least means we can journey together through the passion instead of him stomping all over a shared journey. Well, apart form feeling the need to give sermons when silence was scripted.

Now Good Friday is dawning here. We have:

Kiddy-winkles Stations of the Cross
Ecumenical Love-in Stations of the Cross
Solemn Proclamation of the Cross with Mass of the Pre-Sanctified

then

[Snore]

Unfortunately they won't be numerically well-attended, as I inherited a parish that preferred performance to faith. Before I came it used to be a Three Hour Service (poor attendance) followed by a packed choir and orchestra concert performance.

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BabyWombat
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Maundy Thursday we had 10 gathered in a circle around a simple nave altar, presiding priest with red stole over her street clothes (no clerical collar). Said service, no music. The sermon was a simple reflection on the call to be responsible for each other, even when the other is different or strange in some way. We each washed the feet of the person to our right; then at communion we each in turn gave communion to that person. The setting sun cast a golden glow on us as we began, then faded into a candlelit coziness. Very ”domestic”, very warm, very moving.

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Graven Image
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I stayed home Palm Sunday. The service always feels very strange to me. Reading the Passion and then on Good Friday reading it all again. Why do we do this? Why not do the palm part and leave it at that then carry on with Holy Week in order of the events.
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Brenda Clough
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I arrived at church for the Maundy Thursday foot washing service, and discovered that one of the Altar Guild ladies had fallen and damaged her knee. Leaped into the fray and hauled water for half the service, and then brought home a carload of towels to wash. Only now do I realize that I didn't actually get my feet washed.

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Emendator Liturgia
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quote:
Originally posted by Enoch:
quote:
Originally posted by Emendator Liturgia:
..: the Most Reverend Ronald Langham, Presiding Bishop of the Ecumenical Catholic Church was our special guest preacher. ...

Is that the Catholic Church whose Patriarch is Pope Francis with its headquarters in Rome, or is it some other, different, one? If it's a different one, how does it differ from the moe usual one?
Enoch, the ECC does not have the Bishop of Rome as its Patriarch: it is an international independent Catholic church. Its members understand themselves as following the Catholic tradition without being in communion with the Bishop of Rome. It differs from Roman Catholic practice in a number of key areas such as: the ordination of married men to the priesthood and from Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox practice in allowing married men in the episcopacy, the ordination of women, the acceptance and ordination of people of all sexual orientations, and allowing marriage after divorce.

ECC clergy are recognised by Rome as being validly ordained and consecrated: something similar to Anglican Orders which have come to be seen as valid but irregular.

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venbede
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quote:
Originally posted by Emendator Liturgia:


ECC clergy are recognised by Rome as being validly ordained and consecrated: something similar to Anglican Orders which have come to be seen as valid but irregular.

I understood that Anglican orders were declared absolutely null and void by Rome.

(Can someone please reply about the passion of Palm Sunday. It is the palm gospel that is the addition, not the passion.)

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leo
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The Chrism eucharist in the cathedral was good - Mozart's Coronation Mass.

Felt odd, afterwards, to the funeral of a suicide.

The evening eucharist with foot-washing was fine but there are less and less people every year signing up to do a stint during the Watch.

Will be off, shortly, to deacon the Liturgy.

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by venbede:

(Can someone please reply about the passion of Palm Sunday. It is the palm gospel that is the addition, not the passion.)

Neither - the Palm Gospel was read in Egeria's time in 4th Century Jerusalem.

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
Reading the Passion and then on Good Friday reading it all again. Why do we do this? Why not do the palm part and leave it at that then carry on with Holy Week in order of the events.

Because it is not a play. Each evangelist tells the story from different angles so we look at these in turn throughout the week.

And there was much more until the reforms - we had Mark on Monday and Tuesday then Luke on Wedneday and Thursday.

Also, many only go to church on Palm Sunday then again at Easter, the other days not being obligatory, so they'd never hear the passion otherwise.

