Thread: AS: Shipmates Expecting 2006 Board: Limbo / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Grits (# 4169) on :
 
We look forward to several new additions to the Ship's deckhand brigade this year. Please keep us posted here on all your Great Expectations!

[ 12. May 2007, 08:02: Message edited by: Alan Cresswell ]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
FoaT you are right, and I am already sick of all these oh you need this, you can not live without this, it is a bad a wedding...some things are needed such as a car seat new as with a used one is considered dangerous. Some things are very good second hand and any I am offered will be gratfully recieved for example a baby bath(I decided this is needed as I find the bathroom too cold to bath in and a baby needs to keep warm with a bath I can bath baby in front of fire). The problem is we are a long way from ny friends and work the main sorce of aquantances has another bub comming just before mine. Still Opshops(read charaty shops in UK) will also be a good source. A few things will be new and everything we buy will be thought about as to its use. I feel I am being mean but I want to be realalistic. Just honnestly you could spend forever buying this and that and a cute this and that to go with it.

Sean made the cosleeper in 44c heat in a hot shed painted it now just needs another layer or two of paint and a way of making it legs...looks so good I can't wait to use it. Will be a while.

Have my 12 week appt tuesday. Excited but also a very silly thought keeps comming in what if it isn't viable? I could happen but is unlikely...then I have heard it is that before every milestone some get nervous so I wont be alone. Lovely Sean is on holidays so he can come.

Been sick thought it was just morningsickness but became gastro so no work and rest and so on I was doing. Sean has been looking after me which has been lovely. Back pain is all gone(thank God)
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
[Votive] For your little one, Bronwyn, and
[Votive] [Votive] For you. May you be blessed with peace of mind.

(Off now to fill the second-hand dresser with second-third-and-fourth-hand clothes...)
 
Posted by blackaxe (# 10622) on :
 
hi guys. I didn't post on the previous Shippies expecting thread but read it a few times. Mr B and I (as many on the Down Under threads would know) are expecting a Hatchet on 7 July 06.

Bronwyn I know how you feel about the 12 wk scan - we were very nervous about it, and not for any good reason either. But that doesn't stop you from feeling worried and I can empathise with that.

As for spending money - it can get ridiculous and stupid. We are going to look at second hand stuff as well as new because some people trade stuff in after the first one is born, even if they have a 2nd or 3rd child! But that's the North Shore 'must have the best' attitude I'd say...

It might even be worth your while taking a trip to the city to go to one of those massive baby shop barns as apparently the more you buy in one hit, the bigger the discount they give you (up to 25-30% off my friends have told me). My mother also has been raving about Baby Target, but I don't know if they are anywhere except in places like Sydney and Newcastle.

[ 01. January 2006, 22:20: Message edited by: blackaxe ]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Can expectant Grandparents post, too?

My daughter-in-law is in labor right now with my very first Grand! [Axe murder]

Any prayers for the safety of Laura (the Mom) and Winter (the child) will be very appreciated by Daughter-Unit and me!
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
I've been expecting 2006 for ages... [Biased]

Bronnie Dearest, will be praying. And Jedijudy, how wonderful! Have fun with all the cuddling!

[Votive]

Love to all for a blessed (and productive) New Year.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
JJB?
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
My daughter-in-law is still in labor. [Tear]

Poor Sweetheart.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Guess JJB is just recovering before posting. Jedijudy your poor daughter in law.

I went to the 12 week scan and all went as planned except my bloodpressure was really low, I mean so low the midwife took it 4 times, I am usually normal with my bloodpressure so it would explain why I have been feeling tired and crazing salt. Will check it again in a week, the joys of being a nurse I can do that see. Low blood pressure isnt a problem really high is worse.

Sean was able to come and guess what? the baby waved at us!!!! So cute and starting to look like a baby not a blob.

So exciting. Sean has nearly finnished the baby cot. We bought a teddy bear for the baby today hope s/he like him. This baby is going to be spoilt if we are not careful.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
So glad it went well, Bronwyn!

I'm with others on the amount of stuff you need to buy - we borrowed or got second-hand a lot of what we used. The baby is hardly going to care if the buggy is the latest model!

On the other hand, decorating and setting up the nursery is one of the nicest parts of expecting a baby, so why not enjoy it as much as you can!
 
Posted by Tom Day (# 3630) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:

Sean was able to come and guess what? the baby waved at us!!!! So cute and starting to look like a baby not a blob.

Hlad it went well. Although I still do call our baby blob. I just got so used to it during Annie's pregnancy.

Tom
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Sean was able to come and guess what? the baby waved at us!!!!

Little Hutch waved at us during the scan too [Big Grin]

quote:
This baby is going to be spoilt if we are not careful.
You can be as careful as you can, and the kid still gets spoilt. Sometimes there's no controlling grandparents, other relatives and friends. Not that I'm complaining having just got back from the US with inexpensive stroller, car seat, snuggly and assorted clothes largely from the generosity of family and church friends.
 
Posted by blackaxe (# 10622) on :
 
Bronwyn glad to hear all is well with the non-blob baby. We are calling our bub 'The Project' (i am an architect so its kinda appropriate)... we intend on using this name as much as possible for the entire pregnancy as we want to find out the sex of the child but not spill the beans to anyone else. I realise this is a difficult task hence the need to call it something very non-gender specific!!!

As for spoilt grandchildren, many of the Christmas presents to my husband and I were for the future bundle of joy - so we have been relegated already and the bub is nowhere near arriving on the planet! Being the first grandchild on both sides of the family also means that the bub will be a virtual celebrity for a while I am sure. The next thing you know he/she will be charging for photo ops... [Biased]
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
I'm here, but I'm not pregnant any more! Ended up having an emergency caesarean as the inhabitant didn't like the induction process, but we're both fine now. She was eventually born on December 30th, 15 days late. So much for late ones being boys! She's gorgeous, and already has her father wrapped firmly round her little finger!

Many thanks for all the good wishes and support over the past months.

JJB
 
Posted by Tom Day (# 3630) on :
 
[Smile] [Smile]

Congratulations from Anne, Matthew and Me.

Glad you're both doing well.

[Smile] [Smile]
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
So glad that all is well.

Congratulations!! [Smile]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
Congratulations JJB!! [Smile]

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Dear Bron, say after me: this baby is going to be indulged, not spoiled. Indulged, not spoiled.... [Big Grin]

I don't post on these threads often, but you all are in my prayers.

JJB: way to go! That's the way the Amosling came into the world. She also had her father wrapped around her finger from Day 1. Have you got a name yet?

Jedijudy: [Votive]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Well done JJB!!

Bron and Sean and Bellybaby! [Yipee] I remember Holly waving at us and now there she is in the kitchen revising for Psychology exams...

Sheesh, I'm SO glad I listened to those people who told me how quickly it passed and to enjoy every minute! (Childhood, NOT pregnancy! [Ultra confused] )

Love to you all, Bron.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Congratulations JJB! Glad to hear that the little lass finally arrived safe and sound.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Yay!! Congrats JJB! [Big Grin] Many happy years to come! [Axe murder] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Caz... (# 3026) on :
 
Congratulations JJB [Big Grin]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Congratulations JJB! I'm so happy for you!

I would like to announce that I am a Grandma!!! [Big Grin] [Yipee]

Winter was born (a caesarian birth) this morning at 6:29 a.m. My son assures me that she is the "cutest baby ever".

Daughter-Unit and I will drive up to see them tomorrow.

I can't wait! [Big Grin] [Axe murder]

[two excited to speel rite]

[ 04. January 2006, 00:11: Message edited by: jedijudy ]
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Hearty congratulations to JJB and Jedijudy. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Some things are very good second hand and any I am offered will be gratfully recieved for example a baby bath(I decided this is needed as I find the bathroom too cold to bath in and a baby needs to keep warm with a bath I can bath baby in front of fire).

You are quite right that second-hand is fine and that most of the stuff they sell is just that: stuff. A lot of things can be improvised; both my kids, as infants, took naps in a laundry basket padded with a blanket.

It's also hard to predict what is going to be the "essential" piece of equipment for you and your baby. We got one of those wind-up swing things because some friends found it a godsend dealing with their infant. I ended up passing it along to someone else after about a month because I didn't use it enough to justify tripping over it the rest of the time. So buying cheap or begging or borrowing definitely makes sense.

At the time my kids were born, our drafty old farmhouse was heated by a single woodstove and it was cold! I never gave them actual baths until they were old enough to sit up by themselves (and it was warm weather), at which time I took them into the tub with me to play in shallow water. The normal washing off during diaper changes and cleaning up spit-up and drool and a bit of sponge-bathing here and there (be sure to wash the head/hair once in a while) is more than sufficient to keep a baby clean. And extracting part of the baby to sponge bathe it while leaving the rest bundled up keeps the baby warmer than being plunked naked into a tub of water.

Glad all is going well and feel free to ignore me. I just love giving baby advice and I'm sure you're getting lots! [Big Grin]

Congrats to JJB and Grandma JediJudy, too!
 
Posted by Eanswyth (# 3363) on :
 
Well, as I have absolutely no desire to be a mother, I never expected to post here. But if grandmothers can I guess a godmother can. [Yipee]

My godson Bobby is due in mid-March and I'm starting to get excited. Went to a craft store yesterday and bought some cross stitch patterns of "Prayers for Little Ones" with teddy bears and bunnies. Tres cute!
 
Posted by sundog (# 8916) on :
 
Congrats on all the new arrivals!
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Many congrats JJB & jedijudy!
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Thanks for all the kind thoughts! D-U and I will be leaving in about an hour to see our little Sweetheart. (And her parents!)

I'll post pictures later.
 
Posted by Luisa (# 7761) on :
 
As someone who has a new-ish baby, and being number 3, I have realised that second hand is as good as first hand.

Congratulations to all who have just has little babies, and congratulations Bronwyn.
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
Many congrats to JJB and also to GrannyJedi [Biased]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Many congratulations to you both, JJB and the JediGranny.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
If anyone is interested, my sweetie can be seen in these photos.

(I had forgotten how tiny and soft the little ones are!) [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
awwwww. So cute.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
If anyone is interested, my sweetie can be seen in these photos.

(I had forgotten how tiny and soft the little ones are!) [Axe murder]

She's just gorgeous, Grandma! Thank you for giving us the chance to coo. [Axe murder] [Angel]
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Hello. I'm new here. I'm expecting my first baby in March. We don't know what it is going to be - we call it Beeb and sometimes I say "he" and sometimes I say "she", though my parents jump on me every time I use a gender-specific term, as if I might have hit upon a new mysterious way of finding out without the aid of ultrasound.

I'm a bit nervous and quite tired (still another four weeks at work). So I started reading these boards in the evenings because it was like listening in to an interesting conversation without the pressure of having to think of something sensible to say myself (often impossible for me these days).

Congratulations to you new mums and grandma (lovely pictures) and good luck to the other expectants.

Posy
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Hello, Posy (hello little Beeb! [Axe murder] ) and welcome.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
You know, I'm getting a bit fed up with this.

I'm tired, I'm grumpy, my back hurts nearly all the time except when I lie down, and I seem to be rapidly losing the ability to bend over. This all seems to be taking a ridiculously long time already, and I'm only 26 weeks.

And I'm getting increasingly worried about what happens when the baby arrives - I don't even like children! Especially all the ones I had to deal with over Christmas who were thoroughly horrible.

Please somebody reassure me all this is fairly normal, and that I'll cheer up soon.

(PS - Hi Posy! And congrats to the new arrivals!)
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
All other children but one's own are horrid nasty little specimens of sludge.

No, no I don't mean it! [Yipee]

What I really mean is, even when you aren't crazy about kids in general, kids en masse, kids in malls and schools and churches, you will love your own. You will even like your own, sometimes. You understand your own and you work out how to cope with your own. It will be fine, Ratmama. [Big Grin]

But as for this:
quote:
... I'm tired, I'm grumpy, my back hurts nearly all the time except when I lie down, and I seem to be rapidly losing the ability to bend over...
Welcome to my world. And I'm not even pregnant, so no reward for me at the end of it! whimper whine moan poor little me...

Congratulations to all -- yes, get used stuff, get loaned stuff, live as simply as you can.

Breastfeed if you can so you'll just have to tuck a change of clothing and a diaper or two in your purse, and then you can run along, you and Baby.

My little ones shifted around the house and yard with me in a wicker laundry basket as well, jlg. [Smile]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Thank you all for letting me share my baby photos! [Big Grin]

Welcome Posy and little Beeb!

(((Rat))) I think it's perfectly normal to be a bit wary starting out on a journey of any kind where you don't know the exact outcome. Babies seem to have this wonderful knack of helping Mama to forget the discomfort and worries experienced during pregnancy. As a previously not-thrilled-about-kids person, my children have turned into the joys of my life. I hope you will have that same report for us in a few years! [Smile]
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Rat, don't worry about not liking 'children in the lump' - I don't either, and am exceptionally good at making them cry just by holding them! I was worried that I would feel the same way about my own, but all those people who told me so often 'oh, but it's different when it's your own' were aggravatingly (and fortunately!) right! Speaking from the vast experience of a whole 10 days of motherhood, but it's true so far.

JJB
 
Posted by holly (# 689) on :
 
Congratulations to JJB and Jedijudy on your new arrivals.

[Axe murder]

holly xx
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Tired (most of the time), grumpy (some of the time) and struggling to bend down (all the time) are all things I can identify with, along with that sinking feeling every time I realise that being pregnant hasn't made me like other people's children any more than I did before.

Rat - I think we have to trust everyone who tells us that we will like our own!

I'm looking forward to holding Beeb, but part of me isn't looking forward to not being pregnant anymore. Don't know if that makes any sense.

Posy
 
Posted by BanneR LadY (# 10505) on :
 
I had never even held a baby until I had my own - and strongly suspected I had no maternal instincts whatever - but that miracle occurred in those first few hours after childbirth for me. It was quite a surprise, but the power of babies to surprise me still keeps me lining up at church for a cuddle with the latest new arrival. And now I am decidedly clucky again, as my eldest daughter gave birth yesterday to her second son. MMMM, that baby smell! I just love it.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
What they said.

But I'm still not convinced that I like babies, except for my own. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Uh-oh. I LOVE babies. I like holding them, talking to them. I even find that when they fuss, fretting moms take them back before I'm necessarily ready to give them up.

I have only vague notions of how diapering and bathing work, I've had few chances to get up close and personal with the business end of a baby... but I just sort of assume we'll get that figured out- probably before anyone actually drowns. You keep the breathing end above water, right?

[ 10. January 2006, 11:46: Message edited by: Fool of a Took ]
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Unfortunately my issue isn't so much with babies, which I've always found reasonably bearable, but with children. I had two of them (4 & 6) in my house over New Year and they were absolutely insufferable. Don't get me started on the reasons why or we'll probably wind up in Hell! But the squeaky voices certainly didn't help.

However, I suspect this may be down to my mental state more than anything else. Chatting to people since I came back to work, it seems they were inflicted with children behaving in similar ways over Christmas, and found stuff that seemed downright psychotic to me to be not just bearable but amusing and even endearing...I think I may be over-reacting a bit.

I'm sure you are all right, and all will fall into place once the wee one arrives.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Rat

I am unchild, but have two famillies that I join with at times. As far as I can see there are two types of behaviour that will annoy you and whether your children will do it will be different in the two.

First is behaviour that is antithetical to your approach to life. Your kids will not go for this sort of naughty behaviour as nature and nuture work together to eliminate it.

Second is the behaviour that actually points to your own weak spots. This your kids will do, and will know exactly how to wind you up by doing it. You tend to love them anyway.

Jengie
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
If you DON'T fall in love with your newborn immediately, don't worry. Lots of people do it over the course of the next month or so. Your first post-birth impression may be simply, "Whew, glad that's over, now may I go to sleep please?"
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
Unfortunately my issue isn't so much with babies, which I've always found reasonably bearable, but with children. I had two of them (4 & 6) in my house over New Year and they were absolutely insufferable. Don't get me started on the reasons why or we'll probably wind up in Hell! But the squeaky voices certainly didn't help.

However, I suspect this may be down to my mental state more than anything else. Chatting to people since I came back to work, it seems they were inflicted with children behaving in similar ways over Christmas, and found stuff that seemed downright psychotic to me to be not just bearable but amusing and even endearing...I think I may be over-reacting a bit.

I'm sure you are all right, and all will fall into place once the wee one arrives.

On the whole, I loathe the offspring of other people after about 5 minutes in their company. However, I am quite fond of my own, and it takes hours before I wish them gone.

You should find your wee one very nice, even if you don't ever like anyone else's brat.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Left at the Altar:
On the whole, I loathe the offspring of other people after about 5 minutes in their company. However, I am quite fond of my own, and it takes hours before I wish them gone.

You should find your wee one very nice, even if you don't ever like anyone else's brat.

As always, LATA's robust good sense makes me feel better!

Besides, my neuroses have temporarily been overpowered by the bloody awful maternity deal my work have finally come up with. Grr.

How is everybody else getting on?
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Baby seems to be doing well (check-up next week), as s/he's been very active. I, however, have had a frikkin' cold with a plugged up ear for over three weeks. I've steamed my head, consumed copious quantities of homemade chicken soup/broth, and drunk several times my body weight in orange juice with lemon, lime, or sanguinello. Hubby got over his cold in a week, thanks to being able to relieve symptoms with Lemsip. I'm tired of home remedies that don't actually work, and I'm about ready to kill for some actual medication. Currently, being pregnant is pissing me off, because otherwise I could take something and bludgeon this cold to death.

And just for those who are considering it (you know who you are), don't post any helpful remedies ... I've tried them all already. If you want to have a temper tantrum with me, then fine, but keep your "helpful" tips to yourselves. Thank you.

So, how's everybody else?
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Damn annoying that. *too scared to say anything else* [Biased]
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
Flausa, all Lemsip is is sugar and paracetemol - both of which are safe in pregnancy...
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Actually chukovsky, Lemsip also contains a decongestant (that Pheynlwhatever stuff), which is why both my official and unofficial health visitors AND my doctor have said I can't have it. But thanks for the "helpful" advice. [Disappointed]
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
Oops! I never take decongestants and I know there's a kind without, but it must be an own brand...

But at least you can have paracetemol...
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well yes is annoying in pregnancy that you can not take drugs to help. I had severe back pain which did not enable me to walk. By experience a 'cocktail' of drugs with walking/swimming would mean I could be at work the next day. I was off work 3 days. Very tempted to take one as I had them...last night one of the pregnant women at work admitted she had taken an unsafe drug as she was desperate, I joked now the baby will be born with three heads which she laughed at. (hope that isnt conscrewed as advise as I really suggest you follow the professionals advice).

Been travelling well just tired. I can not comment on the other peoples children issue as I for about 4 years every times I see a child of any age find myself watching them and if I get a chance chating to them. I actually know this is abnormal but I guess it helped when I fostered children so many years ago.
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Once you have a cold I'm not convinced anything cures it. Maybe helps you get through it. The only thing I ever found made any difference was hitting it with zinc before it really settled in.

Anyway you'll be better in a day or two Flausa. [Votive]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Couple of pints of Guiness should cure it Flausa. Followed by a night of rampant sex.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Stupid stupid coughs. [Mad] [Mad]

[Withholds advice/anecdotes]

Ultrasound on Monday indicated the babe is right back on track with the average growth curve. Earlier on, we were 'ahead' by almost a week, then by a few days. Normally, I'd think 'ahead of the curve' is kinda cool. But not when it comes to say... passing an EXTRA large watermelon through a nostril. [Ultra confused]

Doc is pleased with things. Sugar is under control (like, scarily... Even New Years' didn't put me over! But who am I to argue with the little strips?) Babe is head-down, but doesn't seem to be in any hurry. Which is fine- for the next few weeks. (Though I wouldn't mind leaving work early. [Devil] ) I have official word that once we get past that magic due date (Feb 9) Doc will encourage things along.

We're slowly but surely putting babe's room together. I'm off now in search of a rug. This is fun! We've been married almost 8 years, but lived in rectories- so we've never decorated before. And he's not really allowed to complain about he cost. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pânts:
Couple of pints of Guiness should cure it Flausa. Followed by a night of rampant sex.

Now that's some of the best advice I've gotten in months. [Biased]

Took, you're getting close now! Congratulations on the good reports. [Yipee]
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
Flausa, I can't give any advice, but all my sympathy for the "therapeutic orphan" months. Everyone is so careful now re pregnancy medication, rightly, but it's a miserable time to be sick.

Took: Be glad you're back on the curve. My second had a head two weeks ahead of her body size, and it wasn't amusing delivering it. [Smile]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Took, excellent work on your blood sugar levels.

Flausa, lots of sympathy. It sucks feeling crap for such a long time, and it is even crappier when common remedies can't be taken.

Wood's dad had a home remedy for the cold. He would take an onion and cut it in half, then stand it over night in a glass of milk. In the morning he would eat the onion. Apparently it worked every time. However this 'cure' has not been cleared for use by pregnant women from the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (British FDA), so my advice is that you don't try it. [Big Grin]

I hope that you will feel better soon.
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
Hmmm ... eating an onion and a night of rampant sex ... does anyone see how these two "remedies" might be mutually exclusive?
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
My advice was not to eat the onion, so you should be okay. [Big Grin]

bb
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Speaking of medications during pregnancy I am having a large debate with myself. NB this is not advice seeking only sharing issues. I think one thing which will help me is the fact we are going away for a week today to be with my family in Melbourne(but limmited if any access to the net).

For many years I have been on an anti depressent. There is a good reason for this, I have tried so many times to go off it without sucess always falling in a heap, but managing to pick up before things get too bad. Dr have been very suportive of me self monitoring the medication with suport of Sean. When we first considered pregnancy we saw a dr in the UK and basically the jury is still out on if the medication does cause any problems for baby but who is going to feed it to mums not needing it.
We all that time ago decided I should keep taking it if I got pregnant. The problem is that I am now in another very cautious country and I needed to see two separate GPs early in my pregnancy. Both were really pushing me to stop taking the anti depressant and I held my ground to them but came home and told Sean, we decided to try reducing the dose, which I did but I forgot it a few days and whopps I am not drug free. I can feel myself starting to slide a bit but then think if I can hang out a few more weeks I will be doing my baby a favor. suffering from a cronic depression means I know what I can manage and pace myself and so on but really at this point I usually would be going back on them. Sean is supportive whatever I decide and has born most of the brunt of the depression tears and so on.
Think I will decide in the next week without the stress of work or even being home only being around people I love. My gyne is supportine of me doing what I feel I should do and doesn't feel the risk is too much for baby.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
[Votive] prayers for you and your little one and Sean as you work together to make the right decision for your family [Votive]
 
Posted by Arabella Purity Winterbottom (# 3434) on :
 
((Bronwyn)) for a really tough decision.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Bronwyn [Votive]
I was told by my doc some ADs are ok (I was on them when I was first preggers).
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
(((Bronwyn, Baby, Sean))) [Votive]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
just a quick message from my parents place. Thankyou for all your support. We decided to start the anti D again as We felt it was better for me to take a small dose and survive and enjoy the pregnancy than to have to put up with the depression. I actually feel it was the right decision so started it a few days ago...please God let it work soon. (they take a min of 2 weeks) Also I am now 14 weeks officilly into my second trimester. Morning sickness is abaiting which is making me feel better also.

How is everyone else????
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Continuing to pray for you Bronwyn. Glad to hear you are beginning to feel better after the nausea and hope the other medication begins to help soon as well.

Had a check-up with my health visitor and GP yesterday. They were running behind schedule, so my GP practically pushed me out the door after two minutes, but the HV was much better. Neither was able to give me assistance with the cold (yes, it still be lingering), just keep steaming my head and drinking hot liquids. Pah.

On the up side, I'm doing well otherwise. HV took my weight and I'm actually maintaining ... just a kilo more than when I started (but I fluctuate that much anywhen when not pregnant). She said I will probably be one of those lucky gals with "extra meat on my bones" (such the diplomat she is [Biased] ) who actually loses weight thanks to being pregnant. Whoo hoo! [Yipee] I really was struggling with the thought of gaining even more weight, so this is a grand relief.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Glad to hear it all went well, Flausa.

And Bron- that sounds like a really sane decision, and [Votive] that the meds get to working soon.

I saw Doc #3 this week, the one who is monitering the diabetes. He dismissed me from his care, because as controlled as things are, there's nothing he can really do for me in the *gasp* 3 1/2 weeks I have left. [Ultra confused]

Checking-in with Doc #2 (the OB/Gyn) is now weekly. He doesn't do anything except weight and blood pressure, glance at my blood sugar records, measure my belly, and ask if there are any problems. Which hardly seems worth the 45min-1hour I spend sitting in his waiting room because he's behind schedule.

He did tell me that I'm negative for Strep B - which means I don't have to be on antibiotics during labour. Good- more room for the pain drugs [Biased]

Now if people would just be so kind as to stop eyeing my giant belly and asking me if I'm having twins... [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Fool of a Took:
He did tell me that I'm negative for Strep B - which means I don't have to be on antibiotics during labour. Good- more room for the pain drugs [Biased]

Don't you get tested again when in labour? I thought it could show up when in labour but sometimes not beforehand (although I could be wrong).
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
I only knows what I'm told re: Strep testing...

Not that I'm an expert in these things, but my body feels different today and I suspect that the babe has 'dropped' (or engaged, or lightening depending on the book...) Which is due to happen about 2 weeks before delivery. Right on cue.

I read on and asked myself "Increased frequency of urination... how is that even possible?!"

It is. [Help]

We got the carpet, the crib and the rocking chair into babe's room today. If s/he comes early, s/he doesn't have to sleep in a drawer after all [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
So excited for you Took ... know you've been waiting a looooooooooong time for this.
 
Posted by blackaxe (# 10622) on :
 
we have hit wk16 (or are close to wk17 depending on whether you pay attention to the ultrasound date over the obstetrician) and I feel like I look fat rather than pregnant. I have told a few people this week that I am pregnant (not people who really know me or have seen me before - new clients etc - and therefore don't know what I normally look like) who have remarked 'oh, really? right' as if I always look like a bloody lump!!! bring on the real baby bump i say - at least nobody will be guessing about whether I ate too much at Christmas or not... (which I didn't, only put on a kilo between wk 10 and wk 14, which the Doctor was amazed at!)

somehow I am still managing to fit into many of my clothes, although I am pushing the friendship with some of them. and my brother's wedding is this coming Saturday and I have to make some adjustments to a sleek floor length designer dress I have worn before such that I can eke the last bit of room left in the dress. couldn't have pushed it beyond this week though.

as for the project - well i gather s/he is still doing his/her thing. been getting a few weird pains every now and then but I gather that's the quickening beginning. [Eek!]

[ 22. January 2006, 10:19: Message edited by: blackaxe ]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Exciting took!!!!!

Blackaxe, I think I get it about the fat rather than pregnant. I actually think exven from very small bump people look pregnant. One of the girls at work tried to tell a patient she had christmas puddings to hide her small pregnant lump but well she looked pregnant.

I don't think I will be out of my own clothes for a while as the fat on my body plus my nausea and vommiting continues.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
I looked fat rather than pregnant till very recently, and even now it's an arguable point. I'm terribly jealous of people with a nice well-defined round bumps and inside-out belly buttons.

Mind you, I can see right down my belly button now, which I've never been able to do in my life before.

Part of the problem, of course, is that I've always been pretty plump, especially around the middle. But people also tell me it depends on your body shape - a sturdily built lass with a larger body cavity carries more of the baby inside so the bump is less obvious. Other people have said I'm carrying the baby 'well back', which means its a boy, or alternatively means its a girl, depending who you talk to. (Midwife visit tomorrow, so at least I'll hopefully be reassured that my poor bump is growing on schedule even if it's not as impressive as some other people's!)

So all a clear as mud, then.

I a bit narked, though, that maternity clothes seem mostly to be designed along the fashionable 'skin-tight and skimpy to show off your bump' line, rather than the far more civilised 'hide inside a tent for several months' look I was hoping for.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Rat, I think we must be the same body type - I looked fat rather than pregnant until I was about six months gone. I know what you mean about the skimpy maternity wear; I got by for a long time in trousers a size bigger than usual with elasticated waists and very baggy tops. After that I bought maternity trousers and teamed them with even baggier tops from (oh, the shame of it) Evans.*

Jane R

*Note for non-UK readers; Evans is the leading chain of clothes stores for 'oversize' women...
 
Posted by Never Conforming (# 4054) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
After that I bought maternity trousers and teamed them with even baggier tops from (oh, the shame of it) Evans.*

Jane R

*Note for non-UK readers; Evans is the leading chain of clothes stores for 'oversize' women...

There's nothing wrong with buying your clothes from Evans!

Jo
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Never Conforming said:
quote:
There's nothing wrong with buying your clothes from Evans!

Sorry, didn't mean to cause offence. I have a love-hate relationship with Evans, because I got thrown out once (when not pregnant) for being too thin. The shop assistant informed me (looking down her nose) 'We don't go down to YOUR size'. But I couldn't get anything that fitted properly in so-called 'normal' shops, either (where the shop assistants clearly thought I was too fat, but most were too polite to say so). This left me bitter and twisted, because I rather liked the clothes in Evans. They were certainly better quality than the alternatives.

This was several years ago, BTW, when 'normal' shops like BHS only stocked things up to UK size 16 (18 if you were lucky). Things have improved somewhat since then.

Jane R
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
I a bit narked, though, that maternity clothes seem mostly to be designed along the fashionable 'skin-tight and skimpy to show off your bump' line, rather than the far more civilised 'hide inside a tent for several months' look I was hoping for.

Yes- the overall theme of maternity design here seems to be "Ooh! I've got BREASTS! Everybody see my new boobies!?!"

I've got some really great things from Pennington's (our plus-size shop) and will eventually pass them on to another pregnant friend as official 'maternity wear'... maybe I'll take the tags out first, though. [Biased]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
I am sure this baby is kicking. Sean says it is wind but no it has come on like that for a couple of weeks. More strongly now. So exciting.
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
Bronwyn thats just so exciting [Smile] [Smile]

baby baby baby [Big Grin] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Weds 9pm, Channel 4 has a interesting looking programme about extended breastfeeding (if that's what it's called!!) if anyones interested!
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
i saw that... one woman in the advert had much older toddlers feeding off her... yeukky! Im interested to see it... !!
 
Posted by Tom Day (# 3630) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Emma.:
i saw that... one woman in the advert had much older toddlers feeding off her... yeukky! Im interested to see it... !!

according to the blurb in the Gaurdian, one was 7 and one was 10!
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
TEN TEN TEN TEN?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!??!

flip.

I teach 12 year olds. thats wierd!
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
Bitty!!!

[Projectile] [Projectile] [Projectile]

Auntie Doris x

[ 30. January 2006, 22:05: Message edited by: Auntie Doris ]
 
Posted by Dark Knight (# 9415) on :
 
quote:
Posted by blackaxe:
somehow I am still managing to fit into many of my clothes, although I am pushing the friendship with some of them. and my brother's wedding is this coming Saturday and I have to make some adjustments to a sleek floor length designer dress I have worn before such that I can eke the last bit of room left in the dress. couldn't have pushed it beyond this week though.

Mrs K had to fit into a bridesmaids dress right at the begining of third trimester, for her sister's wedding last year. Having the dress measured and made was...challenging [Eek!]

God bless you all expecting this year. Baby K is just the most beautiful little 7 month old girl you could ever imagine, so be encouraged that at the end of this time actually having the little tacker out in the world is so wonderful. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tom Day:
according to the blurb in the Gaurdian, one was 7 and one was 10!

And I'm pretty sure I heard one of them say something like, "I think we should be allowed to breastfeed forever." <shudder> So far, all I can think about it is that if you want your children to have breastmilk for that long, shouldn't there come a time where you start at least putting it in a cup for them?
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
I caN NOT BELIEVE A CHILD WOULD WANT TO FEED THAT LONG. mY MUM FEED MY YOUNGEST CHILD TIL SHE WEENED HERSELF, THAT WAS ABOUT 4.
 
Posted by duchess (# 2764) on :
 
Browyn, it feels so good to see you posting here, to see our prayers answered. I was just thinking this and needed to say it out loud.

It is such a blessing and encouragement after years of hanging on with faith, you two.

[Tear]
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
quote:
Originally posted by Tom Day:
according to the blurb in the Gaurdian, one was 7 and one was 10!

And I'm pretty sure I heard one of them say something like, "I think we should be allowed to breastfeed forever." <shudder> So far, all I can think about it is that if you want your children to have breastmilk for that long, shouldn't there come a time where you start at least putting it in a cup for them?
That might be more difficult than you think, going by my adventures into expressing milk. (Can take ages). I do think that breast feeding is a good idea, up to a point. It's really good when baby is latched on properly and doesn't take forever to get full.

This is not quite the case for Matthew. When I started feeding him, it was ok, but he did seem to take a long time to be full. Some feeds were over two hours (which was getting ridiculous). He wasn't gaining enough weight, and he was fractious a lot. In the end (a couple of weeks ago) I'd just about had it, and went and bought some formula. Best decision I've made. We've been bottle feeding and doing a bit of breast since then, and now he's back on track - he gained loads last week. He's much better. So breast isn't always best, it depends on you and baby.
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
I think in this case annie, the woman **is** still easily producing milk etc etc for years and years - so for her expressing would be "an" answer if she wants to feed them breast milk... at that ago tho the reason presumably is more to do with the contact and comfort??

Any blokes think theyd mind if their wives were breastfeeding kids up to 10 years old? not find that a bit wierd?!
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
It strikes me, though this may be more of a Purg thread, that this is something that gets very sensationalised - so, although there may well be problems with a child having no boundaries, or the child's mother and father disagreeing on when is the right time to stop breastfeeding, or the mother wanting to stop but the child having tantrums if she does - and those of course would all be good reasons why continuing breastfeeding might not be a good idea.

However, it's hard to see why it would be intrinsically wrong - it's common in many stable, well-balanced societies for the last child to be breastfed till very, very late (I read that in the nomadic Kalahari desert people 8 years is an average for the last child).

The problem is, breastfeeding itself is so uncommon past a few months of age in Western society that people have come to see it as odd to continue even after a year or so. So the very fact of late breastfeeding is seen as strange, rather than associated family problems (which don't necessarily follow) being the real issue.

Anyway, as I say, perhaps more Purgatorial.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Just started a thread here in Purg to continue this specific discussion.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Annie P:
We've been bottle feeding and doing a bit of breast since then, and now he's back on track - he gained loads last week. He's much better

Glad to hear that he is thriving and that things are more relaxed for you.

bb
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
Part of the problem, of course, is that I've always been pretty plump, especially around the middle. But people also tell me it depends on your body shape - a sturdily built lass with a larger body cavity carries more of the baby inside so the bump is less obvious...(Midwife visit tomorrow, so at least I'll hopefully be reassured that my poor bump is growing on schedule even if it's not as impressive as some other people's!)

Keep meaning to respond to this. As I said before, my health visitor advised that we sturdier girls don't necessarily show as prominently with our bumps. But on the up side, it might mean you end up weighing less after birth. Interesting weight loss program, eh?

How did your midwife visit go?
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
How did your midwife visit go?

Fine, thank you. She says my bump is just the right size! [Biased]

She also claimed she could identify the various bits of the baby just by poking my tummy - bottom, legs and head - which I thought was amazing. Apparently the baby was lying head down during the visit!

I'm anemic though, so I assume that explains how exhausted I've been. I've been eating pretty carefully, so they've prescribed me supplements to help. I'm actually kind of relieved to realise I'm not meant to feel this bad.

How are things with you?
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
The wee wan's kicking as I type. Ten pm, which is bedtime for me most nights, seems to be an active time for the sprog. Though there have been some early mornings (3am-ish) where s/he's waited until then to do something akin to the can-can.

As to supplements, I took the folic acid vitamins for the first three months as recommended then stopped because Dr and health visitor said I could. But my energy levels plummeted, so I started taking them again. Have felt so much better since (well, apart from the stupid cold). But I do feel like I've been eating healthier as well. Eating two pieces of fruit while at work during the day, sometimes another piece at night, eating more veg, and particularly carrots which I can eat 'til they come out my ears.

Took, you must be getting close now, how are you?
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
It's officially Always the Weekend but Never Sunday™

I'm due next Thursday, but my blood pressure has risen over the last week. If it stays high, Doc will want to induce on or before the due date. We'll make that decision on Monday.

Home Care nurses will be coming daily to check blood pressure, and for the protein in my urine (yay, more peeing in a cup...) that would suggest pre-eclampsia. If either looks bad, I suspect the next course of action will be induction.

It all seems like so much drama- but since it is centred around high blood pressure, getting anxious about it only makes it worse. So, I'm trying not to. I have good friends praying for us and hope that I can let it go, knowing that others are doing my fretting for me.

Meanwhile, when the Doc checked this morning I was about 2.5cm dilated, and softening. I understand this state of affairs can last a while, but it does mean that if it comes to induction, I've at least got a natural start on the process.

I'm hoping that the Babe (in real life, I've been calling it Sine Nomine, but that just doesn't work around here [Biased] ) will get things rolling independently, but if it's a punctual, cooperative little creature, those aren't traits it inherited from me.

Failing that, I've got 13 hours of Firefly, 3 Seasons of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the first season of the Muppet Show, a pretty decent rental place just a short walk away, and a comfy sofa. And I'm enjoying everything I eat now, because once these occasional irregular twinges become proper contractions I'm supposed to stick to liquids. And there's no point still having no-sugar-added chocolates in the house once I come home diabetes-free.

How many times in my life will everyone agree that I should just sit on the sofa eating bonbons all day?
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Good luck, Took. I hope everything goes smoothly for you whenever the Babe makes his/her entry.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Took oh HOW exciting!!!!! May God be with you and your baby. May the delivery be uncomplacated. May you cope with the wee one.

Our wishes are with you.
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Good luck Took. You're already more dilated than I was after 3 days of induction!!

I'm interested in the size-of-bump discussion. I too tend to err on the plump side of things, and being over 6' tall didn't show much till late on. Even at 42 weeks pregnant, my bump only ever measured 40cms. And I weigh less now than I did before I got pregnant, without having tried to lose weight at all, so it can indeed be a good weight-loss programme if you're lucky!

JJB
 
Posted by Jillyb (# 4610) on :
 
thinking of you took, hoping all going well xxx
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by JJB:
Even at 42 weeks pregnant, my bump only ever measured 40cms.

I got the impression, though I could easily be wrong, that you were supposed to measure 1cm per week? in which case that is almost exactly right??
 
Posted by footdoc (# 4389) on :
 
Congratulations Took, hope all is going well. xx
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Sheesh, I threw up hourly for the first six months and STILL managed to put 3 stones on! (42 pounds).

(Now they're both adults I have finally taken responisibilty for the excess weight though, and am losing it steadily. [Biased] )

Bronwyn, are you about 20 weeks now? I grin daily as I think of you. (That's almost like something St Paul wrote, innit?!)
 
Posted by Jillyb (# 4610) on :
 
*Bump* [Biased]


any news anyone on took???
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Swimmer has about 6 hours left to make this a DIY project. Doesn't seem likely- which is too bad; Tuesday's child is full of Grace.

Otherwise we're going in tonight to start induction. Prostiglandin early this evening, then back for the full-out-bring-it-on Oxytocin drip first thing tomorrow.

My sister was on the drip for 24 hours before anything even started happening, but we're expecting to be parents before Friday.

[Big Grin] [Ultra confused] [Smile] [Eek!] [Cool] [Help]
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
Wishing you all the best and praying for a good labour. Remember, his hand only exists for you to squeeze it, so squeeze away!

Seriously, really hope that all goes smoothly, and that baby is born without complications. [Angel]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Oh, Took. Am so excited for you. Will be praying that all goes smoothly and you and your new little one will be home safe and sound (in separate pieces [Biased] ) very soon.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Oooh, exciting! Good luck, Took!
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Took has had her baby! [Big Grin] [Yipee] [Big Grin]

A girl, born February 8th, 2006 at 7:30 a.m. She weighs 7 lbs, 4 oz.

quote:
Mother and baby are doing very well
[Big Grin] [Yipee] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
Woo Hoo! Yay! [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Tom Day (# 3630) on :
 
Excellent. Congratulations to Took.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Happy, happy, happy! [Yipee] Congratulations to a mother who I suspect will be anything but inferior.
 
Posted by ebeth (# 4474) on :
 
Congratulations Took and family! My this just be the start to "...and they all lived happily ever after" [Biased]
 
Posted by Suze (# 5639) on :
 
Popping in to add my congratulations Took, God bless as you settle in to being a little family.
 
Posted by marmot (# 479) on :
 
That is such great news, Tookie. Bless you all!
 
Posted by Jillyb (# 4610) on :
 
[Yipee] what great news [Big Grin] - many congratulations to the took family [Yipee]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Congrats to FoaT, miniFoaT and DaddyFoaT.

May they float along gently, and live long and prosper.

[Overused] [Angel] [Yipee]
 
Posted by FiliusSyon (# 10722) on :
 
Yippee. Congrats. [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Doublethink (# 1984) on :
 
Congratulations Foat [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
WHHHHHHHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!

[Yipee]
 
Posted by ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
[Axe murder] [Axe murder]
Congratulations
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Habemus Tooklet!!!
 
Posted by basso (# 4228) on :
 
Congratulations, Took!

(v. good, GK!)
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Hooray! Every happiness to Ma & Pa & Baby Tookums!
 
Posted by Emma-Jean (# 7165) on :
 
Yay! Way to go Took, Mr.Took, and Little Miss Swimmer! [Big Grin] We want pictures! We want pictures! [Overused] you are awesome! Could hadly wait to hear. [Smile]
 
Posted by ebeth (# 4474) on :
 
One more vital stat needed: Name ??

and I'll echo emma jean, a picture of baby would be nice too [Big Grin]
[Axe murder] to the Tooks
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Fantastic news - congratulations! Looking forward to the pictures.
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
Hurray!!! Congratulations!!! [Axe murder]

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Ann (# 94) on :
 
[Yipee] [Axe murder] [Yipee] [Axe murder] [Axe murder] [Yipee] [Axe murder] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
Wonderful news!

