homepage
  roll on christmas  
click here to find out more about ship of fools click here to sign up for the ship of fools newsletter click here to support ship of fools
community the mystery worshipper gadgets for god caption competition foolishness features ship stuff
discussion boards live chat cafe avatars frequently-asked questions the ten commandments gallery private boards register for the boards
 
Ship of Fools


Post new thread  Post a reply
My profile login | Register | Directory | Search | FAQs | Board home
   - Printer-friendly view Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
» Ship of Fools   » Special interest discussion   » Dead Horses   » Yet more crappy choruses, wonky worship-songs and horrible hymns (Page 15)

 - Email this page to a friend or enemy.  
Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  ...  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  ...  26  27  28 
 
Source: (consider it) Thread: Yet more crappy choruses, wonky worship-songs and horrible hymns
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
We are Marching can be made to fit The Gummy Bear song with relative ease.

And you'll find the GB song rather more 'peppy' than We are Marching.

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4604 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Belle Ringer
Shipmate
# 13379

 - Posted      Profile for Belle Ringer   Email Belle Ringer   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Oscar the Grouch:
it seems increasingly false for comfortable, white, middle-class congregations to sing it...

...there was a huge surge of triumphalism. We were "claiming" the Kingdom and being "prayer warriors". Well, others were. I was increasingly standing in the corner

I was unaware of the African background until I went looking for a link and heard the opening rhythm. Local praise band does it like a folk song, same feel as "this land is your land."

I think your comment about triumphalism and the contrast to what is actually going on is what makes me cringe a bit even while enjoying a bouncy cheerful song - enjoying less after band leader decreed no off-beat harmonizing, no hand drum, just straight beat melody. (The decree applies to all songs - no harmonizing, no offbeat responses, no hand instruments,those are "not worship.")

The song is a declaration of energetic triumphal movement while we just sit there and then wander over to the coffee or go to lunch. In a younger church with people bouncing and waiving hands etc it might seem less contrast to reality.

I appreciate the various comments.

Posts: 5824 | From: Texas | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Pine Marten
Shipmate
# 11068

 - Posted      Profile for Pine Marten   Email Pine Marten   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mdijon:
quote:
Originally posted by Belle Ringer:
Am I being too literal, just relax and enjoy the rhythm?

At once too literal and not literal enough. It's a South African song and there's a huge emotional impact to get literal about.
We have sung it in our shack sometimes, but then we have (as well as middle class white British) people who are South African, Nigerian, Sudanese, and Jamaican as well as South American, North American, Belgian and various others I can't list! it seems to go down ok [Smile] .

--------------------
Keep love in your heart. A life without it is like a sunless garden when the flowers are dead. - Oscar Wilde

Posts: 1719 | From: Isle of Albion | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Barnabas62
Host
# 9110

 - Posted      Profile for Barnabas62   Email Barnabas62   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
It's a good vehicle for the open and joyful expression of communal praise. As seems pretty obvious from that wonderfully evocative video.

One of my favourite Desmond Tutu stories involves him leading a congregation from cathedral to streets during the apartheid era. Police and soldiers had burst into the cathedral and surrounded a congregation gathered for a peace conference and prayer meeting. Tutu advised them that they had already lost, then led the congregation to safety, singing this song as they marched out. Every time I hear this song, I remember that act of courage and my heart is warmed.

I guess the song is like a flower. In the wrong place, and certainly sung "staid and anal" it will be more weed than flower. But that is a consequence of seeking to control and bottle joy, rather then express it freely.

--------------------
Who is it that you seek? How then shall we live? How shall we sing the Lord's song in a strange land?

Posts: 20858 | From: Norfolk UK | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Jolly Jape
Shipmate
# 3296

 - Posted      Profile for Jolly Jape   Email Jolly Jape   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
originally posted by Belle Ringer

(The decree applies to all songs - no harmonizing, no offbeat responses, no hand instruments,those are "not worship.")