Finally, the inclusion of both palm and passion gospels is a meditation - if you allow Jesus to enter into your life (as he entered the city) then there's bound to be trouble - plus some make a poojt about the fickle nature of discipleship - cheering hosannas one day and braying for crucifixion another day.

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by venbede:

(Can someone please reply about the passion of Palm Sunday. It is the palm gospel that is the addition, not the passion.)

Neither - the Palm Gospel was read in Egeria's time in 4th Century Jerusalem.
Meant to add that you can only see the palm gospel as an addition if you startr with Cranmer and ignore everything else that went before.

Cranmer omitted the palm gospel because he say palm crosses (or pussy willow in the English usage) as supersitious and Romish.

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venbede
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Ta, leo.

Heaven forbid I should think Cranmer's bowdlerization of catholic liturgy in any way normative.

But thank also for answering the point as to why we have the passion gospel on Palm Sunday.

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Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

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BabyWombat
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Went to a neighboring parish for their early Good Friday service. It was a simple TEC BPC Good Friday Liturgy of the Word plus solemn collects, but no veneration of the cross or communion (they’ll do that at the bigger service in the evening). Again a small congregation, mostly all retirees.

Simple yet very powerful homily referencing the poem Tenebrae by Paul Celan, and its repeated phrase “Pray Lord, you are near, pray to us.” The preacher suggested that today God indeed prays to us to make real the words of the collect: “let the whole world 
see and know that things which were cast down are being
 raised up, and things which had grown old are being made 
new, and that all things are being brought to their perfection
by him through whom all things were made.”

It shook me deeply, for reasons I do not yet understand. And despite then going to complete holiday food shopping and several other chores, it haunts me still.

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Let us, with a gladsome mind…..

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
city) then there's bound to be trouble - plus some make a poojt about the fickle nature of discipleship

should have read 'make a point'

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Forthview
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As Leo points out the Palm ceremony was earlier on , a separate service from the Passion Sunday Mass.

Later on it was put immediately before the Mass. This is the reason why ,for those who use liturgies dating from before Vatican 2, the liturgical colour was red for the Palm ceremony and purple for the Mass of Passion Sunday.

Nowadays in the Roman liturgy (Ordinary form) the colour is red throughout

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Zappa
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quote:
Originally posted by BabyWombat:
Went to ... it haunts me still.

Just wow. And isn't that what it's about?

[Overused]

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Gee D
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Yesterday, we had The Crucifixion by Henry Lawson as a reflexion. Very good, I'd not come across it before, and did not think Lawson had it in him.

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moonfruit
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We had Stations of the Cross today, using the set of images entitled Break Broken. I was particularly struck by the way the reader almost cried out "my God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" at the Crucifixion station - he really captured the desolation, and it sent shivers down my spine.

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All I know is that you came and made beauty from my mess.

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L'organist
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We had our usual Christ's Cross with readings (mainly St John), motets and hymns.

Cross (plain, wooden) venerated at the beginning then just words and music, with pauses for reflection between.

Gobsmacked to find that the congregation was quadruple what we'd come to expect: discovered word has got out that (a) there are no sermons, and (b) that the music is good (I know, pride is a sin, etc).

After that we had choir tea and a short rehearsal for tomorrow and Sunday.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Albertus
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Usual reflection, exposition of cross, and communion with pre-consecrated elements (which for some reason always seems a bit unneccessary to me). Small congregation, in the choir stalls. During the period of silence punctuated by organ music and bits of poetry and so on, which I tend to find rather intrusive, I took myself off round the church and did the Stations by myself, without a set guide. That worked very well for me.
Shan't be going to the Vigil tonight. I seem to find my liturgical tastes getting more and more stripped back these days, to a sort of plain 1662 with no need to say anything much to fill up the spaces inbetween.

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leo
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We hsd the usual - readings including John's Passion, veneration of the cross, solemn prayers and communion.