Congrats to the proud Mum 'n' Dad [Yipee]
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
Many, many congrats to the 'Tooks'.

[Axe murder]
 
Posted by sundog (# 8916) on :
 
Yipee! Welcome Swimmer and congrats to the Tooks.
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Wonderful news, congratulations.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Brava! Congratulations to the Took family!
 
Posted by Mousethief (# 953) on :
 
YAAAAAY! Many happy years! May the Tooklet enjoy a long, happy, peaceful, and productive life. And may the parents soon rediscover what "sleep" means!
 
Posted by Dee-nz (# 5681) on :
 
Hooray!!

Welcome on board to the wee deck scrubber

Is'e cute??

Huh? Huh?

Can I have a hold??
 
Posted by Adrienne (# 2334) on :
 
Many congratulations - welcome to the little one!

A
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
Fantastic Took [Yipee] Well done
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Well done and many congratulations - may your family have many years of love and laughter ahead of them.
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Wahey!! Congratulations to all the Tooks.
[Yipee]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
I have both name and picture! She is very cute!!

I don't know how Took feels about posting that on random website so prob best if you PM or email me and I can send it (at least until she arrives back!).
 
Posted by MaryFL (# 7482) on :
 
Congrats, Took! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Lookin (# 10855) on :
 
just to pop into this thread to give my congrats to the "took" family!

[Smile]

Hope all is well

Lookin x
 
Posted by holly (# 689) on :
 
Just want to also add our congratulations.

[Axe murder]

Holly & JonoT

xxx
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Well done, God bless, and many congratulations!
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
Nothing better to put a smile on peoples faces!
Congratulations!

[Yipee] [Axe murder] [Yipee] [Axe murder] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
Congratulations, Took [Smile]
 
Posted by footdoc (# 4389) on :
 
Brilliant news..... Congrats to Tookey and Mr Took. [Axe murder] [Axe murder]
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
Congratulations, Took! May the Tooklet eat heartily, sleep long and often, and smile at you the rest of the time. [Smile]
 
Posted by The_Lilith_Adams (# 9088) on :
 
Mazal Tov to the Took Family - wishing you all that you wish for yourselves - and more!

TLA xx
 
Posted by Spiffy da Wonder Sheep (# 5267) on :
 
Welcome to the world, Swimmer!
 
Posted by Honeybones (# 10603) on :
 
Congrats!!!
I feel a very strong urge to pop over with a casserole and some ice cream. And a jumbo pack of diapers.
Cause thats what you do.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Congratulations!!!!! I have been forced off line for a few days and have been thinking and praying for you. Now on Seans work puter which is a lap top(YUCK) I keep putting on the caps lock.

All is well with baby kicking all the time. I did feel her (or him) kick from 12 weeks. (now 17 weeks)

On the boy girl thing we have a chance to find if we have a girl or boy maybe soon how do you decide? I don't really want to know Sean does. I guess I am inclined to let him decide as so far he has only seen one ultrasound and i HAVE FELT BABY KICK AND FELT SICK AND so on. I am not too fussed I just guess traditionally no one knew.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
[Axe murder] [Yipee] for Tooks and Swimmer.

Bronwyn, I think it's very noble of you to let Sean decide on the 'boy or girl' thing. I was mildly interested in finding out, but Other Half was dead set against knowing. He said it would 'spoil the surprise'. So I respected his wishes and didn't ask either, because I would never have been able to keep quiet about it that long.

I remember being overwhelmed with astonishment when I saw her for the first time. I don't know what I was expecting, but here was this real (tiny) human being with her very own face, and it didn't look at all how I'd thought it would. I don't think knowing in advance that she was going to be a girl would have spoiled the surprise much (and it's very useful if you want to go down the pink/blue route for the nursery etc.).

HTH,

Jane R
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
My first baby was born on 8th Feb 1980.
All the hope and dreams that I had for her on that day have come to pass.
I pray the same for you, Took.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Thanks so much, everybody- what a wonderful array of good wishes to come home to!

Hazel Elizabeth Ruth is upstairs sleeping.
Hazel-nut is such a good hobbit-ish name, I couldn't resist. I still have to figure out how to post photos- and much of my brain is distracted elsewhere. You'll just have to take my word for how gorgeous she is. [Big Grin]

'Swimmer' was an apt moniker- thanks to whoever it was came up with it! Everything went 'swimmingly' well from starting active labour around midnight to her arrival at 7:30 am. Doc arrived to start inducing, and was just in time to catch her instead. His first words to me were 'stop pushing, there's her head'.

And there's the bell, summoning me to the first non-hospital food I've seen in days...

[Axe murder] [Tear] [Votive]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
Hazel.... what a pretty name.

Congratulations to you all!! [Axe murder]

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
hmm... what happens if I post this link ?
 
Posted by noelper (# 9961) on :
 
Deep Joy and Hope to you and all of your family [Big Grin] , Took.

[Yipee] [Yipee] [Axe murder] [Votive]
 
Posted by Grits (# 4169) on :
 
Precious baby. Thank you for the photo.
 
Posted by Manda (# 6028) on :
 
Gorgeous [Axe murder] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Dee-nz (# 5681) on :
 
Awwwwwwwww

[Axe murder]

Wee Sweetheart
 
Posted by Suze (# 5639) on :
 
Thanks for the photos Took, she's simply gorgeous.
 
Posted by Lookin (# 10855) on :
 
how gorgous!

once again congrats to you mate!

continuing to think and pray for you all [Big Grin]

lookin x
 
Posted by sundog (# 8916) on :
 
She's lovely - such beautifully coloured hair!
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Lovely, Took. Congratulations! [Yipee]
 
Posted by TrudyTrudy (I say unto you) (# 5647) on :
 
Haven't checked this thread in ages, but I was just schelpping around the Ship this morning thinking, "I wonder if Took has had that baby yet?" when I saw the happy news! Congratulations!
 
Posted by Freelance Monotheist (# 8990) on :
 
Wow, congratulations Took, what a beautiful little girl!
Hazel is such a pretty name!
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
[Big Grin] Took. Mom and daught as pretty as can be.
 
Posted by Melisande (# 4177) on :
 
Oh, she's lovely, Took. The hair especially. I love how they fold up like little tree frogs at first.

Bronwyn, I didn't want to know the gender with either child; my husband did. With both, we ended up deciding to let it flash us at the ultrasound if it wanted to. Neither did, though I could have sworn I saw boy parts on the second; still, I spent a while thinking the kidneys and bladder were its face, so not too surprising I was wrong....
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Welcome Hazelnut! What a cutie!
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
Congratulations Took. And welcome to baby Hazel.
The ship's creche is getting comfortably full. Who's volunteering for creche hosting duties?
 
Posted by Jenny Ann (# 3131) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chorister:
The ship's creche is getting comfortably full. Who's volunteering for creche hosting duties?

Oooh, Oooh, Me!

Congrats Took and little hazel [Big Grin]

J
 
Posted by Dee-nz (# 5681) on :
 
oh me to,

I love babies and since I dont have any of my own I like borrowing other peoples. I have a neice and a God daughter both cute wee buttons under 1 year old.

I will be nice to your bubbies I prommise!
 
Posted by Raylene (# 4949) on :
 
Lovely baby.

Congratulations to the whole clan!

R [Axe murder]
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
[Axe murder] to Took and Tooklet.

Unfortunately I'm so disorganised I only posted your baby hat today. Hopefully it gets there before Tooklet is too big to wear it!
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
What a gorgeous little girl! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Had my regular health visitor and GP check-up today, and tested with sugar in my urine. They've scheduled me in for a glucose-tolerance test tomorrow. Please pray that the elevated levels were just because I took my sample after I'd had breakfast and a glass of fruit juice rather than first thing after getting out of bed.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
That's very likely, Flausa.
[Votive] for you both.
May you not only have good test results, but peace of mind.

I recommend NOT going for your glucose tolerance test right after a big lunch topped off by a large bar of chocolate. (Not my smartest day... I blame the placenta-brain)

If, however, the glucose tolerance test *does* reveal a problem, remember it isn't the end of the world- just a reminder to eat really well for a while. And if your sugars are up- better to know it early and get it under control. (Sure, easy for me to say now that I can eat chocolate again [Biased] )

If you'd like to check your own urine for sugars (and ketones, and protein) at home, I could send you the remainder of a 100-test-strip package, purchased at my expense and used for 3 days. [brick wall]
 
Posted by Freelance Monotheist (# 8990) on :
 
Put me on creche duty too, I love kids of all ages and not only am I the eldest of 4 (9 years between me & youngest) but have lots of experience babysitting!
Again, Took, she's gorgeous!
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
Congrats to la familia Took! The hazelnut is gorgeous!

Charlotte
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Well, they have now starved me overnight, forced me to drink a horrid, sugary drink called Lucozade, and stole two vials of my blood. I should have the test results next week, which means until then, they have to assume that I am diabetic, so no sugar (though after that wretched drink I don't want it anyway).

The frustrating thing about it is I don't really eat a lot of sugary stuff anyway (though the health visitor said that the muesli I eat has quite a bit of sugar in it). I have on average maybe one sweet a week, so doc has said I have to eliminate all the fruit juice from my diet. Which means I'm down to drinking water and milk since I don't drink soda or squash. Anyway, I have to keep reminding myself that no matter how dreadful it sounds at the moment, it's still better than how my father-in-law is going to be with food after they remove his stomach because of the cancer. See, I can find the silver lining in any cloud. [Waterworks]

Took, I'll let you know if I need the strips next week. Thanks for the offer! Hope you are enjoying the Hazelnut as much as you are enjoying your freedom to eat chocolate again.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
[Frown]
Courage for the week ahead, Flausa!
The nothing-but-water-and-milk was hard on me, too. Mr. Took was under orders to bring a big bottle of premium orange juice to me in hospital.

Are you a cheese-lover? Cuz that doesn't break down into sugar- making it a guilt-free snack. And real butter melting all over your vegetables (the Wee Wan needs the calories!) And a small scoop of premium ice-cream is sometimes good for your soul- and better for your body than a large bowl of no-sugar-added ice-cream substitute [Biased]

And if Alan doesn't also change the way he eats, at least when you're dining together, you always have the option to kick him in the shins.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Well, currently Alan is under obligation to finish the apple-rhubarb crumble that I made on Sunday. So I can't really kick him for something that I asked him to do. Tickle him mercilessly if he seems to enjoy the crumble too much, but kick him ... nahhhhh.

Oh, and mmmmmmmmm ... cheeeeeeeeeeeeeese.

[ 15. February 2006, 12:13: Message edited by: Flausa ]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Hopefully Flausa you will be one of those people who just allow sugar out that way. It is quite normal for some people and it is not diabetes. Still the GTT is a good idea I am having one next week myself. (Family history of diabetes and well my weight)

I am so tired at the moment I am finding work hard and I am STILL vommiting. Oh well at least we have the baby God promised us. Is anyone else keeping a diary?
 
Posted by Dee-nz (# 5681) on :
 
[Votive] for the vomiting
[Yipee] for the baby
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
I've got a couple of friends who are pregnant at the moment and one told me about a new thing for morning sickness, the other has tried it and it works for her too.

Its a CD from here. It makes some funny sounds but is quite effective.

I hope this is helpful to people, or if its seen as advrtising that the hosts will kindly remove it.

Choccie (they are friends, honestly, its not me!) [Big Grin]

[ 16. February 2006, 12:30: Message edited by: Chocoholic ]
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
I'm bumping this up so Miss Jane can find it, as I am not a clever person when it comes to link thingys. [Smile]
 
Posted by miss jane (# 3107) on :
 
thankyou, clergyman's daughter!
 
Posted by miss jane (# 3107) on :
 
(sorry for the double post)

hello all, I'm new to this thread, so I guess I should introduce myself. My name is Jane (I know this is fairly obvious, but it seems like a non-introduction if I don't include it!) and I am expecting my first child on or around July 16th this year.

cheers,
Jane
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Welcome and congratulations, Jane! Grab yourself a nice soft cushion, a glass of milk, and join the fun.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Oops! Just read your other thread, but wasn't in time to come back here and delete my previous post.

Just in the way of comment, I do think there's a reason that pregnancy lasts nine months, and I'm not talking just for the baby's development. I think most of us need at least that long to get used to the idea of becoming a parent and the other impacts that this will have on our social, emotional, physical, sexual, and spiritual life.
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
Flausa,

I'm thinking about you and your blood test results. When I was pregnant I had to go through exactly the same thing, and it turns out it was all just because I had eaten practically a whole bunch of grapes. I hope that it is a similar explanation for you!

[Smile] [Smile] [Smile]
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Yes, I was wondering how the tests went - also a good reminder for me not to over-indulge in fruit juice tomorrow!

quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:

Just in the way of comment, I do think there's a reason that pregnancy lasts nine months, and I'm not talking just for the baby's development. I think most of us need at least that long to get used to the idea of becoming a parent and the other impacts that this will have on our social, emotional, physical, sexual, and spiritual life.

I don't know. In a way it might be easier if you made the big decision then, boom, got the baby while you were still sure it was an excellent idea. This way you have an awful long, slow time during which to worry yourself into a frenzy about all those things. (I seem to have got to the abject terror stage...keep having these awful anxiety dreams where I forget to, or amn't able to, feed the baby and it starves. But my mum assures me I'll get over it!)

[ETA I mean she says I'll get over the abject terror, not starving the baby. She's quite sure I won't forget to feed the baby.]

[ 20. February 2006, 20:01: Message edited by: Rat ]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Hoping to get the test results tomorrow just before my appointment with the midwife. Have been having periods of diziness since removing sugar from my diet, so I really suspect my sugar's low as opposed to high. My sister had the same thing happen. I verbally thwacked her for not telling me that.

Good heavens, Rat. I've had some mild moments of panic thinking about how much life is going to change in a few months, but I hadn't yet had nightmares about starving the kid. Eek! Something else to keep me up nights.
 
Posted by miss jane (# 3107) on :
 
thanks for your welcome, Flausa. (Although I will avoid the milk if that's O.K., as it is the one guaranteed thing which will bring on major projectile vomitting!) I'm sorry if I came off as a scratchy b**** on the other thread.. I don't know what to do with ideas expressed on it... still thinking.

goodluck with the midwife visit and test results.

cheers,
Jane
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Rat, your nightmare about forgetting to feed the baby made me laugh I'm afraid! Trust me, if you're breastfeedng you won't be able to forget - your boobs won't let you! (neither will the baby, of course, but it's more personal than that) The Bubble has slept from 10.30pm to 6.30am the last two nights, so I've been waking up with leaking cannonballs strapped to my chest. Lovely! [Eek!] Thank God for breast pumps.

JJB
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
Hi all, I'm newly pregnant (expecting in September if all goes well).

miss jane, I think it would be a great idea to discuss the stuff you mentioned on your locked thread. Perhaps that would be easier on a private forum, where we could have "philosophical" discussion threads as well as "status" and "wellwishing" social threads? What do others think?
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Congratulations, Light and welcome to the club!

I am extremely pissed at the moment. Got my test result back this morning, and it was normal.

However, the doctor that works with the midwife doesn't like the way that my GP's office conducts the test, so they want me to take the test again (had a message on my answering machine with the appointment schedule without asking me when I got home from work today). My urine was clean today. I've only had one bad sample and that was last week's and again that was after a large glass of juice.

I've decided if they want to have a pissing contest over who's blood test is better than who's they can do it their damn selves and leave me out of it. I intend to call them tomorrow when the office is open so I can give them an earful.

Oh, and the midwife forgot to take my 28 week blood test today, so they'll want more blood for that as well - but they'll happily take that at the hospital when I go for my new GTT. Ha! [Mad]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Flausa Oh dear don't you hate it you are only the patient!!!!!!

Been really struggling this week. The local accident which has killed 6 teens and one serously injured has been hard for this small community and all I keep thinking is what if I had allowed our child to go to a party in the middle of nowhere and he/he was killed by a car. So many hurting families. Going down the street monday the whole town was in morning.

Been really emotional and not helped by having to go to a work conference which I have found hard in several ways. One being intrusive into my own self which is well always a bad idea unless you really want an emotional scene which is not the persona I have at work.

Been tired all the time but unable to rest due to severe pain, which I don't really know the reason for but suspect it is ligaments streaching combined with well streaching of scar tissue.

Over the last few days I have been really quite depressed and partly due to forgetting to take the anti D I believe as well as hormones and so on. Still being nausous has not helped either and [Projectile] a few times.

On the other hand was really excited as baby did some movement which I noticed for the first time whilst moving. Before it was only when I was sitting quietly. I put my hand to feel so Sean can and baby stops. Soon he wont worry about being shy I guess.

Better try to get a tiny bit more sleep before work.
 
Posted by Goar (# 3939) on :
 
Bron,

After Señor Frog came last August time has been especially hard to find and we have not spent time on the Ship. That said Suusan and I have been praying for you over the past few months.

Oh how pleased we were to see the wonderful news! Now another tiny baby to add to the list! How wonderful.

Take it easy. Treat yourself well. Hang in there.

I will try to check in more regularly for the updates!

Goar
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Flausa Oh dear don't you hate it you are only the patient!!!!!!

Ha! They don't know yet how well I can play the game. I've placed two phone calls to the office today, but no return calls back. My plan as it stands now is to go tomorrow to the hospital, tell them they can take the blood for the 28 week check-up, but that I refuse to take a second GTT. In order to make this an effective refusal, I intend to eat breakfast, hence making any test invalid.

Holding you in my prayers, Bron, as you are struggling. Just try to remember the baby's kicks and movements in the times that you are feeling poorly. It's the one thing that I know helps me feel better - a gentle reminder that the misery is well worth it.
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
Oooo, Flausa, you're about to become a 'non-compliant patient'! Welcome to the club. [Smile]

While it's important to be aware of possible problems such as gestational diabetes, it's also important to be your own medical advocate and listen to your own body. It seems that the medicalization of pregnancy is still alive and thriving, with lots of tests and interference "just in case". It's important to question and require justification for all this stuff they want to do. And it's quite all right to decide to decline some of it.

It's also good practice in preparation for not getting sucked into a "omigod it might be something serious" mode when you've got an infant and are dealing with the pediatrician's office.

My second child was a homebirth. When I took him to the doctor's office at three days old, the nurse (young and fresh from school, barely looked up from the forms, much less noticed us) insisted that we needed a follow-up visit two days later because "the baby has not regained his original birth weight". Yeah, right. He weighed ten pounds at birth and three days later had plunged down to nine pounds fifteen ounces. [Roll Eyes]

Quite the contrast to the lovely experienced nurse I had for my first child. One of the routine questions was "how often does the baby eat and how much at each feeding". Since I was breastfeeding on demand, I just looked at her and said "I have no idea. Whenever she wants to, for as long as she wants". She laughed and wrote down 'mother and baby are thriving'.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Flausa,
woke up late last night and worried you would not see the point I was making saying you were only the patient but I see you did. I guess from both being a patient and the fact that I am now pregnant on the fact I was a non compliant patient. I would still be doing IVF, the dr prescribing the same drugs(which didn't work) and he would be getting rich and me older and well not pregnant.
Always question everything. Now due to my refusal just to be a patient I have a dr who really does understand, lets me choose if I want a test, although the ones she has suggested I have agreed to except the one to check for downs as I wouldn't abort anyway. She accepted this.

Thanks Flausa I do remember the kicks, read my diary when I need to as I sometimes forget the visions and dreams God gave us. This baby is special.

B
 
Posted by Suze (# 5639) on :
 
Bron I just love popping over here and seeing you on this thread [Axe murder] . [Votive] Praying for all you expectant mums and your little bundles.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Still enjoying reading this and seeing how you're all doing.

[Axe murder] to all!
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Flausa, reading your posts it seems you're really worked up about all this; hormones don't help!

By all means rant but do remember the most important thing is to keep your Blood Pressure down, so counter your outbursts with some quiet yoga or soothing music. Seriously. You don't want high BP.

Forget to breastfeed? [Killing me]

Mine are still 10 inches bigger 20 years on, they were so keen... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Vikki Pollard:
Mine are still 10 inches bigger 20 years on, they were so keen... [Eek!]

Thanks. And there was me living in some vague hope that they might 'tone up' again one day. Parcel tape here we come.
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Cheer up. Some people report a concave chest once feeding has stopped!

Anyway it's wasted on me. Nobody's interested in 'em. [Biased]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Vikki Pollard:
Flausa, reading your posts it seems you're really worked up about all this; hormones don't help!

By all means rant but do remember the most important thing is to keep your Blood Pressure down, so counter your outbursts with some quiet yoga or soothing music. Seriously. You don't want high BP.

Actually, I'm quite fine. Blood pressure's good and everything. And high blood pressure doesn't come from one incident. I'm really not the sort to get overly emotional and stressed to the gills, so a few moments of anger at times are ok and in this case were absolutely appropriate. Not all stress is bad stress. However, when I am angry, soothing music is not helpful - it just drives me batty. But as a former social worker, I know quite well how to calm myself down.

As to hormones, current research suggests that they don't drive our behavior as much as we women would like to think. It's our behavior that drives the hormones. I've really not had any hormonal surges the whole pregnancies. One day where I was tired and teary but that's it. I'm hoping that bodes well for the delivery meaning that I won't be one of those women who turns into a psycho-bitch towards her poor unsuspecting husband.
 
Posted by Tom Day (# 3630) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
As to hormones, current research suggests that they don't drive our behavior as much as we women would like to think. It's our behavior that drives the hormones.

Tom makes mental note of this argument [Biased]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
...one of those women who turns into a psycho-bitch towards her poor unsuspecting husband.

You mean this isn't normal?? [Two face]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tom Day:
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
As to hormones, current research suggests that they don't drive our behavior as much as we women would like to think. It's our behavior that drives the hormones.

Tom makes mental note of this argument [Biased]
[Killing me]

Well get back to me when you're in perimenopause, Flausa! [Biased]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well I have found I have been moody for months now well years on and off with the IVF treatments. I guess though that is a LOT of hormones and also I believe I am particually sensitive. I one had to take a different pill to usual and I actually became so depressed I was suicidal. I finally managed to convince a nurse to change it and wow withing 2 days I was so much better.
I guess I also have chronic depression which is real and is relieved by the anti depressants. I have a wonderful husband who accepts me how I am and sometimes that can be not badly but irritable and moody. I really find it hard to believe in my case the hormones are followed by behaviour as I know I am being unreasonable but really can not help it. Things become worse when I have had a poor nights sleep, a stressful day at work or an emotional incident. Sean jokes I am like a 2 yo who will become irritable and then have a rest and I am much better.
Flausa where is this research? Interested as I always thought it was the other way.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Vikki Pollard:
Well get back to me when you're in perimenopause, Flausa! [Biased]

Well, this isn't really the most appropriate place to get into such a dialogue as it's a support thread for pregnant women. But if we're both still around the ship in 20 odd years, maybe I'll start a thread in Purg (or possibly Hell) in response.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Flausa where is this research? Interested as I always thought it was the other way.

I'll be heading offline shortly for the weekend, but maybe when I get back I'll try to find the info online and start a thread in Purg. As I say to Vikki, a support thread isn't the best thread to have this sort of discussion. I apologize for starting it, but I must admit, I don't like it being implied that my behavior is simply because of hormones. It's an insult to me and my ability to control my own behavior.

As to the Glucose testing. I had my blood drawn yesterday for my 28 week tests, and explained to the midwife at the hospital how I felt like I was being jerked around. She was very understanding; she was concerned at the lack of communication at the health centre; and she said explained to me the differences in the tests. She said she would put it back in the hands of the health centre and make them responsible for taking further action. We also had a very pleasant chat about Florida (as she goes there every Spring), and travel plans. I very much appreciated her as she actually treated my like a reasonable, intelligent adult.
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
That's like saying it's an insult that your head aches if you have a head injury, surely?

Anyway all I was meaning was that hormones demosntrably do affect our behaviour (and personally I found pregnancy easier without the guilt trips from occasional bad days). Just seeing Lucy's mood swings as she's been on various treatments over the last four years is proof of that, as is working with teenagers in any capacity!


In pregnancy, it's important to be kind to yourself, is what I was saying. And to know that some things ARE out of your control. For example, every woman I know would have gladly sat and thought, "Ok, NOW I go into labour!" In fact the timing of labour is dictated by hormones produced by the baby's side of things. Totally out of our control.

However your aim to be Nice to your husband is a good and Christian thing, and I'm sure Alan will support you in it. [Biased]

Glad you've finally found someone who takes you seriously and treats you as an adult. Sadly this has always been a potential failing in the UK system, though there are lots of good guys and gals around too. Have a good break.

Bron, how many weeks are you now?
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
... I very much appreciated her as she actually treated my like a reasonable, intelligent adult.

But when you're pregnant, you're not. Haven't you noticed?!? [Biased]
 
Posted by ebeth (# 4474) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pânts:
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
... I very much appreciated her as she actually treated my like a reasonable, intelligent adult.

But when you're pregnant, you're not. Haven't you noticed?!? [Biased]
Welcome to the treatment of (impending) mothers. Just wait 'til you have an opinion about school [Biased]

All the best to the future Mummies on the thread and congrats to the new ones! It's really nice that you have a forum to share ideas/concerns/and good news.
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Flausa where is this research? Interested as I always thought it was the other way.

I'll be heading offline shortly for the weekend, but maybe when I get back I'll try to find the info online and start a thread in Purg. As I say to Vikki, a support thread isn't the best thread to have this sort of discussion. I apologize for starting it, but I must admit, I don't like it being implied that my behavior is simply because of hormones. It's an insult to me and my ability to control my own behavior.

I

Isnt it better than people thinking youre *really* grouchy selfdefensive/ whatever?
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Ha! They don't know yet how well I can play the game.

Good for you! There is absolutely no need for women to be treated like idiots simply because they are pregnant or a new mother. (Of course some should be treated like idiots, but that is because they are idiots. [Smile] )

Rat, there are people who take a perverse delight in worrying expectant/new parents. They see it as 'a warning of what is to come'. Tis a load of rubbish and is just plain mean. Perhaps you could imagine pushing grapes up their nose and try to work out how long it would take them to notice. [Cool]

Best wishes to all for a safe and smooth pregnancy.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
(Of course some should be treated like idiots, but that is because they are idiots. [Smile]

Thanks
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well had the 20 week scan yesterday. Went to a lot of effort to make sure Sean was there as it was with a specilist dr and the 12 week one was much clearer and the Dr was well um very uncommunacative. I got so nervous I kept saying is it normal is it normal which he said as far as he could see it was. The only thing which gave me any confidence in his ability was he took the lords name in vein when he heard my history.

Oh well dont think I will bother with a second one from him unless my gyne really thinks it is worth it. Also had the Glucose test yesterday. Such a waste of time sitting in a waiting room for two hours. Felt so sick though from not eating and that very sweet drink which made my insulin cells go overboard and my sugar dropped I will be interested to see results but I felt like they were so low. Felt instantly better when I ate after the 2 hours.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
I've been thinking about some stuff since Miss Jane posted, mostly about body image, but also about just... life.

We wanted this pregnancy for years. I know our struggle pales in comparison to some but, still, it was a long time coming. And the Nutter somehow chose to make her appearance at the one time in my life when I actually wasn't looking for any huge changes. I was happy. Happy with my work (or lack therof), happy with the fostering, happy with my home, happy with my marriage, my health, and life in general.

And now, she's changed everything. She hasn't made everything better, or everything worse- but she's certainly made just about everything different.

I lost some things that mattered to me when she made her existence known. My physical fitness goals were shot. The Foster kids moved on. I was 3 fecking pounds short of my next Weight Watcher's magnet... I resented her for some of that. I wonder if I'm alone in that- even in the midst of really enjoying pregnancy, having a little corner of my heart that resents all that I gave up- not just for the 9 months of pregancy, but for the foreseeable future.

But I also think now that I am doubly blessed in the timing of her arrival. 2 years ago I desperately wanted a child, and I was desperately unhappy. I don't know if her little shoulders could bear the weight of that. I had some extra time; I got some things under control in my life, and made myself happier. So now, even though things are forever different, the responsibility for my happiness is still mine- not hers.

I don't know... maybe I'm just going a little loopy from lack of sleep.

And not to get all schmaltzy (oh, but my precious angel is worth everything I've given up...) but expecting and new parents- what have you lost? And what do you do when, even if you're really enjoying what is- you miss what was, or what can now never be?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
You're totally not unusual. I did this too. Sort of like a love/hate relationship with the baby, except you can't bear to THINK of admitting to yourself that you could feel that way.... I suspect it happens to everybody, actually, that is aware enough to notice their lives have changed!

What helped me was getting away from my little Lamb long enough (like an hour or so) to go and do some of my pre-pregnancy things--taking a walk, going to a bookstore (!), seeing a friend. It may seem impossible, but I found that by six months (possibly sooner, can't remember) that I'd adjusted and now couldn't imagine life WITHOUT the Lamblet. But the first few months with a firstborn are damned hard.

Oh, and yes, you probably ARE a bit loopy from lack of sleep--I certainly was. The best thing I ever did was to find someone willing to "babysit" (actually just to sit and hold the baby in her arms) while I went in the other room and slept. No worries about emergencies, or "what ifs"--I was still on the premises, just drowned in sleep. A lifesaver.

Sounds normal to me. But if it really worries you, talk with your doc about possible postnatal depression, which is apparently very common, and can be treated. I'm sure I had it.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Hey Took! Glad to see you still posting here. Am a little hesitant at present to really share any more personal stuff on this thread, thanks to the Advice Squad that inevitably shows up to tell us how it should be done and how you should feel. But I will tell you that you aren't alone in recognizing losses that come with the arrival of the "bundle of joy."

Oh, but the things we gain ... weight, dirty diapers, midnight feedings, toys underfoot ...
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
I remember looking at myself as if from outside myself -- and shaking my head and "tsk tsk tsk"-ing at myself --

Because I actually felt horribly sad and sorry for myself and maybe a little resentful of the first baby, for just a little while.

Everyone and his uncle popped up from Heaven knows where to see the little one. I was just sort of incidental. No one drove out to the hospital to see me.

Didn't quite sink into such depths any other pregnancy. Maybe it was depression, who knows?

Expect the unexpected. Sleep deprivation is a form of torture, you know, and you will go through that.

And I believe the most annoying sound on the face of the Earth is a young baby crying. I mean, annoying as in penetrating, a real attention-grabber. God made it so pitiful and penetrating for a reason -- so we wouldn't sleep when Baby needs us.

If anyone designs an alarm clock that rings with a realistic sound of a baby crying, I want some of the profits, it was my idea first!
 
Posted by marmot (# 479) on :
 
What Tookie said:
quote:
...lost some things that mattered to me when she made her existence known. My physical fitness goals were shot. The Foster kids moved on. I was 3 fecking pounds short of my next Weight Watcher's magnet... I resented her for some of that. I wonder if I'm alone in that- even in the midst of really enjoying pregnancy, having a little corner of my heart that resents all that I gave up- not just for the 9 months of pregancy, but for the foreseeable future.



At the time, I thought I was the only one who felt that way. And I really struggled with it, feeling more like a walking milk machine than a well-educated professional person. I felt like my life was being sucked right out of me.

I suspect every mother comes to terms with her changing identity in a different way. In my case, 17 years later, I can say these things about the changes in my life:

1. Some things are never the same. I mourned some, like career opportunities I missed, and wearing size 4. Some women regain those things; I never did.

2.Some losses became less important over time. I can say that on balance, those compromises, though they seemed huge, were right, and I'm glad I made them.

3. It helped me to remind myself that I was going into child-rearing with all the energy and skill I could muster--a sort of "This is Job 1 until the project is finished." Silly, I know, and not always easy, but it did help me to prioritize.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Things I miss:

1. Being free to drop everything and go out for the evening on a whim.
2. Having enough money for singing lessons.
3. Having six days off from doing the laundry every week.
4. Being a person in my own right and not just Chief Bottle-Washer in someone else's retinue.
5. Watching anything we like on the TV at any time of day (nowadays it's approved children's programmes only until Madam is in bed).
6. Lie-ins.

Things I like:

1. Total strangers (usually, but not exclusively, old ladies) come up to you in the street and admire the baby. Even in Reading.
2. There is now at least one person in the world who I would willingly die for. Even if she is always upstaging me.
3. Postman Pat, Bob the Builder, Brum and Thomas the Tank Engine. And someone lent us the DVD of Trumpton - I'd forgotten how good it was. Without a two-year-old excuse I might never have known...

Jane R
 
Posted by Corpus cani (# 1663) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
And someone lent us the DVD of Trumpton - I'd forgotten how good it was. Without a two-year-old excuse I might never have known...

[Big Grin]
Corpus
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Again breaking the flow of things but I haven't got those feelings which I can identify currently. I really want to know about vitamin K. Are you going to give it to your baby? If so how?

When I was in uni(1994) and did my mid placement I was told Injection was bad due to studies which suggested an increase in cancer. At the time I found an article which discounted this. I spent ages arguing with my supervisor about it as she had not heard of the research.

Now 12 years later the studies are still inconclusive. Some research suggesting a slight increase and others no increase in childhood cancer. I also think it is important as the disease they are trying to prevent is very dangerous making a child bleed to death. NOT here trying to give or get medical advice just want other peoples thoughts.
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
I recall that, Bronwyn. Between my first child (who had the injection) and my second child they started to raise these questions.

I recall my obstetrician saying that the "research" was retrospective and, in his view, flawed. Nevertheless, my second child had the Vitamin K by mouth, rather than injection. There was a much higher chance of bleeding to death (due to treatment not working so well as if injected), than of cancer, so far as anyone could tell, but no-one was giving injections.

By the third child, the research had been fairly well discredited and he had the injection.

I felt much more comfortable having the injections than the other.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Again breaking the flow of things but I haven't got those feelings which I can identify currently. I really want to know about vitamin K. Are you going to give it to your baby? If so how?

Alien had it through injection. Because that seemed the best option!
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Re Vitamin K: we weren't given the option; Little J had the injection. Given a choice between a remote and possibly nonexistent risk of cancer and a small risk of bleeding to death, I'd risk the cancer every time.

Bottle-fed babies don't get the Vitamin K injection in the UK; formula milk is fortified with it, so the injection is not considered necessary.

Jane R
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Thanks for the feedback. I guess I will ultamatly get the injection as well I intend to breastfeed baby, Although as Jane said it would mean I wouldn't have this delemea so much(although in Aust they do recommend children have the Vitamin K if they are bottle feed just looked it up).

Busy week for baby last week with the scan which didn't show much, the glucose tolerance test which means I am diabetes free [Yipee] for the momment.. Dr appt, which showed I have now gone back to my prepregnancy weight, but dr was not concerned anyone who has seen me will know why(I am rather large) and hospital visit.

Was interesting to go to the hospital as a client always find it funny that those you see in the corridor every day and greet do not know you when you do not wear a uniform. Midwife showed me round which was great and also took my history. Was quite extensive interview including the dope I once smoked. Was interesting to note she was keen on the brest feeding idea for me even though some evidence suggest doing so with my anti D might not be a good idea exciting baby. I guess it is not considered safe yet but the gyne and the big womens hospital here suggest it is probably safe and looking at the alternative I guess it is better.

Last few days had a virus with sore throat, tiredness, headace and so on, resting heaps and avoiding tablets when I can. Sean was worried I wasn't. I was more worried as baby decided to have a 28 hour period of very little if any activity I could detect. I kept telling myself he has just moved round I cant feel him and so on but still I was anxious, now back to normal kicking and so on. (phew)
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Hi Bron, glad to hear it's all going well! [Yipee]

We had the same concerns over the vitamin K and the MMR but went ahead with both in the end. I'm not sure I'd be opting for the 25 or so vaccinations mooted these days in the UK - does it never end?!

Lucy never really moved much during pregnancy. So I thought. When she was born we realised she was just not very big and therefore not that noticeable. I'd feel wriggles now and again but not the mighty jolts I'd had from Holly, who objected to ne resting a mug on my belly during Bible Study and kicked it onto the floor... [Killing me]

I've always thought the trick to new parenthood is to realise that there is no going back to how it was before. You are not that person. I think this is the trigger for a lot of depression. As somebody said, be open to seeing the GP, be honest with the Health Visitor (mine were marvellous) and ask for what you need from people.

I didn't get time on my own for about four years after the babies were born (I mean literally) and I certainly regard it as one of the most stupid things I ever did in my life.

But you're right, they ARE worth it.

I have to say that now they're bigger than me. [Biased]
 
Posted by ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Hello mums-to-be,

I hope you don't mind me butting into your thread to ask advice. A colleague of mine is going on maternity leave at the end of next week (the baby is due at the beginning of June) and we're pondering on what to buy her.

Should we get something treaty for her (my preferred option, but I've no idea what would constitute a nice treat), something for the baby, something generic (like a photo frame) or perhaps just some vouchers (which would probably be most helpful).

We've got about £40, so if there's anything lovely you'd like bought for you if you were in her position, what would it be?
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Hotel Chocolat do chocolatey gifts for new parents: see here for details.

Some friends of ours bought us the crate the Christmas after Baby was born. Daddy and I enjoyed the chocolate, and she still has the bib.

If you buy clothes for the baby, you might want to consider getting a larger size; most people buy the newborn size or 0-3 months, failing to realise that the baby will continue to exist and require clothes after this period. My work colleagues got me a set of 3 baby-gros for 6-9 months, a toy suitable for a newborn baby and some posh talc and bubble bath for myself. All were acceptable and the baby-gros were still in use long after the other new baby gifts had been used up or passed on.

If money is tight, your colleague might prefer to have vouchers so she can choose what she wants.

HTH,

Jane R
 
Posted by ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
I love the Hotel Chocolat crate and I've bought it for a couple of people - but she's a bit funny about chocolate so that's off the radar.

Re: receiving baby clothes before the birth - is that the 'done' thing? My Mum always brought me up believing that baby clothes (of the older age ranges) were great presents, but only after Mum & baby were safe after birth. But I think I realised at work today that this isn't necessarily a normal attitude to have (though it has, unfortunately, served me well in a couple of cases [Frown] )
 
Posted by Eanswyth (# 3363) on :
 
ACK! My godson isn't due until March 19 and he has decided not to wait. He's coming today! Please pray for a safe delivery and healthy baby and mom.

Eanswyth
Bobby's nervous godmother
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ferijen:
We've got about £40, so if there's anything lovely you'd like bought for you if you were in her position, what would it be?

Personally, I'd want stuff for the baby not for myself, as I really don't do fru-fru that much. One of the best things we've received so far was gift vouchers to Mothercare (thank you, thank you, thank you Jackie) and to my favourite store back home, because it meant we could buy stuff for the baby or for me.

There's nothing wrong with asking her for ideas either. That way if you do purchase an item, then you'll be assured it's something that she wants, not that will be regifted or put in the attic.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Oh, and it's not butting in if you're asking us for advice, it's only butting in if you're giving us unsolicited or unwanted advice. [Biased]

[Votive] Prayer for E's little Bobby.
 
Posted by Eanswyth (# 3363) on :
 
Thanks be to God! I am pleased to announce the birth of Robert Lawrence at 9:20 today. Parents and child are doing very well.
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Congratulations Eanswyth. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
That's lovely news, Eanswyth! [Smile] [Axe murder]
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ferijen:
Re: receiving baby clothes before the birth - is that the 'done' thing? My Mum always brought me up believing that baby clothes (of the older age ranges) were great presents, but only after Mum & baby were safe after birth. But I think I realised at work today that this isn't necessarily a normal attitude to have (though it has, unfortunately, served me well in a couple of cases [Frown] )

My mother thought her neighbours were mad for wanting her to keep the pram before they came back from hospital with the baby - but if it was me, I think I'd rather not have things at home to remind me of the baby that didn't come home. I have heard of people having friends or relatives nip round to the house to remove baby goods but that would not necessarily be an ideal situation.
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
Also wanted to say - I'm going to probably have a new niece in April, but it may be a new nephew (ultrasound not being 100% when it comes to saying it's definitely a girl!) and, given the ultra gender-defined nature of even babies' clothes these days, I'm not making or buying any clothes until I see the whites of her (or his) eyes, or at the very least get an email or phone call to confirm!
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
I think it's difficult. We weren't aware of (or had forgotten) the thing about not having baby stuff in the house. I can see the practical sense in it.

However, once we had the pram and cot and baby clothes in the house, I do not think it was helpful for several people to hiss in tones of doom 'OMG, you haven't brought the pram into the house have you?'. I'm not at my most rational at the moment, and even while trying to dismiss it as a silly supersition I honestly spent a couple of days quite distressed at the implication that we've 'jinxed' the baby.

I think for a pre-birth present I'd avoid stuff for the baby just in case, unless the person specifically asks for it. A bunch of friends from where I used to live came down this weekend and they brought me a 'pampering set' of body and bath products because they thought I might be feeling unpampered and ungirly. Which - even though the products aren't really the kind of things I'd use - I thought was quite touching.
 
Posted by Dee-nz (# 5681) on :
 
quote:
Thanks be to God! I am pleased to announce the birth of Robert Lawrence at 9:20 today. Parents and child are doing very well.

Hooray [Axe murder] [Axe murder] congrats on the new squeaker
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
If you buy clothes for the baby, you might want to consider getting a larger size; most people buy the newborn size or 0-3 months, failing to realise that the baby will continue to exist and require clothes after this period.

If you choose this option, remember to think what time of year it will be when the baby wears the items. A snowsuit for a 6 month old is probably not the best gift for a baby born at Christmas in the northern hemisphere.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
AND keep in mind that lots of them wear the six month size when they're three months, or nine months, or.... In other words, if you really want to play it safe, pick something that can be worn whatever the weather. Like socks....
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
If you want to gift Mom, I've been absolutely living in fleece 2-piece pjs with easy-nursing-access front buttons.

I only have two pair, and they get spit up on a lot. I do a lot of laundry in order to have clean jammies. Hard to spend that kind of money on jammies, though.