What a strange understanding of worship your band leader has. Don't imagine he reads much Old Testament! What would he think of David? [Ultra confused]

--------------------
To those who have never seen the flow and ebb of God's grace in their lives, it means nothing. To those who have seen it, even fleetingly, even only once - it is life itself. (Adeodatus)

Posts: 3011 | From: A village of gardens | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Belle Ringer
Shipmate
# 13379

 - Posted      Profile for Belle Ringer   Email Belle Ringer   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Jolly Jape:
quote:
originally posted by Belle Ringer

(The decree applies to all songs - no harmonizing, no offbeat responses, no hand instruments,those are "not worship.")

What a strange understanding of worship your band leader has. Don't imagine he reads much Old Testament! What would he think of David? [Ultra confused]
LOL, probably "performance, calling attention to self, not leading others in worship."

I'm just noticing how much the way a song is done can make it crappy or amazing.

Posts: 5824 | From: Texas | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Pomona
Shipmate
# 17175

 - Posted      Profile for Pomona   Email Pomona   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I've sung We Are Marching whilst doing a conga line, singing it in a more staid environment would feel pretty cringey.

--------------------
Consider the work of God: Who is able to straighten what he has bent? [Ecclesiastes 7:13]

Posts: 5302 | From: UK | Registered: Jun 2012  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

 - Posted      Profile for Curiosity killed ...   Email Curiosity killed ...   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Lord of the Dance: can be found in a prominent position on the CofE's own wedding music suggestion page, along with other cringe-making numbers.

There are some alternative words to some of the CofE's more *interesting* choices of wedding music on Ally Barrett's website - part way down that page are alternative words to the tunes of Lord of the Dance, Jerusalem and All Things Bright and Beautiful intended for weddings.

--------------------
Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13481 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Lamb Chopped
Ship's kebab
# 5528

 - Posted      Profile for Lamb Chopped   Email Lamb Chopped   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Ash Wednesday--and of course the first song had to refer to Jesus "walking on this guilty sod." I cracked up and got weird looks.

Y'all Brits are ruining me.

--------------------
Er, this is what I've been up to (book).
Oh, that you would rend the heavens and come down!

Posts: 19958 | From: off in left field somewhere | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

 - Posted      Profile for Karl: Liberal Backslider   Author's homepage   Email Karl: Liberal Backslider   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
Ash Wednesday--and of course the first song had to refer to Jesus "walking on this guilty sod." I cracked up and got weird looks.

Y'all Brits are ruining me.

Thing is, over here the image of Jesus trampling over some poor sinner would actually be the primary meaning of the phrase. "Sod" for turf is very rare; a lot of people wouldn't even know that meaning.

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17450 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jolly Jape
Shipmate
# 3296

 - Posted      Profile for Jolly Jape   Email Jolly Jape   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
Ash Wednesday--and of course the first song had to refer to Jesus "walking on this guilty sod." I cracked up and got weird looks.

Y'all Brits are ruining me.

Ah, yes. Twila's infamous recourse to the rhyming dictionary! [Roll Eyes]

--------------------
To those who have never seen the flow and ebb of God's grace in their lives, it means nothing. To those who have seen it, even fleetingly, even only once - it is life itself. (Adeodatus)

Posts: 3011 | From: A village of gardens | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mr Clingford
Shipmate
# 7961

 - Posted      Profile for Mr Clingford   Email Mr Clingford   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I don't think I've ever sung this though:
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/saint_joseph_meek_and_mild.htm

--------------------
Ne'er cast a clout till May be out.

If only.

Posts: 1635 | From: A Fleeting moment | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

 - Posted      Profile for Leorning Cniht   Email Leorning Cniht   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
"Sod" for turf is very rare; a lot of people wouldn't even know that meaning.

I am still given annual amusement by the signs that appear outside the local DIY/garden type store: "SOD TODAY".
Posts: 4752 | From: USA | Registered: Feb 2013  |  IP: Logged
John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

 - Posted      Profile for John Holding   Email John Holding   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Round here it's "turf" that would often not be used. (though grass fertilizer is sometimes sold as "turf builder"). Garden sod is the usual term.

The use of "sod" to refer to a person (in whatever sense), or sodding as an all purpose alternative to fucking, the way the brits seem to use it, is pretty much unknown as well.