Additionally, a 'Good Friday' workshop aimed at kids, where they make things - lots of adults turned up too. My initial reaction is that the Liturgy alone should shape these days but tghese workshops seem to attract people who don't like words but are 'kinaesthetic.'

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L'organist
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Good Vigil service - and we had a baptism.

PP got the order of the readings out-of-kilter, but I think the choir were the only people who noticed.

Sang my favourite Easter hymn: Come, ye faithful, raise the strain of triumphant gladness to the tune St John Damascene - not only is it perfect for the vigil, but you also get to sing the wonderful word unmoistened
[Biased]

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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georgiaboy
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My second Vigil here at the abbey. Excellent weather, and timing was such that we began after darkness fell.

Fire kindled in the plaza in front of the church, then all followed the Paschal Candle into the darkened building. (Including one of the community cats!)

A substitute sang the Exsultet very well, though the candle bearers flanking him held their lights too high, so not helpful to the singer.

Seven lessons, each with a responsory and a prayer. Magnificent reading of the creation saga, the reader had an understanding of Jewish poetry.

third lesson (crossing the Red Sea) led directly to the canticle following -- same lector doing both. Quite effective.

No baptisms or confirmations, but we all processed back to the font to dip our hands in the blessed water.

I miss the Litany of the Saints and feel that the blessing of the font should precede the beginning of the Eucharist; more dramatic and then the mass proceeds apace.

Brass trio with the organ sounded splendid.

Traditional Roman Canon with concelebrants taking parts of it.

Organist ended with Toccata from Widor 6th (not 5th, thank God!) and we ended precisely three hours after we began.

A lovely time was had by all -- except possibly the cat, who had to be removed at one point.

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
and feel that the blessing of the font should precede the beginning of the Eucharist; more dramatic and then the mass proceeds apace.

Why? The baptisms and/or renewal of baptismal vows come instead of the creed - after the gospel.

Do do it before the mass - and the whole of the vigil is a mass - makes no sense.

If you go from the 'service of light' to the 'liturgy of initiation' that breaks with history - in the early days, the catechumens had their instruction in Old and New Testaments throughout the night before being baptised - not after their baptisms.

[ 28. March 2016, 08:47: Message edited by: leo ]

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Gee D
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The Apostles' Creed forms part of baptisms/renewal of vows here, rather than the renewal being an alternative to the Creed as your post suggests.

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Ceremoniar
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
and feel that the blessing of the font should precede the beginning of the Eucharist; more dramatic and then the mass proceeds apace.

Why? The baptisms and/or renewal of baptismal vows come instead of the creed - after the gospel.

Do do it before the mass - and the whole of the vigil is a mass - makes no sense.

If you go from the 'service of light' to the 'liturgy of initiation' that breaks with history - in the early days, the catechumens had their instruction in Old and New Testaments throughout the night before being baptised - not after their baptisms.


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Ceremoniar
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
and feel that the blessing of the font should precede the beginning of the Eucharist; more dramatic and then the mass proceeds apace.

Why? The baptisms and/or renewal of baptismal vows come instead of the creed - after the gospel.

Do do it before the mass - and the whole of the vigil is a mass - makes no sense.

If you go from the 'service of light' to the 'liturgy of initiation' that breaks with history - in the early days, the catechumens had their instruction in Old and New Testaments throughout the night before being baptised - not after their baptisms.

Until 1970, the font was blessed as part of the vigil ceremonies before the start of the Mass itself. So it "makes sense" in that for many centuries that was the order of the rite, and still is for those who use the older form of the missal.
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venbede
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But at least there is not this silly C of E business of only blessing the Easter Candle after the OT readings. How can you read in the dark.

--------------------
Man was made for joy and woe;
And when this we rightly know,
Thro' the world we safely go.

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Adam.

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When you've lost any sense of the Easter Vigil being the place for Christian Initiation, it makes perfect sense to me to bless the font at around the same time as you're blessing the fire. AIUI, the post-conciliar reforms moved the blessing of the font to after the homily to restore the initiatory character of this service.