Some things, it's really nice to have the 'good' version: carrier/slings, diaper pails, monitors, or bouncers come to mind. Are baby gift registries another crass North American anomaly? They're a good way to make sure that kind of stuff doesn't get duplicated. Failing that, you're left with blatant gift-planning with mom, or stealthy phone calls to the dad.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
well I personally think I would rather have things ready. I know there is a chance I may come home without baby or I may not come home but I personally would hate the thought of not knowing if I have had the right equipment and I have been buying it over several months(oh nappies on special I will buy, singlets and so on) Almost have everything we need except a few extras, I would really like a baby monitor but will suggest it to a person wanting to offer a gift for example.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
In other words, if you really want to play it safe, pick something that can be worn whatever the weather. Like socks....

Just thought of something else that we found very useful, the little baby vest with poppers underneath. They were good for summer and winter wear. In the summer it was practically all my babies wore, in the winter it was one of the layers to keep them warm.

Babygros were also very useful as they could be used as pjs, or daywear. It was so handy having a stack of them for the days when 4 changes of clothing might be needed.

12 years ago the advice given was to be careful with babygros with feet and to make sure that the baby's feet had plenty of wiggle room. Some people cut the feet off the baby grows so their baby could not have sqwished feet.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Babygros are very useful. Little J spent about the first six weeks in babygros or vests (depending how hot it was), because I didn't have the energy to worry about putting her into daytime clothes. She didn't care as long as she was clean and dry (and well-fed).

I can understand people who don't want baby things in the house before the baby is born, but we got everything ready beforehand on the grounds that waiting until she was born to get things would make life unnecessarily difficult. As it was, we spent the first week or so making emergency trips to the shops for things we hadn't thought we would need.

[Actually, it never occurred to us that having baby things in the house in advance of the baby was tempting fate. There were so many things that could have gone wrong anyway we were fully occupied worrying about those].

Jane R
 
Posted by ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Thanks for the ideas. I still prefer the vouchers idea, but I may just ask her!

Regarding the baby stuff in the house - the tradition I was aware of, for what it's worth, was that it was normal, indeed, necessary, for the parents to do the preparation they'd need (clothes, nappies, preparing a nursery, pram, etc. etc. etc.), but for baby gifts to be presented to the baby when they were both safe and well.

When my colleague's baby is born, I full expect to do a mothercare shop - but then, I love buying baby clothes anyway!

(Incidentally, a friend of mine told me 'you can never have enough babygros or bibs', so my present buying tends to focus on this)

[ 08. March 2006, 09:14: Message edited by: ferijen ]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
We're almost fully stocked up here preparing for the Wee Wan, including jeans, onesies, vests, sleepers, stroller, car seat, and a portable playpen, thanks to the generosity of friends and family. I've even gone ahead and purchased terry nappies, because it's one less thing for me now to worry about.

The clothing (in a variety of sizes) was purchased mostly in the States, where there are a whole ton of neutral colour options - lovely yellows, greens, and tans (with a few outfits that have yellow, green, pink, and blue). We did get one blue sleeper from my sister, because it has a penguin on the front and she loves penguins. Someone said, "but it's blue! What happens if the baby's a girl?" I rolled my eyes and said, "well then, duh, she'll wear blue."

I think there does tend to be a different approach to buying baby stuff in the States versus over here (prior to this thread, I'd never heard about the superstition with bringing a pram in the house before baby was born). In the States, frequently there will be baby showers before the baby is born so the family will be as prepared as possible for the arrival. I've found that the "gift shakedown," as I think Sine phrased it on another thread, over here tends to occur after the birth at the Christening or baptism or baby dedication (depending on the liturgical flavour). Just a cultural difference - I don't think either is necessarily a better or worse approach. Things purchased before birth tend to be geared to the early months whereas gifts purchased after the birth tend to be geared to the later months. One would hope that in any case the gifts would be a benefit to the family receiving them.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ferijen:
I love buying baby clothes anyway!

Don't I know it! I went to a christening for a friend's little girl this weekend and had to slap myself in order to keep my spending to a set limit.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
[In reply to Flausa]

Quite a lot of the clothes my sister gave us were blue; her youngest is a boy. What really got me was that our girl was frequently mistaken for a boy even when she was wearing pink. On one occasion, she was described as 'a beautiful little boy' when wearing a frilly white dress.

I came to the conclusion that some people just assume babies are boys until told otherwise [Mad] So I gave up worrying about dressing her in blue. Her favourite tops at the moment are two navy and red ones with pictures of Brum on the front, handed down from her youngest male cousin who also likes Brum. Probably everyone thinks she's a boy when she wears those, in spite of the embroidered flowers on her jeans.

Jane R
 
Posted by Mathmo (# 5837) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
... make sure that the baby's feet had plenty of wiggle room. Some people cut the feet off the baby grows so their baby could not have sqwished feet.

[Eek!] I had to read this again to make sure I wasn't reading what I thought I was reading... but no-one's cutting their baby's feet off, so that's OK. [Hot and Hormonal]

I have a number of friends who are expecting in the next few months, and I was just beginning to think about what to get for them - excellent timing!
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
I have made a list, but now I am a bit embarrassed about actually giving it to anyone - I mean, what if they weren't planning to give Beeb a present??

I'm more than 38 weeks now so into the any-day-now period, which does make it quite hard to think about anything else except Beeb.
 
Posted by MaryFL (# 7482) on :
 
When I make baby clothes, I usually go with green or yellow. I recently shipped some to a cousin of mine who was expecting and learned a few days before shipping it that it was a girl. I shipped the yellow layette anyway, and my cousin remarked that the color choice was excellent because she doesn't care for pink anyway. Phew. [Smile]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Well, we got one more major purchase out of the way today. I was perusing the free local newspaper (as is my habit on my Wednesdays off), and found an ad for a Mothercare cot with mattress for £14 (we just looked at the identical cot on Saturday in the store for £60 plus at least £30 for a mattress). We just went to look at it, and it's in really good nick, so we'll just give it a wipe down, disinfect and air the mattress (though it looks really good), and re-assemble it in a month or so. Very happy to find such a cracking bargain! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Grits (# 4169) on :
 
Fabulous, Flausa. I just love a good deal, and I have fond memories of taking that secondhand crib and making it mine.
 
Posted by Michèle (# 1401) on :
 
Hello everyone, congratulations to all the new babies' parents and the mums and dads to be.

On the subject of Vitamin K

quote:
Now 12 years later the studies are still inconclusive. Some research suggesting a slight increase and others no increase in childhood cancer. I also think it is important as the disease they are trying to prevent is very dangerous making a child bleed to death. NOT here trying to give or get medical advice just want other peoples thoughts. Bronwyn
Well, I did a 2nd year essay on the topic (actually a triple assignment including a viva Bron) last year, and here's an extract on the up to date information for you:

More contemporary and reassuring evidence is now available from a large national study by the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study, which incorporated updated pooled analysis for 7017 children, 1174 with leukaemia (Fear et al 2003). Fear et al (2003) found that there were no associations between intramuscular Vitamin K and any diagnostic group, and concluded that the most likely explanation of the previous study by Parker et al (1998), in the light of all evidence, could be explained by chance.

If you'd like me to email the whole essay with the references I'm happy to do so. (Have you got access to your hospital library?)

In addition, suggest you download the MIDIRS Informed Choice leaflets – Bron read the professional and parent versions. Indeed, there are a wide variety of leaflets available to download, which I recommend to any of you pregnant ladies.
MIDIRS Informed Choice leaflets, bookmark this site!!!!!

quote:
Bottle-fed babies don't get the Vitamin K injection in the UK; formula milk is fortified with it, so the injection is not considered necessary Jane R
Actually, that’s not true at all! Artificially-fed babies do get Vit K, because it might be an incentive not to breast-feed! It’s standard practice in the UK for all neonates to have Vit K. Anyone having had an instrumental delivery or pre-term definitely needs it. However, it is very questionable whether all babies need it. How can the Paeds know which babies are at risk though?

For a different slant on the matter (interesting article on physiology and nature, and maybe there’s a reason that babies have low Vit K stores.. read Sarah Wickham. here for an alternative perspective

Orakay is the oral vit K in the UK, and is unlicensed. The problem with it, is that it has to be given several times, over several weeks, and there’s the issue with absorption should it be vomited out! Some women are worried about the thought of giving their new baby an injection. Well, you can always breastfeed them at the time, which will give immediate comfort. And obviously, they’ll be having the first vaccs at 2 months’ anyway.

On matresses

Um, well. Glad you got a bargain, excellent value for the cot. You might just like to check this out though (obviously, I can't see the mattress and am just offering you the information.)
Reusing mattress (Scottish study)

here's the BMJ links..

hope this helps a bit

with love to all m x [Smile]

[ 08. March 2006, 18:17: Message edited by: Michèle ]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Michèle:
Um, well. Glad you got a bargain, excellent value for the cot. You might just like to check this out though (obviously, I can't see the mattress and am just offering you the information.)

Actually, I am well aware of some of the concerns around used mattresses (having worked in child protection and studied child development), but even the article you linked to states that there MAY BE a correlation, but it isn't a cause and effect.

Again, as I've alluded to several times on the thread, I really don't appreciate unsolicited advice that treats me as if I don't understand the choices that I'm making.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Michele said:
quote:
Actually, that’s not true at all! Artificially-fed babies do get Vit K, because it might be an incentive not to breast-feed! It’s standard practice in the UK for all neonates to have Vit K. Anyone having had an instrumental delivery or pre-term definitely needs it. However, it is very questionable whether all babies need it. How can the Paeds know which babies are at risk though?

Well, I must have been imagining it when the health visitor said 'your baby doesn't need the vitamin K booster because she's getting half formula milk', then.

Jane R
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:

Again, as I've alluded to several times on the thread, I really don't appreciate unsolicited advice that treats me as if I don't understand the choices that I'm making.

to be fair - thats hardly what she was doing.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
The most useful thing anyone got me was a huge stack of plain, thick washcloths. We used them for spit rags, we used them for spills, we used them for bibs, we used them (surprise) for washcloths. Since Little Lamb was a preemie, we even used them for blankets (a perfect fit from neck to toes).

now that he's almost five, we're using them for spaghetti mops (you know, informal meals at home where something messy is served and a cloth napkin shouldn't be sacrificed.

ETA: of course, I'm trying to con you all into thinking that we use cloth napkins on a regular basis. Sine especially. What would he think of my forks!

[ 08. March 2006, 22:31: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
The most useful thing anyone got me was a huge stack of plain, thick washcloths. We used them for spit rags, we used them for spills, we used them for bibs, we used them (surprise) for washcloths.

Other day in K mart a department store cheap like woolworths in UK they were selling washcloths plain on clearance for 70c each (about 50 US cents or 30 pennys at a guess)Only had 4, but they went to a good home, for spills and so on will keep looking for more.

Also intend to buy a different set for bottom wipes to wash with the nappies. Just thought we have a few old towels...might cut them up into a suitable size and use them...blanket stich around the othside...or just buy some material...
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Bron, do what my sister did and go to one of those cheap places that sells cheap and nasty manchester, where you should be able to buy about 50 for $5.

They probably won't be white, but since they'll be wiping poo from your baby's bum, colour hardly matters.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Good thinking!!!! I will go shopping in cheap and nasty...but still have really taken to the idea of using old towels too... gives me an excuse to buy a few new ones [Smile] Hey wiping poo who cares about the color. (would I really need 50? [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
(would I really need 50? [Ultra confused]

Well, buy 20. You may be the world's greatest washer-woman now, but you will soon tire of it.

My sister (being soooooo sensible) bought 25 of one colour and 25 of another. One colour was for bums and the other for faces.

Worked a treat.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
Michele said:
quote:
Actually, that’s not true at all! Artificially-fed babies do get Vit K, because it might be an incentive not to breast-feed! It’s standard practice in the UK for all neonates to have Vit K. Anyone having had an instrumental delivery or pre-term definitely needs it. However, it is very questionable whether all babies need it. How can the Paeds know which babies are at risk though?

Well, I must have been imagining it when the health visitor said 'your baby doesn't need the vitamin K booster because she's getting half formula milk', then.

Jane R

Did your baby have oral Vit K at birth? If so, 3 doses are usually given (birth, then boosters at one week and six weeks) if the baby is exclusively breastfed. If the baby is having more than about a bottle a day of formula milk, the one week and six week doses aren't given as the Vit K is in the formula (although again practice seems to vary - I quite often would visit a new family at 10-14 days and find that the midwife had administered the one week booster even though the baby was having a bit of formula). But at the moment in the UK all babies will be given Vit K at birth, unless parents explicitly do not consent to it, regardless of the feeding method the parents intend to go with.

If the baby is given the intramuscular injection at birth, then that's all they get regardless of whether or not they're breast or formula-fed - it's a bigger dose delivered all in one go and no more is required.

It depends on the hospital which route is administered. Where I used to work most recently the standard practice was oral Vit K, so us health visitors had to be on the ball to make sure that we knew who was fully breastfeeding to make sure their babies got their booster doses. But when I first qualified and worked near another local hospital where most of our mums delivered, their standard practice was to give Vit K injection unless oral was requested. These hospitals were only a few miles apart, so it seemed that the jury was out on the best method and they just went with the preference of their heads of paeds/obstetrics.

[ 09. March 2006, 06:52: Message edited by: Jack the Lass ]
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:

Also intend to buy a different set for bottom wipes to wash with the nappies. Just thought we have a few old towels...might cut them up into a suitable size and use them...blanket stich around the othside...or just buy some material...

I got some small squares of cloths off e bay. I think there were 20 in all, but we haven't used them all. We accumilated some terry toweling nappies, which are used for wiping up sick, putting Matthew on when changing him on changing mat and when we're out and about. The nappies we actually use are like tot bots, but a different make. Have you thought about the type of nappies you would like to use?

On the Vit K thing - we were given 6 little shots to give to the baby, one a week, since I was breast feeding him. When we switched to formula, we were told to stop giving him the drops.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Annie P:
We accumilated some terry toweling nappies, which are used for wiping up sick, putting Matthew on when changing him on changing mat and when we're out and about.

I wanted to use the shaped nappies for my children, but my Mam bought two packs of terry nappy squares.

I tried really hard to use them, and found them too difficult to use. I knew I had to wash them before use, but no one thought to mention that if I washed them about 10 times it would be so much easier to get nappy pins through the fabric. I also couldn't get the nappy to have a close enough fit for it to catch what it was meant to catch.

We started using the nappies for moping up sick etc. Then when the children were older I needed some hand towels for the kitchen. I dyed one pack navy, and the other bottle green, and those squares of terry have been hand towels since then. So far no one has guess what their former live was meant to be. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
I want to use the squares and have 10 terry toweling ones currently. I also have two packs of a dozen flannellette ones but they cant be used with the 'snappy' but the terry towling can not be used under 6 weeks(apparently) Also I have more comming second hand now sure which type. I can not get my head around the shapped ones and all but like the flat ones.
Now looking for non plastic outside coverings at a reasonable price(wool or fleece or other not sure which, haven't seen them in the shop much or at all.
Looked into cupboard to get the old towel and Sean reminded me I had given them to him for the brewery!!!! I was looking forward to sewing...I find hand sewing relaxing, oh well I will buy the cheap ones.

I will wash all nappies at least 3 times as instructed to help with the putting pins through them.
Vitamin K issue still in my mind and to be honnest I am thinking oral is the best way. I know injection is slightly more effective but has a slight risk. Interesting to see the different proticols around the world.

I am not the best washer woman actually I havent washed for 2 weeks currently but there is a reason...our washing machine has broken down again and the repair man is taking forever to come. (tomorrow he says but I don't trust him) I would call someone else but the same problem happened a month ago. I was told there was a death in his family hence he took time off. Being that the worst car accident happened just up the road and got national and some international coverage(6 teens killled) I let it ride.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Jack the Lass said:
quote:
Did your baby have oral Vit K at birth? If so, 3 doses are usually given (birth, then boosters at one week and six weeks) if the baby is exclusively breastfed.
No, she was being breastfed exclusively then. She had the injection. By 6 weeks she was on half-and-half combination feeding and the health visitor said she didn't need the booster.

I've calmed down a bit since last night, but after rereading Michele's post I still think it was patronising, to both me and Flausa.

Bron, these may be too expensive where you are, but we bought 18 muslin squares (actually intended as nappy linings, I think) to use as comfort blankets. They were very useful; we put them over our shoulders when we were burping her to catch the fallout, used them to mop up sick and wipe her face when it was dirty... all sorts of things (not for the rear end, though). As well as all of those uses, she liked cuddling up to her blanket when she was feeling insecure or upset. She still takes it everywhere with her, and the big advantage of Blanket (unlike a favourite teddy bear) is that if it gets dirty or (horror of horrors) lost, you can just give her another one. I like LATA's idea of colour-coded wipes for different ends; wish we'd thought of it.

On saving money: my sister cut up old sheets and blankets and hemmed them to make cot bedding, rather than buying new stuff. They were still serviceable when she gave them to me for Little J. You can get two cot sheets or four crib sheets out of a full-sized single sheet. You will need far more sheets and blankets than you expect; at least four lots of sheets and preferably six, to allow for accidents (you can probably get away with 4 blankets, because you won't need all of them on the bed at once in Australia).

Jane R
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Forgot to mention another use for towelling nappies: my sister gave me some of the square ones that we used as towels when she was tiny. When she was very small we used three or four towels for each bathtime; we had some of the hooded ones which were nice for wrapping her in after she came out, but the ex-nappy towelling squares were very useful for drying all the nooks and crannies. After the first time she weed before her nappy went back on, we usually had one as extra protection for our knees under that end...

HTH,

Jane R
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
Jack the Lass said:
quote:
Did your baby have oral Vit K at birth? If so, 3 doses are usually given (birth, then boosters at one week and six weeks) if the baby is exclusively breastfed.
No, she was being breastfed exclusively then. She had the injection. By 6 weeks she was on half-and-half combination feeding and the health visitor said she didn't need the booster.
Interesting - my understanding was that if she'd had the injection she wouldn't need a booster full-stop, nothing to do with the feeding method, as the initial dose was all that was required - I'm surprised that feeding was mentioned as a reason. It's really interesting to see that even within the UK there are so many different variations in practice with Vit K - I'd never heard of the one-a-week-for-six-weeks either, I guess it's down to each individual hospital/community trust which they recommend.

I'm trying really hard to not jump in on this thread - sometimes professional knowledge is a hindrance rather than a help, and I don't want to come across as patronising or knowing-it-all (note to all: I am not the fount of all knowledge. You heard it here first [Big Grin] ). I found it quite a hard line to tread, but basically tried to see part of my job as a health visitor as helping families steer a course between the various, often conflicting, advice that they would receive from all quarters. You'll already have found that everybody and his wife has an opinion on pregnancy, birth and child-rearing, but at the end of the day you have to make the decision you feel is best for you and your child.

Re: different coloured wipes for each end - I still do that for me, and I'm 36 [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Now looking for non plastic outside coverings at a reasonable price(wool or fleece or other not sure which, haven't seen them in the shop much or at all.

I saw these earlier today in a UK on-line store, and was trying to find some in Australia when I came across a rather 'interesting' product,
Belly casting kit. [Big Grin] "A pregnancy belly cast is a plaster cast made of an expecting mom's beautiful pregnant form."

Baby BeeHinds has a range of wraps and nappy covers. I know someone who has a pattern for a knitted nappy cover. If you are interested let me know.

{Edited to fix codes.}

[ 10. March 2006, 11:40: Message edited by: Grits ]
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
I want to use the squares and have 10 terry toweling ones currently. <snip>
Now looking for non plastic outside coverings at a reasonable price(wool or fleece or other not sure which, haven't seen them in the shop much or at all. <snip>

I used folded cloth (terry and flanalette) squares (back in the dark ages they didn't make all the cute alternatives that are around today [Biased] ). As outer coverings I did have some proper flannel pilchers, but actually found that after the first couple of months I wanted something a bit 'snugger'. I discovered that some of the pants sold as training pants for toddlers, made of furry acrylic stuff or terry towelling, worked very well. They did one tour of duty as over-nappy pants, then came back for another tour of duty a couple of years later as training pants. Cheap, and effective.
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
On the subject of real nappies, I thought I might use terries, since that's what I was brought up on, but when I investgated further, and purchased some of the shaped towelling nappies (you use these in conjunction with a waterproof outer) which fasten up with velcro, I was sold.

I would highly recommend that you look at the nappylady web site for more information. They have a questionnaire that you can fill in, to help you find out which type of nappy you would be best to buy. Has tonnes of good advice.

We went for Little Lambs in the end. A shaped towelling nappy which uses either a disposable or fleece liner, does up with velcro and has a breathable waterproof wrap which you put over the top (like the plastic pants you can get for terries) - much better. I can give you the website address if you want (don't want to be done for advertising!) and also some other info about where to find "wraps".

The shaped towelling nappies are elasticated - catching all the stuff and the velcro means you have no faffing about with pins, while the wraps are not plasic, so baby's bottom is kept cooler and dryer.

You can get nappy nippers - which are an alternative to pins for terries. I would strongly recommend using fleece liners, as they are lovely and soft against baby's skin and do an exellent job of letting wee go through and keeping bottoms dry.

Sorry - could waffle on about real nappies all day. Don't get me started on how to wash them and the debate between dry pailing and cold sanitizing! [Roll Eyes] [Help]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Ok, so now I’m interested. Just because I’ve been thinking about it from some of the posts here, I was wondering why people post on this thread.

I certainly started posting on it when I was preggers cos I wanted to see what other people thought about certain things (both pregnant people, and those with experience of pregnancy (or even not!)), some of whom are people who I feel I know and respect, even though I only know them online.

That doesn’t mean to say I didn’t read lots of other ‘advice’ and talk to lots of other people IRL, both medical people and friends. If I came across things on the thread that I didn’t agree with or didn’t want to know about or hear, I just ignored them, knowing that in pregnancy and with children, everyone does things differently. Although that was how I viewed most of the ‘advice’ I was given both IRL and online – as part of a bigger picture where everyone does things differently.

(And before comments are made, yes this is in response to Flausa, but not as a criticism, but merely because I’m interested to know generally why people post here.)
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Grits:
Fabulous, Flausa. I just love a good deal, and I have fond memories of taking that secondhand crib and making it mine.

Grits, I realised just how much of a kick I get out of finding good bargains, so I've started a thread about it. Care to join me to tell me about some of your other good finds?
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
Free to a good home!

No, not baby birdie - one of these!

We were given this 'prenatal heart listener' when I was pregnant with baby b, and now would like to send it on to someone else who would enjoy it. The link above shows the nearest I can find to what we have but I don't think it's exactly the same.

Anyway if you'd like it or want to know any more, pm me. I'd rather just post to the UK, as I don't know how expensive it will be to post overseas.

A word of warning, though!
I'd say this isn't for you if you're likely to panic if you find it hard to find baby's heartbeat. We managed it precisely once in the pregnancy! (And that was mainly because I'd been to the midwife and she'd told me what position he was in, and I rushed home and did it then, knowing where to listen...) It was nice for mr b to hear it though, as he wasn't able to come to many of my midwife's appointments with me.

cheers
b
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Oh dear. They think the baby might be breech. [Frown]

I've to go back next week so the midwife can have another check and see if it has turned itself right way up. If not, I'll have to go for a scan and then they'll try to turn it. Which - if it's anything like as uncomfortable as what the midwife was doing to me this afternoon - doesn't sound like a barrel of laughs.

So turn yourself, little baby, turn!
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
(((Rat))) I shall be praying that the little one decides to do some swimming laps this week and ends up in the right direction. [Votive]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Very kind of you birdie to offer this. Looked it up and your warning and decided I would be a panic person, although I grabbed a stecoscpe from work and heard baby the other day when I was worried(not a heartbeat but movement). Guess I can do that when ever I want.

Rat hugs and prayers.
 
Posted by Luisa (# 7761) on :
 
When I had my latest baby, in Perth they gave him the vit K injection and as it is so effective they didnt need to give him any boosters. The medical staff dont like giving babies vit k orally here as test have shown that its not as effective as quickly as the injection and also giving it orally can sometimes need 4 booster doses.

On the nappy debate I used terry nappies when at home and disposable whilst out and about as i didnt want to be carrying around wet terry nappies. With regards to covers Target sell some fleece covers for a reasonable price, though they do have a small strip of plastic in the crotch area this is easily removed. The best website i have found for folds of terry nappies is Nappy Folds . Hope this helps.

[ 17. March 2006, 01:55: Message edited by: Luisa ]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
quote:
I grabbed a stecoscpe from work and heard baby the other day when I was worried (not a heartbeat but movement). Guess I can do that when ever I want.

Bronwyn, since you posted this, I've had this mental picture of you at work. All the doctors, nurses, and patients are running around in panic and frenzy, but you are the epitome of serenity as you stroll down the halls smiling contentedly listening to your little one through your stethoscope. [Cool]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
I've to go back next week so the midwife can have another check and see if it has turned itself right way up. If not, I'll have to go for a scan and then they'll try to turn it.

Anyone know when this sort of procedure is done these days?

When I was last pregnant (9 years ago) they didn't do turning until a week or two before the due date. Their reasoning was that most babies turned quite naturally by week 37.

It is amazing how much changes in just a few years. I saw a 3-D image scan the other day, and you could see the baby's face and spot family resemblences. Amazing, totally amazing.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
I've to go back next week so the midwife can have another check and see if it has turned itself right way up. If not, I'll have to go for a scan and then they'll try to turn it.

Anyone know when this sort of procedure is done these days?

When I was last pregnant (9 years ago) they didn't do turning until a week or two before the due date. Their reasoning was that most babies turned quite naturally by week 37.

It doesn't sound like they've changed. Next week will be week 37. If the midwife decides a scan, etc, is necessary it'll need a hospital appointment, so I assume that'll take a few days to arrange - so we'll be into week 38 before they try the turning, quite likely.

So the timescales sound much the same.

At the moment I've been advised to spend lots of time on my hands and knees, or kneeling with my bottom higher than my head! Apparently this encourages the baby to orient itself properly and also discourages it from engaging its bottom where its head should be. If the bottom has already engaged it won't be possible to turn it.

All very dignified [Biased]
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
I remember being told at ante-natal classes that getting down on your hands and knees and scrubbing the kitchen floor was the best position to get the baby to settle down where it should be. By week 37 this is a bit tricky though.

b

[Top of the page, typical.]

[ 17. March 2006, 09:48: Message edited by: birdie ]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
[Big Grin] I imagine that getting down on your hands and knees wouldn't be as bad as trying to get up afterwards!

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well I pwesonally can not imagine getting down onto the floor at 37 weeks. Now I am finding it hard to get out of the bath, and up off the floor. I am only 23 weeks. I find it painful to get up again. I guess my weight prepregnancy has contributed to this but this pregnancy makes me so tired. All the books say I should be dancing around. Only in the last few days(conveniently while we were away) have my clothes all shrunk and I have had to go and look for alternatives. I actually look and feel bigger too.

Flausa I found a quiet moment in a quiet room to listen to the heartbeat, still last couple of weeks have been really emotional and tearful too, hopefully this phase will stop soon, hard for my colluges and Sean.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
Next week will be week 37.

I tried to work out what week you would be in by looking at some of your older posts. I had thought that you were about 34 weeks, hence the question.

quote:
All very dignified [Biased]
Oooh yes! Dignity becomes a very rare gem.

A friend recommended another position to get the pelvis above the head, lying on the sofa with legs hooked over the back and head dangling off the front of the seat. How she imagined a pregnant woman could get into that position, never mind get out of it, I have no idea.

I have pretty dodgy joints, and the hormones released in pregnany were likely to make them worse. It was not known if I would be able to carry a baby to full term. Before I became pregnant my GP sent me to see a specialist in my particular joint condition. It is rather nice being able to tell people that I was sent to see Professor Nookie to see if I could have a baby.

Nookie is a colloquial term for sex. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Well I pwesonally can not imagine getting down onto the floor at 37 weeks. Now I am finding it hard to get out of the bath, and up off the floor. I am only 23 weeks. I find it painful to get up again. I guess my weight prepregnancy has contributed to this but this pregnancy makes me so tired. All the books say I should be dancing around. Only in the last few days(conveniently while we were away) have my clothes all shrunk and I have had to go and look for alternatives. I actually look and feel bigger too.


Bron, I'm pretty sure the books are wrong! I felt tired, irritable, tearful and generally misterable throughout pregnancy. I'm sure there are women who enjoy the process, but I can't say I was one of them! I was pleased to be pregnant for the first few minutes, but after that it was downhill all the way! Motherhood, in contrast, has been a great pleasure, which at least is a convenient way round when you think of the duration of both conditions!
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Had check-up today and everything's A-Ok. The midwife's office called me before my appointment to say they had my 28-week bloods back (4 weeks later!) and sugar was a little high so they wanted me to take another GTT. I spoke to the doctor and she said not to worry about it as my urine was clean today, my previous two urines have been clean, my last GTT was normal, my blood pressure's good, and baby's heartbeat is good. So I intend to cancel this GTT tomorrow and tell these silly people to stop mucking about with me.

From here on out I alternate seeing midwife and GP every two weeks. As if I didn't dislike going to the doctor enough already ...

Oh, and I've only put on 1 kilo in the last five weeks, for a total of 4 kilos during the whole pregnancy - whoo hoo! [Yipee]

[ 21. March 2006, 17:03: Message edited by: Flausa ]
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Had check-up today and everything's A-Ok.

Good stuff, Flausa, glad to hear everything is going well.

I was back at the midwife today, and she still can't be sure how the baby is lying, so I've to go into hospital tomorrow for a scan to be sure. Oh well, what will be will be I suppose - even if it comes to a c-section, that won't be the end of the world. (I wonder if I could convince them to do a wee bit of liposuction at the same time? [Smile] )

Everything else seems to be OK, though, the heartbeat is good, no problems with my urine or blood pressure, no swollen ankles or anything.

Bron: I agree with Moth, I haven't found pregancy to be a particularly pleasant process either, and have often been tired, grumpy and fed up with the whole thing at times when the internet said I should be energetic or contented. If you're in discomfort too, that won't help.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:

I was back at the midwife today, and she still can't be sure how the baby is lying, so I've to go into hospital tomorrow for a scan to be sure.

We had the scan this morning and it looks like the baby is right way up after all. It just seems to have a particularly prominent bottom, while its head is tucked away neatly, which made it hard for the midwife to tell manually which was which. Apparently it is looking fine and in a hopeful position for a normal birth.

It was sucking it's thumb!!

We couldn't see if it is a boy or a girl, but we weren't too bothered about that.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
[Axe murder] yes. Glad Rat. [Yipee] [Yipee]

I guess I am resigned to a ceasor but a natural birth is a lovely thing. So pleased.

This week had a very hard time at work and have been really depressed, comming home crying, poor sleep. I seem to not be able to do anything about it but I do know the boss is aware and frustrated by it too and has been supportive. It isn't only me either. Being on the lower dose of anti depressant hasn't helped. I just do not want to harm our baby by taking more. Was 90% sure I was going to call in sick today but didn't, came home to Sean very worried about how I coped. Have days off now so hopefully I can relax. A few days is all I need. Very keen to go back to the dr to see this tiny one again and well starting anti natal classes soon.

Have another delemia which is in my mind. Our main church is wanting to start a mothers group for new mums, which I would like to join but also feel it would be better to join one closer so our child has long term relationships with people who are closer ones who will go to school with and I can form long term relationships with too. Another church in the area has an up and running one for our area to which I have been invited. It doesn't seem the one by our church will take off due to very minimal interest and I personally do not feel I could lead a group as I am such a new mummy and well have very little idea what I am doing. My depression does come and go and making commitments is hard. Both may turn out to be too much for me so not an option. Guess Sean pointing out the rectors letter reporting the group wouldn't go ahead due to lack of leaders made me think about it again.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Originally posted by Rat:
quote:
We had the scan this morning and it looks like the baby is right way up after all.
Yay! [Yipee]

Prayers for you, Bronwyn, that you have a restful weekend, helping you to feel re-energized before heading back to work.

I've talked with the midwife today and have decided to go in for the GTT next week. I've been given two paid days off work so if I feel like I did after the last one, at least I'll have sufficient time to recover. She said it's not mandatory that I do it since I have had clean screens since the 28-week blood draw, but it's better to be cautious. Also, my supervisor at work has been really encouraging about taking the time off, so I'm going to set aside my dislike of hospitals and go and do the needful.
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
We had the scan this morning and it looks like the baby is right way up after all. It just seems to have a particularly prominent bottom, while its head is tucked away neatly, which made it hard for the midwife to tell manually which was which. Apparently it is looking fine and in a hopeful position for a normal birth.

It was sucking it's thumb!!


[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]

exciting [Smile] Im so pleased for you [Smile]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Fab Rat!

Well done Flausa!

And *hugs* Bronwyn. I had a similar dilema about Mum and Baby groups. I've ended up going to the one close to me (if I ever go!!) rather than 'my' church one, because of similar reasons of me wanting Alien to get to know 'locals'.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Yay for the right-way-up Ratling!

Bron- Here's me on my soap-box, feel free to scroll past:
Life in the community of the Church is, at its best, a balance between the offering and receiving of ministry. Now is a time for you to receive. If you're like me (a vast assumption, but one we're all prone to making) it is hard for you to hear "This won't go forward without leaders" and not want to volunteer. But, sometimes just because a new project or ministry is a good idea doesn't mean it's the best use (stewardship, even?) of a Church's resources. If the success or failure of a project depends on overextending a New Mom who's already feeling somewhat overwhelmed... then it should probably fail.

Hmm- I should probably realize at some point that this is mostly a note to myself, since the Rector has been hinting around that it would be nice if the Mommy Group started back up again at the Church, if only there were someone to take charge...
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Good news about Baby Rat.

Bron, FWIW I felt lousy for the first three months and had galloping indigestion for the last three months. I think I would have been OK for the middle three, but unfortunately that coincided with a) a very stressful house move and b) two months of being separated from Husboid, as he was in the new house and I was 200 miles away in lodgings, finishing up my notice in the old job. So I was too stressed out to notice whether Baby was acting up. Don't believe everything you read in the books; we're all different. In fact, my sister (who did this three times) says every pregnancy is different...

I second what Took said about not volunteering for anything until Baby's here and you are sure you can cope. I was like a zombie for the first four months; just doing the shopping was a major triumph. Of course, YMMV...

Jane R
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well I really do think this being my first that I shall be not right for the church mothers group and also local means a lot to me. In the past 2 months a local man and his 10 yo son lost their lives in a plane crash and leaft other sibblings, the car accident which killed 6 teens a few kms up the road also happened. It is a close knit community who are greving and I feel this child is one way for me to become part of it.

The depression has become worse than ever, Sean has been so wonderful to me. I went to the dr today to talk about it. She gave me a week to recover and suggested talking to the gyne thursday about increasing the meds I am on. Heasatant to do this as they have not been shown to be safe in pregnancy yet the safest on the market. I will take care of myself and eat well, try to start exercising(which is usually first sign of depression for me and very counter productive) Hopefully I will pick up.
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
We had the scan this morning and it looks like the baby is right way up after all. It just seems to have a particularly prominent bottom, while its head is tucked away neatly, which made it hard for the midwife to tell manually which was which. Apparently it is looking fine and in a hopeful position for a normal birth.


Great news.

Now (said with authority by a woman who has grunted out three sprogs): when they say "push", they really mean to say, "Do a really big poo".

That's the only thing that gets the little buggers out. Imagine doing the biggest poo ever, and your wee babe will slip out, no problems.

Best wishes. I await your news, with grandmotherly anticipation.

[ 28. March 2006, 09:11: Message edited by: Left at the Altar ]
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
LATA said:
quote:
Now (said with authority by a woman who has grunted out three sprogs): when they say "push", they really mean to say, "Do a really big poo".
[Killing me] That's exactly what it feels like! But there's an element of really bad period pain in there as well. In my comparatively limited experience, that is.

Jane R
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Well, went for my GTT yesterday at the hospital (and was completely knackered afterwards), and they've just called with my results. My fasting test was slightly lower than last time (so still normal) and my HBT (?) which measures over a period of time was also well within normal range - hurrah! Guess that means I get to do some baking this afternoon!
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Guess that means I get to do some baking this afternoon!

Hurrah!
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
[Killing me]
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
LATA said:
quote:
Now (said with authority by a woman who has grunted out three sprogs): when they say "push", they really mean to say, "Do a really big poo".
[Killing me] That's exactly what it feels like! But there's an element of really bad period pain in there as well. In my comparatively limited experience, that is.

Jane R

Yup, I think that would sum it up. It's when they tell you that you can't push, that's like being in an exam or something and really needing the loo, but knowing that you can't do anything.

Also, I read some advice which said to push all the way through the contraction. It might hurt at first, but it actually lessens the pain.

I actually found the pushing bit (before he got stuck) the really gratifying part. Does that say anything about my toilet habits? [Paranoid]
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Yes. Uncle Siegmund would say you're a classic.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Yes Flausa enjoy the baking!!! It is a wearing experience the full Glucose tolernce test. I begged my dr not to make me do it again. I was flat on my back after the first hour and nausous and about to vommit. Blood taker seemed to chat forever to everyone. As soon as the test was over I ate and was fine.

Had gyne appt today, still only put in a kg, for 24 weeks very low but not a problem. (I am that big. Blood pressure is still low. Told dr about the depression and how just being away from work has helped and boy I do feel better(not perfect though) she said that with the decreased dose of medication I am taking as I am pregnant can be increased and in fact a lot of medications are even lower doses due to the blood circulating around so people need more. I decided with Sean at the beginning of the week to see how the week off went and if it was no good still then try the increase in meds, gyne happy with this.
Baby is still hiding but all appears well, I have a small glucose test again in 3 weeks to make sure diabetes has not come on. As well as blood tests for iron and so on.
Most exciting is this: Until last night Sean had not felt baby, last night we were singing 'I danced in the morning when the world was young' and baby kicked in the last verse, I got Sean to put hand on tummy no luck but again we sung it and in the last verse baby kicked AGAIN and Sean FELT it. So exciting.
Had a phone call from a colluge at work and she tells me work is just as bad. I guess taking this time out has been the best thing.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
How is everyone?????
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
I finished work on Friday, and I must say I feel 100% better for it - everybody I've spoken to has remarked how perky I sound! I do think it was a mistake to start maternity leave so late, but it isn't a physical job so I didn't think it would be a problem, and didn't want waste leave. But it is so nice to be at home and have time to spend preparing for the new arrival, without feeling torn in several directions all the time. It didn't help that work was very, very fraught this last week or so (TBH I wouldn't be surprised if the company doesn't survive [Frown] ).

Midwife appt this morning, so hopefully everything will still be OK.

And then I think I'm going to do some cooking - everybody has told me it's a good idea to freeze some handy meal portions to tide us through the first month or so. Lentil soup and lasagne, I think. Maybe I'll do some baking too!
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:

Most exciting is this: Until last night Sean had not felt baby, last night we were singing 'I danced in the morning when the world was young' and baby kicked in the last verse, I got Sean to put hand on tummy no luck but again we sung it and in the last verse baby kicked AGAIN and Sean FELT it. So exciting.

Mr. Took didn't feel the Swimmer kick for ages, either- mostly because as soon as he put his hand on my belly, she stopped kicking.

Now, months later, Daddy still has the magic touch to calm her down and put her to sleep when she's fussy. With any luck, Sean's got it, too. [Big Grin]

[Votive] That between not-working, and your meds, you find the balance that works for you and the babe.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Had a midwife appointment today ... just normal poking and prodding ... poke ... ow! ... oh, I'm just looking for your pubic bone ... well, ya' darn sure found it!

Fondal height normal ... baby's heartbeat normal (love that hollow sounding woosh woosh woosh that it makes) ... blood pressure low, but normal ... urine clear ... blood flowing so freely that we could hear the swishing as the little vials filled.

We wrote up our birth plan, and we're gonna try for a water birth. The midwives here are all really gung ho on the idea, and in my mind anything I can do to relieve pain without using drugs is a Good Thing™. The nurse today did say that if I do a water birth that I can't use a TENS machine. Hmmm ... I wonder why not ... [Roll Eyes] The nurse then asked Alan if he wants to cut the umbilical cord. Poor guy turned about three shades of green, and when he recovered said something along the lines of why don't we wait to see if he doesn't faint during the labour first.

Then I got home from work early today to find a package waiting for us and hoorah our new nappies our here (dear heavens ... never thought I'd get excited about nappies)! We're going to use a mixture of the terry squares (2 packs of 6 already purchased) and Motherease One Size nappies (purchased 10 nappies and 5 pop-in liners). I felt I had an obligation to give the terry squares (using a mix of muslin squares and biodegrable disposable liners) a go, because my mother saved a set of nappy pins that she used on me when I was a we'an. Actually, doing a mix also keeps the cost down a bit more, which being the penny pincher that I am, made me feel better about the whole thing.

Oh, and this week is my last week at work. Stopping earlier than I ever thought I would, but I've got a growing list of things to do before the wee wan arrives.

So a kick! kick! greeting to all. Rat, you must be getting really close now! Oooooooooooh. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Tom Day (# 3630) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
The nurse then asked Alan if he wants to cut the umbilical cord. Poor guy turned about three shades of green, and when he recovered said something along the lines of why don't we wait to see if he doesn't faint during the labour first.

I just said no. Which was probably a good thing as going from watching Matthew have inhections I don't think I could...

Glad things are going fine [Smile] You're all in our prayers

Tom
 
Posted by ebeth (# 4474) on :
 
Mr e said "no, thanks" as well. He figures that's why we pay the doctor.
I have a friend whose husband, too, declined the 'cut the cord offer', so she took the doc up on it. Honestly I don't know she managed it, but she did. She said it was like cutting through rubber tubing. (ok, now you've either lost your lunch or decided that's not so bad....)
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
And then I think I'm going to do some cooking - everybody has told me it's a good idea to freeze some handy meal portions to tide us through the first month or so. Lentil soup and lasagne, I think. Maybe I'll do some baking too!

Think 'high fibre'. That's all I'm saying.

b
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:

So a kick! kick! greeting to all. Rat, you must be getting really close now! Oooooooooooh. [Yipee]

Official due date is the 14th - so it could be any time from now to the end of the month! Gosh! I am HUGE like a watermelon.

quote:
The nurse then asked Alan if he wants to cut the umbilical cord. Poor guy turned about three shades of green, and when he recovered said something along the lines of why don't we wait to see if he doesn't faint during the labour first.