John

[ 19. February 2015, 18:42: Message edited by: John Holding ]

Posts: 5905 | From: Ottawa, Canada | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

 - Posted      Profile for balaam   Author's homepage   Email balaam   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
The use of sodding as an all purpose alternative to fucking, the way the brits seem to use it, is pretty much unknown as well.

It is an alternative to buggering.

Helpful Brit advice. [Biased]

--------------------
Fearfully and wonderfully mad

ن
blog

Posts: 8675 | From: Somewhere else | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
bib
Shipmate
# 13074

 - Posted      Profile for bib     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
The only times I seem to use sod regularly are in crossword puzzles.

--------------------
"My Lord, my Life, my Way, my End, accept the praise I bring"

Posts: 1269 | From: Australia | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
Oscar the Grouch

Adopted Cascadian
# 1916

 - Posted      Profile for Oscar the Grouch     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
The use of sodding as an all purpose alternative to fucking, the way the brits seem to use it, is pretty much unknown as well.

It is an alternative to buggering.

Helpful Brit advice. [Biased]

Agreed. But is it an EXACT equivalent? Is telling someone to "sod off" precisely the same as telling them to "bugger off"?

Is it more rude/crude or less?

And does it make any difference which part of the UK you are in when you say it? During my time in West Yorkshire, it became very apparent that the ejaculation "Oh bugger!" was really very mild and almost completely acceptable in any situation (although I avoided using it in the presence of the bishop - but then he weren't from Yorkshire, were he).

--------------------
Faradiu, dundeibáwa weyu lárigi weyu

Posts: 3817 | From: Gamma Quadrant, just to the left of Galifrey | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged
Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

 - Posted      Profile for Leorning Cniht   Email Leorning Cniht   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Oscar the Grouch:
Agreed. But is it an EXACT equivalent? Is telling someone to "sod off" precisely the same as telling them to "bugger off"?

Is it more rude/crude or less?

I think you understand the etymology.

In terms of crudeness, I'd rate "sod" as slightly milder than "bugger". (One of the biggest surprises I had on moving to the US was hearing my infant daughter's pediatrician describe her as a "cute little bugger".)

Bugger is pretty mild, though - you'd have to draw a very fine line indeed for "sod" to be acceptable, but bugger to not be.

Posts: 4752 | From: USA | Registered: Feb 2013  |  IP: Logged
Snags
Utterly socially unrealistic
# 15351

 - Posted      Profile for Snags   Author's homepage   Email Snags   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I have no academic basis for it, but I instinctively feel that "sod off", "you dozy sod" etc. tend towards a more southern/London/home counties (or perhaps just large conurbations) and mildly lower-middle-class usage, whereas "bugger off", "you daft bugger" etc. are more commonly northern (and possibly far southern - i.e. thick accent territory) tendencies, and more likely to be both working AND upper class usages.

But that may just be a personal tic with no wider validity, with most of my family being a variety of buggers (northern) but my school mates a bunch of sods (southern).

Actually, most of my school mates were a bunch of cu^HNO CARRIER..............

--------------------
Vain witterings :-: Vain pretentions :-: The Dog's Blog(locks)

Posts: 1380 | From: just north of That London | Registered: Dec 2009  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
...The use of ... sodding as an all purpose alternative to fucking...


That's pretty much what the French accuse us of, isn't it?
[Big Grin]

[ 21. February 2015, 21:05: Message edited by: Albertus ]

Posts: 6424 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Not usually. Le vice anglaise is generally taken to mean a little light discipline, sometimes known as flagellation [Biased]

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4604 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Oh, that too.
Posts: 6424 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

 - Posted      Profile for North East Quine   Email North East Quine   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
It was Thinking Day today and the Rainbows sang the Arky Arky song, with a verse I'd never heard before;

The animals they came out in threesies, in threesies, threesies.
The animals they came out in threesies, in threesies, threesies
Must have been those birds and beesies, beesies
Children of the Lord.

(For non-Brits, Rainbows are the youngest of the Girl Guides).