An Easter Vigil without baptisms has always felt a little like a Wellington with no beef to me, but I assume that's how it will always be in a monastery. If you don't have any baptisms, you don't get the Litany of the Saints. In a typical parish, this should be reason enough to evangelize and get some catechumens for next year! (Or a homegrown ordinand / religious vocation, so as you can attend the ordination / profession together and hear the litany there)

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Brenda Clough
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We have gotten good at reading in the dark, with the aid of those little clip-on halogen lights on a bendy neck. I suppose an I-pad would also do you.

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by Adam.:
When you've lost any sense of the Easter Vigil being the place for Christian Initiation, it makes perfect sense to me to bless the font at around the same time as you're blessing the fire. AIUI, the post-conciliar reforms moved the blessing of the font to after the homily to restore the initiatory character of this service. profession together and hear the litany there)

I didn't know that - though i did know that it used to happen on Holy Saturday MORNING and that they used a triple candle.

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by venbede:
But at least there is not this silly C of E business of only blessing the Easter Candle after the OT readings. How can you read in the dark.

That's one alternative version in Times & Seasons. The other is the 'proper' order. We read the OT in the LIGHT (literally of the cancle) of the New.

This gives reasons why the 'proper' order is better.

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Ceremoniar
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quote:
Originally posted by Adam.:
When you've lost any sense of the Easter Vigil being the place for Christian Initiation, it makes perfect sense to me to bless the font at around the same time as you're blessing the fire. AIUI, the post-conciliar reforms moved the blessing of the font to after the homily to restore the initiatory character of this service.

An Easter Vigil without baptisms has always felt a little like a Wellington with no beef to me, but I assume that's how it will always be in a monastery. If you don't have any baptisms, you don't get the Litany of the Saints. In a typical parish, this should be reason enough to evangelize and get some catechumens for next year! (Or a homegrown ordinand / religious vocation, so as you can attend the ordination / profession together and hear the litany there)

In the pre-1970 rite, the font was never blessed "around the same time as you're blessing the fire." The blessing of the fire comes at the very beginning, followed by the blessing and procession of the paschal candle, then the spreading of the light among the faithful. The Exsultet is then sung. The OT prophecies follow, each with a psalm and prayer. This all takes quite a bit of time. Then the litany of saints follows, and then the blessing of the water and the font. whether or not anyone is to be baptized, because even if no one is coming in that night, there will be baptisms soon enough. Then the renewal of baptismal vows and sprinkling of the people.

While the rite is anciently connected to the baptism of catechumens, the baptismal theme extends throughout the Easter season. In fact, the water and font were until 1955 blessed again at the vigil of Pentecost, for any others who were to baptized at the close of the paschal season. This is the origin of the name Whitsunday for Pentecost, reflecting the baptismal robes to be worn. The moving of the rite of baptism to its position in the Ordinary Form after the homily does not really "restore the initiatory character of this service," as they are just as initiated, whether it is done earlier or later in the liturgy. It does, however, reflect the place in the missal of 1970 where the conferring of other rites and sacraments (confirmation, ordination, profession, etc.) generally takes place.

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Adam.

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[Confused]

Then, I don't understand your previous post where you told leo it "makes sense" to go straight "from the 'service of light' to the 'liturgy of initiation'" (his language) because "for many centuries that was the order of the rite, and still is for those who use the older form of the missal."

I think there's some talking cross-purposes going on, especially different people meaning different things by "before the Mass."

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leo
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What Ceremoniar said is correct - I looked it up and I was (partly wrong).

On a different tack, and before this thread gets closed, what did other shipmates notice about numbers attending this year?

In the 1970s, it was expected that most serious Christians would attend the whole Triduum.

This year, I felt depressed at the turnout:

Thursday - 33% of average Sunday attendance

Friday - 50%

Easter Vigil - 33%

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Angloid
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quote:
Originally posted by Adam.:


An Easter Vigil without baptisms has always felt a little like a Wellington with no beef to me, but I assume that's how it will always be in a monastery.