Mr Rat is also less than enthusastic about that idea. He says he's sticking to the head end of things.

It was on the tip of my tongue to say "Nah, thanks, we're having a natural childbirth so I thought I'd just bite through it myself".
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
[Killing me]

Well, as several animals eat the placenta after giving birth (watched a cat do that and I almost hurled), and there are cultures where it is acceptable for humans to do so as well ... how bad could it be? And now ... back to my baking (cookies, not placentas).
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
The chef guy from Rive Cottage, Hugh Fernly-Whitting-thingy, cooked a placenta once. It was served at the baby's Naming Ceremony. He suggested treating it like liver.

A few years back I heard about blood drawn from the cord being used to help in the treatment of sick children. Is this something that is still happening?
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
Tom was offered the scissors to cut Matthew's cord, but he refused! Not very good with needles. I think he was pretty pleased that he managed not to feint - especially with the amount of blood and needles going around.

As for sticking at the head end, hubby might not have much choice. What I mean is, that they might need him to help with the delivery. Tom was asked to be used as a foot support for me to push against, so I guess that he did see a lot of what was going on.

Top tip for labour - keep drinking plenty of water through out. Gives you something to throw up with (if a contraction makes you heave) and also, where I was, they made me pee three hours after labour. If I couldn't do it, they would have stuck a catheter in. [Eek!] Much easier if you have some water already in you.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
The chef guy from Rive Cottage, Hugh Fernly-Whitting-thingy, cooked a placenta once. It was served at the baby's Naming Ceremony. He suggested treating it like liver.

A few years back I heard about blood drawn from the cord being used to help in the treatment of sick children. Is this something that is still happening?

In my booking in session I was given info about this. (www.cellsense.com.au)but what seemed to be offered is keeping the babies cord blood in case they get sick and need it up to 18 years. I thought bet that is expensive so looked up the website. it was expensive $2000 plus dollars to store the cells. I actually think I like the idea of donating to help someone else potentially as although I may regret it if our child becomes sick. Guessing where I am this will not be possiable as it is quite a small and remote hospital. Another organization AUSCORD do offer this service. Thanks for reminding me I should look into this.
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Just logged on after a couple of weeks absence and wanted to report that my little Beeb was born on 24 March 2006 at 7.23am after a brief labour. Beeb is doing fine. I'm still a bit shell-shocked and sore, as I had to have a lot of stitches, and still a bit weepy, which I'm a bit ashamed about. I'd be happy to share more gory details about the birth and first two weeks if anyone is interested, and would be delighted to receive any advice anyone has, though I can't guarantee to take it.

Very best wishes to you all
Posy
x
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Posy:
Beeb is doing fine. I'm still a bit shell-shocked and sore, as I had to have a lot of stitches, and still a bit weepy, which I'm a bit ashamed about.

Congratulations!!! [Yipee]

Don't be ashamed about being weepy... that's OK. Fairly major changes in life do that to people!!!

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
[Yipee]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Congratulations Posy! [Yipee] Be sure to post pictures of the little one for us when you get the chance.

And maybe hold off on the gory horror stories for about five or six weeks (you know until after I've been through it [Biased] ).
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Congratulations, Posy.

Don't let the weepiness overcome you. Go and have a talk to someone about it all (you can PM me if you want to have a moan).

It gets better.

[ 07. April 2006, 20:47: Message edited by: Left at the Altar ]
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Congrats to Posy, and welcome to the wee Beeb!

It does get better.
And weepy is one of many totally normal ways to feel.
And DO post pictures!

FoaT & the Nutter
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Congratulations Posy! [Yipee]

Our antenatal classes warned us that weepy is so common as to be normal, so don't feel bad.
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Thanks for the messages - you are all very reassuring. I think I'm finding it hard to adjust to not knowing what I'm supposed to be doing 90% of the time, among other things...

Beeb is an angel when he's quiet - and then I don't know what to do with myself - and a gangster when he's lively, and then I don't know what to do with him.

Trial and error I suppose...
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
You mean he wasn't born with an instruction manual?!? Shucks ... I was still holding out hope for one to be attached to the placenta or something.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
When he's quiet, you sleep.
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Absolutely. For the first sixteen years if need be.
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:


We wrote up our birth plan, and we're gonna try for a water birth. The midwives here are all really gung ho on the idea, and in my mind anything I can do to relieve pain without using drugs is a Good Thing™. The nurse today did say that if I do a water birth that I can't use a TENS machine. Hmmm ... I wonder why not ... [Roll Eyes]

Water birth - Fab. The relief I felt when they said I was 5 cm dialated and I could go in the pool. Oh, the boyancy you get from the water is great (lifts baby off pelvic bone) and the water is lovely and warm. Just have a bed pan ready if a contraction makes you be sick.....

Go for it Flausa, I hope you manage to get one.

I found my tens machine useful, as it gave me something to do before I could get in the water. And gas and air is good at taking the edge off things. (and the mouth piece gives you something to bite down on).
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Our labour suite has two rooms with pools, and if they aren't being used I might try to get one to use during labour - people have given me good reports. But I don't fancy actually delivering in one. I know I'm just weird, but doesn't seem hygenic to me.

I'm in this odd limbo state at the moment - due date is Friday, so could be soon or could be a wee while. The baby has moved down (I can eat again and my sore back has eased - hooray!), I'm reasonably comfortable in a large sort of way, but just sort of waiting... Happy enough and getting on with a couple of little projects but always aware that they'll probably have to abandoned soon. Weird feeling.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
I wanted to try a water birth, but when my waters broke they were green and the midwife put Baby R on a heart monitor. So I couldn't.

Hope the TENS machine works for everyone else; I didn't find it particularly helpful. Every time it went off it felt like my back was being skinned, so I went for the paracetamol instead. And (later on) the gas and air.

Jane R
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
I'm still amazed by the whole gas and air thing. Hadn't heard of that until coming over here, so I'm glad for a wider range of pain relief options. Though the TENS makes me a little nervous.

I did find it amusing when the midwife said to me with a deadly serious expression, "you won't be able to use a TENS machine if you chose a water birth." I had to really control my response on that one. I really wanted to throw a mock hissy fit and protest, "What?!? I won't?!? Why ever not?" But on that occasion, I refrained.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
I did find it amusing when the midwife said to me with a deadly serious expression, "you won't be able to use a TENS machine if you chose a water birth." I had to really control my response on that one. I really wanted to throw a mock hissy fit and protest, "What?!? I won't?!? Why ever not?" But on that occasion, I refrained.

We had the same conversation with our midwife. Then she told us, in similarly serious tones, that 'if the father wants to get in the pool we must insist he wears swimming trunks'.

We couldn't help but start giggling then.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
I guess as a nurse you would be surprised how much people actually need to be told these things...wont go into details but yes is better to tell everyone to help prevent a situation.

Today I grew out of my uniform for work, yesterday it fitted, today it wouldn't, I think the baby moved or something as I feel it heaps today esp when cleaning the shower I told Sean baby didn't like me doing the shower.. [Big Grin] . It was funny people asked me if I had a different shirt on(An oversized one which one of my work colls had had before she lost a lot of weight) all people who had been pregnant believed I could have grown out of it in one day, all who had not been didn't.
 
Posted by Michèle (# 1401) on :
 
Rat - what I usually suggest is for ladies (and their men) to expect anything to change at any moment! So, don't be surprised, if in fact when you are in the water, you just can't get out in the end. Most women don't want to leave unless it's necessary and you don't even have to get out to wee (I always give my ladies a bedpan and leave the room for a mo).

Also, the guys need to know that what works one minute is bad the next, so not to be surprised if that wonderful massage is suddenly rejected with a swatted arm and a screech!

Good luck
Am keeping an interested eye and prayers for you all.

m

[ 12. April 2006, 14:54: Message edited by: Michèle ]
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
The methods of pain relief I worked through at home were massage (lavender and jasmine oil), paracetomol, relaxation and sleep, warm bath and finally TENS. My husband told me the TENS machine had 15 settings, but as I had no idea how dilated I was or how fast I was progressing, I was trying to move through the levels really slowly, and in the end, didn't use even half of the levels available.

At the hospital, I was straight onto gas and air - I thought it was fantastic, partly because it keeps you breathing slowly and deeply through contractions. About 2 hours after we arrived, I was ready for the birthpool. I thought that was great too. However, my waters had not broken, and when the head became visible in the amniotic sac, the fluid was stained, and I was asked to get out of the water after only about half an hour.

I then delivered Beeb very quickly on the floor next to the birthpool without any pain relief at all.

Good luck to those of you due to deliver in the near future. I wish you a labour as short as mine but without the need for as many sutures afterwards.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
I was wondering how people are getting on with 'maternity leave'. A friend said it was a really big shock to her system not to have to go to work and she found it hard to cope with at times.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
I was wondering how people are getting on with 'maternity leave'. A friend said it was a really big shock to her system not to have to go to work and she found it hard to cope with at times.

I'm enjoying it so far, but of course the baby isn't here yet.

I did think it might be strange, so I've made an effort to set up and stick to a routine. In the mornings I work on a website project I've got going on, a bit of gentle exercise after lunch, then the afternoon is for housework and cooking. Of course I realise that when the baby arrives it'll throw my cosy routine right out the window, so I'm not sure how things will go then - just have to take it as it comes I suppose.

For the moment, though, I'm finding it good. I certainly feel far more relaxed and far less anxious than I did during the last month or so of 'proper' work, when I seemed to be continually torn in incompatible directions.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Went to the first anti-natal class last night, with Sean. Was ok but a little upset I will never be given the chance to try labor and realised how many of the classes were devoted to it but made me think people who are expecting a labor would feel cheated if they didn't get it with the hype. All the people were first time parents and really one of the aims was to get to know some other pregnant people.

[ 13. April 2006, 18:14: Message edited by: Bronwyn ]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
... Was ok but a little upset I will never be given the chance to try labor...

Bronwyn, I have been there too. I had enormous fibroids during my first pregnancy, and found out in the 9th month that they had shifted down and were blocking baby's way out. I was so disappointed. All I can say is that the doctor and nurses did everything they could to make the delivery a special time for us. May it be for you too!
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Guess I have already known as my history would mean it was dangerous-having had a fibrois removed which was so large the dr is amazed I still have a uterus(1.3kg), just I guess when I was told this the chance of a child was so remote I didn't think it was too much to bear. I guess I am learning as a pregnant woman much of the hype of a natural birth is by the professionals.
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Aw Bron... I'm sure it will be special for you.

And at least you won't get piles! [Big Grin]

Lucy won't ever give birth vaginally even if she gets pregnant. Watching her throwing up when she went back on the Pill this week after one of her four periods a year, I foudn myself wondering if she would get morning sickness as badly as me. I've always found when broody (ie recently and nothing to be done about it)that the memory of the birth didn't put me off in the least, but I only have to think bck to those 6 months of vomiting... shudder... [Projectile]
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Bron, I sympathise. I felt that the emphasis in the antenatal classes I went to was rather too heavily on 'natural' birth too. There was very little said about caesareans and what to expect, or even about inductions, so the classes weren't much use to me either as I ended up having a failed induction (3 days of it, ugh!) which resulted in an emergency section when the baby got distressed.

I think that there can be too much emphasis in ante-natal classes on getting the baby born, and not enough on preparing for life together after birth, which is the real long-term challenge. All babies are miraculous, all births are miraculous however they are achieved, but they are not an end in themselves. As Churchill said in a different context, it is not the end, it is not even the beginning of the end, but it is the end of the beginning!

[Votive] for everyone here who's facing the joys, frustrations, anxieties and challenges of childbirth and parenthood. Good luck to us all!

JJB
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Bron, the classes are supposed to benefit everyone who attends, so you should ask for information to be provided that is relevant to you. In the class we've been attending, they ask every week if anyone is have a C-section or induction so that they can direct the class accordingly. In one class, even though no one said they had a section planned yet, both the physical therapist and the midwife spent time talking about C-Sections and what to expect before, during and after. They stated this was important because every expectant mother needed the information just in case (as would the birth companions need to know what to expect).

Had check-up today (they are every week from here on out), and everything's A-ok. Have only put on one more kilo (in spite of our decadent weekend away) in four weeks, putting me up to five kilos gained over the whole time. Am still happy with that, but am hoping I hold steady from here on out.

I am really enjoying not working, but my identity has never been tied up in my job, so I'm just as happy not having one. I'm continuing to keep in contact with my colleagues (including some in India and Indonesia), because they have become friends, and I will be going out to lunch with some of them this week. I find it very easy to fill my days what with walking hubby to work, picking up groceries, regular housework, prepping the house for baby, stamp collecting, playing my keyboard, knitting a blanket for baby, putzing on the computer, wandering around the town centre, trying new recipes, and just reading, listening to music and relaxing. Somehow it seems I look at the clock and it's 11am and the next thing I know it's suddenly 4:30pm. It's a good thing.

By the way, Rat how are you doing?

[ 18. April 2006, 12:12: Message edited by: Flausa ]
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:

By the way, Rat how are you doing?

Oh, I'm OK. Still here, still heavy, still waiting...

Getting a touch fed up now, I'd just like all this to be over! So we can get on with this new phase of life, whatever it's going to be...

Oh well, I'm only 4 days past due, so perfectly normal - I guess it just feels longer [Biased]
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
Once you get past your due date, every day seems like a life time. I booked myself in for a facial and a leg wax which was a really great way of spending an afternoon.

Mind you, when the new phase starts, you be thinking "What the hell did I do before which was so time consuming???!"

[ 19. April 2006, 09:24: Message edited by: Annie P ]
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
... Was ok but a little upset I will never be given the chance to try labor...

Bronwyn, I have been there too. I had enormous fibroids during my first pregnancy, and found out in the 9th month that they had shifted down and were blocking baby's way out. I was so disappointed. All I can say is that the doctor and nurses did everything they could to make the delivery a special time for us. May it be for you too!
Bronwyn, I've been there too as well. Mr Amos and I went to all the classes, were really excited about him being present at the birth, all psyched up about breathing and so forth----and then the Amosling was an emergency c-section and Mr A was at the time too ill to be allowed in the theatre. And yet, partly because of the wonderful medical staff, but largely because it was our own longed-for baby, it was an unforgettable, wonderful time. The best moment, I still think, is seeing your child's face for the first time. God bless you and be with you and Sean and your little one, and prayers for all the expectant parents on Shipboard.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Thanks for your support, I have emailed the midwife and she has sent me a comprehensive program as to when things are and actually suggested we turn up late to one session. Think I was a bit depressed about the whole idea of hearing nearly 3 hours a week on how great natural birth is. (Well not really just when you get depressed things seem like that) I really have got the pregnant waddle now and am questioning if I am going to keep working. I feel so tired but I will give it up if I need to and for the first time in ages I actually feel good about my work, less stress and so on.
Went shopping yesterday, didn't mean to but ended up in the baby section of the store and bought a heap of different sized grow suits in varrious sizes. I justified it in that they were 50% off and I had a futher voucher for 20% off. So exciting. Made me feel good. Now I am just looking for excuses not to do the house work, and running out fast.
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
I'm in week 18 now and we're going in for the first ultra sound on Monday. I've been having some pains in the sides of my tummy the last week or so and not been able to reach the midwife to ask about it. There has been stress at work and I have been doing some travelling so I hope that there's a natural and "safe" explanation but I'm still worried. [Frown]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Light, look up "round ligament pain in pregnancy." If that's what it is, totally benign and expected, and apt to kick in just as the baby's getting heavier. Do mention it to your midwife, etc. but it's most likely to be something totally innocuous.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
In the hospital today visiting, and, on the way to the lift, I met a nurse pushing a trolley on which was a perspex cot in which was an very, very new baby, fast asleep. He had a little hat on, and his bottom lip was thrust out*.
I thought of all of you on this thread. [Votive]


*He looked like he might have been related to Pyx_e.

[ 22. April 2006, 19:50: Message edited by: Amos ]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Light I hope the pain isnt too bad. I guess I have had pain throughout and I have put it down to ligaments streching and baby pushing on scar tissue. In some pregnancy books it talks about them. I find a heat pack helps but then on of my friends said On your pregnant tummy? I just make sure it isn't too hot.
Do mention it to the midwife though as mentioned above, the thing is all these things can worry you. That in itself isn't good reassurance helps.
Amos, so tiny the baby sounds!!!! I can not wait. Was grumpy with a work colluge as he announced as a father he took his half hour baby around the hospital and SMOKED outside!!!! Yes smoked with the baby. I couldn't believe it.

Still quite unreasonably proud that at 28 weeks I am still in my own clothes... [Yipee]
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Went shopping yesterday, didn't mean to but ended up in the baby section of the store and bought a heap of different sized grow suits in varrious sizes. I justified it in that they were 50% off and I had a futher voucher for 20% off. So exciting. Made me feel good. Now I am just looking for excuses not to do the house work, and running out fast.

It's lovely isn't it? And Daddy doesn't usually mind you buying stuff for baby (he does it a lot too!). Just a thought though - people will buy you quite a lot of clothes, which is fantastic. We hardly ended up buying anything at all, and it's still going on. In fact I don't think I'll need to buy Matthew anything for a while, thanks tot the generosity of others. Means that you can concentrate on getting other stuff sorted.

Glad to hear things are going ok. Our midwives were very much on the page of if it's a verginal delivery (have I spelt that right?) then that's fine. If it's a C section, that's ok too.

Providing you end up with a healthy baby at the end of it, who cares how it comes out. Matthew got stuck, and I would of happily gone down to the operating theatre to let them take him out, or done anything else for that matter, just to have my baby as I was through with pushing at that point.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Now 10 days past due, and booked to go into hospital tomorrow morning so they can try to induce labour.

I'm not particularly looking forward to that since the process sounds like a bit of a bore and they keep you in the ward for observation when I'd much rather be at home as long as possible - but needs must I suppose. I really just want all this over with now, and a healthy baby here I hope!

There's still this afternoon and tonight for the process to kick of naturally...so everybody cross your fingers for us [Smile]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
[Votive] and [Yipee] for you at the same time, Rat. Best wishes on a safe, speedy, and pain-free (it could happen, right? [Biased] ) delivery.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
[Votive] for Rat. Hope Baby starts coming tonight. The policy where you are must be slightly different; here they don't try induction until you're 14 days overdue, unless there's some reason to believe that Baby is in distress (they give you a checkup on the due date and a week later).

Our girl was fashionably late. She arrived the day after we'd been to hospital for our 'one week overdue' appointment.

Jane R
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well wishes Rat!!! May all be perfect(well at least bearable) [Votive] [Votive]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Best wishes and hugs...
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Good luck Rat, will be thinking of you.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Hope it all goes well Rat. I assume you have a night of hot curries and wild sex planned for tonight?! [Biased]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pânts:
Hope it all goes well Rat. I assume you have a night of hot curries and wild sex planned for tonight?! [Biased]

Friends of ours got 2 of their 4 started by curry + cider + sex. Not sure how wild, just ingeneous.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Best wishes on a safe, speedy, and pain-free (it could happen, right? [Biased] ) delivery.

Yep. Could. Did.
And it started by induction.

Hoping for the best for you, too, Rat and Ratling.
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
Had the ultra sound yesterday and everything looked fine [Smile] Got some nice pictures too. Caid was so nervous when they were doing the measurements that I thought he might break down... I was calm from the moment they showed us that the heart was beating.

Suddenly I feel that I can be happy about this pregnancy and stop worrying so much. It feels so much better.

Here's to Rat, hoping everything goes well!
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
Rat [Votive] (fingers crossed too!)

Light [Smile]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Light:
Suddenly I feel that I can be happy about this pregnancy and stop worrying so much. It feels so much better.

When something has gone wrong before it is so difficult not to worry. Long may your happiness continue.

Prayers for Rat, Mr Rat and the little one.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Light, I'm glad to hear that everything checked out ok. Continued [Votive] for a safe and healthy pregnancy.

I had my midwife appointment this morning (I'm going to tire of weekly appointments real quick), and everything is ticking along fine. Had a different midwife than usual (hooray! cuz I don't like the otherone), and she was really enjoyable to deal with. She actually explained things as she went along including telling me that since my urines have been clear and my hemoglobin looks good from my 34 week tests, no more blood will have to be taken - yay!

Then she gave advice that should make hubby happy. She said since I'm 37 weeks and the baby's heartbeat is strong, the baby can safely come at any point now, so I should be having lots and lots of sex, as this encourages the cervix to soften. Ahhh, well, I guess whatever makes the delivery easier ... [Biased]

[Votive] Continuing to send happy thoughts across Scotland to Rat.
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
[Hot and Hormonal] [Hot and Hormonal] [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Stop wasting time posting... get back to her! [Biased] [Snigger]
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Hoping & praying that Rat's had some 'movement' and things are going well there. [Votive]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
This is rather presumptious, but I have a request.

Why your time for delivery is close could you include someone within SoF in the list of people to contact when something happens. Perhaps I am too impatient, but I get worried if I don't hear news.

bb
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
I think I can speak for both of us, but any news posted here will be posted by one of us. We'll try and do that as soon as possible after we're home, after phone calls to assorted relatives on both sides of the Pond. We don't consider that posting news like that is anyone's task but our own - we're not going to be sharing the pleasure of that task with anyone. If that leaves people impatiently waiting for news then tough.

If we have to spend a couple of days in hospital and don't have access from there, then we might ask my brother to post an update.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
I'm home again and happy to report that Mr Rat and I have been joined by ratling Andrew Mattheus, born on Wednesday 26th... the best new baby in the whole wide world.

The labour was pretty difficult - I won't upset the expectant mums by going into the gory details, but they are available on request [Biased] The hospital and midwives were absolutely excellent throughout, and hugely supportive after the birth. No NHS horror stories to report.

We're tired and happy to be home. Andrew is healthy and sleeping nearby. Thanks to everyone for your good wishes, prayers and happy thoughts.
 
Posted by Jillyb (# 4610) on :
 
[Yipee] Many congrats to the rats and welcome to the world baby Andrew [Yipee]
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
Many, many congrats! [Yipee]

[ 28. April 2006, 15:08: Message edited by: dolphy ]
 
Posted by Ann (# 94) on :
 
[Yipee] [Yipee] Congrats [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
Wonderful news Rat! I was very happy to see your name on the Ship's frontpage. [Votive] and [Axe murder] to you and little Andrew and Mr Rat of course!
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Hooray!!!! A new Scottish shipmate in the making! [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
Congratulations!! [Yipee]

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
Congratulations [Yipee]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Congratulations and many, many blessings to the Rat family! (And what a beautiful name!)
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Congratulations, Rat and Mr Rat, and welcome to the world Andrew [Smile]
 
Posted by duchess (# 2764) on :
 
Yeah! Praise God for healthy new baby Rat! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
yayayayayaya - congratulations Rat family [Smile] [Smile]

[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by ebeth (# 4474) on :
 
Congratulations to the Rats and baby Andrew.

Best Wishes at this wonderful time,

the ebeths
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
& many congratulations from us
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Great news- congratulations! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ann:
[Yipee] [Yipee] Congrats [Yipee] [Yipee]

[Snigger] Likewise. Yay for Matthew (and well done Rat!! [Biased] )
 
Posted by Derf (# 2093) on :
 
Congratulations Rat and Mr Rat [Yipee] [Yipee]

Sounds like there's definitely going to be potential for baby friendly Scot meets so the rest of us can admire the junior shipmates [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Rat - congratulations! Very pleased for you!
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Derf:
Sounds like there's definitely going to be potential for baby friendly Scot meets

I think that's a certainty.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Congratulations, blessings, and welcome! You little Rat! [Yipee] [Biased]
 
Posted by Adrienne (# 2334) on :
 
Many congratulations to the Rat family! [Smile]

A
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Hazelnut glancing up from her customary location to gurgle 'congratulations, Rat' and 'welcome aboard, Andrew'
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
Blessings on the 3 of you. [Angel]

Congratulations!
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] Hooray and welcome to the wee Ratling.

Well done Rat [Overused] round of applause for all your hard work [Smile]
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
Welcome baby Andrew! Congrats to Rat and Mr Rat [Yipee]
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Congratulation to the Rats. [Big Grin] [Yipee]

I'm glad you like him, Rat. I knew he'd turn out to be wonderful.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Congratulations!!!!! [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Tom Day (# 3630) on :
 
Congratulations Rat. [Smile] [Yipee]

Tom
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
Cong RAT ulations! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Hurray!

bb
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by duchess:
Yeah! Praise God for healthy new baby Rat! [Yipee]

Congratulations to my avatar twin Rat (and Mr Rat of course)
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Congratulations, Rat and family! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Congratulations Rat! Hope you are getting over the birth and enjoying Andrew.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Thanks everyone! Andrew the Ratling is absolutely gorgeous - he even smells adorable (something nobody else seems to have noticed, even his doting daddy, must be some evolutionary mummy thing). He has lots of lovely black hair, which I am determined will not fall out and turn blond, no matter what Mr Rat's family may think!

We're beginning to settle into things now, I hope. It's been a little fraught, what with recovering physically from the birth (still a bit sore!), not getting much sleep, learning to breastfeed and all the rest. Not to mention all the visitors - I mean, obviously I can understand why everyone would want to come and pay court to the Best New Baby In the Whole Wide World, and people have been lovely, but it does get a bit trying handing round biscuits and tidying up for the next lot when what you really need to do is grab every opportunity to sleep.

I must say I had no idea how demanding breastfeeding would be. At the moment I seem to be completely ruled by the iron whims of the hungry little ratling, which can get a bit much especially around 2am. There have been a few tearful moments. However, I'm sure this must be a temporary adjustment period for us both. After all, other people have babies all the time, and manage to go on and have normal lives: go to the shops, dry their hair, hold coherent telephone conversations, have careers as high-flying, crime-solving lawyers, etc.

Oh well, I suppose I'd better go and check out the baby and toddler thread now [Biased] . Thanks again to everyone for your congratulations and good wishes.

Rat, Mr Rat and the Ratling
 
Posted by Legodude_uk (# 5671) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
<snip> Not to mention all the visitors - I mean, obviously I can understand why everyone would want to come and pay court to the Best New Baby In the Whole Wide World, and people have been lovely, but it does get a bit trying handing round biscuits and tidying up for the next lot when what you really need to do is grab every opportunity to sleep.

Many congratulations Rat on your new arrival...

One tip with regards to the visitors....lable the cupboards in the kitchen where the cups aetc are and when they arrive, ask them very nicely if they would like a drink, if they say yes then tell them everything is labelled out there and would they mind helping themselves and yours is a <insert preferred beverage here>. Most people won't mind a bit and if they do, well, do they really deserve a cuddle with the Best New Baby In the Whole Wide World?
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Yay Rat! [Yipee] and [Votive] for Andrew Mattheus.

PM me if you want a whinge about breastfeeding... but it does give you a good excuse not to make tea for visitors 'Sorry, I need to finish feeding him - would you mind making your own?'

Our girl's hair was very dark when she was born; it's lightened a bit now (mid-brown) but I think it will go darker again as she gets older. It's almost exactly the same colour as Husband's was when he was a child, and his hair was very dark brown before it started going grey. On the other hand, I was blonde when I was a baby and now have light brown hair; so blonde is unlikely for the Ratling, IMNSHO. Unless he decides to dye it, of course.

May God protect you from Exploding Nappy Syndrome,

Jane R
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
Congratulations Rat! He sounds gorgeous. (Do we get to see any pictures?).

Things do settle down eventually - including the visitors. If it really does get on your nerves, and is affecting you, tell them to bugger off/ phone before hand to check it's ok to come round. It's much more important you get your sleep and are rested, as you'll have more patience for breast feeding then. He'll be just as interesting in a couple of weeks as he is now. The alternative is that you get them to make a meal/ help with something, which would help you.

I found the first four weeks or so, the most difficult. I took one day at a time, which seems to be the best policy. Hope you are enjoying having him around at some point!
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
The subject of visitors came up at our ante-natal classes. It seems that the common experience is you're inundated with visitors for the first couple of months, then you get virtually none after that. Which means when it's all new and you need time to get used to being a parent (and need sleep and rest) you're always running around for visitors as well as the little one. Then when the novelty wears off and you really need someone to talk to you're on your own cos hubby's paternity leave is over and the visitors aren't there. Now, if only people could work out a way to spread the visits in those first few weeks over a year ...
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Yes issue of visitors is a worry. Guess I am lucky we live 15 mins from town and everyone thinks it is the end of the earth!!! Guess my concern is my baby will be born in the hospital I work in...so easy just to pop accross and my issue is well I will be recovering from a ceasor, trying to establish brest feeding, probably have post natal depression, actually have told them I do not want visitors and when I am ready will bring baby in to them.
I would suggest as above people help themselves to tea coffee and so on, it is too much for you Rat.
Been really tired and pained. at work did a urine test and it incicated I might have gestational diabetes and a urine infection. Will be seeing gyne on friday hopefully she will reassure me. I havent been too concerned about this test as I have been so ill eating wasn't something I wanted to do much in the last 48 hours and it may be my body is reacting to that. Now trying to make food work for me again.
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
Just wondering how people are doing...
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
All's quiet on the Western (Scotland) front. Just trying to finish knitting a baby blanket before the wee wan arrives. I've done a blanket for each of my sister's kids (as well as two other people's kidlets), and am looking forward to actually keeping one for my own child, for a change.

Nothing really new ... although after my most recent visit with my health visitor this week (chatting about pain relief in labour, nappies, breast feeding, travel plans, plans for stress and visitor control), she looked my in the eye and said, "you are a sensible woman." That one comment has pretty much kept me feeling good all week. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
Thanks everyone! Andrew the Ratling is absolutely gorgeous - he even smells adorable (something nobody else seems to have noticed, even his doting daddy, must be some evolutionary mummy thing).

That New Baby Smell is an established fact, Rat, though it may indeed be a mummy thing. I love it myself and remember the older ladies commenting on it when my little ones were born.

quote:
I must say I had no idea how demanding breastfeeding would be. At the moment I seem to be completely ruled by the iron whims of the hungry little ratling, which can get a bit much especially around 2am.
You don't "seem to be" completely ruled by the ratling, you are! It's normal.

quote:
There have been a few tearful moments.
All quite normal. I took to motherhood and breastfeeding like a duck to water and had easy babies, but still had those emotional swings. (When my firstborn was a week or two old, I ended up one day sitting on the bed soaking her with tears and apologizing for how horrible her life was going to be because I was convinced that my husband was going to leave me for my younger sister, who was staying with us for a few days to help out. I mean, they had had such a animated conversation at dinner the night before and it was just obvious, wasn't it? [Hot and Hormonal] [Roll Eyes] ) Disrupted sleep and readjusting hormones can do strange things to your mind.

quote:
However, I'm sure this must be a temporary adjustment period for us both.
Yes it is. Just keep telling yourself "Hormones", and put those visitors to work while you sit in your chair inhaling that New Baby Smell (surely while they're waiting for the kettle to boil, they could wash up some dishes or fold some laundry? [Devil] ).
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
...she looked my in the eye and said, "you are a sensible woman."

She was merely stating the obvious, Flausa.

With you and Alan for parents, that Little Nuclear Device is going to be one lucky kid.
 
Posted by The Kat in the Hat (# 2557) on :
 
Best piece of advice I had was "don't get dressed for the first 2 weeks." If you are in your dressing gown, visitors instinctively seem to want to make you drinks. If you are dressed, they expect you to make them. I didn't follow it after my first birth, and got very stressed trying to learn to be a mother & still be a good host.
With nos 2 & 3 I (mostly) followed it & it (mostly) worked. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well I have some news, and have learnt a positive about having an eletive ceasor(not really elective for me but that is what the call it) I now know the date our baby will be born!!! (4th July) Actually it is a bit earlier than I expected as it is 38 weeks to the day, the reason being it could be that date or a week after with the risk of an emergency one if baby decided to well make a show before hand. I don't want that having worked in a country hospital I know everyone will be called in. may be tired and at 3am who can blame them, there is more chance of something going wrong.

Other than that I have a perfectly healthy baby as far as dr can tell, have put on no weight and although I have been very sick and tired the pregnancy has been unremarkable. Incredable for me usually I am a woman of every complication, although I try not to be so much.
Guess the other thing to report is my glucose test came back normal and hence although I had a high sugar level and other signs of G diabetes when I did the test at work, it can be put down to the fact I had gastro. I also have no urine infection that again was the fact my whole system was out from the gastro. (relief !!!!!!trying to find safe antibiotics in pregnancy I am not allergic to would have been an issue)
Other than that joined the brestfeeding association and that is exciting and apparently they are very suportive up here. The next two pre natal classes will be relevent so there wont be the explaining to everyone as they see us walk in late or not turn up asking if we had forgotten the class.
Not long to go for me so exciting!!!!!!
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
yay...

Am so excited for you guys, esp for Bron since this has been such a long hard road. yay on having an actually, my baby is going to be born this day date. That has got to be the best ever thing about an elective Ceaser.

All the best for Flausa and Bronwyns births. When are you due Flausa??
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
Thanks everyone! Andrew the Ratling is absolutely gorgeous - he even smells adorable (something nobody else seems to have noticed, even his doting daddy, must be some evolutionary mummy thing).

In her book "Operating Instructions," Anne Lamott says of her newborn, "He smells like God." (I highly commend this book -- the diary of her first year with her baby -- to new mothers (and fathers) everywhere. It's very frank, hilarious, and spiritual.)

Bronwyn, sounds like good news all around. With both my kids being scheduled c-sections, we also knew the date in advance and in one case it influenced the name selection. When we found our son's delivery would be Oct. 12 -- Christopher Columbus day in the US -- we took "Christopher" off the top of the names list. We figured we'd avoid a lot of teasing for the little guy.

This is one old mum who loves reading this thread. Blessings to all of you.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dee.:
When are you due Flausa??

Next Monday ... or whenever the wee wan decides to make his or her arrival in the outside world. So that should be about 3 weeks if I go with the current trend here. [Biased]
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Gosh...thats seven days to go!!! Countdown is well and truly on then!!! Dosent seem that long ago that you announced you were pregnant [Eek!]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Well, I'm trying not to count, but I think doing so is pretty much inevitable. Church was pretty funny though yesterday with people actually telling me they didn't want to see me there next week (unless I was there showing off a new edition).

Dee, IIRC you were one of the ones who signed up for creche duty ... so have you been brushing up on your virtual babysitting skills?
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Well...

Last week I looked after my real life neice for 2 days while my sister was in hospital...She is 11 months old. Does that count [Biased]

Cyber babysitting could be a bit riskier tho...still with your genes maybe it will be smart enough to blog its needs from really young...Aunty Dee...I need a bottle and my bum needs changing...I suppose if it hits the [Waterworks] icon that would work...

...sort of

...hmmmmmmm
 
Posted by Tom Day (# 3630) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Church was pretty funny though yesterday with people actually telling me they didn't want to see me there next week (unless I was there showing off a new edition).

Standard proceedure I'm afraid. It's funny at first, but the joke wears thin pretty quickly, especially after the second week. [Disappointed] [Roll Eyes]

Anyway, hang in there and chill out. Hope that the wait doesn't get too tedious!
 
Posted by Ye Olde Motherboarde (# 54) on :
 
quote:
When are you due Flausa??
And Bronwyn is due too?

Oh, my gosh, I have to rush and get those baby presents done real soon1 [Eek!]

Congrats, Rat and Family!
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tom Day:
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Church was pretty funny though yesterday with people actually telling me they didn't want to see me there next week (unless I was there showing off a new edition).

Standard proceedure I'm afraid. It's funny at first, but the joke wears thin pretty quickly, especially after the second week. [Disappointed] [Roll Eyes]

Anyway, hang in there and chill out. Hope that the wait doesn't get too tedious!

Bugger, didn't realise that Tom hadn't logged out. [Disappointed]

That was me posting.

Sorry! [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tom Day:
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Church was pretty funny though yesterday with people actually telling me they didn't want to see me there next week (unless I was there showing off a new edition).

Standard proceedure I'm afraid. It's funny at first, but the joke wears thin pretty quickly, especially after the second week. [Disappointed] [Roll Eyes]

Anyway, hang in there and chill out. Hope that the wait doesn't get too tedious!

Yeah, you wouldn't believe the number of people who were 'shocked' to see me at church the day before my due date (oh, and the week after it too!!).
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Or the ones who would ask 'when are you due' and then take a big step backwards when the answer was "Thursday"... as if I was going to suddenly drop a baby on their shoes.

And then there's how 'brave' you are for taking the baby out. That goes away pretty fast though. Apparantly, leaving the house with a 2 week old is brave and you can be forgiven just about anything, but by the time you're hauling around a 3 month old, you really should have your personal grooming back under control [Biased]

(((Flausa))) I recall not enjoying the last week very much.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Yes, well I do keep telling them that I don't really expect to have the wee wan on the day. But we must let the little old ladies have their fun.

Dee, I was thinking maybe I can rig either a scratch and sniff system for the computer system of perhaps rewire the speakers that if I put the baby close enough, you'll be able to smell when diapers need changing. [Biased]
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Ewwwwwww,

I changed to really naaaasssttyyy ones last week. My neice presented me with 2 real biggies instead of the requesite one. 2 in a row [Projectile]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
After about twenty years of that (albeit with a six year break mid way, so only 14 I guess) I hope NEVER to see a nappy/diaper again. NEVER.

(mind you, I used to have a dog that enjoyed the process: she used to hang around waiting for any er, produce that fell to the floor when I was sluicing [Eek!] [Projectile] )
 
Posted by craigb (# 11318) on :
 
Kids and dogs, I remmember my nephew sitting on a floor once beside the dog, sniffing each others ...produce....

Yep but I owuldn't miss the nappy thing for any thing, congrats to all new mums and dads and may your children bring you great joy and happiness.

Blessings craig b
 
Posted by AdamPater (# 4431) on :
 
Why is it that any conversation amongst new parents sooner or later turns to poo? [Confused]

(I'm sure RooK would have a name for it.)
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ye Olde Motherboarde:
quote:

And Bronwyn is due too?


Im not due til July 18th a bit behind Flausa, but I KNOW I am having my baby on the 4th July, which is 2 weeks early, but I guess I wanted to celebrate independance day for the baby.(I am not American though)
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Fool of a Took:
Or the ones who would ask 'when are you due' and then take a big step backwards when the answer was "Thursday"... as if I was going to suddenly drop a baby on their shoes.

My Mam and my Aunt Isobel were both around 8 months pregnant when my Aunt Jean got married. It is traditional in Scotland to get married, have a large dinner with all of the wedding guests and then to have a dance afterward.

No-one, but no-one, would ask my Mam and Isobel to dance. In the end they decided that sisters should do it for themselves. Apparently it was quite the sight to see, two hugely pregnant women dancing the Gay Gordons. [Big Grin] The family doctor was also at the wedding, and his eyes never left the pair of them whilst they were on the dance floor.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by AdamPater:
Why is it that any conversation amongst new parents sooner or later turns to poo? [Confused]

(I'm sure RooK would have a name for it.)

Cos that's what being a new parent is all about?
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by AdamPater:
Why is it that any conversation amongst new parents sooner or later turns to poo? [Confused]

There's even a theme song
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Brilliant, Took! [Big Grin] It's not just women who get 'parental porridge brain', which is good to know.

Good luck, Flausa. [Votive]
 
Posted by Melisande (# 4177) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Apparently it was quite the sight to see, two hugely pregnant women dancing the Gay Gordons.

Brilliant! An also-pregnant friend and I danced together a few times back in the spring, and many jokes were made about us being our own two-couple set.

I was a bridesmaid when 8 1/2 months pregnant with baby #2, and everyone kept pushing their cell phone numbers on me in case I had to flee the ceremony.

And yes, the "still here?"/"better not see you next week!" comments wear thin very quickly.

And after my first, I cried and cried the day I accidentally put a dark sock in with the white load of laundry. Post-natal hormones are crazy nuts.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
[Votive] For all the new mummys and soon to be mummys who will experience posy baby hormones on the ship.

Post Natal Depression runs in my family and it is one of the few things that scares me about having a baby.

On the other hand my sister is due to pop out number 2 any day now (beeb will prolly be prem and has a growth on its lung [Votive] [Votive] ) and though she suffers from depression she has never been more stable than when she has been pregnant and a mummy...the hormones seem to work FOR her.

[Axe murder]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:


And after my first, I cried and cried the day I accidentally put a dark sock in with the white load of laundry. Post-natal hormones are crazy nuts. [/QB]

Yes that is depression. Sean had a school camp recently and was frightened to leave me. I have been really struggling with that sort of thing and yes it can be something as silly as that which ruins my day. Sean really worries when I come home from work as it is most likely to happen then as I have much more contact with people and well sometimes Joe public isn't going to stop being annoying because I am in a uniform I am meant to take abuse(apparently)
Really dreading the post natal depression which is most likely to kick in. I know for a fact if I increased the AD a lot of these feelings would go but I also know the drug isn't 100% safe for baby so I am keeping a lid on it with half my normal dose.

Can't imagine dancing at 8 1/2 months pregnant but hey the baby would be full term so if something did happen it wouldn't be the end of the world.

All new parents talk about poo, I guess as it for me is overwelling I read a brestfeed baby may pooo after every feed!!!! That is up to 15 times a day if I read the other bit right.

Speaking of brestfeeding I have joined the Brestfeeding Association of Australia and been reading a lot. Does anyone else intend to brestfeed?
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
The ratling is a fortnight old today! He is being breastfed and poos a lot. (He also particularly enjoys peeing when his nappy is taken off, in great dramatic arcs across the room).

But it isn't terribly nasty poo, and doesn't smell particularly offensive. Just yellow muck, and quite easy to deal with. I've read this is typical of breastfed babies.

His only real poo moment so far was when we were taking him to visit relatives, all dressed in his very best clothes. Just before we were due to leave, he managed to poo right up his back and down his legs, all over his lovely outfit, something he's never done before or since! He knows, I tell you.

On the subject of baby blues, I had a really shaky weekend. Partly hormonal I'm sure, partly being in more or less constant pain, partly just the pressure of so many visitors stressing me out. (It is a mystery to me how so many people can lecture you endlessly about getting enough rest and sleeping whenever you get the chance, while completely oblivious to the fact that they are stopping you doing exactly that.) It all boiled up on Saturday when I cried for hours and hours, convinced I was such a bad mother that Mr Rat and family wanted to lure the ratling off the breast and onto a bottle to get him away from me. On Sunday I dropped my lunch on the floor and that set off another day of tears and feeling incompentent.