Posts: 6337 | From: North East Scotland | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
Gwai
Shipmate
# 11076

 - Posted      Profile for Gwai   Email Gwai   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Without disagreeing about any of the stuff about some congregations singing some songs in ways that are sheer appropriation, it can be so perfect too. Was just reminded of something that happened a couple years ago. We were singing a song in Yoruba, and I was in the choir so I knew a few people were concerned or complaining about pronunciation. As we were singing, I saw some people come in late while we were singing said song. I saw the newcomers join in particularly excitedly with the song. It was all the more noticeable because they were so very quiet and almost unresponsive the rest of the time. I found out at coffee hour that they had recently emmigrated from Nigeria, and knew very little English. They'd come because they were of the same denomination and hoped to find a similar worship experience. Think how fun it must have been to come and hear people singing (albeit with bad pronunciation I suspect) in your own language!)

--------------------
A master of men was the Goodly Fere,
A mate of the wind and sea.
If they think they ha’ slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.


Posts: 11861 | From: Chicago | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Baptist Trainfan
Shipmate
# 15128

 - Posted      Profile for Baptist Trainfan   Email Baptist Trainfan   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
To change the theme: did anyone else know that Michael Saward, writer of "Christ Triumphant" and an editor of that butt of much derision, "Hymns for Today's Church", died a couple of weeks ago? I only came across it by chance (I clearly don't read the right newspapers).
Posts: 9231 | From: The other side of the Severn | Registered: Sep 2009  |  IP: Logged
leo
Shipmate
# 1458

 - Posted      Profile for leo   Author's homepage   Email leo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Yes - he was one of those (few at the time) evangelicals who influenced the wider church.

Before his time at St. Paul's Cathedral he was vicar of Ealing and the vicious rape pf his daughter took place in his vicarage. he was also beaten up.

--------------------
My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

Posts: 23024 | From: Bristol | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
St. Gwladys
Shipmate
# 14504

 - Posted      Profile for St. Gwladys   Email St. Gwladys   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
not a crappy chorus but...
We go to a monthly tune club, where Darllenwr and a number of others learn Welsh folk tunes. The tutor has them playing phrases by ear, and then putting the whole thing together. In this month's session, she taught them a tune, had them play it slowly, then get faster. At the end, she asked if it had been too fast for anyone. Our friend Ken, who is also a Reader and a church musician remarked to Darllenwr " you can't scare us, we can cope with "You shall go out with joy!""

--------------------
"I say - are you a matelot?"
"Careful what you say sir, we're on board ship here"
From "New York Girls", Steeleye Span, Commoners Crown (Voiced by Peter Sellers)

Posts: 3262 | From: Rhymney Valley, South Wales | Registered: Jan 2009  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
NEQ

I had to look up your 'Arky Arky' song
[Eek!] [Projectile]

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4604 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Helen-Eva
Shipmate
# 15025

 - Posted      Profile for Helen-Eva   Email Helen-Eva   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:


Bugger is pretty mild, though - you'd have to draw a very fine line indeed for "sod" to be acceptable, but bugger to not be.

Interesting. I'd say that the former is a lot milder than the latter - for example, I'd almost always use "sod" as a euphemism for "bugger" and I'd happily say the first in the office but not the second. Possibly a pond difference or just a feature of my upbringing (south eastern English)?

--------------------
I thought the radio 3 announcer said "Weber" but it turned out to be Webern. Story of my life.

Posts: 608 | From: London, hopefully in a theatre or concert hall, more likely at work | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
To quote the hymn:
But thy couch was the sod,
O thou Son of God,
In the deserts of Galilee.


I'd say the two are interchangeable, the b word being very much in everyday parlance, and not just in that well-known military expression KBO (a favourite of Churchill, apparently) and that useful word embuggerment.

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4604 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Needless to say, K*v*n M**h*w changes those lines.
Posts: 6424 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Of course - what do you expect from an anagram of weak - envy him?

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4604 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Also an anagram of I've weak hymn
Posts: 6424 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

 - Posted      Profile for North East Quine   Email North East Quine   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
NEQ

I had to look up your 'Arky Arky' song
[Eek!] [Projectile]

In fairness, it was being sung by 6 year olds. Though they were being accompanied on the guitar by our minister, and many in the congregation (including me!) were doing the hand gestures.
Posts: 6337 | From: North East Scotland | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
mdijon
Shipmate
# 8520

 - Posted      Profile for mdijon     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
NEQ

I had to look up your 'Arky Arky' song
[Eek!] [Projectile]

You have to respect a lyricist who can rhyme arky arky with barky barky, threesies with beesies, and floody floody with muddy muddy. It is a fantastic song for children and for adults who remember singing it as children.