In the (Anglican) monastery where I attended the Vigil this year, there was a baptism (and is, apparently, most years). This is because they run a theological college and the candidate was the son of one of the students.
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Angloid
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:


On a different tack, and before this thread gets closed, what did other shipmates notice about numbers attending this year?

In the 1970s, it was expected that most serious Christians would attend the whole Triduum.

This year, I felt depressed at the turnout:

Thursday - 33% of average Sunday attendance

Friday - 50%

Easter Vigil - 33%

I suppose it depends what your Sunday attendance usually is. I've been resigned to such numbers for many years: in fact it is usually a struggle to get anybody to see the point of the Vigil at all (not for want of trying). In some places Maundy Thursday has been better supported than Good Friday, and Palm Sunday almost as well as Easter. Nowt so strange as folk.

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Fr Weber
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Our Triduum attendance was only just below our usual Sunday attendance. I beat the drum for the Triduum all through Lent, so that may be part of it.

The thing we have to come to terms with, though, is that some people will always have the idea that church is for Sundays and Sundays only. I refuse to give in to that mentality by transferring feasts to the nearest Sunday; if folks want to celebrate Epiphany or All Saints, they'll have to make it to church on January 6 or November 1.

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stonespring
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quote:
Originally posted by Angloid:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:


On a different tack, and before this thread gets closed, what did other shipmates notice about numbers attending this year?

In the 1970s, it was expected that most serious Christians would attend the whole Triduum.

This year, I felt depressed at the turnout:

Thursday - 33% of average Sunday attendance

Friday - 50%

Easter Vigil - 33%

I suppose it depends what your Sunday attendance usually is. I've been resigned to such numbers for many years: in fact it is usually a struggle to get anybody to see the point of the Vigil at all (not for want of trying). In some places Maundy Thursday has been better supported than Good Friday, and Palm Sunday almost as well as Easter. Nowt so strange as folk.
I've noticed that Triduum Services at Episcopal Parishes is much, much lower than at RC parishes. The three days of the Triduum are not "Holy Days of Obligation" for RCs (mostly because of the insistence that there be only one service (in each language, at least) at a parish on each day and the difficulty this causes with people's work schedules), although they are the holiest celebrations of the church year. The Easter Vigil often gets standing-room only attendance in RC parishes because it is the only day each year in adult RC converts are baptized, confirmed, and/or otherwise received into the church. In some parishes in communities where there is a lot of interaction of Catholics with non-Catholics, the Easter Vigil serves this purpose, but in many other parishes the Vigil serves as a sort of "adult religious education graduation day" for adults from Catholic families who were baptized Catholic as babies but for one reason or another did not receive First Communion or Confirmation when they were growing up. Then again, since the RC church seems to be a place of rapid growth in one place and decline in another, there are quite a few parishes where there are not even any adult Catholics to Confirm and give First Communion to at the Vigil. I was at at least one of these parishes, but its Vigil was pretty well attended, perhaps at least because the weekly Saturday Vigil Mass is just as well attended as the Sunday morning Mass (of which there is only one and is a bit too early for some people). Also, the Vigil service at many RC parishes is one of the premier musical events on the Church calendar, so that also tends to draw congregants.
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Brenda Clough
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For years the sunrise service at our church was jammed. This year for the first time I saw empty seats in the pews. The second and third (there are 4) services I am tell were thronged in the usual way, so I hope it was only the concept of getting up and into your Easter best at sparrowfart that put everyone off.

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Adam.

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quote:
Originally posted by leo:


Thursday - 33% of average Sunday attendance

Friday - 50%

Easter Vigil - 33%

That's pretty much true by default for us: three almost full regular Sunday Masses; only one of each Triduum service. Each Triduum service is fuller than any one Sunday Mass, but we could simply never fit all of those people. The fact that the students get a four-day weekend means many of them go home (or elsewhere) which is probably the only thing that makes it work.