Things seem to be getting much better this week, though. My various sore bits are beginning to ease off, so I feel less like an invalid and can walk and sit without flinching. And we've enforced a visit ban on the family for at least a week (so everybody hates us now, but at least I have room to breathe and can get used to looking after the wee one without a critical audience).

It feels like I'm learning to work around his demands now rather than being run ragged by them. Yesterday I even managed to clean the bedroom and bathroom, so even though the rest of the house is a wreck there's a little oasis of order [Biased]
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Sorry to double post, but I just realised how negative that last post sounded. We have had lots of fun too!

The Ratling sleeps very well once he goes off, we've never had to get up more than once during the night. The health visitor says his feeding pattern is perfectly normal for a baby who plans to sleep most of the night - that's why he's particular demanding late evening and first thing in the morning. She also says he is thriving so he's obviously feeding well and getting all the milk he needs.

He loves his bath, and going out in his pram - good fun now that I can walk more than a few yards without feeling like my insides are going to drop out.

He's also getting more alert by the day. He often stays awake for a while after a feed and looks around him instead of going straight off to sleep. He focuses on our faces, turns towards our voices, and seems to be fascinated by anything with bright contrasting colours.

There've been a few trials, but he's definitely worth it [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
(((Rat))) I can't believe he's two weeks already! They grow up so fast!

I think I'm becoming more and more thankful that I don't have much family close by to pester us. And our building has a buzz-in entry system, so people can't get up to our door unless I'm in the mood to let them in. Visits by appointment only, subject to cancellation by mum and baby.

Oh, and Bronwyn, I'm planning to breastfeed, but don't plan to join our local "club," as their meeting times/locations are stupid inconvenient for me. Besides, they seem to put good in-home support in place with the midwives and health visitors, and I can always call on my emergency, back-up health visitor, Jack the Lass. I've also received a bazillion how-to pamphlets and a DVD (which I'll watch one of these days).

I know the best reason to breastfeed is for the baby's health, but personally I'm keen on the added benefits of free baby food and less smelly poo.
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
Sorry to double post, but I just realised how negative that last post sounded. We have had lots of fun too!


That's the thing with these baby blues - if I let on how I feel, I then have to follow it up by saying, but I'm happy really, and I love Beeb, in case people think I'm a bad mother. I probably am not a very good mother, but as I am the only one Beeb has, I'm also the best one he has.

Re breastfeeding I think the advice they give you before the birth rather underplays the fact that it can hurt quite a lot - and this doesn't necessarily mean you are doing it wrong. I have had midwives and breastfeeding counsellors check how Beeb is latched on, and he is fine, but my breasts still get sore sometimes at the end of a hungry day.

Also, breastfeeding him when he was newborn was nothing like what I was told beforehand. He had a small mouth (well, he was a tiny baby!) and I have big breasts, so I had to pull out my nipple into a mouth-sized portioned to get him latched on. My mother was very reassuring, but if I had been relying on the leaflets and the antenatal advice, I would never have managed it.

Hope you're all doing OK. Beeb is now more than 6 weeks and is being weighed today.

Best wishes
Posy
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Posy:
That's the thing with these baby blues - if I let on how I feel, I then have to follow it up by saying, but I'm happy really, and I love Beeb, in case people think I'm a bad mother. I probably am not a very good mother, but as I am the only one Beeb has, I'm also the best one he has.

I'm sure you are a very good mother.

I have to say, though, I'm not so much concerned with being thought a bad mother (not today, anyway [Smile] ) as I am with depressing and pissing off the mums-to-be, who's thread this is. I was made livid in the last couple of months of pregancy by people telling me horror stories that seemed to imply, with varying degrees of glee, that I'd ruined my life. I found this very aggravating at a time when I was already feeling vulnerable and sometimes wondering whether I'd made a huge mistake that it was far too late to back out of.

I don't think it's good to pretend all is rosy or lie, of course, but I do think it's good to be balanced too, and I know I have a tendency to play up the disasters in any situation at the expense of the good things. And for me, so far, it has been worth it. (Even the stitches... hmm, well maybe not them)

I do agree about the breastfeeding though, I don't think they warn you how much it can hurt and the emphasis on saying 'well that means you're doing it wrong' doesn't seem entirely helpful or completely realistic. I think what sometimes happens is that one early imperfectly positioned feed damages your nipple, but then every feed after that aggravates it again and hurts like hell - which makes it difficult to tell whether you're doing it right or not, as well as making your heart sink when feeding time comes around. Like you, I've had quite a lot of pain on one side, despite being assured by midwives and health visitors that the Ratling is correctly latching on and getting good feeds. It seems to be getting better now, thank goodness.
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
I'm not put off by posts like yours Rat, I think it's good to have realistic expectations of how things can be after the birth. I'm good at setting unrealistic goals for myself so it is helpful to know that it is ok and normal to have difficulties coping with the new situation. You don't make having a newborn sound exceptionally horrible in any way!

The tone in your post was not "ooo, here's another story of how horribly wrong everything can go", just a realistic account of how you are experiencing things.

But I have a sincere urge to shake your insensitive visitors, as well as my "well meaning" colleague who keeps telling me horror stories about deliveries and stillborn babies. At least my male colleagues try to hush her when she gets started, for which I am very grateful.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:


His only real poo moment so far was when we were taking him to visit relatives, all dressed in his very best clothes. Just before we were due to leave, he managed to poo right up his back and down his legs, all over his lovely outfit, something he's never done before or since! He knows, I tell you.


SC was given a little frilly romper suit in a very small size by my mother. She never saw him in it, because whenever I put it on, he'd either poo, pee or posset on it within 5 minutes! On one occasion, I literally put it on as they left to visit us, and they live 10 minutes away, but he still soiled it in time!

ShadoK said it was him showing early good taste in clothing. [Snigger]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well so much activity today on this thread. Rat you are in my thoughts and prayers as you cope with Ratling.

Breastfeeding I always thought wasn't easy I guess joining the local group was also a way of meeting other mums around here as well I don't know many. Was very excited to see a tiny bit of colostrum on my brests in the last 24 hours. Only a drop but enough to excite me. Guess up here a little nervous about the health professionals. Some have been well midwifes for years stuck in a country hospital. I just want support. Well worth the $50 (approx 20 pounds) I believe.

Had a phone call from a friend today who is so sweet but was extreamly concerned when I mentioned I was in agonizing pain, to the point when even lifting a 2kg container out of the trolley sent shooting pains in my abdo and back. Shouldn't have been shopping all all but were needed a few things. Even walking has been painful. She convinced me to ring the hospital. Spend an hour and a half with a dr and midwife who did all sorts of tests and eventually suggested nothing was wrong with baby but I take a drug which I have had in the past and am sensitive too. I was willing to give it a go til I came home tonight and looked it up in my book of drugs in pregnancy given to me by a fellow nurse. The side effect is harm to baby's renal system in the 3rd trimester. Hence I have given it a miss and am in aganizing pain until I ring for advise tomorrow from where my gyne suggested I call about my anti depressent. Ie the womens hospital in Melbourne.
Most up to date researched info avalible. I am sure it is just scar tissue and although uncomfortable isn't worth risk to baby.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
I think I'm becoming more and more thankful that I don't have much family close by to pester us. And our building has a buzz-in entry system, so people can't get up to our door unless I'm in the mood to let them in. Visits by appointment only, subject to cancellation by mum and baby.

The only way to do it!

quote:
I know the best reason to breastfeed is for the baby's health, but personally I'm keen on the added benefits of free baby food and less smelly poo.
Ohh yes. Damn good reason.

Nip cream is an essential for breastfeeding. And those who say if you're doing it right it wont hurt at all are talking out of their arse. Most womens nipples aren't used to being sucked on that much, of course they're gonna bloody hurt until they 'harden' up.

[ 10. May 2006, 18:48: Message edited by: Pânts ]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Bron, those midwives are probably the best people around!

I found creams dreadfully unhelpful - made my nipples wet and more sore. In the end I just gave up on maternity bras (DON'T get the ones with zips if they still make them! Just DON'T, ok??! [Ultra confused] ) and wore tee-shirts which were easy access for the baby and weren't spoilt by copious amounts of milk. They also let my nipples dry out between feeds (which wasn't long). Breast pads just kept them moist and sore. (I don't mean when I was out anywhere, of course! I wore bras then...)

So excited for you Bron! Hope the pain is better soon. Good that you are careful about the baby; my Mum was a nurse and had dreadful morning sickness with me but refused the new wonder drug they offered her 'just in case'. There were LOTS of thalidomide babies the year I was born. [Votive]

[ 10. May 2006, 22:10: Message edited by: Vikki Pollard ]
 
Posted by busyknitter (# 2501) on :
 
Trouble with breastfeeding is that what works for one, doesn't help at all for another. i could not have survived the early days of feeding without both a decent bra and the nipple cream.

Busyknitter's product endorsement is here . It was fantastic and provided instant relief. You can get it at any decent chemists (though i think it may be a UK-only product).

All the best to all you soon to be Mums [Smile]

BK

[ 11. May 2006, 05:40: Message edited by: busyknitter ]
 
Posted by Suze (# 5639) on :
 
I'm just catching up with events here - congrats on baby Ratling, Rat, it's been so good to read of your first couple of weeks with him.

I didn't realise you were due so soon Flausa, prayers that all goes well for you both.

[Votive] for all the new mums and mums-to-be posting here.
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
I'll second Busyknitter's recommendation for nipple cream. And it has a really nice smell.

Like her I could not imagine surviving without a bra in those early days - I even used to wear a 'sleep bra' at night. I guess this was mainly to hold the 'breast pads' in place.

I fact I didn't buy breast pads as I found a cheaper alternative. i dunno if you can still get it, but 16 years ago there used to be a product called nappy roll - designed as a disposable insert for terry nappies I think, to absorb the bulk of the mess. I found that if I cut this into squares of half the width of the roll, it made cheap and very absorbant breast pads. Which for someone with leaky boobs like me was a godsend (do other people experience leaking heavily from the other breast when you are feeding from the first one - or was that a personal quirk of my body?!)
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
(do other people experience leaking heavily from the other breast when you are feeding from the first one - or was that a personal quirk of my body?!)

It happened to me too. I found that the leakage problems stopped after a couple of months, but found washable breast pads great until then.

If you are going to use washable breast pads it is good idea to get a little laundry bag. I didn't use one, and a breast pad slipped between the drum and the seal and cause problems with the spin cycle. The engineer said that he has seen washines ruined by breast pads.

I was just thinking, if you were to write a manual for visitors, what would you put in it?

My entry would be only stay for a max of 20 mins (unless the mother pleads with you) and always at least offer to make a cup of tea or do the dishes.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Add to the manual:
If you think muffins or cookies or sandwiches are an essential part of visiting, bring some muffins or cookies or sandwiches, and serve them yourself.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I was last pregnant thirty-five years ago. To prepare for breastfeeding I massaged my nipples with Masse cream two or three times a day, starting about eight weeks before my due date.

The cream is specifically designed to toughen a woman's nipples and make them more flexible. It works very well.

The other important point is not to let the baby suck very long the first few days. There's no milk there anyway, so you're not depriving him of food.

Moo
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
I come from a breastfeeding family (again, we're cheap [Biased] ). My sister had a fairly easy time breastfeeding her three. She said the worst bit was when my niece (her eldest) started getting her teeth (she had teeth very early ... no hair, but nice teeth), and during some eager feeds starting chewing rather than sucking. Yowch!

[ 11. May 2006, 14:27: Message edited by: Flausa ]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
I'll second Busyknitter's recommendation for nipple cream. And it has a really nice smell.

I said it first! But yes, Kamillosan is the best!
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
My manual for visitors would suggest that they do what Babybear says, and also offer to:
hoover (vacuum)
mop the kitchen floor
iron (only if they're good at it).

Also, that if the visitor has a cold, the visitor should stay home. Do not suggest that you are helping Baby to build a strong immune system.
 
Posted by Suze (# 5639) on :
 
Also, if you're a close friend and they are comfortable with you looking after nipper for an hour or so, offer to babysit while mum has a shower/nap/whatever else she hasn't been able to do. I've had a few friends who have told me they really appreciated it.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Oh, and get them to bring a meal with them. I had a few who did that, and it was wonderful!!!
 
Posted by busyknitter (# 2501) on :
 
Recently, when a member of our congregation had her third baby, church arranged a meals rota for the first 2-3 weeks. It seemed to work well (especially as word got back to me that they liked my lasagne best [Big Grin] )

BK
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Beginning to thank God my mother sees it as her responsability to come up here for a couple of weeks and do ALL the house work, cooking and so on until I establish a routine and I am lucky now as I can tell her I need time alone. She will also serve all visitors drinks and so on. Worried it might be too much but I think I can tell her to have a rest.

Just back from Drs who was also shocked I was suggested I have the drug that was suggested and a phone call to the experts suggested it can cause a babys heart to close in the valves, kidney problems and something about labor. Got back to me having what I suggested originally and that is considered safe.

Managed to go to the brestfeedng night last night but was very uncomfortable. Here in Australia we have a product called Lansinoh which is get this: Australian and New Zealand Refined Wool fat, Refined in the UK and packed in Canada and Australia. I was told no preparation is necessary or recomended but I have been rubbing this onto my brests for weeks now once a day as they look dry. Most people do not need anything but it is suggested when you are feeding to put a little bit of milk on the brest and let it dry before covering with a bra. Also make sure the baby is lached on well as the midwife shows you. If you leave baby incorrectly to suck the brest will be sore.

On another front today I managed to lose both a reciept to claim money back from the govt for healthcare, I managed to break down in the chemmist picking up the medication as I was told I needed a card I also managed to have given someone who asked for it and then forgot to give it back. I was in so much pain when she sent me away to get it I told her I couldn't and pointed out I didn't need t for the script which she argued with me(I was right being a nurse I know how things work she just asked for it routinly). Then told me to go straight back, to which I said I couldn't I was in too much pain. All this in front of a pharmist I knew as well as a relative of a client. Got home, phoned both places and they are both in the post. I have not had to get in and out of my car three tomes which is so straining and painful currently.
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
Glad to hear your mother will be around to help out during the first weeks, Bronwyn.

I can't imagine coping with all the visitors and such people are describing. And I was happily up and doing things within hours of having my kids. But you need that initial few weeks to get your body and sleep schedule meshed with the baby's needs. Which in plain English means when the baby is asleep, the only choice you should be making is "Do I need to sleep now too or do I want to get something done?".

No wonder new mothers seemed so stressed and have trouble breastfeeding and whatnot if people are expecting them to be gracious hostesses immediately post-partum!

Rat's post brought back memories of those first breastfeeding days -- settling the sore and stitched nether-regions gingerly down on the pillow in the chair, followed by the grimace of pain as the little barracuda latched onto the sore nipple. [Smile]

I guess because I had watched my mother nurse my younger sister (when I was six) and my older sister nurse her babies (when I was a teen), I knew that nursing was a pleasant and relaxing thing once established, and worth every second of the initial pains.

I still miss it to this very day and I'm 54. When they're tiny, they heave this wonderful sigh of total contentment after they fall asleep and let go (or you detach them). When they're older they look up at you while nursing and sometimes smile (and thus lose their hold on the nipple [Razz] ) and they pat and stroke your breast with their little hand. *sigh*

I know it doesn't work for everyone, but I do want to encourage the new moms to find the courage (or a suitable watchdog to chase them away) to deflect the useless visitors and take the time to give breastfeeding and bonding with the baby all the immense time and attention it requires.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by busyknitter:
Recently, when a member of our congregation had her third baby, church arranged a meals rota for the first 2-3 weeks. It seemed to work well (especially as word got back to me that they liked my lasagne best [Big Grin] )

BK

Our congregation did that for me when Sc was born. It lasted a fortnight. One week we had spaghetti bolognaise three times! I certainly found out who the best cooks were!
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
It sounds as if I'd better plan to place Caid at the door with a big stick (or his kung fu sword!) to chase any visitors away. [Big Grin]

I thought the baby should be kept away from other people during the first weeks because of risk of infections. Or is that just for the premature ones? My colleague just had a baby who was three weeks early and they didn't even let relatives visit in the beginning.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jlg:
I know it doesn't work for everyone, but I do want to encourage the new moms to find the courage (or a suitable watchdog to chase them away) to deflect the useless visitors and take the time to give breastfeeding and bonding with the baby all the immense time and attention it requires.

Any time you want a job as watchdog to chase away visitor, you're hired! Feel free to bring your favourite deflecting weapon of choice. [Biased]

Not sure how I feel about having meals brought to us. Both hubby and I really enjoy cooking and find it one of the few "chores" that help us to relax. I am going to try to put aside some meals in the freezer, which means I've had the chance to cook, it'll be something that we know we'll like to eat, but still be a quick meal if that's what we need/want. Though if Jack the Lass wants to bring us more of her scrummy flapjacks, she is more than welcome. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Heh. As well as providing the Cresswells with yummy pudding, this week I have also discussed how to potty train toddlers with my sister and just got off the phone after a London-based friend with a 6 week old baby called me for advice about sleep and feeding. I still haven't finished my ****** essay though. Argh.

Perhaps I should start charging for my services [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Jack, how 'bout we say a goat cheese and roast garlic tart makes us even this week and a new lettuce patch puts on a start for next week? [Biased]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moth:
quote:
Originally posted by busyknitter:
Recently, when a member of our congregation had her third baby, church arranged a meals rota for the first 2-3 weeks. It seemed to work well (especially as word got back to me that they liked my lasagne best [Big Grin] )

BK

Our congregation did that for me when Sc was born. It lasted a fortnight. One week we had spaghetti bolognaise three times! I certainly found out who the best cooks were!
Mental note dont make spag bol if making for someone in the church then.
 
Posted by The Kat in the Hat (# 2557) on :
 
I was the first from my family to produce offspring. Apparently when my sisters told my mum they would going to visit, my mum said something along the lines of "you will not be a visitor, you will find someting helpful to do around the house - and take lunch with you!".
I did appreciate that (although I didn't know that was what had been said until much later!)
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Spag bol and breastfeeding... hmmm.

Not a good combo if my memory serves me correctly. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Indeed Vikki. Even having had the spag chopped up, I still left half of it over myself and the floor! [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
About 10 seconds after I sat down to eat a meal the baby would need to be fed. Then my plate was pushed over to Gremlin so he could cut up my meal. After a few weeks I got rather adept at managing to eat dinner one-handed.

Pizza was a good thing as it can easily be eaten one-handed. Pasta things seemed to have the ability to slide of the fork. This was especially true if I was wearing a white top.
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
I breast fed exclusively for about 3 weeks or so, by which time, the two hour feeding sessions were starting to really do my head in. Sometimes it was ok, but for the majority it was quite stressful for me and little one. He never seemed to get enough and wouldn't go down to sleep easily. As soon as we started to put a bottle in, he was so much more contented, and I was happier too.

I still think that breast is best, but at the same time, if you're going to be miserable, I wouldn't blame anyone for going onto bottles.

If we have another one, I will try again, but I'm not going to get my knickers in a twist about it. I have heard that with some babies it works well, and with others it's much more like Matthew and me. I suppose it's just the way things go.

(Little nipper has just started on solids, and is sleeping ALL through the night - 7 till 7. Hurrah!)
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Annie, you mean we're not all the same, and one person's experience or "expertise" won't work for everyone? How on earth, can anyone ever do this motherhood thing right? [Eek!] [Biased] Oh wait, you engage your brain (and your partner's brain, if you aren't a single parent), discard the well-meant but crap advice, and find what works best for your family. Annie, I keep meaning to tell you that I have a great deal of respect for making the decision that was right for you and Matthew, regardless of what other people might think or say. [Overused]
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
Thanks Flausa, you are right. What I think I was trying to say was that breast feeding might not work. I hope it does work, but if it doesn't, don't beat yourself up about it. Little one and you might both be better off on bottles. It's something you have to decide, don't let anyone pressure you into doing one or the other.

The single most important thing in this whole baby rearing is that you are happy and baby is happy (as far as possible). If there are things which you can change to make that possible, then do it. You don't get a medal for being brave, just for the sake of it, in parenting. (And that goes for labour and birth too).
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
I'd absolutely second what Annie says. I had a similar experience with breastfeeding - I tried very hard, but within a few weeks it was clearly not working well enough. As I look at my strapping great six-foot tall elder son now, I do wonder why I beat myself up so much at the time, fearing I'd ruin his life by not succeeding at breast-feeding!

I tried again with my second son, but he was prescribed anibiotics at about a week old, which upset his stomach and led to all kinds of feeding problems. I got even more het up about him, as his weight crawled along at the bottom of the charts, and he refused milk in any and all of its forms. Suddenly, at about a year old, he started eating normally, and at 12 he is if anything a little too plump - I'm watching his snack intake! I can't quite believe I used to fear that he'd starve to death because I wasn't feeding him properly.

One of the great benefits of living in the civilised west is that we have clean water and can sterilise bottles. So, if you really can't get on with breast alone, there is a perfectly adequate alternative.

You have to be a good-enough parent, not a perfect one. You will make mistakes, and circumstances out of your control will affect what happens, but if you love your child and you have an ounce of common sense, it will all work out in the long run.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
I agree with you all. While I'm perfectly convinced that breast is best, loads of stress and misery are definitely not best. It's got to be best to do what works for you and the baby.

I think it's worth bearing in mind that when I was born, the experts here didn't encourage breastfeeding at all, and women who insisted on it (my mum was actually called 'disgusting and unnatural' by one of the nurses in maternity!) were strongly advised to stop after 6 weeks. There was no support for breastfeeding mums, and no acceptance of public feeding. The result being that most of my generation either weren't breastfed or only for a short time - yet I don't see any huge drop in IQ, health or life expectancy among 30-somethings. So I'm betting that while the benefits of breastfeeding are surely real, they're not the matter of life and death we're currently lead to believe.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Well I think the only way is to breastfeed.


.


Just kidding! [Biased]


No, really, I am just kidding. Having seen friends going through trauma like Annie, whatever's best for baby and mum.


You see, I'm paranoid now... you do know I'm just kidding don't you?!! [Paranoid] [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Just a word of support for all the new mommies and almost-mommies. I just wanted to add that, if you get baby started on it right away, you might have the option of doing both breast- and bottle-feeding. I did this with my firstborn, giving her a bottle around 5 pm when we were both tired and cranky. It also lets dad in on the feeding routine, so he can enjoy it too. Firstborn was able to take both formula and pumped milk in the bottle. It made it easier to transition to day care when my maternity leave was over. Not all babies will cooperate with alternating, though -- her younger brother would have no part of it. (At eighteen, he's still a stubborn pup - bless his heart [Biased] .)
 
Posted by Tom Day (# 3630) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
It also lets dad in on the feeding routine, so he can enjoy it too.

It's great! I remember feeling left out when I couldn't help with the feeding and a bit useless. However, now I love feeding him - especially the solids - quite fun [Biased]

Tom
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
I would also like to comment that I support peoples individual decisions in feeding, using cloth nappies or disposables, and all other decisions in childcare.

No one has any right to condem how another parent brings up a child unless it is an issue of abuse which non of these things do and making sure baby and mummy is happy is most important.

Oh and had an original idea for when the temp is 43C but will check with a health professional. Frozen breat milk icepoles...I mean for an older baby.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tom Day:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
It also lets dad in on the feeding routine, so he can enjoy it too.

I remember feeling left out when I couldn't help with the feeding and a bit useless.
Oh, I don't know. You could always have taken nappy duty. That way you were both responsible for one end. Seems a fair division of labour to me. [Biased]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Oh and had an original idea for when the temp is 43C but will check with a health professional. Frozen breast milk icepoles...I mean for an older baby.

[Killing me] Could help with teething pains too!
 
Posted by Melisande (# 4177) on :
 
We have Lansinoh here in the States, too; it did well by me both times.

Breastfeeding can hurt for all kinds of reasons -- my older daughter and I traded thrush for a few months, and my younger was born tongue-tied, which meant that she couldn't get a good latch. I figured out the problem when she was two months old, but before that, there was a great deal of pain, depression (what was wrong with us? it worked fine with L!), and plummeting self-esteem when I had to supplement with formula. Even though I intellectually understood that sometimes breastfeeding doesn't work, and in the abstract supported women choosing however they fed their babies, it was very hard for me to concede that I couldn't provide my baby with everything out of my own body (yes, I knew that by giving her a bottle so she wouldn't, say, starve to death, I was providing her with what she needed).

She had her tongue-tie clipped at two months, and got much better at nursing immediately, and at days shy of nine months she's still both nursing and getting the odd bottle of formula. In a lot of ways having the formula option is more convenient if I want to go out or mix her some cereal; with L I was constantly in a state about how much Precious Frozen Milk I had in the freezer, and whether any event was worth thawing for (I was working, so hoarded it for days she was home with the sitter). Honestly, I'm still proud that I raised her on breast milk alone, but it took some angst. Now, I have angst over C for other reasons. Can't win. [Smile]
 
Posted by musician (# 4873) on :
 
The only right way to do things is what works for you and your family. Until the children are born, you've no idea how it will change your life....and nor has anyone else.

I remember thinking before the birth that I'd breastfeed - none of that imitation stuff for my kids, oh no!
Well,I started, but sonny boy didn't want to know and after a few days of pain, neither did I to be honest.
Switched him to a bottle and he took to it straight away. A bonus for that was that psyduck could share the feeding - two blessings there, daddy-bonding and more sleep for me! [Yipee]

Do what suits you,when it suits you, if it suits you and how it suits you.

Apologiees if this is just repeating others, but it's really important.
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Pain, particularly after feeding, can also be caused by mastitis. I thought it always started with a blocked duct, so when I got pain after feeding, only in one breast, I thought it was nothing to worry about and would go away. Wrong. It didn't - it got worse. After about a month I went to the doctor, and it turned out that I had infective mastitis and needed antibiotics. It's now cleared up and I'm still able to breastfeed, but I put myself through several weeks of completely avoidable discomfort. So please, if you get pain after feeding, get it checked out.

JJB
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
Just to say, Flausa and Alan, you are still very much in our thoughts.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Stubborn little critter. Out! out! I tell you!
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Stubborn little critter. Out! out! I tell you!

[Big Grin] Sorry that really made me laugh - I am sure that it is very frustrating for you!

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Stubborn little critter. Out! out! I tell you!

I'm sure you're really keen to get that baby in your arms, but try to enjoy the last hours of pregnancy. Visit a nice restaurant that you won't be able to take baby to, go and see a film, or just wander round an art gallery or museum. Trust me, your restaurant and film days are soon to be behind you for a good while to come, and though you might visit galleries and museums, you'll do it behind a small child asking questions!
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Tee hee. Moth that was funny. We aren't really a museum and gallery sort of couple (though I'm looking forward to having a little person to take around to such places as my parents did with me when I was little), our visit to a nice restaurant is usually a pub, and the last "film" we saw was "Wallace and Grommit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit." We did our last quiet weekend just the two of us away in April, but there's really nothing in our "busy social agenda" that we won't be able to do with a kidlet in tow.

Auntie Doris, I was going to say, "out! out! damn spot," but thought that might sound too much like I was talking to a dog (scroll down to sample page).

Actually, the only drag at this point is both AC and I are having sleepless nights, and we'd at least like to have a good reason for doing so. You know, put a face to the problem. [Biased]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
[QB] Auntie Doris, I was going to say, "out! out! damn spot,"

... and that was exactly the quote I was thinking of!

Auntie Doris x

[ 22. May 2006, 10:07: Message edited by: Auntie Doris ]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Flausa, do you have an induction date booked?

Here's hoping baby decides to come of his/her own accord, and hurries up! (I have some lettuce to collect [Smile] ).
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Actually, the most frustrating thing at the moment is not being able to do the things we actually like to do. Walking, camping, hiking, and travelling are almost completely out of the question, because of my physical limitations at present. But all of those things will be doable again once I no longer have the equivalent of an 8lb bowling ball sitting on my bladder.

The uncertainty isn't great either. AC's hesitant to have nightcaps, because we don't know if he'll need to be alert and driving in the middle of the night. We're not making dinner plans with people, just in case we have to cancel. We'll be missing a Shipmeet because of it. We're avoiding phoning family and friends, because they're all waiting for "the call."

So at present, the pregnancy is a not a pleasure, but at least I know it won't last more than another week (they'll induce after 7 more days), so we're almost there.

ETA: JtL, my check-up's tomorrow, so they'll do an internal ( [Eek!] ), and if they can't do a membrane sweep to set things rolling, they'll schedule the induction.

Oh, and your lettuce looks brilliant and I found another very scrummy-sounding veggie recipe that we'll need to test out.

[ 22. May 2006, 11:10: Message edited by: Flausa ]
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
ETA: JtL, my check-up's tomorrow, so they'll do an internal ( [Eek!] ), and if they can't do a membrane sweep to set things rolling, they'll schedule the induction.

I was nervous at first about having an internal sweep, but in the end I actually found it quite pleasant. Something about some one being able to lift the baby's head off my pelvis for a couple of minutes was quite gratifying. Like having an itch that you can't scratch, and some one doing it for you.

Matthew was 11 days late, after we tried everything to get him to move. I would second Moth's recommendation of doing something special, as there really is little chance after the birth. I went for a leg wax and a back massage just before I was due and it was lovely.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
Flausa, it sounds like your social life is much like mine and ShadoK's! [Smile] . However, even "Curse of the Were Rabbit" will be out for a bit whilst the baby's tiny (unless he/she is far better behaved than either of mine), and not all pubs let kids in [Frown] . The hiking will be great whilst he/she is small enough to carry, but there's an awkward phase at about 3-4 years old where they're too big to put on your back and too small to walk very far. If you have more than one child, that phase can last a fair while! (We're now at awkward phase number 2 - they're big enough to outwalk us, but don't consider a walking holiday in the Yorkshire Dales to be fun any more!).

Still, I appreciate your frustration - it's a long wait to see that little person you've been carrying inside! I do hope he/she pops out soon, and with as little inconvenience to you as can be managed!
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
Yeah, there's very little you can't do with a nursing baby along for the ride. Like, wander leisurely up and down the grocery aisles, nursing the little one in the kiddie-seat of the grocery cart there in front of you as you decide between French Cut or Regular green beans.

Time drags right now, but it will pick up and go faster and faster and in what seems like only a few weeks you will be wondering how the little one got so grown and done with school already.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moth:
However, even "Curse of the Were Rabbit" will be out for a bit whilst the baby's tiny (unless he/she is far better behaved than either of mine)

I can vouch for that. We've tried to watch the same DVD 4 times since the Ratling was born and been foiled every time. If he doesn't scream the place down, we fall asleep. Or both in succession!

We did go out for a meal on Saturday though - left the wee one with his grandparents and an unnecessarily huge supply of expressed milk for a couple of hours, which he largely slept through. We're probably horrible, traumatising parents! [Eek!] He seemed to survive the experience though...and so did the grandparents.

quote:
Originally posted by Annie P:
I was nervous at first about having an internal sweep, but in the end I actually found it quite pleasant. Something about some one being able to lift the baby's head off my pelvis for a couple of minutes was quite gratifying. Like having an itch that you can't scratch, and some one doing it for you.

I think my midwife must have been doing it wrong, it was nothing like that.

I have to say I found the internals during induction and prior to delivery one of the worst and most unpleasant parts of the whole experience - I don't know why, it doesn't seem logical considering what-all happened later with the forceps and everything. I expect it depends on the person, I'm a big wimp until you give me lots of drugs.

Flausa: good luck! One way or another you'll have your wee wan with you soon! We're really excited for you and Alan.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Janine:
Yeah, there's very little you can't do with a nursing baby along for the ride.

That very much depends on the temprament of baby and mother, and also on health.

quote:
Like, wander leisurely up and down the grocery aisles, nursing the little one in the kiddie-seat of the grocery cart there in front of you as you decide between French Cut or Regular green beans.

American grocery carts must be shaped very differently from the ones over here. There is absolutely no way I would have been able to nurse a baby whilst the baby was in the cart. The contortions would have been quite something and it would not have been a leisurely wander, but a lurch and a stagger.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
I have to say I found the internals during induction and prior to delivery one of the worst and most unpleasant parts of the whole experience.

That's what I've been told by several women as well. Which is why I'm dragging hubby along to the appointment with me tomorrow for moral support and distraction.

And Annie, I am beginning to wonder about you. Leg waxing = a special treat? [Paranoid] [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
I have to say I found the internals during induction and prior to delivery one of the worst and most unpleasant parts of the whole experience.

That's what I've been told by several women as well. Which is why I'm dragging hubby along to the appointment with me tomorrow for moral support and distraction.

I think it might depend on how many you end up needing to have - things get more tender the more they are prodded. (Honestly, I really tried to think of another way to put that.)

Because of the way my induction went, I had about 5 or 6 over a couple of days. The first couple were no big deal. By the last one, things were getting Unpleasant.

So let's hope you only have the one - might get things going anyway.

All the best
b
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
things get more tender the more they are prodded. (Honestly, I really tried to think of another way to put that.)

...the more pokings you get the sorer things become? [Snigger]

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:

And Annie, I am beginning to wonder about you. Leg waxing = a special treat? [Paranoid] [Ultra confused]

There was no way I was going into hospital with hairy legs. Better than trying to shave them.

Actually, the back massage was the really good bit.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
[Votive] for Flausa and Alan. Good luck.

And a piece of well-meant advice which you are free to ignore (I know you don't like advice); for at least a week afterwards, keep your knees together when getting in and out of the car*. I wish someone had told me that in advance...

Jane R

* of course, you may be one of these Models of Deportment who always gets in and out of a car with her knees together; I'm not [Frown]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
* of course, you may be one of these Models of Deportment who always gets in and out of a car with her knees together

[Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me]

Quick update. They couldn't do a membrane sweep today (midwife told me that I did very well for my first internal ... guess flexibility helps in more than one way), so they've scheduled me to go in to hospital Friday afternoon to start the induction. So the wee wan will be out soon whether or not it wants to be.
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
First internal what? Exam? What have I missed along the Saga of Wee Wan route? You ain't been examined internally at all along the way? [Paranoid]

Oh, BB -- we gots great big ol' grocery carts, and since I'm 5'5", the handle and baby-basket part had the little one able to recline - sideways - at the perfect height for nursing.

[ 23. May 2006, 11:22: Message edited by: Janine ]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Janine:
First internal what? Exam? What have I missed along the Saga of Wee Wan route? You ain't been examined internally at all along the way? [Paranoid]

Methods in medicine change over the years, sometimes dramatically. A friend who gave birth about 30 years ago had an internal exam every time she had an ante-natal appointment.

With my first baby (12 years ago) I maybe had about 9 internals before labour started. When the little cub came I think I had a grand total of 3.

The list of 'Do & Don't' changed quite a bit in the 3 years between children too.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Methods in medicine change over the years, sometimes dramatically. A friend who gave birth about 30 years ago had an internal exam every time she had an ante-natal appointment.

With my first baby (12 years ago) I maybe had about 9 internals before labour started. When the little cub came I think I had a grand total of 3.

Yep, I had no internal examinations until I was 7 days overdue and had the 'membrane sweep appointment'. Then several during the induction process.

It isn't considered necessary now unless there are problems, until the time comes when you could\should be preparing for labour and they need to check the progress of your cervix.

When my mum had me they did internals at the drop of a hat, apparently.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Janine:
First internal what? Exam? What have I missed along the Saga of Wee Wan route? You ain't been examined internally at all along the way? [Paranoid]


Actually I havent been examined internally or externally unless you count ultrasound (done every visit) and the time I rang up disressed with pain a week or so back - then a jr dr and a mid wife externally examined me. Guess with my ceasor I am lucky might miss out all together. [Yipee]
So tired with work, breast feeding classes organizing car seat fittings, but pleased to say Sean suggested I rest tomorrow and go out for a special dinner in the evening. Only concerntrate on the needed work. He cleaned up the house toocame home it was a blessing.
Had another embarrassing or funny incident at work tonight. Had really bad nausea and KNEW I was gonna spew, ran to nearest loo, which from past times is not very private, Without even getting the door shut I spewed and then managed to shut the door. Heard people outside asking who is in there(this is also a client loo) and by the time I could come out I had an audience of 3 people awaiting to see it I was OK. Assured them I was and the illness was not infectious. Had a lot of pain and heartburn hence up at midnight.

Thinking of you Alan and Flausa...was just lying in bed complaining I have been so busy haven't been around for a few days to check on news of you. Don't know if it is only an australian thing but friday is cystic fibrosis day, so I will remember you.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
I know you don't like advice

I've been thinking about this, and felt I should respond as several people have commented to me in private - some condemning me for my feelings and others praising me. I am not adverse to receiving advice in certain contexts (in fact, I have often sought advice in my life), but there are certain contexts where I find "advice" to be potentially harmful or at the very least, inappropriate.

So here are the reasons I've had issues with the proliferation of advice being given on the shipmates expecting threads:

1) As has finally been acknowledged on the most recent pages on this thread, each woman and child is individual, and therefore, each pregnancy and child and labour and delivery will be different. What works for some will not work for others, and pushing people to fit your own model for what worked can be physically, emotionally, and mentally damaging to another.

2) As babybear mentioned, medical knowledge/opinion has changed drastically in regards to pregnancy over the last several years and actually still varies from country to country. What was advised for someone 30 years ago, or even 5 years ago, may now be condemned by the same professionals.

3) I have a whole host of professionals supporting me through this pregnancy who are medically trained and have way more legitimate medical advice and knowledge than a group of women with individual experiences. These professionals supporting me also have a better knowledge of my and my child's physical/medical circumstances, so are much better equipped to advise (though I am still able to question some of their advice if I receive conflicting information, which I have between my midwives, doctors, and free information distributed by them).

4) I think it unwise to accept medical advice from people that you only know on the internet. As I've already said, my doctors know my situation, but a person on the internet only knows what little I've revealed, and so cannot speak intelligently to my specific situation. I know it is also Ship policy to not give medical advice, though quite a bit has been given on these threads, mostly by people with no medical training.

5) I get enough "advice" from well-intentioned folks IRL ... I don't really want it or expect it from this thread. I was thinking again today that it amazes me that the same women who were irritated to no end by being given advice turn around and do the same thing to other women (same with the sharing of horror stories).

6) When people give unsolicited advice, there is an implication that the person on the receiving end doesn't already have the information. Let me just reiterate, I was my sister's breathing coach for all three of her pregnancies which gives me a great deal of insight into labour and delivery. I was a social work major and child safety professional, so not only
have I studied child development, but I've gained some very intimate and scary details to which the average parent will never have been exposed (trust me ... your horror stories about your children and teenagers have nothing on the crap I've seen and dealt with).

In summary, I am an intelligent, well-read, educated woman married to an intelligent, well-read, educated man with access to trustworthy, reliable, and professional information. Between the two of us, we also have real-life access to friends and family who support us. If I have a question, I know whom to ask for information or where to look for it.

So, that's where I'm coming from on this. Probably should have explained earlier on in the pregnancy, but I had hoped there wouldn't be the need. So you can [Roll Eyes] , [Disappointed] , [Mad] , or [Overused] at me, but please don't tell me how to have and raise this baby. Thank you.
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Annie P:
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:

And Annie, I am beginning to wonder about you. Leg waxing = a special treat? [Paranoid] [Ultra confused]

There was no way I was going into hospital with hairy legs. Better than trying to shave them.

Unlike the woman in the bath opposite me who, about an hour after giving birth, went and shaved her legs in the bath, and didn't rinse it out. [Projectile]

Jane R - why not get out of the car like that?
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Pants said:
quote:
Jane R - why not get out of the car like that?

[knees together]

Some women may not have this problem, but I had a couple of wounds 'down below' that were too small to be worth stitching but not too small to rip open every time I performed this particular manoevre. It took me about two weeks of intermittent agony to work out what was wrong.

Flausa, I'm sorry if you thought I was being snide. I was really trying to make you laugh... but I see I did that as well. I hope you didn't take offence at anything I said, as none was intended.

Jane R
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
<snip> So here are the reasons I've had issues with the proliferation of advice being given on the shipmates expecting threads: <snip>

It's funny how differently people react to this sort of thing, isn't it? When I was pregnant with baby b, I tended to let all the advice wash over me, picking out the good bits. Yes, some of the advice was not appropriate for me, some of it was annoying (first prize going to the person who said 'well you'll take your folic acid next time!' on hearing baby b had Spina Bifida), so I ignored those bits. I never really felt like anyone was telling me how to run my life or bring up baby b.

I can totally understand all you've said, Flausa, but I have to say also that being aware of how you've felt about this has made me very cautious and reluctant to post on this thread. I don't think that I would have been 'giving advice', just sharing my experiences of pregnancy with baby b. There have been a few times where I've thought our experience might have been interesting or helpful for people, but I haven't posted as I've been concerned about annoying or upsetting you. I thought long and hard about whether to post the comment I did about membrane sweeps.

It's probably me being over cautious, I dunno.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
Flausa, I'm sorry if you thought I was being snide. I was really trying to make you laugh... but I see I did that as well. I hope you didn't take offence at anything I said, as none was intended.

Jane, I didn't think you were being snide, and you did make me laugh (though not about why you would need to be careful about getting in and out of the car [Ultra confused] ). As I say, I just wanted to clarify why I have responded to some of the advice offered here as less than the gold nuggets that people think they are. I wasn't offended in the least by what you said.

Neither was I upset about what you posted about the membrane sweep, birdie. And your caution in posting has been greatly appreciated.

The reason I have posted on this thread was as the OP suggested - "to keep (the Ship) posted here on all your Great Expectations!" It has been the easiest way to keep a large group of people informed and to keep informed as to how others were progressing. If I had thought it was going to be a thread where advice and horror stories would be given, I would have stuck to email to keep Shippies abreast of things.
 