--------------------
mdijon nojidm uoɿıqɯ ɯqıɿou
ɯqıɿou uoɿıqɯ nojidm mdijon

Posts: 12277 | From: UK | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

 - Posted      Profile for Leorning Cniht   Email Leorning Cniht   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Helen-Eva:
I'd almost always use "sod" as a euphemism for "bugger" and I'd happily say the first in the office but not the second.

Here is, apparently, the BBC's list of rude words, of somewhat recent vintage. There's some difficulty with the list, of course - "God" and "Jesus" can be swearing or not depending on context, as can several other words on the list.

But for our purposes it ranks "bugger" as very mildly ruder than "sodding".

Posts: 4752 | From: USA | Registered: Feb 2013  |  IP: Logged
Karl: Liberal Backslider
Shipmate
# 76

 - Posted      Profile for Karl: Liberal Backslider   Author's homepage   Email Karl: Liberal Backslider   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mdijon:
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
NEQ

I had to look up your 'Arky Arky' song
[Eek!] [Projectile]

You have to respect a lyricist who can rhyme arky arky with barky barky, threesies with beesies, and floody floody with muddy muddy. It is a fantastic song for children and for adults who remember singing it as children.
Apart from the subject matter of course, which isn't really suitable for anyone.

--------------------
Might as well ask the bloody cat.

Posts: 17450 | From: Chesterfield | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

 - Posted      Profile for LeRoc     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
The animals came out in threesies? What did they do while on board?

--------------------
I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

Posts: 9462 | From: UK / Africa / Brazil | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
What would you do, locked up in the dark in pairs for however many nights it was?

[ 25. February 2015, 10:17: Message edited by: Albertus ]

Posts: 6424 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
LeRoc

Famous Dutch pirate
# 3216

 - Posted      Profile for LeRoc     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Albertus: What would you do, locked up in the dark in pairs for however many nights it was?
Brush up on my Bible studies? [Angel]

--------------------
I know why God made the rhinoceros, it's because He couldn't see the rhinoceros, so He made the rhinoceros to be able to see it. (Clarice Lispector)

Posts: 9462 | From: UK / Africa / Brazil | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Ah, but it hadn't been written yet then! [Smile]
Mind you, I suppose they could have got sewing and made some leisurewear. Then they could have come out in onesies.

[ 25. February 2015, 10:33: Message edited by: Albertus ]

--------------------
My beard is a testament to my masculinity and virility, and demonstrates that I am a real man. Trouble is, bits of quiche sometimes get caught in it.

Posts: 6424 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
North East Quine

Curious beastie
# 13049

 - Posted      Profile for North East Quine   Email North East Quine   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
What rhymes with "onesies"?

The animals they came out in onesies, in onesies, onesies.
Noah, his wife, and all of their sonsies, sonsies?



My favourite rhyme is twosies / kangaroosies.

All together now! Ready to wave your arms in the air? Go!! Rise and Shine and Give God the Glory, Glory!

[ 25. February 2015, 11:19: Message edited by: North East Quine ]

Posts: 6337 | From: North East Scotland | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
mdijon
Shipmate
# 8520

 - Posted      Profile for mdijon     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
My favourite rhyme is twosies / kangaroosies.

It's the syncopated rest before delivering the last word of the couplet that completes the effect - allowing a listener just enough time to wonder what the rhyme could possibly be. It's a work of art.

--------------------
mdijon nojidm uoɿıqɯ ɯqıɿou
ɯqıɿou uoɿıqɯ nojidm mdijon

Posts: 12277 | From: UK | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Heavenly Anarchist
Shipmate
# 13313

 - Posted      Profile for Heavenly Anarchist   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
What rhymes with "onesies"?

The animals they came out in onesies, in onesies, onesies.
Noah, his wife, and all of their sonsies, sonsies?