At my old parish, Good Friday was far better attended than any one Sunday Mass (but not as much as the four put together). Holy Thursday and the Vigil got less than our most popular regular Sunday time slot, but more than our least. Easter Sunday was bursting to the seams (which none of the Masses on a normal Sunday came close to).

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Leorning Cniht
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:

This year, I felt depressed at the turnout:

Our numbers for the Great Vigil have been dropping year-on-year. At least partly that's because we have more young families: the reality of having small children is that at most one parent can make it to an evening service.

If one of the parents sings in the choir, or serves as a LEM or something, it'll be that parent. We're down to having the same number of people in (choir + altar party) as in the general congregation - about 30 each, which I suppose is about 40% of our ~150 ASE. ETA: That's a lie - I forgot to count the smaller service. Adding both services, we're more like 200 on a Sunday, so that's 30% for the Vigil.

I think our numbers for Thursday and Friday were similar, but I was at home with the small children.

ETA: We were down in numbers for Easter Sunday this year because it coincided with spring break, and several of our regular families were travelling.

[ 28. March 2016, 20:27: Message edited by: Leorning Cniht ]

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Albertus
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
What Ceremoniar said is correct - I looked it up and I was (partly wrong).

On a different tack, and before this thread gets closed, what did other shipmates notice about numbers attending this year?

In the 1970s, it was expected that most serious Christians would attend the whole Triduum.

Really? In A-C parishes maybe, but among your average middle-of-the-road BCP/Series whatever CofE people? I wasn't there, but I'd have thought Easter communion, certainly; Good Friday, very likely; but the Easter Vigil? Would this have been a 'must attend', or indeed celebrated at all, at All Saints, Middlestump Parva or St Johns, Leafysuburb? Perhaps I'm wrong: as I say, I wasn't there at the time. But I am pretty sure that while the Church of my Yoof (small-m modern ASB Catholic, middling sized town in Kent, early 1980s) took Good Friday very seriously (proper 3 hour reflection and talks), it never did anything much at all on Holy Saturday.

[ 28. March 2016, 20:27: Message edited by: Albertus ]

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Ceremoniar
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quote:
Originally posted by Adam.:
[Confused]

Then, I don't understand your previous post where you told leo it "makes sense" to go straight "from the 'service of light' to the 'liturgy of initiation'" (his language) because "for many centuries that was the order of the rite, and still is for those who use the older form of the missal."

I think there's some talking cross-purposes going on, especially different people meaning different things by "before the Mass."

I think that you are confusing my post with someone else. I never used the term "service of light." The other words are my response to the claim that baptism only makes sense after the gospel and homily. That has been responded to and clarified by Leo.
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Adam.

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I think after long hours of praying, and probably not sleeping too much, many of us are misreading many others. I'm happy to drop whatever the point was...

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by Angloid:
quote:
Originally posted by Adam.:


An Easter Vigil without baptisms has always felt a little like a Wellington with no beef to me, but I assume that's how it will always be in a monastery.

In the (Anglican) monastery where I attended the Vigil this year, there was a baptism (and is, apparently, most years). This is because they run a theological college and the candidate was the son of one of the students.
If that's where i think it is, quite a few students go elsewhere during the Triduum because of a woman priest (former curate of ours) is on the staff and might be the presider.

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Angloid
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No 'might be' about it. More fool them if that's the case: though there were no obvious empty places in church and one wonders about their sense of priorities.
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leo
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The college was required to provide alternatives for those who couldn't accepot women priests - I am fairly sure that the Ministry Division stipulates this as respecting 'differing integrities'.

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Zappa
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quote:
Originally posted by Angloid:
I've noticed that Triduum Services at Episcopal Parishes is much, much lower than at RC parishes. The three days of the Triduum are not "Holy Days of Obligation" for RCs ...



Holy Mary Mother of John Lennon - I don't think Anglopalians have obligated anything liturgio-sacramental (except in some quarters the Real Absence™ ) since Henry got his willy in a droop.

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