Posted by Grits (# 4169) on :
 
Host Post

I would like to remind everyone that there are several pregnant women posting on this thread, and it's possible that some of them might actually benefit from some of the advice being shared. I want to make sure they feel comfortable to continue posting and requesting input from others, if they like.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Thank you for your ruling, Grits. Apologies for overstepping my bounds as a Shipmate.
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
Overstepping?

Just 'cause you process stuff you perceive as advice differently than some others, doesn't mean you saying so is supposed to turn this thread into an echoing empty room with a few postcards tacked to a bull-board and a lonely cricket chirping in a dusty corner.

It didn't look to me like you were trying to make everyone who comes to the thread change the way they ask and tell stuff, to suit you. I don't think Her Gritsness was saying that. Just looked to me like she wanted to make things plain.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Janine:
It didn't look to me like you were trying to make everyone who comes to the thread change the way they ask and tell stuff, to suit you.

I'm, sorry, but that is precisely what it looks like to me. From my perspective, there was an established form in previous instances of this thread, and it was a place where advice or tips could be given, and Flausa wanted to change that into her own view of what the thread should be.

Tip/advice like Jane's recent one about keeping knees together when getting out of a car are just the sort of thing that don't get mentioned by doctors or midwives, but make such a difference to comfort.
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
I've missed it, perhaps, since I am only a spotty reader of the thread (oh, what would hit the fan if I turned up pregnant at my age!)...

Maybe it didn't look that way to me because I am very very good at only taking what works for me, out of not only advice but everything similar -- recipes, employer directives, shrill screeds delivered via bullhorn from streetcorners("Yer goin' ta Hell, yew adulterous sinners!", Hammond, LA, 1984)...

**Free bit of advice, use it if you dare: Buff them nipples, sisters!**
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Tip/advice like Jane's recent one about keeping knees together when getting out of a car are just the sort of thing that don't get mentioned by doctors or midwives, but make such a difference to comfort.

I think that's part of the potential benefits of unsolicited advice. Yes, it can be annoying when it just seems like interfering, but it's also where you get the information you didn't know you didn't know, if that makes sense.

As I said, for me the best way was to hear it all and pick out the good bits, rather than say 'I don't want advice unless I specifically ask for it'. But that's just me!

And now this is turning into a tangent, so I'll stop and go back to lurking.

All the best, those of you who are due soon!

b
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
Well, in the spirit of potentially helpful unsolicited advice, I shall post my one and only original childcare tip:

If, like me, you have a collicky screamer, use the subtitle function on your TV or DVD player. That way you can watch your favourite programme whilst walking up and down soothing your noisy bundle. It is also quite helpful when your toddler wakes up and you don't want the sound on while you're sorting them out.

I knew about subtitles because my sister is deaf and uses them all the time. Others don't.

Do feel free to ignore this information if not required. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
I must say I appriciate advice and have sort it from here. One particular issue was the vitamin K issue and it was very interesting to read the practices around different parts of the world. We are given choices but the research is up to the individual parent. Funny when I asked in a prenatal class about the bennifits verses the risk of the first hep B immunization at birth the woman assummed I was anti immunization and preached. I know for a fact I was sick for some time after the hep B injection so well I am hesitant to give it to our baby so young. No one can give me evidence as to why I SHOULD do it at birth, so I wont. Baby will still get all his/her shots just a bit later. (Although I put my foot down at 4 injections of the shot which is current practice unless I can be given evidence to show baby needs them. I am very immune after having shots in 1990. Every time my status is questioned because of a needle stick injury I would be told I would need a top up. I haven't it is so high.
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
Hmmm. Practice sure does vary.

Re: internal exams... Seems like any doctor/midwife would want to do one when they first gain you as a patient, and then they'd want to monitor effacement at the end. Hard to imagine any healthcare person meaning to catch the little guy when he slithers out not wanting a look at the Undercover Territory.
 
Posted by musician (# 4873) on :
 
quote:
Stubborn little critter. Out! out! I tell you!
a story in our family was that when my mum was expecting her first - in 1940 - she was a week overdue. My dad's contribution to hurrying it up was a trip to Largs from Glasgow. (probably the best bit of 2 hours each way, up and down and round and round - it's nowhere near a motorway even now!)By bus. And then home again. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Suze (# 5639) on :
 
Eeegads, that bending, windy coastal road..... your dad was a sadist!
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Heh. Hubby has commented that maybe we should have taken our intended drive to the used book store in West Kilbride this past weekend after all (it's on the coast about 40 miles from here). It's not as far as Largs, but boy is there some scenic driving between here and there. Frankly, I think he manages to find enough potholes and bumps in roads without intentionally seeking such things out. [Biased]
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
I think there is advice and advice. I've nothing at all against people telling stories of their experiences, or giving hints of the 'this worked for me, you might be different' sort. That's really interesting and potentially useful, in fact.

But really, I don't think I've been contradicted so much in my entire 37 years as I have in the last 9 months. And to be honest, I found the experience really began to break down my confidence. From being an adult person with a right to views, suddenly I'd become somebody whose every opinion, no matter how tentatively expressed, was instantly rubbished and dismissed. In fact it seemed like people would actively solicit your opinion, no matter how much you tried to flannel, in order to pounce and rubbish it! (Maybe it's a Scottish thing - I'm quite serious - related to the 'I knew him when he had no arse to his breeks' phenomenon.)

My (unsolicited [Razz] ) advice would be don't give unsolicited advice that begins with a 'Huh'. Whether its an uttered 'huh' or an implied 'huh'. Examples would be:

- Huh, you think you're going to a wedding in June? You won't be going to any wedding in June.
- Huh, breastfeeding? Don't bother, you'll hate it, won't last more than a month.
- Huh, I give you two weeks with those reusable nappies.
- Huh, well, you can say goodbye to this room [you just decorated], those plants'll have to go for a start, and that rug'll be ruined before you know it.

The thing being, yes, it's all new to me and I don't know - but neither do you! I might be one of those easy-going mums who slings the baby over her shoulder and and goes anywhere, or I might not. I might take to breastfeeding, or I might not. But I've done what research I can, and made a decision, and I don't need it picked apart. We'll find out when it happens.

I don't think I saw a lot, if any, of that kind of advice on the ship, but I certainly got a lot of it in real life, and it set my teeth right on edge.
 
Posted by musician (# 4873) on :
 
quote:
your dad was a sadist!
nah, just an impatient Irishman!
 
Posted by musician (# 4873) on :
 
quote:
Frankly, I think he manages to find enough potholes and bumps in roads without intentionally seeking such things out.
we used to live in Deepest, Darkest Ayrshire and for 2nd Infant, had to travel to Irvine (best part of 70 miles).
So the morning 2nd I decided to arrive was the morning afetr a winter storm...make that a Winter Storm. So the usual road, the coast road, was shut due to the number of boulders, whales, ships etc parked on it as a result.
Psyduck phoned the police to ask which roads were OK and was told none of them, don't travel. SO he explained and the cop told him to use a particular road. Well, it was a twisty road, even by local standards and it had more pothole than road surface! Suffice to say that 2nd Infant arrived fairly quickly after we got to Irvine! [Ultra confused]

A pal of ours wiated so long to go to hosp that her husband was flying up the road and was stopped at 4 am by a police car for speeding. Husband yelled why he was racing. The 2 cops were really pleased, said thay'd always wanted to do this, told them to follow, switched on the blue light and took off even faster!
Even then, their Infant was nearly named Otis, after the lift company taking him and his cross legged mum up to the labour ward! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Just cos everyone's saying it now, I'll join in (I'm such a wuss really!) I agree with everything Birdie says!

For me, this was a very useful thread to get a variety of ideas and opinions. Because it was such a variety I realised that was was no 'one right way' and that I would choose how I wanted to do things - that was sometimes saying 'yeh, that sounds great', and sometimes 'not a chance'. As Flausa said though, sometimes it did depend on who was offering the particular advice - some people get right up my nose, so I ignored all posts by them!! I guess that's the advantage of boards like this.

FWIW I've enjoyed continuing to read about others experiences and hearing about where people are in their pregnancies / births ect.
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
I've got a question about work... how long did you stay at home /do you plan to stay home before going back to work? How long is the maternity leave in the UK? Does the dad get to stay home any?

I'm trying to get my head around what I want to do, since I have the opportunity to be flexible... we have a very generous leave-system for parents here in Sweden. So I'm really interested in your thoughts!
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Light:
I've got a question about work... how long did you stay at home /do you plan to stay home before going back to work? How long is the maternity leave in the UK? Does the dad get to stay home any?

I'm trying to get my head around what I want to do, since I have the opportunity to be flexible... we have a very generous leave-system for parents here in Sweden. So I'm really interested in your thoughts!

In the UK mothers are statutorily entitled to 6 months of paid maternity leave, and another 6 months unpaid.
[ETA: most people that I know have gone back after 6 months and not used the second, unpaid, period which is a fairly new entitlement.]

Not full pay, though. The statutory entitlement is 6 weeks at approx 90% of salary; the rest of the leave on statutory maternity pay of approx £100 a week. The company claims most of this expense back from the government (or if it qualifies as a small company can claim back over 100%). The father is entitled to 2 weeks of paternity leave, which can be taken at any time during the first 2 years of the child's life (I think). This is, IIRC, at 90% pay for 2 days, then £100 a week for the rest of the fortnight.

Many professional jobs will contractually offer better terms than this - I know people who get 6 months on full pay, or 12 weeks full pay, 12 weeks half-pay. This is usually considered an incentive to attract the best people, and may also be tied to some contractual obligation on the part of the employee such as continuing to work for the company for some period of time after leave.

My company have only offered statutory terms, which frankly I found a little insulting. They did offer me a large bonus to come back to work 6 weeks after the birth of the baby, which I told them to stick up their collective bottoms. There were several moments when I suspected they were trying to goad me into resigning outright, though in the end they did nothing that stepped over the line into illegality.

I haven't decided yet what I'm actually going to do, though I'm going to have to start making some decisions soon about work, childcare and who (if anybody) is going to be main carer. It partly depends how we manage on a much reduced income (I earn a lot more than Mr Rat), partly on what kind of return-to-work terms I can negotiate (they may let me work at home for some period, for instance), and partly just on how myself and Mr Rat feel.

Assuming we can manage financially, it's still too soon, I think, to have any clear idea about the last, we're all still getting used to things. Part of me wants to get back to work asap, and part doesn't. A big part of me thinks it's past time for a change in career and that this is a good an opportunity as any to take a break then look in another direction. Part of me doesn't want anyone else to be looking after my lovely Ratling, or to miss out on time that we'll never, ever have again. And part of me wants to get back to a secure income, adult conversation and not being puked on all day. I just don't know yet which of the three is strongest!

So there we go, that was coherent and helpful, I don't think. [Biased]

[ 24. May 2006, 12:57: Message edited by: Rat ]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Light interesting question. I have a book in my room with the answer but am loathed to wake up Sean to get it.
I am interested a bit as I have just sorted out mine(in Australia) for a nurse I can take 8 weeks paid, leave at full pay and up to 12 months unpaid. I have to allocate a time say 6 months and then say I will be back a month before or I want the whole year. Interestingly enough I also can use annual leave but the total time must not exceed 12 months. I said I would take 6 then in 5 months will probably say I resign, and take all my annual leave then work casually.
 
Posted by Mrs Tea (# 10570) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
quote:
Originally posted by Light:
I've got a question about work... how long did you stay at home /do you plan to stay home before going back to work? How long is the maternity leave in the UK? Does the dad get to stay home any?

In the UK mothers are statutorily entitled to 6 months of paid maternity leave, and another 6 months unpaid.
[ETA: most people that I know have gone back after 6 months and not used the second, unpaid, period which is a fairly new entitlement.]

Not full pay, though. The statutory entitlement is 6 weeks at approx 90% of salary; the rest of the leave on statutory maternity pay of approx £100 a week. The company claims most of this expense back from the government (or if it qualifies as a small company can claim back over 100%). The father is entitled to 2 weeks of paternity leave, which can be taken at any time during the first 2 years of the child's life (I think). This is, IIRC, at 90% pay for 2 days, then £100 a week for the rest of the fortnight.

The current standard rate of Statutory Maternity and Paternity Pay is £108.85 a week (see the DTI website for details). And sadly for the fathers, that's all there's any statutory entitlement to - there's no legal right to a couple of days at full or 90% pay, but a lot of companies already offered a few days at full pay before the legal right to paternity leave came in, and if so they aren't allowed to rescind it. So when our first was born Mr Tea got three days at full pay 'cos that was his company's deal, and the rest of two weeks at the standard rate 'cos that was his legal entitlement. For women, as you say, the first 6 weeks do have to be at 90% of full pay.

There's an excellent website at www.tiger.gov.uk which is run by the DTI and allows you to work out exactly what you're entitled to in your case.

I'm expecting my second at the moment (which fact is to blame for my long silence from posting anything on SoF -- for months I felt too grotty to do anything but survive and earn a living). Since Mr Tea is nowadays the main carer for our toddler and only in limited self-employment, I'm trying to work out how to survive on £108 a week for 4.5 months -- Christian charities like my employer rarely give anything more than the legal minimum. One answer, of course, is Child Tax Credit, which doubles while you have a baby in the house under a year old, so if you're on any medium-to-low income it's well worth claiming.

[ 24. May 2006, 13:41: Message edited by: Mrs Tea ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by musician:
A pal of ours wiated so long to go to hosp that her husband was flying up the road and was stopped at 4 am by a police car for speeding. Husband yelled why he was racing. The 2 cops were really pleased, said thay'd always wanted to do this, told them to follow, switched on the blue light and took off even faster!

[Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me]

Moo
 
Posted by Grits (# 4169) on :
 
quote:
...in the spirit of potentially helpful unsolicited advice...
Very funny, moth. [Big Grin]

Just wanted to announce that I'm expecting...


someone to have a baby before page 20 of this thread!
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
[Eek!]

(deflates)

Dammit, Grits! [Snigger]
 
Posted by Grits (# 4169) on :
 
Honey, you are so easy.
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
jlg swoops in randomly as she tends to do, reads the backlog and...

I apologize if any of my posts felt oppresive or judgmental. I do have this thing for pregnancy and infants and it was all pretty easy for me and I tend to wax nostalgic and also "pronounce" things. Please don't hesitate to smack my if I opst something pompous, OK?
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
I am going baby visiting tomorrow. I have a gift bag with some things for the baby, and something for the 2 year old big sister. Can you give some suggestions for a little something for the parents, or even just the mother? So far, all I can think of have been luxury chocolates or some cream cakes.

bb
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Earplugs and a lock for the bathroom door?
 
Posted by Suze (# 5639) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
So far, all I can think of have been luxury chocolates or some cream cakes.

bb

I'm not pregnant nor am I ever likely to be but cream cakes and chocolate work for me every time. You could also try some really nice bath stuff/massage oil/body lotion.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pânts:
Earplugs and a lock for the bathroom door?

[Snigger]

Suze, the body pampering idea is rather lovely. I know that there are some essential oils that pregnant women are advised to steer clear of. Is there anything similar for breastfeeding mothers, are they advised to keep clear of any essential oils?

[ 25. May 2006, 07:12: Message edited by: babybear ]
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
I can't remember if there are any oils which breastfeeding women should steer clear of, but I do know lavender is okay.

I'd always go for lavender if I wasn't sure what someone could have or particularly liked - it's relaxing and good for healing - my midwife advised me to add it to a bath to help keep the stiches healing properly.
 
Posted by Curious (# 93) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
I am going baby visiting tomorrow. I have a gift bag with some things for the baby, and something for the 2 year old big sister. Can you give some suggestions for a little something for the parents, or even just the mother? So far, all I can think of have been luxury chocolates or some cream cakes.

bb

A gift voucher for the nearest delivery or takeaway restaurant? Or a couple of M&S ready meals to put in the freezer for that moment when there is NO TIME TO COOK!

Curious
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Support for the body pampering idea here. I was given some really nice bath gel and matching lotion just after Bubble was born. It's a real treat to use them and was lovely to be given something specifically for me. Such things tend to last longer than chocolates, too!

JJB
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curious:
A gift voucher for the nearest delivery or takeaway restaurant? Or a couple of M&S ready meals to put in the freezer for that moment when there is NO TIME TO COOK!

Curious

Practical as always and IMHO spot on!

Being fed by others was one of the most thoughtful things our church and other friends did for us after both girls were born. They were also very good at putting the kettle on when visiting (referring back to an earlier conversation.)

[ 25. May 2006, 12:37: Message edited by: Ags ]
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
...don't give unsolicited advice that begins with a 'Huh'. Whether its an uttered 'huh' or an implied 'huh'.

How about this from my mother-in-law, two weeks ago. She was sitting on my sofa holding the Beeb, who was being as charming and placid as ever, when she said "Have you given him a dummy yet?"

"No", I replied brightly, "after all, he's only 7 weeks old. When he cries, he's not doing anything wrong, he's just doing what a 7 week old baby does." (In any case, though I didn't bother pointing this out to her, the Beeb is a natural self-soother - thumbs, fingers, cuffs of babygros go in his mouth when he wants to suck - he doesn't really need anything else apart from my breasts.)

"You will" she says, "you will - just wait until 12 weeks".

At that point I just wanted to pick up something large (maybe 2 volumes of Celebration Hymnal off the piano) and shove it in her mouth.

Am I bad?
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
quote:
Originally posted by Pânts:
Earplugs and a lock for the bathroom door?

[Snigger]

Suze, the body pampering idea is rather lovely. I know that there are some essential oils that pregnant women are advised to steer clear of. Is there anything similar for breastfeeding mothers, are they advised to keep clear of any essential oils?

Although a great idea I remember at my breast feeding class some babies find perfumes confusing and dont like the taste. In fact I have been advised only wo wash boobs in water. Oh to be able to be back to my pre pregnancy state when I enjoyed chocolate, ate it whan I liked, it didn't make me sick and essential oils were part of my DAILY bath which I made bath bombs. Now the essential oils make me nauseus, baths are too cold and well only when Sean is around to pull me out if I need him.

Im wondering is a nice feeding friendly set of PJs would be my first choice or an item of brestfeeding friendly clothing.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Posy, you could have just put a dummy in your mother-in-law's mouth. [Biased]

[ 25. May 2006, 13:25: Message edited by: Flausa ]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Posy:
Am I bad?

Don't you believe it.

One line that I found useful was 'Hmmm, there might be some truth in that.' said in a thoughtful manner. It sounds like you are might be agreeing with the person, or at the least giving it some thought. It doesn't commit you to anything and you could well decide that there was no truth in it at all. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Posy:


At that point I just wanted to pick up something large (maybe 2 volumes of Celebration Hymnal off the piano) and shove it in her mouth.

Am I bad?

No, it was only the hymnals, not the whole piano after all.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Posy, you could have just put a dummy in your mother-in-law's mouth. [Biased]

Once when I was getting irritated and voluble about something and BC was very small, he thoughtfully took his dummy out of his mouth and tried to put it in mine!

I didn't know whether to laugh or cry!
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
I'd always go for lavender if I wasn't sure what someone could have or particularly liked - it's relaxing and good for healing - my midwife advised me to add it to a bath to help keep the stiches healing properly.

I was given a bottle of Badedas which did a similar job. Was recommended to me by the midwives at the hospital. Lovely stuff.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
You might take your appointment book and a pen, and give them a guaranteed evening out while you watch the little ones?
 
Posted by Ann (# 94) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Annie P:
quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
I'd always go for lavender if I wasn't sure what someone could have or particularly liked - it's relaxing and good for healing - my midwife advised me to add it to a bath to help keep the stitches healing properly.

I was given a bottle of Badedas which did a similar job. Was recommended to me by the midwives at the hospital. Lovely stuff.
I was recommended salt! With the added bonus that it would make the bath irreversibly non-slip by eating away at the surface.

quote:
Originally posted by JJB:
Support for the body pampering idea here. I was given some really nice bath gel and matching lotion just after Bubble was born. It's a real treat to use them and was lovely to be given something specifically for me. Such things tend to last longer than chocolates, too!

JJB

My mum gave me something pampering after the birth of one of my children. As the youngest is now eleven and I still haven't used it, I'd say it lasts longer than chocolate.
 
Posted by marmot (# 479) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
You might take your appointment book and a pen, and give them a guaranteed evening out while you watch the little ones?

Nothing personal, but that assumes they want you to take care of the kids. Some people can be picky about who gets to babysit, esp. when baby is young.
 
Posted by Suze (# 5639) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by marmot:
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
You might take your appointment book and a pen, and give them a guaranteed evening out while you watch the little ones?

Nothing personal, but that assumes they want you to take care of the kids. Some people can be picky about who gets to babysit, esp. when baby is young.
It also assumes you're comfortable looking after them. Some friends I've been very happy and comfortable looking after their children, other friends less so - and I imagine they feel the same about me. Depends on the friendship I think.

I did give one set of friends a voucher for their favourite, close to home, restaurant one time - with the offer to babysit. Giving them the voucher meant the could decide to go when they wanted, and ask whoever they felt comfortable with to sit for them. Close to home restaurant meant they were only gone for about 90 mins, but had 90 mins of grown up, going out time which, by the time bub was about 9 weeks old, they really appreciated.
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
I have to run off now -- but I began trying to Google things like

"essential oils""weaning"

and

"essential oils" "dry up"...

I figure if you look up anything recommended to help with weaning, and avoid those things that come up, then you'll be OK with the soothing products and essential oils, etc.

Things I believe a nursing mother would want to avoid in large quantities, things to not use "pure" on your breasts for example, might be peppermint oil, eucalyptus oil and melaleuca ("tea tree") oil.

I have always used things like these as skin soothers, wound sterilizers, etc. -- I bet melaleuca oil would be a great thing to dot on the painful hot skin over a plugged duct! -- but these three at least have been recommended to me to help my breeding dogs "dry up" when they needed to, so I would think they might have the same effect on a lady.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
The babysitting idea can be altered in other ways too--one very kind friend gave me an envelope with "pay a babysitter of your choice" money in it, for our first night out, whenever it should be. Another came to our home and just held the colicky baby for several hours while I got some much-needed sleep in the next room. I wouldn't have been happy leaving him home alone with her at that age, but wow! what a blessing her mere presence (and arms) turned out to be.

One could perhaps also offer to have older children (or disabled grandparents, etc.) looked after while parent(s) and child made the obligatory early doctor's visits? There are so many of those in the first few months....
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
Or offer to do all the grunt work associated with a take-out meal: pick it up, set the table (a nice one with candles and the good china and a tablecloth), serve the food, sit in another room with the baby while parents have a leisurely dinner (OK, this will depend on the cooperation of the baby [Smile] ), and then clean up everything. This will, of course, depend on both you and the family being comfortable with you in their kitchen.

Or if you're dealing with people like we were way back when, simply call and say "I was thinking of pizza - want me to bring some by? What toppings do you want? OK, see you soon" and then show up with beer, too. Bonus points if you hold the baby for ten minutes while Mom eats.

Having said that, the bottom line for me, I guess, is that if you're not an intimate friend, and you're not willing to do a bit of serious research among close family and friends of the mother, you're better off sending a handwritten note or a card expressing your sincere congratulations and joy at the arrival of the baby, and simply leave it at that. But then we're all curmudgeons in my house.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Thinking of Flausa and Alan today - hope it goes really well for you both (and not too slowly [Smile] ).
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
(wow, this post got extremely long, scroll by if you are not interested in boring details about Swedish parental leave!)

Thanks for your replies Rat, Bronwyn and Mrs Tea!
Very interesting to hear about the different opportunities in different countries.

In Sweden the parents have the right to take a total of 16 months off work, where two months are exclusively set aside for each parent. The rest of the time (12 months) can be divided as the parents see fit. They cannot, however, both take parental leave at the same time.

The first 13 months are "paid", i.e. 80% of your salary, and the last 3 months you get a very token sum (less than £30/week I think). Most people use up all of the paid time, and it's getting common for dads to take at least their exclusive 2 months off. The money comes from the government, but some employers will offer to "fill up" up to 90% for a couple of months.

Me and Caid have planned to spend at least the first month after the baby comes at home together (he will use his annual leave, I will take parental leave). Then I have tentatively planned to stay at home full time for 5 more months, then start working part time and let Caid take over at home. I have no idea whether this is realistic in terms of breastfeeding etc. but the plan is not written in stone. I like my work but I'm still looking forward to staying home.

I am an engineer, and 90% of my colleagues are male. I will be the first woman to take parental leave from my workplace, there are a lot of dads but they usually only take a couple of months of at the time, mostly planned when work is not too busy. So I am a little worried about how taking time off will affect my position. My boss seems to be openminded about letting me work part time when I get back which is nice. I'll just have to see I guess...

If, as Rat said, most mothers in the UK take at most 6 months leave, how common is breastfeeding? I have been told that 6 months is the minimum, and then it takes a couple of months to wean the baby, but I have no clue really!
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Thinking of you Flausa and Alan Will keep checking to see news!!!!! [Smile]


light I didn't end up posting the UK info I had as it would seem I was beaten to it. I guess I love the UK childcare books and well our honeymoon was in Wales.

Just wanted to comment on the breast feeding thing. In Australia this has become a big thing with the Australian Breast Feeding Association. Actually a feeding mother is often given breast feeding time to either express milk or if not then a baby can be brought to them, or you can make a trip to baby to feed. Would be worth asking your boss if they can supply a room, you will need a fridge to store the milk(if mainly male colluges some might feel funny about breast milk in the staff fridge, problem solved by not telling them and wrapping milk up as I did with my IVF drugs), a private room if you are shy, in an eletric pump then a power point. In my work place people slip into the bosses office, turn away from the door and express. No one has a problem with it. (Although if the ward is busy sometimes a woman can be uncomfortable and I have instructed them to JUST GO I will sort it)

By 6 months baby is still reling on mainly milk for nutrition, I mean by that that is what the world health organization say, start solids at 6 months but give milk(pref breast) until at least a year as main source of food. This also suggests if baby is hungary and you are away someone can feed a bit of babyfood to keep baby going until you are around.
Beware a totally breast feed baby may not take a bottle and a cup may need to be used. Best to try before you go back to work. A breaif summary of this is in a pamplet which if you are interested I can show you the URL with a summary and I can order and sent the booklet on if you think it could be of bennifit. Good luck.
 
Posted by Curious (# 93) on :
 
Alan & Flausa [Votive]

Curious
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
Flausa, Alan & Wee Wan.
[Votive]
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Light:

If, as Rat said, most mothers in the UK take at most 6 months leave, how common is breastfeeding? I have been told that 6 months is the minimum, and then it takes a couple of months to wean the baby, but I have no clue really!

Breastfeeding is shockingly rare in the UK, with very few babies exclusively breastfed till 6 months, and indeed with many health visitors seeming to recommend solids earlier than that - even for mothers and babies that find breastfeeding difficult, it is not recommended to start them earlier than that.

Comparing what I have seen of the advice and support mothers get here, versus what they get in much poorer countries where breastfeeding is very common, it seems to me that the work situation can't help, but the main difference is that most mothers don't know a large number of other mothers who've breastfed for more than a few weeks, so don't have an array of experience to draw on if they don't have an easy time of it.

Most of the mothers I know who've breastfed for longer (and there aren't many of them, even though I know lots of mothers as friends and through work) are those who seem to have had a lovely time of it; the few who didn't, but who persevered, seem to be those with a friend or relative who also had difficulties.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:
Breastfeeding is shockingly rare in the UK, with very few babies exclusively breastfed till 6 months, and indeed with many health visitors seeming to recommend solids earlier than that - even for mothers and babies that find breastfeeding difficult, it is not recommended to start them earlier than that.


Yes, but the advice changes frequently. I was advised to introduce solids at 12 weeks with BC, and at 20 weeks with SC. Most mothers I knew introduced them when the baby seemed too hungry for breastmilk alone, despite any advice they were given. I suspect babies vary quite a bit, and, as with most things, there is no fixed rule depite what academics claim.

A baby is not a project, but a person. I think most mothers know their own children better than the experts.
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
I'm sure this is true, and I also know the advice keeps changing - but I've known more than a couple of people who thought their baby was quite happy on milk, but were pushed by friends/relatives/HVs to start solids earlier than recommended (as in, earlier than recommended at the time rather than earlier than recommended now).
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
What Moth said. Our girl was permanently hungry, so we introduced solids long before the WHO's recommended 6 months (counts up on fingers; about 18 weeks, if memory serves). The advice I got was that I shouldn't feed any solids until she was at least 16 weeks/4 months old, as her digestive system wasn't mature enough to cope until then; after that, pureed fruit and veg was OK, and baby rice mixed with milk, but meat and eggs shouldn't be introduced until she was over 6 months (there's plenty of NHS propaganda - oops, I mean information leaflets - available with more details).

I suspect (though no health professional has ever confirmed this for me) that the 6-month cutoff date is intended for mothers who don't have access to clean water and sterilization equipment and the reason they chose it is that new-born babies don't need much iron in their diet because they're born with enough to last for 6 months. After that, they need to start eating solids because breast milk doesn't have enough iron for them. The risk of iron deficiency after 6 months is greater than the risk of food poisoning.

Jane R
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Hugs across the sea to my lovely friend Flausa and her dear hubby! [Axe murder]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:
most mothers don't know a large number of other mothers who've breastfed for more than a few weeks, so don't have an array of experience to draw on if they don't have an easy time of it.

I was very fortunate; all of my friends who had babies breastfeed them for at least a year. One friend was a La Leche League counsellor, and had about 6 years breastfeeding experience herself. Knowing someone who has 'been there and done that' is so useful. Breastfeeding four different children gives you a fair bit of experience.

I also found it useful to go along to the local La Leche League group. It was good to see how others were getting on and to swap news and advice. The group I went to was very happy to welcome pregnant women. It gave us a chance to ask questions and gain realistic expectations.

My GP was also rather fantastic. She had trained as a paeditrician before she became a GP, and he had also breastfed her children. Another 'been there and done that' and so can offer good solid advice.

For those in the UK, NCT have a Breastfeeding helpline that is 8am-10pm every day, with trained breastfeeding counsellors who will listen, give suggestions and help (0870 444 8708). I think they also have breastfeeding groups similar to the ones run by La Leche League.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
quote:
he had also breastfed her children.
[Eek!] [Biased]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Oops. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
ADidn't realise how passionate I have become about breastfeeding til I re read my last post. Have just done a course by the Australian Breastfeeding accociation Australia (formally Nursing mothers) which has filed me with info. If any australians are interested it is well worth the money and currently you get a free book if you join.

Still I will also say I understand not everyone can and the ABFA line is suport people in their choices and so wont push breastfeeding unless requested. It sounds similar to the UK group Babybear was refering too.

Any news from Alan and Flausa?????
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
I'm confused.

quote:
Originally posted by Flausa [on May 22]:
So at present, the pregnancy is a not a pleasure, but at least I know it won't last more than another week (they'll induce after 7 more days), so we're almost there.

Did I miss a post somewhere about Flausa being in labor? This post indicates that they won't be inducing for a couple more days.
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moth:
quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:
Breastfeeding is shockingly rare in the UK, with very few babies exclusively breastfed till 6 months, and indeed with many health visitors seeming to recommend solids earlier than that - even for mothers and babies that find breastfeeding difficult, it is not recommended to start them earlier than that.


Yes, but the advice changes frequently. I was advised to introduce solids at 12 weeks with BC, and at 20 weeks with SC. Most mothers I knew introduced them when the baby seemed too hungry for breastmilk alone, despite any advice they were given. I suspect babies vary quite a bit, and, as with most things, there is no fixed rule depite what academics claim.

A baby is not a project, but a person. I think most mothers know their own children better than the experts.

Added baby cereals by 4 months for 1st baby.

After that, breastfed the rest of 'em, with a rare supplemental bottle of my milk, or water, or goat milk, if I positively could not be home for a feeding.

I let them eat whatever I was eating after they were old enough to pick up suitable pieces.

The only one who weaned early was the cereal baby.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Jen, I think this is what people have been thinking about.

quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
so they've scheduled me to go in to hospital Friday afternoon to start the induction.

Hopefully, this means a Cresswell baby this weekend.
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
re: weaning. I was determined to wait and wait - but Holly actually supplemented her feed at 11 weeks by dipping her fingers in my food as I was distracted by breast-feeding and then sucking her fingers as I took a mouthful from my plate!

She always has been a strategic thinker.

I fed her till 11 months though and Lucy till 9 months. I really took on board all the stuff that was around about breastfeeding being a partnership - which means that if it isn't working for either of you, then it's not working. That is so important. It worked for me. If it hadn't done, then I would have stopped. No guilt trips allowed, you've just done the greatest thing possible by giving birth; give yerself some slack! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
Any news on the little mad Cresswell?
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Jen, I think this is what people have been thinking about.

quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
so they've scheduled me to go in to hospital Friday afternoon to start the induction.

Hopefully, this means a Cresswell baby this weekend.
Thanks, bb, that explains it.
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:
Any news on the little mad Cresswell?

Does this help?
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
Something To Expect
 
Posted by ChrisT (# 62) on :
 
Firstly our heartiest (and heartliest) congratulations to the esteemed Dr Cresswell and Flausa on the arrival of David "Wee Wan" James.

Lily and I would also like to make a smaller (as in 6lb 8oz) announcement: Reuben John. He arrived at 2.52pm on Sunday 14th May with no small amount of pomp and ceremony, and is a joy and a treasure.
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
Wow!!! congratulations [Smile] [Smile] [Smile] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Ann (# 94) on :
 
Congratulations Chris and Lily [Yipee]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ChrisT:
...on Sunday 14th May with no small amount of pomp and ceremony, and is a joy and a treasure.

Fantastic day to be born!

Congratulations.
 
Posted by Adrienne (# 2334) on :
 
Many congratulations! [Smile]
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
Congratulations - he is very sweet! [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaw!!!

[Tear]

I've finished having babies but I'll be broody till I'm at least 85, I'm sure!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
ChrisT, congratulations!

That's wonderful.

Moo
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Vikki Pollard:
I've finished having babies but I'll be broody till I'm at least 85, I'm sure!

Having grandchildren is great fun. You enjoy them for a while, and then you can leave.

Moo
 
Posted by Jenny Ann (# 3131) on :
 
Brilliant ChrisT and Lilly.

Fab!

J
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Congratulations, ChrisT. So cute. [Smile]
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
Many congratulations Chris and Lily. 14th May was only one day before our due date, but David was a bit too happy to stay put.

My unbiased ( [Biased] ) opinion is that Reuben is cute, but not as cute as David.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Congratulations to Chris, Lily, and all of their children. Blessing on this little one.
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
Welcome Reuben John and congrats to your parents!
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Congratulations Lily, and ChrisT Beautiful baby.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Congratulations ChrisT & Lily and little RJ.

Reuben is a lovely name!
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Vikki Pollard:
I've finished having babies but I'll be broody till I'm at least 85, I'm sure!

Having grandchildren is great fun. You enjoy them for a while, and then you can leave.

Moo

Yes - but grandchildren aren't necessarily a given in the case of one of my daughters (and you never know anyway, do you?). And anyway it'd be a bit selfish to make 'em have babies on my account! [Biased]

[ 29. May 2006, 10:55: Message edited by: Vikki Pollard ]
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Alan Cresswell:
Many congratulations Chris and Lily. 14th May was only one day before our due date, but David was a bit too happy to stay put.

My unbiased ( [Biased] ) opinion is that Reuben is cute, but not as cute as David.

There is an old saying: "There is only one beautiful baby in the world, and every mother has it"!

My baby turned 16 today. *Sigh* he's still cute, but where did all those years go?
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
And congratulations Chris, Lily & family! (I thought you'd been a bit quiet recently!)
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
Many congrats to Chris and Lily (at least we know why you have not been around recently [Biased] )
 
Posted by Jillyb (# 4610) on :
 
I go away for a few days and new little people arrive left right and centre [Biased] Many congrats Beth and Alan and Chris and Lily - what lovely news [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Derf (# 2093) on :
 
Congratulations Chris, Lily and Reuben [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
Congratulations to the Taylors and the Cresswells on your little ones. [Smile]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
I remember taking it really seriously when people told me to treasure them while they're little cos it goes so quickly...

It's true! I don'thave children now - I have adults!

And strangest of all, I'm still the same age! Inside, of course - inside. [Biased]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Congratulations, ChrisT [so good to hear from you] and Lily on the birth of Reuben. He's beautiful!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Congratulations to Cresswells and Chris and Lily. [Big Grin]

I thought I should come and say hello as Gumby and I have discovered that we're expecting a little one in January. At the moment I am feeling too hormonal and yuck to be that excited [Help] , but your pictures have made me feel more hopeful! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Astro (# 84) on :
 
Congratulations
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Congratulations ChrisT and Lily! He's beautiful!

Many hugs to Flausa and Alan! I'll be looking forward to meeting darling David James the next time you get on this side of the pond!
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
Congratulations to ChrisT, Lily and Keren-Happuch!

Stick it out Keren, I felt really yucky too in the beginning but it's only been getting better since.

/Light, expecting in September
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Congratualations ChrisT and Lily. Glad to hear the good news of Reuben's safe arrival!

Congratulations also to Keren-Happuch and TGG. Trust me on this, the yucky days are well worth it!

David and I are now home (and very happy to be so after such a long stint in the hospital). Just to share briefly, he was under a great deal of stress during labour, so I ended up having to have a C-Section. Thankfully, we chose to do so at a stage still early enough on (13 hours after the induction process started) that they were able to do a spinal/epidural, so I was awake and alert for the delivery. Just hopefully as a note of encouragement to Bronwyn, this was still an amazing experience, and both Alan and I were able to see David almost immediately upon delivery. Alan was able to hold him after he was cleaned up, and I was able to hold him once we left the operating theatre (about half an hour). And a huge upside is that he's not a conehead!
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
I've got to say that the c-section could have been worse. At least we had a local anaesthetic and were both there and conscious (despite almost 24h without sleep by that stage, the adrenalin was keeping me very much awake, the lack of sleep didn't kick in 'til long after we knew everything was OK) and heard David cry as he came out, even if we couldn't see anything behind a sheet screening off the actual surgery. I could hold Flausa's shoulder (hands weren't available due to assorted drips and monitoring gear), and got to hold David and show him to Flausa within minutes of the birth. There was a possibility of a real emergency, which would have left Flausa under a general anaesthetic and me pacing uselessly in some waiting room (the time I spent waiting while they sorted out the anaesthetic was bad enough).
 
Posted by Anselmina (# 3032) on :
 
Many congratulations, Alan and Flausa! Very happy news.

And to Lily and ChrisT, too, for their wonderful event!
 
Posted by ChrisT (# 62) on :
 
Aww, shucks, y'all are just too kind [Smile]
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
Congratulations Chris and Lily, hope everything is going well! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Congratulations to all the new parents, and good luck as you embark on the next stage of your lives.

JJB
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Thanks Dr and Flausa, I have gone over the ceasor in my mind, trying not to think of all the things which could be not be ideal(baby sick, needing oxygen and rushed off, the thetre staff not allowing breast feeding as I was told can happen, going into labor and well having to have an emergency one so being asleep, Sean not being there, Sean having a cold and them not letting him in, the dragon who yells at me when I take patients over for day proceedures being on duty and insisting I do this or that. Them treating me poorly as I work in an area of the hospital which is to them a joke, me getting stressed about the whole thing and not being able to cope)

I have on more rational days we have been able to make a plan and well if I have a choice I would love our birth to go as well as yours, I have decided on a few things like getting them to lower the drape(they offer this where I am) so I can see baby born. Blood doesn't worry me too much, and I HAVE seen a couple of the ops before as a student. Also asking no one to say if we have a boy or girl until Sean does or I do.
 
Posted by Mrs Tea (# 10570) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Thanks Dr and Flausa, I have gone over the ceasor in my mind, trying not to think of all the things which could be not be ideal ...

I had a caesarian with my last (an emergency rather than planned one, but not such an emergency that it had to be a general anaesthetic). True, a lot can go wrong, but most of the time none of the yucky things you describe do actually happen (well, I don't know about the dragons who work in your hospital of course!). So ISTMT there's no point in worrying about them. It's starting to look likely that Baby Tea #2 will arrive the same way; not my first choice but not something I'm going to allow to spoil the rest of the waiting period.

You know when you go on a roller-coaster there's a moment when the car reaches the top, it stops clicking, isn't moving at all, and you know you'd better just relax and enjoy the ride 'cos there's nothing else you can do? The moment after you've signed the consent form is a bit like that...
 
Posted by holly (# 689) on :
 
Congratulations to Alan, Flausa, ChrisT and lily.
Both babies look absolutely beautiful.

love

Holly & JonoT

xxx
 
Posted by Paul W. (# 1450) on :
 
Wow, only just spotted this (after Holly mis-posted on the Cresswells' thread). Congratulations Chris and Lily. [Smile] [Yipee]

Paul W
 
Posted by holly (# 689) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Paul W.:
Wow, only just spotted this (after Holly mis-posted on the Cresswells' thread). Congratulations Chris and Lily. [Smile] [Yipee]

Paul W

Thanks for bringing that up Paul [Razz]

holly xxx
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Holly's obviously had one double too many. [Biased]
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
(major yippees to all with happy news!)

I haven't been in the family way for almost 5 years, but with chasee#1 I had an energency C-Secion after 95 hours of labor. I was also conscious at the surgery.

I have had two VBACs since then, so it's possible.

try not to fret too much, Bronwyn, you'll just cause yourself too much stress. be easy. A Ceasarian is not any less of a magical moment than a VB.

Comet
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
One of the things that was drummed into us during the ante-natal classes is that the husband has a very definitely role in all of this, he is the buffer between the woman and the medical establishment. He is the one who will stick up for his wife, and protect her when she is at her most vulernable.

Wny not have a discussion with Sean about this idea and see what he thinks. Could he be your St George and protect you from the dragon?

Neither of my children had their first feed in theatre. It must have been about 30 mins after their births that they fed. It didn't seem to have any negative effect on getting feeding established. If anything it might have helped as they were both rather hungry by the time they were put to the breast.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:

Neither of my children had their first feed in theatre. It must have been about 30 mins after their births that they fed. It didn't seem to have any negative effect on getting feeding established. If anything it might have helped as they were both rather hungry by the time they were put to the breast.