My favourite rhyme is twosies / kangaroosies.

All together now! Ready to wave your arms in the air? Go!! Rise and Shine and Give God the Glory, Glory!

[Killing me]
We used to sing rise and shine at Scripture Union camp in the 90s, it was done very unseriously as a sort of cabaret at lunchtime by the leaders and everyone joined in, even the teenagers.

--------------------
'I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.' Douglas Adams
Dog Activity Monitor
My shop

Posts: 2831 | From: Trumpington | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Helen-Eva
Shipmate
# 15025

 - Posted      Profile for Helen-Eva   Email Helen-Eva   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by Helen-Eva:
I'd almost always use "sod" as a euphemism for "bugger" and I'd happily say the first in the office but not the second.

Here is, apparently, the BBC's list of rude words, of somewhat recent vintage. There's some difficulty with the list, of course - "God" and "Jesus" can be swearing or not depending on context, as can several other words on the list.

But for our purposes it ranks "bugger" as very mildly ruder than "sodding".

Hurrah I have internalised the BBC!

--------------------
I thought the radio 3 announcer said "Weber" but it turned out to be Webern. Story of my life.

Posts: 608 | From: London, hopefully in a theatre or concert hall, more likely at work | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Not to do with music but 'rude' words:

Marks & Spencer has banned the use of Jesus and Christ - although you can use Prophet and Jihad...

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4604 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
Albertus
Shipmate
# 13356

 - Posted      Profile for Albertus     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
In what context might you use those words at M&S anyway? [Confused]
Posts: 6424 | From: Y Sowth | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
L'organist
Shipmate
# 17338

 - Posted      Profile for L'organist   Author's homepage   Email L'organist   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Apparently they have a floristry service which delivers (maybe they're part of Interflora?) and someone tried to send flowers to a widow "From all your friends at Christ Church" - and M&S contacted because the online ordering couldn't cope with the 'C' word and the real-person operator wouldn't agree to its use either.

The other two words - I'm assuming someone tried to input them using the online ordering and wasn't stopped??

--------------------
Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

Posts: 4604 | From: somewhere in England... | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged
mdijon
Shipmate
# 8520

 - Posted      Profile for mdijon     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Presumably someone operating without much care and attention listed some curse words and "Jesus Christ" was one of them along with "Fuck" and "Shit". I've not heard Jihad or Mohammed used in the same way.

(I guess that people like Jesus Alemany are not getting flowers sent from M&S)

--------------------
mdijon nojidm uoɿıqɯ ɯqıɿou
ɯqıɿou uoɿıqɯ nojidm mdijon

Posts: 12277 | From: UK | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Vulpior

Foxier than Thou
# 12744

 - Posted      Profile for Vulpior   Author's homepage   Email Vulpior   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
It's not quite a horrible hymn, but the thread I remember seeing a while ago on changes to the words of old hymns isn't immediately visible.

Verse 3 of All my hope on God is founded begins:

quote:
God's great goodness aye endureth,
deep his wisdom, passing thought:
splendour, light and life attend him,
beauty springeth out of naught.

In our modern version it has become:

quote:
God’s great goodness lasts for ever,
deep his wisdom, passing thought;
splendour, light and life attend him,
beauty springing out of naught.

Now I'm all for inclusive language, and can often manage it on the spot. If I know that hymns have been inclusified I know when to watch out for it. But the rest of the "modernisation"? What rule says we get rid of "springeth" and "endureth" but keep "naught"?

It means I have to have my head in my hymn book rather than singing up and out as I would do if I could continue to sing from memory.

Gah!

--------------------
I've started blogging. I don't promise you'll find anything to interest you at uncleconrad

Posts: 944 | From: Mount Fairy, NSW | Registered: Jun 2007  |  IP: Logged



Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  ...  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  ...  26  27  28 
 
Post new thread  Post a reply Close thread   Feature thread   Move thread   Delete thread Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
 - Printer-friendly view
Go to:

Contact us | Ship of Fools | Privacy statement

© Ship of Fools 2016

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0

 
Check out Reform magazine
sip of fools mugs from your favourite nautical website
 
  ship of fools