Neither did the Ratling - it wouldn't have been possible or safe in theatre, I think, since both my arms were occupied with drips and I was lying on an open-sided bench type of thing. He could easily have rolled off or got tangled up in equipment. After the birth I had to be checked for damage and then stitched, so he certainly didn't feed right away.

In Recovery, though, I was put in a bed with proper sides and they immediately brought the Ratling for 'skin to skin', when he rooted for the breast and fed. I think that could have been as much as 30 minutes after he was born. As far as I know there's been no harm done, and he never showed any disinclination for feeding.

I'd try not to stress too much about it, Bronwyn (yeah, I know how much that kind of advice helps! [Biased] ). At least your visit to theatre is planned rather than unexpected, so you can discuss your plans with Sean and prime the staff too, before you get distracted.

Are you the next due?
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Can any of the Scottish mums tell me about this tradition of people pressing coins into baby's hand upon their first meeting. I had several people tell me at church today, "it's not a gift ... it's tradition." Any idea where this has come from?
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Can any of the Scottish mums tell me about this tradition of people pressing coins into baby's hand upon their first meeting. I had several people tell me at church today, "it's not a gift ... it's tradition." Any idea where this has come from?

I'm not Scottish, but my family's from Cumbria, and this custom is common especially in the northern part of the county, up by the Wall and along the Border.

It's called "Hanselling." Basically, it's for luck, and also establishes how good the child will be with money. If the baby holds onto the coin, he or she will always be good with money. If they drop it, they will will not be.

Also if it's a silver coin (which it won't be, due to the sad adulteration of the coin of the realm), it will help with keeping the Little Folk away from the baby.

Deborah
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rosamundi:
It's called "Hanselling."

A 'hansel' is another word for 'gift' in Scots.

When my little ones were babies they didn't get money put in their hands, but the money was put into the pram. It was usually a few silver coloured coins, occasionally a pound coin. This was given in addition to any baby gifts.

The first Monday of the New Year was a public holiday over much of Scotland, and that was called Hansel Day. It was the custom for the employers to give a gift of some silver on that day.

One website suggests that 'inaugural gift' might be a better translation. Another Scottish tradition is to put a hansel in a purse that is given as a gift. The idea is that the person will always have money in their purse.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
Putting money in a new purse is traditional even as far south as Kent. It's very bad luck to give an empty purse - it might stay empty!
 
Posted by Melisande (# 4177) on :
 
So many congratulations to offer when I come back to the thread! Hurrah for the beautiful healthy babies who've arrived, and for those who are still brewing!
 
Posted by LRP (# 5013) on :
 
Congrats to Chris T and Lily.
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
Neither of my children had their first feed in theatre. It must have been about 30 mins after their births that they fed.

Baby b was five days old before he was breastfed. He had my breast milk through a nasal gastric tube till then.

It was difficult to establish breastfeeding as his rooting reflex wasn't as strong as it would have been directly after birth, but we did do it! It took a couple of days to get there, but he never looked back, once he got the idea. I breastfed him till he was nearly 15 months old.

I guess the ideal is to get in there as quickly as possible (!) but don't dispair if it's not possible - baby will get the idea in the end!

b

[ETA - Of course, there was a very good reason why we couldn’t breastfeed until five days, what with baby b’s surgery etc. If you’re concerned about being prevented from breastfeeding without good reason, I think babybear’s suggestion is a good one - make sure Sean is totally clear about what you all want and is prepared to stand up for you at a time when you might not be able to do it for yourself. If you have a written birth plan, you could also make sure your wish to breastfeed as soon as possible is in it in big letters!!]

[ 04. June 2006, 20:37: Message edited by: birdie ]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I've just had a letter with the date for the first scan - 3rd July - which makes things seem a bit more real! I dreamt the other night that the dr told me I was imagining things and not really pregnant at all...

The nausea and sore breasts ought to convince me otherwise, really! I can't decide which is worse at the moment as I'm not actually throwing up, but the sick feeling lasts all day, and being quite well endowed, sore breasts make it hard to sleep. Does anybody have any advice about this? I'm also finding that things that help the nausea one day seem to make it worse the next. [Frown]
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Keren-Happuch,

Sorry to hear you're having a bad time. FWIW, I found eating small snacks throughout the day helped with the nausea; if it didn't, at least I always had something to be sick with (dry heaving is even more uncomfortable than being sick). Dry toast is good, if you can choke it down, or plain crackers. I found greasy things made me feel sicker, but plain bread or biscuits were OK.

HTH,

Jane R
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
Hi Keren-Happuch,

As someone who's already ample bosoms swelled to an L cup (yes that was L cup [Eek!] ) when I was pregnant, I feel for you! I found that I had to wear a soft cup bra in bed, and the use of lots of strategicaly placed pillows helped!

Hope the sickness wears of soon. It really is miserable isn't it? [Frown]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Keren-Happuch, I'm afraid I was very sick for a long time. All I can suggest is to relax and remember it's the result of hormones which mean the pregnancy is going well. Oh - and I wish I'd discovered ginger earlier.

Small snacks didn't do it for me. And I threw up the morning tea and biscuit. [Frown]

Main thing is, don't think you're being silly - if it persists, get to the doctor because you mustn't dehydrate.

My boobs were HUGE (I didn't measure them but L sounds about right) - I wonder if the nausea is related to the rapid breast growth?!

Mind you - 20 years on they're still not small but I hardly ever feel sick! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
I was lucky and wasn't very sick, just a bit queasy. My poor sister, however, was sick morning, noon and night for weeks and weeks. Nothing much helped, I'm afraid.

All you can do is rest (take sick leave if necessary; your doctor should be sympathetic) and console yourself that it's a sign of a healthy pregnancy with good high hormone levels!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I'm not actually throwing up - maybe I wasn't as clear as I thought about that - just feeling queasy ALL the time! Vikki mentioned ginger - lemon and ginger tea is one of the things, which used to help that I've now gone right off. [Frown]

I can't take sick leave though, cos I'm self-employed. At least it seems I can still get a maternity payment from the govt. - need to earn a lot to get my average up... [Biased] Which reminds me - what do I have to do to get free dental treatment? There's some kind of form I think - do I get that from the midwife?
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Feeling nausous is worse than being sick as it is constant and no one sees it(in my case) I mean how can a person understand the feeling? I was both in fact still am at 34 weeks. I found the following helpful.
1, when really bad show up at the hospital(which I work in) and get an injection of maxolon(not sure the name in the UK but the hospital will know) which is safe in prefnancy. If not so bad get your GP to write a script for some and take it as needed. I found the best was buying a product called Mylanta Efferdecent(sp) which is also safe and over the counter. It helps with nausea, heartburn and vommiting. Also lemonade helped me. Stay away from strong smells, eat small amounts often, try vitamin B6 or like me as the eating has been so problematic consider a pregnancy vitamin to make sure you and baby have enough nutrition which I at no stage could eat due to sickness and queasyness. Resting on a bed eyes shut for an hour helps too.

Sore breast are a problem I had ealry on and what helped me was applying a heat pack or hot water bottle. If in public not so easy but keeping them warm helped me. A scaff helped although looked funny as it was summer here 43C [Killing me]
Hope this helps.

Some things worked for me on some days others on other days. hugs anyway.

Bronwyn
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
I have just remembered something that was a right pain and didn't make breastfeeding easy just after the birth.

The anesthetist put some sort of drip into the inside of my elbow. This meant that in the first few hours after the C-section whilst I was still attached to the drip I couldn't bend my arm to cradle my baby for feeding. If the drip had been inserted into the back of my hand there wouldn't have been any problem.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
I have just remembered something that was a right pain and didn't make breastfeeding easy just after the birth.

The anesthetist put some sort of drip into the inside of my elbow. This meant that in the first few hours after the C-section whilst I was still attached to the drip I couldn't bend my arm to cradle my baby for feeding. If the drip had been inserted into the back of my hand there wouldn't have been any problem.

Had not thought of that I know the anethisist can never get to my hand ones and try and try...which hurts a LOT. Might suggest he goes for a leg.
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
what do I have to do to get free dental treatment? There's some kind of form I think - do I get that from the midwife?

Definitely from the GP, maybe from the midwife too.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
what do I have to do to get free dental treatment? There's some kind of form I think - do I get that from the midwife?

Definitely from the GP, maybe from the midwife too.
I've been racking my brains trying to remember where I got mine.

The midwife (or GP, I expect it depends on the practice) definitely gives you form MATB1, which certifies that you're pregnant, and which you need to show to your employer. I presume as a self-employed person you may likely need that to organise your maternity allowance.

But that's not the same as the NHS exemption certificate. I'm sure I either got that direct from my midwife, or she filled in and submitted something that caused it to be sent to me.

Either way, the midwife or GP should know!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Feeling nausous is worse than being sick as it is constant and no one sees it(in my case) I mean how can a person understand the feeling?

Thanks - I was afraid I'd use up the sympathy when people found out I wasn't actually being sick!

I don't actually have a problem with eating - it actually seems to help - but my tastebuds seem to change from one day to the next in what I like! Strangely I've found chillied olives very medicinal. [Confused]

I really need to see the dentist before I see the midwife, but I might see if I can make a dental appointment now for just after the midwife one, just to keep them quiet...
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Keren-Happuch, I got an application for the 'maternity exemption certificate' from my GP, who signed it and I then sent it off. It covers free medical, dental and optical treatment until your child is a year old.

On the nausea front, I realised that it was the vitamin pills I was taking which were making me feel queasy in the mornings. I switched to taking them at night, which improved things drastically.

I too had an emergency c-section and it was about half an hour before I was able to breastfeed, because of the screen and the drips in my hands. Getting things started took a few attempts, but it happened eventually.

[Votive] for everyone awaiting babies.

JJB
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Nauseous AND sick... not a good combo... [Projectile]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Getting harder and harder to get things done. Most difficult today was lighting the fire. I need it to keep warm and Sean lights it when he is around but lugging wood inside, bending down, and then worst of all getting up. Found a baby red back spider today amoung which was quite cute. Wont hurt me only the adult female does. Reminded me I should wear gloves though. Hardly taking a bath now as it is so much effort to get out of it. (I do shower or Sean assists me to get out)
Still will only be 27 days and I will have a baby.
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
... If you have a written birth plan, you could also make sure your wish to breastfeed as soon as possible is in it in big letters!!

I had my deliveries at two different hospitals over several years' time -- but in one way or another, they wanted to take the babies away for various procedures, which sometimes meant they got hungry while they were not with me.

I put a little 3x5 card sign in their little nursery beds -- it said "I Eat At Mom's".
[Big Grin] It seemed to help me get the babies back with me in a timely way, and cut down on the careless feedings in the nursery.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Bronwyn wrote:
Still will only be 27 days and I will have a baby.

That has got to be one of the nicest things that I have heard today! After all these years and the operations and the treatments... 27 days. [Big Grin]

I hope the time passes gently for you, a time to relax and enjoy.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
quote:
Still will only be 27 days and I will have a baby.

[Smile] Yay, Yay, Yay [Smile]

[Votive] Happy [Votive]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
yes been reflecting on my life of late and how exciting it really is. The fibroid which every dr and some nurses with experience in the area being the size it was and me keeping my womb. The removal of the cyst which caused my ovary to be lost and this was I now realise probably an unnecessary operation which I could have treated as I have so many times since with medication. The 7 or 9 lots of IVF which were a pain, had two miscarriages and this pregnancy. The emotional ups and downs when a dr told me I would be unlikely to have a child ever which I refused to believe. The nurse who was sarcastic and having to visit the same place and hear her with others being the same way. The fact she swore at me but I was too scared to make a complaint as it would mean dealing with her again and not getting the care I required. Just the IVF drugs, finding Sean on the net and realising he loves me as I am.
Now I am 34 weeks pregnant and wow it is fantastic(except when bay is kicking on my bladder and scar tissue that isn't keeping me awake and busy in the loo).

God has been wonderful and I am very grateful. [Big Grin] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
Im so so pleased for you Bronwyn. [Yipee] [Yipee]
Its been lovely to share this journey with you [Smile]
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
Me too! Having had the pleasure of meeting you and Sean in the early days of your relationship (when you were Seanwyn@pinkfluffycloud.com), it's lovely to share this adventure with you.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Hey New and soon to be mummys,

Hows it all going?

Actually Duh! [Roll Eyes]

None of you prolly have time to post here.

Anyway praying for you and your wee ones.

yay Bron

D [Yipee]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well tonight I did my last shift. Actually tomorrow I was meant to be working but I told the boss I was so tired and didn't know how I would cope. He a father of two young children he jumped in and is working for me tomorrow. Such a relief, at the best of times I am so exausted by a late finnishing at 10 pm(tonight it was 1030) and then at work again by 7am.
Add that to poor sleep with the baby kicking, heart burn hence I am up now and utter exaustion feeling just getting up is enough to wear me out. I am so tired all the time so work gone will give me half a chance to well get the things I need to do done before baby comes.
20 days to go, and so many drs appts, and other appts.

Oh well I am starting to get excited now.
 
Posted by Goar (# 3939) on :
 
I am so excited for you Bronwyn!!! This is so awesome!

Goar
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dee.:
Hey New and soon to be mummys,

Hows it all going ... None of you prolly have time to post here.

D [Yipee]

Well, I've had a bit of time to post, but didn't feel I had much to say. Alan's parents came up this last weekend for a short visit on short notice (phoned Thursday night to say they'd be here Saturday - eep!), and a good time was had by all. Grandma got to give David lots of good cuddles, and Grandpa declared his approval both of the boy and of how involved Alan was being with his care. They helped with dishes and clean up, let me take naps when I needed them, and took us out to dinner on Sunday, so their visit was much less stressful than I thought it was going to be (this is their first visit to stay with us since Alan and I have been married).

David has been eating, eating, eating, sleeping, and soiling nappies like nobody's business. I spend at least an hour every day reading him stories and poetry while we cuddle (he's a very good cuddler). Did I mention how much he eats? The health visitor said to expect him to begin eating more when he hit his three-week growth spurt ... well he has hit it, and exceeded her expectations. He put on a whole pound this week (so it's not all ending up out in his nappy)! He continues to allow me to have naps in the afternoon between the million feeds, so at least I am staying rested.

Alan goes back to work fulltime next week, and I'm not looking forward to it. Partly because he's such a huge help getting things organized in the morning (he's on morning nappy patrol), but mostly because I've just enjoyed having his company a few extra hours a day ... ah well, we knew it couldn't last.

Well, that's us ... happy, resting, eating, and pooing (and counting the remaining days with Bronwyn and Sean). How are the other little one's and their mums and the mums-to-be?

[ 16. June 2006, 14:41: Message edited by: Flausa ]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Oh Bron... Lu and I are sitting here with happy tears in our eyes. I remember our conversations and my horror at feeling I had to tell you you would have a baby some day, and my guilt when you had such a dreadful time...

I am happy beyond words for you and Sean. I think of you every single day with much love.

Vikki xxx [Votive] [Axe murder] [Yipee] [Overused]
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Yay for baby updates,

I am so glad that wee David is thriving and turning into a great cuddler. It will stand him in good stead later in life...as well as a love of books and poetry. Sounds like you are doing a great job Flausa.

Am counting the days with Bron as well...I forget when the big days is? Anyone remember?
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dee.:
Am counting the days with Bron as well...I forget when the big days is? Anyone remember?

quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn on 7th June:
Still will only be 27 days and I will have a baby.

By my calculation, that makes it 4th July.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Ahhh,

Trust a mad scientist to be able to do the math. Is the wee lad counting yet?
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
I think Bron said she was due around the 17th but that they are going to deliver by C-section on the 4th..?
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Yes, Bronwyn's having an all-American baby! [Biased]
 
Posted by Luisa (# 7761) on :
 
Bronwyn you have had a jouney of sadness and great joy and it has been so enlightening to hear about how hard it can be for some couples to have the family they have dreamed of!

Now sit back and relax and enjoy the last few weeks of being pregnant! Try logging onto Essential Baby. They have a great Forum section which may provide you with some more help and support during the next part of your journey. They also have sections on where in Oz you are and they hold meets if you find that you are having trouble making new friends with babies and children. It has been a big help to me since we moved from WA to NSW.

Oh and if you have a boy I should be able to send you some clothes for him if you dont mind second hand? But I know how expensive clothing can be!

Take care and good luck to everyone who posts here,

Luisa
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
We've been fine. I've had a bit of a hard time the last couple of weeks, feeling a bit down, tired, trapped in the house and generally anxious. But things have definitely picked up this week - the Ratling persists in thriving, and has this week learnt how to smile and chuckle which makes things take on a much happier complexion. I've also met up with one or two other mums from my antenatal class and been reassured to hear some similar things from them.

One story... when I was pregnant one of the doom-laden remarks people kept making, for some unknown reason, was along the lines of 'Ha, you'll never have a long lie again' or 'Better have breakfast in bed now, you'll never do it again'. Well, they were lying. This morning, since Mr Rat is away, after getting the Ratling washed, changed and dressed we decided just to go back to bed for a while. I ate cereal while entertaining the baby with tickles and silly voices, then when he dropped off I listened to most of Broadcasting House with a sleeping Ratling cuddled into the crook of my arm. I can't imagine a better lie in!

[ETA: Looking forward to the 4th of July for Bronwyn and Sean!]

[ 18. June 2006, 13:33: Message edited by: Rat ]
 
Posted by Caz... (# 3026) on :
 
Rat, am praying for a week of chuckles and radio-in-bed (sounds delicious).

From what I hear what you've said is pretty normal... just make sure you have lovely people around you to care for you - you matter too [Smile]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
There was a thing in the paper at the w/e about "preggie pops" and somebody else mentioned them to me too. Does anybody know whether they actually work, or if they're just very expensive boiled sweets? I suspect the latter! [Smile] Oh, BTW, soft bras to sleep in have helped a lot. [Snore]
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
We've been fine. I've had a bit of a hard time the last couple of weeks, feeling a bit down, tired, trapped in the house and generally anxious. But things have definitely picked up this week - the Ratling persists in thriving, and has this week learnt how to smile and chuckle which makes things take on a much happier complexion.

I read somewhere that babies learn to smile by about six weeks because that's as long as their exhausted mothers will put up with only negative feedback! The smile gets poor old mum back on side!

That is probably an exaggeration, but there's just a grain of truth there, as certainly the first few weeks are a sleep-deprived, muddled, steep learning-curve endurance course for many of us. Then that first smile makes it all worthwhile!
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
There was a thing in the paper at the w/e about "preggie pops" and somebody else mentioned them to me too. Does anybody know whether they actually work, or if they're just very expensive boiled sweets? I suspect the latter! [Smile] Oh, BTW, soft bras to sleep in have helped a lot. [Snore]

Didn't think of a soft bra, glad it is helping. I haven't tried the pregie pops but I am guessing they sound like expensive sweets but anything is worth a try!!!! I really did find as long as I was able to swallow water and plain icepoles(icelollys in UK) I was able to survive with a vitamin supliment and eating what I felt like.

OK news from here: Firstly our computer has been on the blink well actually it is the phone line which has meant no computer access which has been a worry for me as I suspected some people may be concerned given my late pregnancy that I had popped. We are driving to Melbourne tomorrow and will have limmited access again for about a week.
I went to my last anti natal appt today. She asked me if I wanted to come next week and I said not really, and she agreed it was not necessary which means one less hour waiting for the dr to be reasured when I don't need to be. Next time I will be in the operating room. 14 days from now and yes it is the 4th July. My weight is the same as it was at 12 weeks of pregnancy which is less than I was before I got pregnant. Funny I went to a pre op appt and was told my BMI (weight height ratio) was too high, I felt like saying hello I have a baby in there! (Plucked up the courage to ask the dr if she were pregnant after a few times of not being convinced, she is 20 weeks)

I also am reflecting on the fact this has been a miricle baby and reading the above comments has me in tears. Vicki, I knew always before I met Sean I would someday conceive and have a baby I really just gave up hope and at times the depression became unbearable. It has meant holding onto a promise which seemed impossable. Has given me a lot of compassion for other having difficulty and the struggle. I really could never understand without having been through it. Has given me quite an insight.
Luisa I am not too proud to accept second hand clothes but the postage may make it too much to make it worth it, but we shall see.
Well better go, Sean also has been computer deprived and well keeps not implying he wants the computer I know he does and I need my afternoon sleep!!!!!!
Please take call all, and it is good to see the new parents doing SO well(this would be a great time to photograph Dr doing something silly when he is sleep deprived) [Biased]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Go with God, Bronwyn. [Votive]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
((Bronwyn)) I am so pleased for you. This thread is cheering me up enormously at the moment!!

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Bronwyn: [Yipee] [Votive]

I've just been for the first midwife appointment and come back with half a ton of reading matter! I now have the form for the dentist etc. and have more of an idea of what happens when.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
[Votive] [Yipee] for Bronwyn and Sean. I'll be praying for you on 4th July (though as I can never get my head around the time difference, it may be 3rd or even 5th...)

Jane R
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
Just a quick report to say that Matthew Day is 6 months old today. Can you believe it? We certainly can't. Where did all the time go?!?!

He is doing so well now. I estimate he weighs in excess of 21 lb, chuckles, smiles, rolls over and is almost sitting up unaided. Recent developments include a whole new range of noises. [Big Grin] [Eek!] I reckon he's going to be quite a talker when he gets older. I thank God for all the joy and happiness he's brought into our lives. He really makes me laugh some days.

I've gone back to work for the last half term of this term, just on a temporary contract at a different school. While it is fairly exhausting, I'm loving it. The staff there are fantastic, I only wish I was staying. Matthew seems to have settled into nursery very well, even if his routine isn't quite as well managed as when he's at home. Oh well!

Thinking of the other new mums and dads round here - also thinking of Bronwyn. I hope and pray that your new little one brings as much happiness as Matthew has to us.
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
WOW 6 months..... [Smile] [Smile]
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
[Votive] Bronwyn [Votive]
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Teddy is now three months old. Today we built his cot; he looks so tiny in it - he was so snug in his little basket. He weighs about 15lbs. He is a lovely little smiler, and very vocal. He seems to want to tell me all about it, whatever it is - I just wish I could understand. We try to get out to something four days of the week; we live in an area with Surestart, so there are lots of support groups and classes - breastfeeding, baby music, baby massage. It has been really nice to meet people locally, so that now there are people to stop and talk to in the street, which I never really had before.

Teddy still wakes at least once at night, so I'm still fairly tired, but I guess it's not long now before weaning, so it's not forever.

Prayers and best wishes to those of you expecting now.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Does anybody have any advice on NCT vs NHS antenatal classes? My mother-in-law thinks the NCT is much better but they're also rather expensive and the midwife said they fill up fast so if we want them we should book now. What's anybody else's experience??

Also, somebody told me that you shouldn't wear underwired bras in pregnancy, but I've also been told that you need extra support! Which is true, or, if they both are, how do I get the support without the wires? [Confused] Thanks!
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
You get the extra support from the extra thick straps and the concrete-reinforced cups.

See here for what I mean by that.

From memory, underwire is bad.

Maternity bras are, on the whole, ugly. It's just as well that pregnant women are, on the whole, beautiful.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Thanks for that link, LATA!

The man's guide to lingerie should be required reading!

[scurries off to look at the full-figure sports bras]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Underwire supposedly can squish the milk ducts, leading to clogs and possible infection. But I'd ask my doctor.
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
When my breasts suddenly grew at least 2 cup sizes (in the first two months of the pregnancy) I went and got fitted with a new underwired bra. It does not pinch or squish at all and is very "supportive". I'm happy that I finally had a professional fitting, even though it was a little more expensive than the bras I usually get. It looks much better than the soft maternity bra I went out and bought first (which was great to sleep in when the breasts were still hurting!) and is very comfortable.

I can see how a badly fitted underwired bra could cause problems, but as long as you feel comfortable it can't be bad. I guess if you are experiencing leakage (I'm not, yet) a maternity bra might be more practical though.

Still three months to go for me until (hopefully) maternity bras become unavoidable... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Light:
When my breasts suddenly grew at least 2 cup sizes

Underwired bras are not recommended for women whose breast are growing quickly or are changing shape. Apparently there is the danger that women will stay too long in a bra that doesn't fit properly and that the underwires can damage the breast.

It sounds like as long as you are aware of the possible problems and get measured regularly then it is up to the individual.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
well back from Melbourne. No idea about bras I went and was fitted once in early pregnancy once a couple of weeks ago. I had not changed since early on.

Melbourne was fine but I was so tired the time mainly was rest, do something, then rest and eat.

I know when I do too much I get pain. Driving back was hard but Sean did most. He has been an angel.

Wont type too much as on Seans work puter as the normal one is a dead thing now apparently and we need a new one. [Frown] Baby bonus now used I guess.
Hate this laptop.

FWIW We are ahead by about 11 hours to the UK and so eve of the 3 July will be the birth.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
OK just realised some may think we should spend baby money on baby. I guess we will spend the money on baby just this is a bonus which came at the time to buy the computer. Guess I could say the baby will be well provided for, please do not worry.

Have spent 5 times at least the bonus with IVF!!!!
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
Bron,

it's your money - spend it on what you want and what you need, for goodness' sake! [Smile]

Will be thinking of you next week, praying that all will be well with the three of you.

God bless
Love Ags
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
You mean I shouldn't be spending my monthly family allowance cheque on poker nights?

But... if I win- it's all going into the college fund.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
OK just realised some may think we should spend baby money on baby. I guess we will spend the money on baby just this is a bonus which came at the time to buy the computer. Guess I could say the baby will be well provided for, please do not worry.

Have spent 5 times at least the bonus with IVF!!!!

Lets get this straight. You are sensible and spend on the baby and then can not post birth announcement, pictures of child etc on SOF because you do not have a computer on which to post, or ....

I think you are putting our unselfishness (high moral tones) a bit too high!

Jengie
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
OK glad it isn't considered not appropiate. Been spending the day arranging the house for baby...so tiring glad I didn't leave the shopping til the last minute.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Anyway, Bronwyn, what makes you think it's YOUR computer?! Baby may have other ideas...

Not long now [Yipee] [Votive]

Jane R
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Won't they just. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by ebeth (# 4474) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Left at the Altar:
You get the extra support from the extra thick straps and the concrete-reinforced cups.

See here for what I mean by that.

From memory, underwire is bad.

Maternity bras are, on the whole, ugly. It's just as well that pregnant women are, on the whole, beautiful.

I had no idea that there was a size 50K [Eek!] I can't imagine the support required just to do one's daily activities with such.

On another note: Again, hearty congrats to all the new mommies and mommies -to-be. It's so nice that you have a thread to share your experiences.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Wide awake at 3am. I have a question. OK I am a large girl and Although I have not put on weight I have become larger in the tummy. I really do not look pregnant just fat, and waddling along and been seen to be buying food. I am very conscious of men looking at me all over, lastly my face with a look of disbelief I could possiably want food with my weight and esp not a milkshake.
Finding it increasing annoying, I know it will be over soon but is spoiling my last few weeks.
Anyone else had this experience?
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
I think you should definitely go "pregnant and proud" Bronwyn! Try the obvious approach!

(not long to go now!) xx
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Yes Bron - up to twenty years after the birth! lol

Can you PM me with your address? I think I've got the right one but I'm not sure!

Lucy is SO excited for you! (As are Holly and I!)

[Votive] [Yipee] [Axe murder] [Tear] [Votive]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Except the shirt in question wouldn't come near covering a bump of more than 3 months. [Hot and Hormonal]

God's blessings to you, Bronwyn x 2!
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
You could walk around with a dreamy look on your face and stroke your bump. Another idea would be to suddenly jump, and then say in a loud voice "Oi, baby, that one really hurt!" "Watch out, that was almost my bladder." [Big Grin]

You might like to make your own 'baby on board' t-shirt from one of your t-shirts that fits and either a permanent marker, or a fabric pen.
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
Or get one of those "baby onboard" signs some people leave stuck in their cars rear windows until their children are into their 20's, and stick it on your back.
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
I didn't run into that when I was actually pregnant, Bron, but I remember getting some of the sort of nasty once-over look you describe from certain men after my first baby was born. It was mid-summer and beastly hot and the few maternity tops I had that were even remotely cool enough I was also sick-to-death of wearing, so I wore various old t-shirts and what-not. Unfortunately the enlarged nursing-mother bustline and the post-delivery saggy tummy made them a bit snug and not always flattering (that's an understatement), but I had neither money nor energy nor inclination to goes clothes-shopping at that point.

There's not much you can do except give them a cold glare and/or ignore them, but it really does make you feel shitty. I still remember that. Do your best to return your thoughts to the baby and Sean and shrug off the negative thoughts. And remind yourself that anyone rude enough to look at you like that is a jerk and an asshole.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I didn't look pregnant either (due to my weight and the way I carried him) even as we went into the hospital. Wish there was some easy way to shame the a*&^&*^(s. As if it's any of their business.
ETA: Could you, perhaps, give a long meaningful look at their groins and then shake your head and giggle?

[ 30. June 2006, 04:19: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Thanks for the info on bras. Can any UK shipmates advise on NHS vs NCT antenatal classes? Mother-in-law is recommending the NCT but they're expensive and the midwife says we'd need to book now!
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
Thanks for the info on bras. Can any UK shipmates advise on NHS vs NCT antenatal classes? Mother-in-law is recommending the NCT but they're expensive and the midwife says we'd need to book now!

I went to a peri-natal meeting yesterday with a load of professionals who have a special interest in child development etc. They were all raving on about the NCT and how important the relationships that they developed there have been to them.

Other than that, no experience of either at all!!! Except for, you might be lucky to find any staff in the NHS! [Snigger]

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Bron, I got huge , and I mean HUGE when I was expecting the Amosling (I'd been rather tiny before). I wore men's shirts in the largest size, big elasticized maternity trousers, and Doc Martens (the only things in the closet that would go on my swollen feet). Right towards the end of about week 37 I had to fly from Houston to London. I know, I shouldn't have, but I wasn't going to produce a little Texan, was I? Did they let me board first along with the old people and people with children? Did they, heck! 'You're just fat,' said the woman at the gate, 'You board with your row.'

Bron, it is so utterly marvellous that you are having this baby. It's a miracle. Who gives a hoot what some stupid guys think? They don't know you. They don't know your story. [Axe murder] [Votive]
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
I don't know anything about the NCT classes.

But our NHS antenatal care was excellent. It is a midwife-led practice, we had a 6 or 8 week course of antenatal classes run by midwives, and another 2 classes run by physiotherapists to advise on physical care during pregnancy and labour. The midwife classes covered subjects such as pain relief, water birth, home birth, breast feeding, relaxation, what to expect at the hospital, care of the newborn, etc. We also had midwife-run aquanatal classes at the local authority swimming pool. I found them all extremely helpful, informative and professional. We do not have a shortage of midwives in our area, of course.

They were also helpful in building relationships with the practice midwives so you didn't feel intimidated phoning them up in early labour or after the birth to ask questions. There was also a very good chance that the midwife who was with you through labour would be someone you already knew, though naturally that can't be guaranteed.

Post-natally, as well as the standard baby clinic run by your assigned health visitor, the midwife unit runs a course of postnatal classes that cover topics such as crying, weaning, dental care, etc. The midwives are quite honest that the point of these classes is not so much the subject matter but an attempt to help the new parents build some social capital. This is a 'dormitory' area where a lot of people moved as DINKies, so have no family locally and their existing social networks are through work, so new mums often find themselves very isolated. Once the course is finished the group is encouraged to keep on meeting, and are introduced to the local family centre for this purpose.

There is also a breastfeeding support group that meets weekly, and a baby massage course (though since one of our antenatal group turns out to be a baby massage instructor we're organising our own class).

I imagine NHS provision will vary by area, so you may need to do some research on what your practice offers. But I certainly wouldn't jump to the conclusion that the NHS offering will be substandard.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
This might be a double post, sorry!

Bron, I looked fat rather than pregnant right up until about 38 weeks. Most unfair, because I actually didn't put on much weight and my arms and legs wound up thinner than they were pre-pregnancy! But my middle was just like a barrel, with no obviously bump-shaped bump.

I felt very much like people were looking at me askance, and being critical. But Amos is right, ignore the buggers and hug your knowledge to yourself, what do those ignorant people know?

I think it's a pity, though, that pregnancy seems to be having a period of being the latest celebrity fad - and we're being conned into thinking that the only acceptable way to be pregnant is the Hollywood way...huge, perfect bump on an otherwise skinny body (a bit like a spider I always think). Certainly maternity clothes seem to be designed with that shape in mind, and that shape only. I'm sure that's the natural shape for some mums, but obviously it isn't for everyone!
 
Posted by Jillyb (# 4610) on :
 
thinking of you Bron and Sean as your little ones birthday approaches, hope all goes well. It's just brilliant [Yipee]
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Oh, and while I'm on a roll... I bloody hate maternity bras and nursing bras. I now know the full meaning of the word matronly. As if it wasn't bad enough that I have to give up alcohol, and peanut butter, and pate, and (temporarily) cycling, I have to walk around with this saggy, baggy monstrosity of a bosom as well.

As soon as I get done breastfeeding I'm going out to buy the pointiest, perkiest, most underwired bra they have in the shop. So there.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
I have to walk around with this saggy, baggy monstrosity of a bosom as well. As soon as I get done breastfeeding I'm going out to buy the pointiest, perkiest, most underwired bra they have in the shop. So there.

I believe it was at about this same time post-pregnancy that Anne Lamott wrote, in "Operating Instructions", "When this is all over, I'm going to hold an awards banquet for my body."


quote:
... we're being conned into thinking that the only acceptable way to be pregnant is the Hollywood way...huge, perfect bump on an otherwise skinny body (a bit like a spider I always think). Certainly maternity clothes seem to be designed with that shape in mind, and that shape only.
I'm so sorry to hear that. The same shift in fashions happened when I was pregnant with my son, 19 years ago. Suddenly all the maternity dresses in the shops fit tightly through the hips and thighs... and I had gained 50 pounds and had an ass as wide as Montana. To top things off, the large-size clothing I had left over from my first pregnancy was heavy winter material, and here we were having the hottest September ever! Misery.

[ 01. July 2006, 01:41: Message edited by: Mamacita ]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
I have been ignoring them, thanks or the suport and also acknowledging it happens. I do really look like an extra fat person although people who know me would know the truth.

Interesting about the maternity clothes fasions, I actually managed to obtain one item which was maternity which fitted. I know I am large but not that big that nothing fitted. I still haven't put on weight and I wont now I guess. I have just been wearing for the main part my own clothes, and surprisingly one set of pants is MUCH looser now than before I was pregnant around the thighs. The tight clothes like jeans have been packed away but mostly my own, which I think means I look less pregnant and more just fat.
Had never looked much at fasion less so maternity but it makes sense as to why I could not buy any clothes. NB mens shirts are a great buy and I had one for work two for elsewhere. This was after my horrid uniform would not do up.

3 days to go...
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
When I was pregnant meternity clothes only went up to a size 16. I found that Evans (a high street women's clothes shop with sizes 16+) was absolutely fantastic. They didn't have any maternity wear, but they did have clothes designed for larger women.

A friend from church and I were pregnant at the same time (delivered a day apart), I looked pregnant, she looked like someone had stuffed a basketball up her dress.
 
Posted by Goar (# 3939) on :
 
We will be praying for you and yours, Bron!
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
It's very exciting, Bron! Best of luck.
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Rat, here's hoping your dreams come true but just in case,learn to appreciate your boobs... mine went up frm a 34B to a - well, never mind that now - 20 years on they are still a 38DD even though I've just lost several dress sizes.

I liked to think of them as 'keen' [Roll Eyes] .

Fashion changes. When I was quite pregnant, big Laura Ashley dresses fitted perfectly. And you didn't pay for NCT classes. I think NCT/NHS depends on your personality. I got a lot of good information from the NCT but although I did go on to have drug-free births I couldn't help wondering how the women felt who'd had to 'settle' for drugs and intervention. Hopefully things have moved on a lot since but back then there was a lot of judgementalism around - and the NCT crowd just weren't 'me' - but that was more because of where we were living at the time. I know lots of people find them incredibly helpful - but if you have to pay, at this already expensive time, I do know lots of people who also find the NHS courses great too.
 
Posted by Poppy (# 2000) on :
 
NCT v NHS

I did both as a didn't know anyone in the area and I needed to network and find other women with new babies.

The NHS classes were huge but I found several like minded souls and we stayed in contact until our children went to school. The NCT was more precious and middle class but I still found 4 or 5 nice ladies and 1 very good friend. The NCT approach did drive me a bit potty at times and I did need lots of intervention at the birth and couldn't breast feed. As a result I felt like a complete failure but the friends I made by joining the groups were worth the NCT pitch which you really do need to balance out with your experience, your body and your needs.

By the time I got to child number 3 and was telling the midwives exactly what I wanted in terms of pain relief and the doses (I'm very petite and normal doses knock me out) one of the midwives did confide that lots of the problems they encounter are as a result of first time mums being very inflexible in terms of what they will consider in terms of pain relief and how they will deliver the babies. She blamed the NCT for the rigidity of thought in the women she saw.
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
...Anne Lamott wrote, in "Operating Instructions", "When this is all over, I'm going to hold an awards banquet for my body."

I cannot recommend this book highly enough for moms. It not only acknowledges how stinkin' hard mothering is - while not being whiney even for a moment - but it also pays homage to the strong, intellegent woman who is still there, despite the diapers and milky shirtfronts.

I buy this book for all new moms in my circle of friends.

Comet

(Go get'em Bron! I'll be checking for happy announcements! and piss on those rude buggers eyeing you! if you're feeling up to it, you could say something like, "You just want me so bad don't you, big boy?")

[ 01. July 2006, 14:33: Message edited by: cometchaser ]
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
Hi Bronwyn, I'm thinking about you and Sean and the little one and will hold you in my prayers over the next few days. [Votive]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Thanks for you well wishes, was overcome with emotion today the church had put together a baby basket full of baby clothes mostly second hand, bunny rugs and nappies. Was so sweet. All are very excited as no baby has been born in the church for several years and the most people are well grandparents so not likely to have them.

All ready now just tomorrow and a sleep and I will be a mummy.

An aside I found the prenatal classes offered by the hospital not very helpful, spoke a lot about a natural birth as if it were the one and only way(no wonder a lot of people think they have failed, even I had although I had resolved it in my mind)
The classes were not organized and one we spent an hour waiting until we were dismissed to go home she didn't know how to rap it up. Hard when Sean had a very long term.
The brestfeeding one was well a couple of hours on why it is good and then no practical advice, the breastfeeding association were much better.

OK dinner time!!!!

Take care all hopefully will let you know ASAP about baby.
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:

Comet

(Go get'em Bron! I'll be checking for happy announcements! and piss on those rude buggers eyeing you! if you're feeling up to it, you could say something like, "You just want me so bad don't you, big boy?")

[Killing me] Not sure what Sean would think about that one! lol

Bron! Lucy is skipping round upstairs singing, "BellyBaby's almost here!!"

So much love and prayers from our little household.

Hope Sean is feeling good too.

[Votive]
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
All ready now just tomorrow and a sleep and I will be a mummy.

That's so much more exciting than "one more sleep 'til Christmas".

Lots of love and hope and prayers coming from all over the place for all three of you.

And, umm, don't expect to lose that 'overcome with emotion' feeling soon. I get all 'verklempt' at the slightest provocation. I got weepy over the (lame and really not that emotionally charged) Canada Day Parade.
 
Posted by Worm in the Grass (# 10999) on :
 
Bron,
love and prayers. Hope all is well [Votive] [Overused]
 
Posted by Adrienne (# 2334) on :
 
Bron, Sean and baby - love and prayers winging your way for the big day. [Smile]

A
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Praying, Bronwyn and Sean and littl'un.

[Axe murder] [Votive]
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
Thanks for you well wishes, was overcome with emotion today the church had put together a baby basket full of baby clothes mostly second hand, bunny rugs and nappies. Was so sweet. All are very excited as no baby has been born in the church for several years and the most people are well grandparents so not likely to have them.

This is wonderful that you have so much church suport. But do brace yourself for a lot of unsolicited advice about the details of how you are taking care of your baby, and practice saying "Thank you for the advice" without feeling any need to pay attention to any of it. Every mother-father-child relationship is unique and outsiders can only see part of the picture.

Above all, relax and enjoy getting to know your baby. You'll make mistakes, we all do, but 99% of the time they're minor mistakes and everything is fine in the end. Trust me, if you can relax and not worry, there is nothing in this world as fascinating and as much fun as watching a small infant discover the world bit by bit.
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
Bronwyn... thinking of you all [Axe murder]

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
So excited - praying... [Votive]
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
ditto [Smile] [Smile] [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
So if I've wrestled with the time/date difference correctly, we over here in the Central Standard Time Zone might hear something here by our July 4th morning?
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Janine:
So if I've wrestled with the time/date difference correctly, we over here in the Central Standard Time Zone might hear something here by our July 4th morning?

Yes I think that is correct. Have left strict instructions for Sean to post the news!!!!!

Got a time for admission now..getting scary. Been spending my time resting in preparation!!!!

This will be my last post as a pregnant woman.
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
Thoughts and prayers are with you and Sean, and of course the little one about to make an appearance.
 
Posted by Sinisterial (# 5834) on :
 
A [Votive] , a [Axe murder] , and a [Hot and Hormonal] (blood rushing to my head from praying so hard) for both Bronwyn and Sean.

Hope to hear some [Yipee] news tomorrow.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Bronwyn & Sean - I'm not a mummy and never likely to be (I hope!) but I have lurked through your troubles & your joy at your pregnancy.
May the birth and your years as parents be full of joy and laughter and love. Many blessings to your family. xx
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
[Yipee] [Votive] again, Bron, Sean and ?

We've just been for the scan, and there really is a baby (I still didn't quite believe that bit [Roll Eyes] ), there's only 1 (phew!) and the official due date is 19th Jan 2007! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
Hoping and praying everything goes well Bronwyn!

Keren, it feels great doesn't it? [Yipee] Before the first scan I couldn't believe that I really, really was pregnant either, in spite of feeling sick and tired all the time... There's not much doubt anymore, with the incessant kicking and boxing from the little troll [Help]

I'm due the 24th of September, and I'm starting to feel troubled by the hot summer temperature... 29 degrees Celsius in my office today. You won't have to worry about that!
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
I drove to my scan at least 3/4 convinced that the whole thing had been a product of my imagination, that there'd be no baby to be found, and that everybody who'd been making such a fuss over my pregnancy would be furious.

Bron & Sean - the Ratling and I are waiting with bated breath. We're thinking about you!
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
[Votive] [Angel] [Axe murder] for all
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
I just can't get Bron and Sean and the Bellybaby out of my mind! Could even be born by now!

[Tear] [Votive] [Angel] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
Me too, I keep remembering and feeling very nervous and excited for them!
 
Posted by duchess (# 2764) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
quote:
Originally posted by Janine:
So if I've wrestled with the time/date difference correctly, we over here in the Central Standard Time Zone might hear something here by our July 4th morning?

Yes I think that is correct. Have left strict instructions for Sean to post the news!!!!!

Got a time for admission now..getting scary. Been spending my time resting in preparation!!!!

This will be my last post as a pregnant woman.

FOUTH OF JULY! FOUTH OF JULY! BROWYN!
Magic baby dust!

Hope it works.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
We've just been for the scan, and there really is a baby (I still didn't quite believe that bit [Roll Eyes] ...

I found out I was pregnant during a scan -- that was a great day! It's quite something when it all starts to be "real," isn't it!

Can't wait for news about Bronwyn, Sean and baby.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
[Votive] [Votive] [Votive]

For Bron, Sean and baby.


This is so exciting after praying for months for you guys on the infertility thread to be praying all goes well today.

Hooray for bellybaby

[Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
Holding Bron and Sean and wee bub in the light.
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Well, it's 5.02pm on 4 July. Hopefully Sean will, pop in soon....
 
Posted by Curious (# 93) on :
 
I guess Sean & Bron have other things on their mind than posting here - BUT WE NEED NEWS!!!!!!

Prayers that all are safe & well.

Curious
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
No it isn't, LATA - it's 8.15 am. [Biased]

I'm sure Sean will have other things on his mind but I'm hoping for news and will have to surreptitiously pop on the Ship at work.

Did Bron ever give an actual time?

Ooooh... it's even worse when you know when someone's having the baby, isn't it!

Sorry, I was too side-tracked last post to congratulate people on their successful scans - isn't it brilliant? I remember Holly 'waving' at us and splaying her tiny fingers. [Smile]

[Votive]
 
Posted by Petrified (# 10667) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
Thanks for the info on bras. Can any UK shipmates advise on NHS vs NCT antenatal classes? Mother-in-law is recommending the NCT but they're expensive and the midwife says we'd need to book now!

We did both (elder pebble is now 17) I found the NCT classes much more useful, the father was only invited to one of the NHS classes, and so did Mrs P. I suspect thing have changed since then.
The idea of being a "failure" was discussed at length because several of the mums to be (including us) already knew they would have fairly heavy intervention because of complications.
Mrs P still meets with her NCT group.
 
Posted by Caz... (# 3026) on :
 
[Votive] Bron, Sean and this most prayed for and long awaited baby.

I already have tears in my eyes and we don't know anything yet!
 
Posted by Jillyb (# 4610) on :
 
[Yipee] it's THE day we've all been waiting and praying for!! [Yipee]

so looking forward to hearing little one has arrived safe and sound

[ 04. July 2006, 08:25: Message edited by: Jillyb ]
 
Posted by Linguo (# 7220) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Petrified:
We did both (elder pebble is now 17)[...] Mrs P still meets with her NCT group.

My mother still meets with her NCT group about once a fortnight. I'm an only child, and I just turned 24!

[Yipee] and [Votive] and [Axe murder] for Bron and Sean and their littley... so exciting!
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Vikki Pollard:
Ooooh... it's even worse when you know when someone's having the baby, isn't it!


yes!!!
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
[Frown]

Here's praying no news is good news. I expect Sean is so exhausted letting relatives all over the world know what's going on that he's just gone home and fallen asleep!

[Votive]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Look if we carry on with this there will be problems in theatre with the midwifes being crowded out by angels.

Jengie
 
Posted by Jillyb (# 4610) on :
 
[Angel] [Angel] [Angel] [Angel] [Angel] [Angel]
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
*flippers still crossed here*
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
[Votive] [Angel] [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
... entertaining angels by the light of the ultrasound screen, Hosts of Heaven, sing over them...
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
[Votive]
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
Praying for Sean and Bronwyn and the little one - heard in the cafe...

[Votive]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sir Kevin:
Praying for Sean and Bronwyn and the little one - heard in the cafe...

[Votive]

What's happened?

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Is everything ok? [Frown]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
No news so far, AFAIK. That's what happened. They might be rather busy.

[Votive] [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Don't start any rumours! All Sir K heard in the cafe was me saying I hope Sean posts soon...

Poor guy has probably been phoning relatives round the world and gone to sleep.

I am assuming that anything untoward would have made its way here for prayer via his friends in the UK by now, so hoping all is well. [Votive] I seem to remember that Dads have quite a hard time of it too, those first few days!
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
[Votive] [Angel] [Votive]
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
Operating on the premise that no news is good news (but hoping to hear soon!) and holding all involved in the light.

eta: [Votive]

[ 05. July 2006, 05:37: Message edited by: neandergirl ]
 
Posted by Petrified (# 10667) on :
 
This is worse than having your own!
[Votive]
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
Um... not quite. I don't yet require LaMaze breathing and/or an epidural to cope with the wait for news.

It is close, though.

[Votive]
 
Posted by magdalenegospel (# 11619) on :
 
[Votive]

Hoping all is well.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
[Votive]

Contiuing to uphold all in prayer that these first few days will be exciting and bonding and full of wonder.
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
Bronwyn, Sean and Little One [Votive]
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
Praying that all is well.....

*imagines us all pacing the 'relatives' room biting our nails and chewing the ends off the cigars in anticipation* [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
I'll go for coffee if anyone wants one?

This is making me crazy!
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
(peeks in to see how things are going.)
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
[Votive] *pacing*
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
I reckon it's so long since Sean posted that he's forgotten his password.

I'll have a coffee, please... [Frown]

[Votive] This has kind of derailed this thread - I am also thinking of everyone else on here...
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Vikki Pollard:
I reckon it's so long since Sean posted that he's forgotten his password.

Either that or he's simply far too occupied with other things at the moment. Bron will be in hospital a few days, and if he's anything like me Sean'll be there until the staff have to practically throw him semi-conscious out of the building to get some sleep (unless they've facilities for fathers to stay over there too). Why not just give the poor man a bit of time?
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Good grief, Alan. I hope you are not suggesting that Sean loves his family more than us? Why would you ever think such a thing? You don't think like that, surely? [Razz]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Absolutely, Alan - but I think because Bron made such a point (perhaps unrealistically!) of reassuring us there would Be News, and because some of us have been praying for this event for several years, I think there are a few more nerves than usual!

My money is on Bron herself posting in a few days! [Big Grin]

Can Dads really stay at the hospital these days? How wonderful!! Of course he won't be at home! Or only in a comatose state, if so.

Hope Wee Cresswell is continuing well. [Votive]
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Vikki Pollard:
Can Dads really stay at the hospital these days? How wonderful!!

Well, I know it's possible at some hospitals in the US. I doubt it's an option on the NHS though. Wishaw Hospital had a policy to allow partners to stay 9am to 9pm (all other visitors had to be fitted into 1 hour slots in the afternoon and evening), though they didn't seem to enforce it very strongly - but no bed to kip on, or shower to use to freshen up.

Personally I'd consider it a great idea if there was the possibility of spouses to stay close to anyone spending an extended time in hospital. I'm sure some of the wards that have been closed could be opened up again - either to put less patients in each ward with room for loved ones to sleep with the patient, or as rooms for loved ones to crash in when needed. I don't see it happening though (except for parents of hospitalised children, which generally happens anyway).

quote:
Hope Wee Cresswell is continuing well.
Wee David is thriving. A very good natured wee man. We took him out to a Shipmeet last week in Edinburgh, where he was no trouble at all (until he got a bit hungry on the way home, but that did nothing more than mean we got home late). He's also been up north for a couple of days in the Highlands, and been on his first "hillwalk". He even sat through the whole of the service at church on Sunday.

Rumours of the death of a social life upon the birth of a baby are greatly exagerated.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Alan Cresswell:
Rumours of the death of a social life upon the birth of a baby are greatly exagerated.

Depends on the baby! My first one was OK at first, but then got very dependent on a strict routine for sleep patterns (Like his Dad, he's not a naturally good sleeper). If we stayed out too late, we'd have hell to pay for a week.

Number two was a horrible, screamy, collicky nightmare until weaned. After that, he was a little angel who you could park in a buggy in the corner and he'd drop right off.
 
Posted by marmot (# 479) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Alan Cresswell:

Rumours of the death of a social life upon the birth of a baby are greatly exagerated.

Everyone's mileage varies on this issue, I suspect. Glad it's working out for you three, and that you're enjoying your time together.
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by marmot:
quote:
Originally posted by Alan Cresswell:

Rumours of the death of a social life upon the birth of a baby are greatly exagerated.

Everyone's mileage varies on this issue, I suspect. Glad it's working out for you three, and that you're enjoying your time together.
Oh, I'm sure that some people do find it impossible. But, it's interesting that practically everyone on hearing that someone's having a baby automatically respond "well, that's your social life ruined for the next 15 years" or "better get out and visit those museums and have meals out, because you're not going to have a chance for the next few years". I seem to recall several such doomsayers on this very thread (and previous incarnations).

Well, it ain't necessarily so.

I wonder how many people listen to the doomsayers, and sit at home all day because they actually believe that it's impossible to go out for a meal with friends, or go for a drive and walk in the countryside? When, with a bit of planning and organisation, they could actually enjoy a decent social life with their child. It's very sad if people do find themselves in that situation because of what others have stated as being a fact.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
Actually, I think most people are remembering the toddler phase rather than the new baby phase. Unless you get a screamer like SC, new babies are highly portable. A few months down the line when wee David is crawling or toddling, and asserting his right not to like what you like, things may get trickier. Then again, they may not. I'm sure he's an angel, and you'll be fine! After all, it doesn't sound like you want to take him clubbing, or anything!

I think if you have two sensible parents who share the load and have reasonable expectations, then you can still have a great time. It's often less spontaneous than when you are a couple, as you have to be organised, but you can have so much more fun as a family. I loved the years when mine were about 6 and 9, as children that age are old enough to be civilised and enjoy museums and walking and the beach etc. etc.

Now they're 16 and 13, and I enjoy their company still. We can go off as a couple, because they're old enough to stay at home without us, or we can all go out together and have a great time. I'm going to specially treasure our holiday this year, as clearly BC won't be coming with us much longer. I shall miss him when he goes his own way, but I'm glad he's independent and adventurous. After all, what are we bringing them up for, if not to launch them into the world?

I'm always glad to hear of happy parents who enjoy their children. It's so exactly what I would wish for every child.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
OOps,

right coffee for Viki. Is that a Latte, capucchino, flat white.....

And speaking of babies ruining your social life it sounds like bollox to me. Mum always said if the eat and sleep well they are pretty portable. Esp if you are breast feeding. Then you just need nappies blankets and something to sleep them in! And she should know...she raised 5 kids from scratch and 32 foster children.
 
Posted by Sean (# 51) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Left at the Altar:
Well, it's 5.02pm on 4 July. Hopefully Sean will, pop in soon....

Sorry about the delay guys. Computer problems at home, rushed off my feet when at school, and spending as little time at either as possible while Bronwyn & Miriam are still in the hospital.

Anyway, Miriam Helen Kelleher was born at 11.33am Australian Eastern Standard Time Tue 4th July. 3.045kg (6lbl 11). No problems or complications. They have had a few hassles establishing feeding but that's getting much better now, otherwise going swimmingly. She's the most beautiful little baby but photos will have to wait until I can figure out how to get them onto the web from my school computer.
 
Posted by marmot (# 479) on :
 
Hooray! Congratulations to Mum and Dad and best wishes for a happy, healthy life for Miriam!
 
Posted by Derf (# 2093) on :
 
Congratulations [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
[Axe murder] ooo Sean how lovely to hear from you. How wonderfully exciting for you all!! Miriam is such a pretty name and I am delighted that everything has gone ok.

Please send lots of [Axe murder] to Bronwyn and Miriam too.

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
yayayyaya im so pleased everythign went well [Smile] [Smile] *happy dance*
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
[Yipee] That's wonderful news! Cheers and best wishes and congratulations and may all of you get some sleep soon. [Big Grin] So glad to hear all went well.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
Congratulations to You and Bronwyn, love and hugs to wee miriam. Such a lovely name!!

[Votive] For the feeding. My sister had trouble estabishing feeding with both her wee ones...it was worrying but they are growing like weeds now.

OOooohh, I love babies.

[pop] that was the champaigne bottle, anyone want to wet the babys head??

[ 06. July 2006, 22:58: Message edited by: Dee. ]
 
Posted by Puppycat (# 4941) on :
 
[PC holding out champagne flute] Yes please Dee.

Congratulations to Bronwyn and Sean. Welcome baby Miriam. [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by ebeth (# 4474) on :
 
Welcome little Miriam! Congratulations to you all.
 
Posted by Linguo (# 7220) on :
 
Champagne, you say...? Pass the bottle this way.

[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] for Bron and Sean and Miriam (and another comment on her beautiful name)!

ETA What better use for my 700th post?

[ 06. July 2006, 23:06: Message edited by: Linguo ]
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
wonderful news! blessings on the child and parents! [Yipee]

Comet
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
A truly joyful event! Congratulations to you all.

[Overused]
 
Posted by MaryFL (# 7482) on :
 
Congrats to you both, and welcome Miriam. [Angel]

[ 06. July 2006, 23:17: Message edited by: MaryFL ]
 
Posted by Adrienne (# 2334) on :
 
Much love and many congratulations to the three of you. [Smile] [Smile] [Smile]
 
Posted by Sean (# 51) on :
 
First picture to keep you going (then I better get on with some work for Monday):
Bronwyn and Miriam
 
Posted by Curious (# 93) on :
 
Oh wow!
Fantastic! Congratulations all three of you!

Curious
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
She's perfect!

Congratulations. I'm so happy for all 3 of you. [Votive]
 
Posted by Luisa (# 7761) on :
 
[Yipee] [Yipee] CONGRATULATIONS!!!! [Yipee] [Yipee]

What a beautiful name!

[Axe murder] Love and blessings to your new family [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
Don't they both look fantastic! Angels you've got, Sean.

Mine (especially the first, three-day labor, poor thing) all looked like Coneheads. The first like Muhammad Ali as a Conehead.

Congrats!

*Whew*

I hadn't a thing to do with it yet I'm half a world away heaving a sigh of relief...

[ 07. July 2006, 00:17: Message edited by: Janine ]
 
Posted by basso (# 4228) on :
 
Great news!! Congratulations to Sean and Bronwyn, and welcom to Miriam.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Oh Wow,

What a beautiful baby, so cute, and bronwyn looks so pleased with herself (as well she should).

Right here we go
[Dee sploshes champaigne into everyones waiting glasses] A toast to wee Miriam and all our ship squeekers. [clink, sluuurp]

And a toast to new Mummys and Daddys, many years of fun and laughter to you all. [clink, slurp, top up splosh]

Oh, and to the medical staff who safely deliver our babies. [clink, wobble, hic, sluuurp]

Sean maaaate, have a cigar [Yipee]

[ 07. July 2006, 01:18: Message edited by: Dee. ]
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
Wonderful! Welcome Miriam and congrats to Bronwyn and Sean! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
What a beautiful baby!! Congratulations to Brownwyn, Sean, and lovely little Miriam!
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
OOh, and a toast to grandparents who spoil their grandbabies and then go home [clink, schluurp, giggle]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Hurray! and Congratulations!

bb
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Brilliant news. Congratulations Sean and Bron and welcome Miriam!
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
Wonderful news! Congratulations and blessings to all three of you.

And I do so like the name. Lucky, since it is my own as well [Big Grin] Great choice! [Biased]
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Ooooh!!!! Sitting here crying with Holly cuddling me. Hold the coffee Dee - I'm getting a large tumbler for the champagne - hang convention at a time like this!!

Congratulations Sean!

Bron has a mini-Me! Who looks delightfully placid.

Oooh, I have to go out and train people in restraining pupils now, and all I want to do is sit and look at that pic and go out to buy something...

Miriam is one of my favourite names and goes beautifully with the surname too - she will be musical with a lovely rhythm like that to introduce herself with! [Yipee] [Tear] [Axe murder] [Votive]

Sean, I am so so so so happy for you all. Well done for never giving up hope.

Lots of love

Vikki xxx
 
Posted by Arrietty (# 45) on :
 
Well done and congratulations.

[Overused] [Yipee] [Axe murder] [Smile]
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
Congratulations! She looks a perfect little angel! I'm so glad it went so well.
 
Posted by Jillyb (# 4610) on :
 
[Yipee] [Yipee] Many congratulations Bron and Sean - welcome to the world little miriam - she's gorgeous!!. Am so pleased for you both after all you've been through [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Wishing you all many blessings. Fantastic news! [Axe murder]
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Many congratulations. How wonderful!
 
Posted by Nutmeg (# 5297) on :
 
Congratulations Sean and Bronwyn. [Axe murder] I was so pleased to hear that Miriam is safe and well. Lovely photo of Bronwyn and Miriam.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Marvellous news. And great picture. Well done all!

Congratulations!!

[Overused] [Cool] [Yipee] [Axe murder] [Angel] [Votive] [Tear] [Big Grin]

And thanks to all who made it possible, congrats and admiration for having a lot of patience and stamina and perseverance.

Thanks be to God!
 
Posted by Annie P (# 3453) on :
 
Congratulations, Bron looks very pleased. Little Miriam is certainly beautiful.

Wishing you every happiness as a family. Hope that there are many moments when you enjoy having her around. Well done!
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]

Congratulations Bron and Sean, and welcome Miriam!

[Angel] (but it really should be singing the Hallelujah Chorus)

Jane R
 
Posted by The Great Gumby (# 10989) on :
 
Congrats to all! What a lovely baby. [Yipee] [Axe murder]

Any of that champagne left, Dee?
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
Many congratulations to Bron and Sean, and a warm welcome to Miriam, from the three of us.

Now, Sean, what's this about getting work done??? Cut that out, and get over to be with your wife and daughter.
 
Posted by magdalenegospel (# 11619) on :
 
From one Miriam to another, welcome to the world!

She's gorgeous.
 
Posted by JJB (# 9009) on :
 
Hurrah! Wonderful news. May you have many happy years together, Bronwyn, Sean and Miriam.

Just a quick update on life with Bubble, in case anyone's interested. She's now 6 months old, has two teeth, and is just starting solids. Not quite all her clothes are orange yet, but almost! She's very smiley and chatty, and generally gorgeous. Arcturus and I are smitten! Like wee David, Bubble is a very sociable baby who likes being involved in things, so taking her with us is no problem. We know how lucky we are!

JJB
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Congrats Sean and Bronwyn, hope you have plenty of chance to enjoy Miriam.

Now the rest of us can go back to normal patterns instead of checking this thread every five minutes. Well once we've sobered up from the champagne!

Jengie
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Hooray. Welcome Miriam! So pleased for you both [Yipee]
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
[Yipee] Many, many congratulations [Yipee]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Well done Bronwyn (and Sean). Miriam is a beaut! Lang may her lum reek!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
[Yipee] Yay! Congrats to Bron, Sean and Miriam [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Worm in the Grass (# 10999) on :
 
Congrats to Bronwyn, Sean and Miriam and best wishes for a wonderful life together
 
Posted by Legodude_uk (# 5671) on :
 
Congrats to Bronwyn and Sean, and welcome to the world and the world of the Ship Baby Miriam!

I hope she brings you both, many years of joy, but always remember that she will become a teenager eventually!!!

Best wishes from all the LDUK household
 
Posted by Ann (# 94) on :
 
[Yipee] [Angel] [Yipee] Congrats to the three of you - she looks well worth the wait [Yipee] [Angel] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Papa Smurf (# 1654) on :
 
THat is *such* good news. Congratulations ! [Smile]
 
Posted by Astro (# 84) on :
 
Congratulations to the 3 of you!
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
Congratulations! I'm so happy for you. (And another person who thinks Miriam is a beautiful name!)

[Yipee] [Axe murder] [Yipee] [Axe murder] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Woohooo!!! Congratulations!!! [Yipee] [Big Grin] [Overused] [Yipee] [Big Grin] [Overused]
 
Posted by Freelance Monotheist (# 8990) on :
 
Awww, she's gorgeous! And Miriam's such a pretty name!
[Axe murder] [Axe murder] [Axe murder] [Axe murder] [Axe murder] [Axe murder]
to all three of you,
FM xxx
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
What a beautiful baby! May her life be blessed, and may she bring blessings to you both. Congratulations, Bronwyn and Sean.

[ 07. July 2006, 18:12: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by frin (# 9) on :
 
Congratulations, Bronwyn and Sean, and welcome Miriam!

So very happy for each of you!

'frin
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Legodude_uk:
Congrats to Bronwyn and Sean, and welcome to the world and the world of the Ship Baby Miriam!

I hope she brings you both, many years of joy, but always remember that she will become a teenager eventually!!!

Best wishes from all the LDUK household

Hey, less of the racism! Nothing wrong with teenagers - they're wonderful! [Smile]
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
(ageism [Biased] )

Well, I nurse my foot for a couple hours and look what happens!

Congratulations, New parents! Welcome to the world, little 'un!
 
Posted by Tractor Girl (# 8863) on :
 
Congratulations to the three of you - what a beautiful baby [Smile]
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Beautiful! Lovely! Perfect! Beloved!

Hazelnut and I are both heartily in favour of classic names for beautiful girls.

[Votive] for you all. [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
Congratulations Bronwyn and Sean - I too think Miriam Helen is a wonderful name. [Cool]
 
Posted by Rowen (# 1194) on :
 
Congratulations. How wonderful!!!!
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Congratulations Bronwyn and Sean! Miriam you lovely little thing!!
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
Congratulations Bronwyn & Sean, and welcome to Miriam. Such a lovely outcome after a long and challenging journey. May the years ahead be full of joy.
 
Posted by Goar (# 3939) on :
 
Praise be to God! This has to be one of the most prayed for babies. We are so very very very pleased for you! For all you've been through. This is so amazing. Suusan and I extend our heartiest congratulations!
 
Posted by Grits (# 4169) on :
 
Welcome to the world, Miriam.
 
Posted by Atlanta (# 2659) on :
 
WELL DONE BRONWYN AND SEAN AND WELCOME LITTLE MIRIAM. [Angel]
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
[Yipee] Blessings and congratulations!!!
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Congratulations Bronwyn and Sean!

And many, many years to Miriam!
 
Posted by Sean (# 51) on :
 
Brief update:

As of Sat morning Miriam had lost rather too much weight (285g) and was looking a bit jaundiced. 24 hours of phototherapy has dealt with the latter, and she had gained back 35g by Sun morning. This morning (monday) he weight is unchanged. Feeding is still a bit of an issue but we got some advice from the hospital's lactation specialist (a lovely lady who's daughter I've taught) so they can come home today!
 
Posted by Arabella Purity Winterbottom (# 3434) on :
 
Congratulations Bronwyn, Sean and Miriam, and every best wish for the next 18-25 years!
 
Posted by JB (# 1776) on :
 
Congratulations to Bronwyn and Sean and welcome to Miriam.
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
Thanks for the update, Sean. Glad to hear that Miriam and Bron will be going home; I'm sure it will do you all a world of good to be together in your own place. I'll send off some extra prayers that mother and baby will quickly find their breastfeeding rhythms.
 
Posted by Sean (# 51) on :
 
I keep meaning to say - thanks for all the prayers everybody - they are much appreciated.
 
Posted by Fool of a Took (# 7412) on :
 
Sean,
the Nutter also had a slow start with feeding- and now she's a cherubically chubby pro. Joining our prayers with others that your two girls 'find their rhythm' soon, and without too much anxiety.
 
Posted by Caz... (# 3026) on :
 
Sean, Bronwyn, Miriam, your journey, and this incredible chapter in it, we have been priviliged and humbled to share.

To God be the Glory for such a precious precious gift.

Welcome Miriam! [Yipee]
 
Posted by duchess (# 2764) on :
 
Thank you God for such a gift! Wonderful name! And I am praying for you 3 in Mildura. The picture was wonderful. Thanks for sharing Sean. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Sean (# 51) on :
 
Change of photo:

Same address, different picture
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
What lovely bright eyes!
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well what a LIFE CHANGING EXPERIENCE Have little to say exausted as I have had very little sleep and feeling well this is worth it but a lot of work. Feeding is taking over 12 hous a day currently but she is finally getting more than just a few drops. Feed takes one and a half hours every three!!!!

Have loved reading all the thread since I was last here, thankyou for all your prayers and support. THANKYOU.

Great to be home sick of the stress of hospital. Was a little stressed today as her level of jaundice went up that I would have to go back but they had a portable machine which she can use in her cot, or even as we cuddle her!!!! She looks like she is at a disco! Red and blue light.

Sean has been a wonderful father and has spent hours settling her, so sweet.

Will go now probably will be a while before I post again!!!!! So tired.
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
Oh Bronwyn! Seeing that you had posted put a big smile on my face. I hope everything stays well with you and little Miriam (she is very very cute!) and that you get some time to rest. [Votive]

Looking forward to reading about how it goes when you are up to posting again!
 
Posted by les@BALM (# 11237) on :
 
A special welcome to all babies born today [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ye Olde Motherboarde (# 54) on :
 
Bron and Sean, my dear friends,

I am so thrilled at the new arrival. I love the name you picked, I love that you are happy, and I love that feel so blessed.

May her life be special in every way, May God shine his face upon her and give her a wonderful life.

HALLELUJAH, thank you, JESUS!!! [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Oh, I well remember that feeding exhaustion!
cb wanted feeding every 2 hours and each feed took an hour.
Looking back though, that was the most important thing that I was doing at the time and nothing else mattered.
Hard to believe she's now getting quite a bump of her own (20 weeks pregnant!)
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
[Axe murder]

I'm delighted to see the end of this journey and the start of a whole brand new phase of your family lives together.

HUGE Congratulations! [Yipee] [Yipee]

[ 11. July 2006, 19:12: Message edited by: Ferijen ]
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
[Axe murder]
 
Posted by Sean (# 51) on :
 
Miriam's photo album:

Album

Click on "View List" to see them all.

(Hope this works)
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
She's so cute, Sean. And I love the brand-new picture of her where mama Bronwyn seems to be raising her fists in victory, like an athlete who's just won the marathon.
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sean:
Miriam's photo album:

Album

Click on "View List" to see them all.

(Hope this works)

It works. Nice photos.

We were a bit surprised by the soap suds in the bath though. Probably one of those differences depending on where you are. But, we were told to wash wee David with just water. Something about a waxy barrier that babies are born with that reduces the chances of bacterial or fungal infection of the skin, and that soap washes this off quickly. Something like that anyway, so no soapy baths in the hospital.
 
Posted by Sean (# 51) on :
 
Interesting. Obviously that idea has penetrated this far into the desert yet.
 
Posted by ebeth (# 4474) on :
 
Beautiful baby! and so lovely to see her parents adore her
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Well the feeding continues and I have been known to fall asleep while feeding. M is putting back a bit of her weight which means we are doing the right thing. Trying to come to terms with the life changing event motherhood is.
About the bath I too was surprised they put soap in the water as the idea of water only was around last time I looked at mid as a student in 1995 to avoid the removing of the waxy layer...vernex(sp), maybe they have decided it is not needed and we are ahead...I do know they didn't bath her till she was two days old, was meant to be one but the feeding was more problematic than I could have believed.

M is out of the lights now so settling better, but also more alert, was stressful having that machine at home but less so than having it in hospital which was the alternative.

So tried need to rest.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Dang, Bronwyn. She's so cute. Now I want another one.
 
Posted by Vikki Pollard (# 5548) on :
 
Great to 'see' you Bron!

A package is on its way. Well. almost...

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX to you all!!! [Overused] [Yipee] [Axe murder] [Votive] [Snore]
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
OK my brain is mush, Just tried to log in 4 times to a bank account with a babk I am not even in. Only stopped as called Sean over to check I had right password. Is there a baby thread still? I cant see one.

Oh and Miriam put on more weight and I feel a bit more like I can do this...
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Extreme congrats, by the way. I hope to pass thru Mild later in the year and maybe could congratulate you both in person?
 
Posted by jlg (# 98) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bronwyn:
OK my brain is mush, ...

Perfectly normal. You're the mother of a newborn. Your sleep is being disrupted, your hormones and other body systems are bouncing around in disarray, and you're doing the equivalent of learning to swim by being tossed into the middle of the lake.

quote:
Oh and Miriam put on more weight and I feel a bit more like I can do this...
Of course you can. Even when everything goes smoothly it's still a big adjustment. It sounds like you and Miriam are settling in quite nicely.
 
Posted by Sean (# 51) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Extreme congrats, by the way. I hope to pass thru Mild later in the year and maybe could congratulate you both in person?

Definitely. Contact us when you know your schedule.
 
Posted by Amy the Undecided (# 11412) on :
 
I have been traveling and busy so I am very late wishing you congratulations, Bronwyn and Sean! Miriam is beautiful!

[Yipee]
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
It is so hot in my office... around 30 degrees Celsius last week, and this week too. No AC.

Frankly, I can't get much work done and this week I have had to leave early because I feel unwell in the heat. My boss is on vacation but today I sent her an e-mail explaining how hard it is to work under these conditions. I don't know what she can do about it though...

I have some vacation saved that I wanted to use to rest and prepare before the delivery (end of September). I guess I could use some of it now, to avoid the heat, but I think I'll really need that rest and time for preparations before the little troll arrives. And I can't help feeling that it's not my fault there is no AC. Then again it's not my employer's fault that the weather is so extremely warm.

Feeling confused, hot and cranky. [Frown]
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
You could find you have grounds for a claim that you're taking time off for health and safety reasons. These FAQs from the HSE, and the other pages at that site, might be useful.
quote:
The HSE guidance publication, Thermal Comfort in the Workplace, seeks to define thermal comfort, and states: 'An acceptable zone of thermal comfort for most people in the UK lies roughly between 13°C (56°F) and 30°C (86°F), with acceptable temperatures for more strenuous work activities concentrated towards the bottom end of the range, and more sedentary activities towards the higher end.'
Of particular interest is the paragraph before that
quote:
Where, despite the provision of local cooling, workers are exposed to temperatures which do not give reasonable comfort, suitable protective clothing and rest facilities should be provided. Where practical there should be systems of work (for example, task rotation) to ensure that the length of time for which individual workers are exposed to uncomfortable temperatures is limited.
Which would, it seems to me from my total laypersons perspective, mean that your boss shouldn't complain if you adopt a more practical system of work - such as one where you leave earlier to be out of the office when it's hottest.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
Would there be any milage in asking for a portable air conditioner to be bought for your office? We complained so much last year that we were allowed to buy one, it cost around £200 I think. It wasn't perfect, but really did make a huge difference to our ability to work (our office is almost entirely glass down one side, so behaves like a greenhouse in the sun - idiotic design).

I think being pregnant would give you extra clout, your employer has to be very careful not to endanger your health. If they can't do anything about the office environment, I'd have no hestitation in asking for flexible arrangements as Alan suggests.

I just can't imagine how uncomfortable you must be in this heat!

Bron - it sounds like you are doing great. I felt like my brain and body were both trying to wade through treacle for the first few weeks, it's perfectly normal to be overwhelmed.
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Just take tme out as sick time if you need to. My employer was very understanding about this if I felt I couldn't work. At your stage I was so tird all the time even now I can not work out how I worked at all. Much better now and that is with 3 hours sleep max at a time.
 
Posted by Light (# 4693) on :
 
Thank you all for your suggestions and support... The heat got to me so I couldn't think clearly about the problem. But my boss was very understanding, she called me up and told us to buy a portable AC (just like you wrote, Rat!) and one of the wonderful men I work with immediately went shopping and is now installing the thing.

During the weekend the temperature has dropped a couple of degrees, since we've been getting some much needed rain. So this week looks much better and I feel like I might actually get some work done! :-)
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
Glad you have the problem sorted light. I remember the aircon at work going off one time and two pregnant women um were very uncomfortable....UK houses and buildings are built to hold heat hence it feels a LOT hotter in the UK with the same temp.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Been to see the midwife again today - a bit bizarre as we both arrived at the same time to find the surgery locked up! We sat around for a while waiting for the staff to come back from lunch before spotting a sign saying they were closed until 3pm... so she had to use her key and let me in through the fire door!

All fine, heard the baby's heartbeat - I still find proof that there really is a baby amazing! - and I don't have to go back again till the end of Oct.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Oh, and forgot to add yesterday - the midwife advised me to take the NCT antenatal classes because they're so stretched we might not get NHS ones! [Eek!]

Apparently at 28 I'm too old or too young to get priority - never mind that it's a first baby... [Confused] [Disappointed] [Frown]
Something's not right here.
 
Posted by Clergyman'sdaughter (# 3136) on :
 
How silly! Surely it should be on a first come first served basis? They are daft sometimes...

Hope you get to a class somewhere. [Smile]
 
Posted by Captain Insano (# 9584) on :
 
Hi all, just popping up on my lunch break to (finally!) say I'm also expecting [Yipee] ! I have been following people's progress with fascination for ages. I'm just over 13 weeks pregnant, which makes me due mid-Feb - the hottest time of NZ summer!

Keren, I'm also 28 and this is my first so I'm interested to see the similarities and differences between things in NZ and the UK!
 
Posted by Left at the Altar (# 5077) on :
 
Congratulations Captain Insano!

(I'd thought you a chap until this announcement, but I'm very happy that you're not.)

All the best with the pregnancy.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Hurray! and congratulations. Hope that things do not get too awful for you heat wise.

bb
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Yay,

a new wee Kiwi shipmate, congrats Captain Insano

[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Insano:
Hi all, just popping up on my lunch break to (finally!) say I'm also expecting [Yipee] ! I have been following people's progress with fascination for ages. I'm just over 13 weeks pregnant, which makes me due mid-Feb - the hottest time of NZ summer!

Keren, I'm also 28 and this is my first so I'm interested to see the similarities and differences between things in NZ and the UK!

Yay! Congrats! [Smile]
The differences between different parts of the UK seem to be interesting enough, but yes it will.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Left at the Altar:
Congratulations Captain Insano!

(I'd thought you a chap until this announcement, but I'm very happy that you're not.)

All the best with the pregnancy.

They say things are very strange down under.
[Biased]

Congratulations, Captain!
 
Posted by Captain Insano (# 9584) on :
 
Thanks for all the good wishes! It's exciting and very mystifying* (and lots of other things) all at the same time [Eek!] .

*How does it fit and WHERE when you're not showing!!!???
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
We had the 20-week scan on Monday and everything looks as they'd expect it to. [Smile] The picture isn't as clear as the first one though.

I'm gradually starting to believe in the reality of the baby as something growing inside me (slow on the uptake, I know) but the idea of there actually being a third member of our family in January is a different matter. This seems sometimes to make me less excited than people expect me to be - I'm just dealing with all the weird things my body is doing and waiting for the "glow"...

And I still hate, hate, hate maternity bras. I've got one that fits and supports but it was £30 so I can't afford another like it [Frown] All the others have no support at all at the sides. Don't the designers have real people to try them on before they sell them?!
 
Posted by Pânts (# 999) on :
 
Yay Keren-Happuch.

(And it would appear not with the maternity bras. I seem to remember having that problem too.)
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
The lady in M&S was at about the same stage of pregnancy and she agreed too! She recommended their non-wired, padded T-shirt bra and said that it was what she was wearing. It's certainly a lot better than any of the maternity ones (apart from the expensive Blooming Marvellous one) so there's a top tip for anybody else with similar problems!
 
Posted by Bronwyn (# 52) on :
 
quote:


I'm gradually starting to believe in the reality of the baby as something growing inside me (slow on the uptake, I know) but the idea of there actually being a third member of our family in January is a different matter. This seems sometimes to make me less excited than people expect me to be - I'm just dealing with all the weird things my body is doing and waiting for the "glow"...
[/QB]

Yes I was not as excited as Ifelt I should be, in fact even now I still can not believe I am a mummy(of course I know but wow the responsability (and joy) I having to make decisions on her behalf, open her letters.
I think I was so sick during the pregnancy I didn't enjoy it and was surprised others said I glowed.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Hey Bron,

Any updated pics?

Would love to see how the we cherub is doing?

[Smile]
 
Posted by Foxy (# 2409) on :
 
Hi Everyone!

I have to tell someone: I'm 6 weeks pregnant!
I'm trying to keep my mouth shut as a couple of months ago I had an early miscarriage and I want to make sure this baby wants to stick around before I share the news, but I'm having a hard time keeping mum, so to speak!

This will be baby #4 for us. I have no abdominal muscles whatsoever after the first 3, so I'm afraid I'm going to look definitely pregnant in about 10 minutes. And just this morning I had my first little shudder of nausea.... I don't know how long this will be a secret.

I'm thrilled, but every now and then I have this shiver of "FOUR KIDS! What are we thinking?" [Big Grin]

Thanks for letting me confide here!

Foxy
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] congratulations Foxy!
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Bravo, Foxy!! Thanks for sharing your good news with us!
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
More babies [Yipee]
 
Posted by Amy the Undecided (# 11412) on :
 
I somehow missed the recent posts here and so I pinged Grits to ask if we could have a "Shipmates Expecting 2007" thread (which she has now started). I guess I was overeager, after waiting for many weeks to share my news and assuming that a new thread would be started for 2007 babies. Very embarrassed . . . but happy to learn about the other early-2007 babies announced here!
 
Posted by Cedd (# 8436) on :
 
Mrs Cedd is due to give birth in less than two weeks. There is still plenty of decorating to be done...
 
Posted by Amy the Undecided (# 11412) on :
 
Congrats, Foxy and Captain!

And yay on the good scan, Keren-Happuch!

And easy labor to Mrs. Cedd, easy decorating to Cedd.

My 16-week check is tomorrow. This was the checkup at which my sister, in her first pregnancy, learned that her baby's heart had stopped beating. So even though there is absolutely no reason to think anything's wrong (heaven knows something's growing in there), I have a sense of holding my breath. I will feel better when this checkup is behind me.

P.S. She went on to have two normal pregnancies yielding the world's best niece and nephew.
 
Posted by Riggwelter (# 8007) on :
 
I'm thrilled to be able to announce that Mrs Rigg is currently providing a nurturing home to the first Mini Rigg who should emerge into our Nitrogen/Oxygen based atmosphere towards the end of January [Yipee]

I would also like to ask for prayers for the two of them as Mrs R has a condition known as Placenta Previa. This means that the placenta is not in the correct position on the womb. She has the most serious version of Previa; the placenta is completely covering the cervix making a natural birth impossible unless the placenta moves to the correct location (around a 1% chance by all accounts). It also increases the risk to both mother and baby.
 
Posted by Grits (# 4169) on :
 
Just a notice that, when this thread gets to page 20, it shall be "offed", and the huzzahing can continue on the new "Shipmates Expecting 2007".

Thank you, and enjoy the rest of your flight.

Grits
AS Host
 
Posted by Amy the Undecided (# 11412) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Riggwelter:
I'm thrilled to be able to announce that Mrs Rigg is currently providing a nurturing home to the first Mini Rigg who should emerge into our Nitrogen/Oxygen based atmosphere towards the end of January [Yipee]

Congratulations!

quote:
I would also like to ask for prayers for the two of them as Mrs R has a condition known as Placenta Previa.
Prayers for all three of you. What does this mean--that Mrs. R will most likely need a C-section? Are there other dangers? [Votive]
 
Posted by Cartmel Bar Veteran (# 7049) on :
 
I am absolutely delighted to announced that Mrs Cartmel Bar Veteran (well she'll be my wife from 2.30pm on Saturday) is currently baking a couple of little Veterans.

We've known it was twins since about week six, but because things don't always work out, have waiting to announce until today.

Because today was the 12 week scan. Both both babies are well and we are expecting them to arrive in March 2007. You can see scans from today at my blog - the link is in the signature.
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cartmel Bar Veteran:
I am absolutely delighted to announced that Mrs Cartmel Bar Veteran (well she'll be my wife from 2.30pm on Saturday) is currently baking a couple of little Veterans.

Woo hoo..... congratulations to you all!!! [Yipee]

Going to be a bit of a shock to the system for you all!!

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Foxy (# 2409) on :
 
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Cartmel Bar Veteran:
I am absolutely delighted to announced that Mrs Cartmel Bar Veteran (well she'll be my wife from 2.30pm on Saturday) is currently baking a couple of little Veterans.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Oh my!! Congratulations! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Captain Insano (# 9584) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cartmel Bar Veteran:
I am absolutely delighted to announced that Mrs Cartmel Bar Veteran (well she'll be my wife from 2.30pm on Saturday) is currently baking a couple of little Veterans.

Hooray! Congratulations!!! And best wishes for Saturday too.

[ 26. September 2006, 02:55: Message edited by: Captain Insano ]
 
Posted by Cartmel Bar Veteran (# 7049) on :
 
Thanks for your kind thoughts folks, it's much appreciated.
 
Posted by Riggwelter (# 8007) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amy the Undecided:
Congratulations!

Many thanks Amy (gosh, I've been off-board for a while...)
quote:
Prayers for all three of you. What does this mean--that Mrs. R will most likely need a C-section? Are there other dangers? [Votive] [/QB]
Thanks for prayers. Yes, a CS is 99% likely and although I like poker, I wouldn't ever bet on a 1% chance. There are other dangers including those that don't bear thinking about as absolute freak-occurence worst-case scenario. I'm feeling unusually full of faith about that though.
 
Posted by Grits (# 4169) on :
 
I'm going to go ahead and close this thread and redirect everyone's attention to the newer "Shipmates Expecting 2007." Thanks!

Grits
AS Host
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
Belated congrats to Eanswyth and her family upon the birth of Robert Lawrence back in March! Maybe I need to read this thread more often so I know what's going on in the world!
[Big Grin] [Cool]
 


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