Thread: Heaven: Recipe Thread - The Second Course Board: Limbo / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by AdamPater (# 4431) on :
 
As your dishes are cleared by our efficient wait-staff, we hope you enjoy the rest of your meal.

AdamPater
Heavenly Host

[Subject edited to make intent clear - AP]

[ 06. June 2008, 09:54: Message edited by: Alan Cresswell ]
 
Posted by Timothy the Obscure (# 292) on :
 
Something simple, but delightful for the fish course:

1 lb. salmon filet
1/2 cup (125 ml) soy sauce
1/2 cup (125 ml) maple syrup (the real stuff--hard to get outside North America, I know)
1 tsp. Liquid Smoke (smoke-flavored seasoning--do you have that on other continents? Optional anyway)
Generous splash of Thai sweet chili sauce

Mix the liquid ingredients and put them in a sealed plastic bag with the fish. Marinate in the refrigerator for 2-3 days, turning every now and then. Take out the fish, put on an oiled broiling pan, sprinkle with coarse salt and freshly ground pepper, and bake at 400 degrees F (204 C) for about 10 minutes, or until internal temperature is 120 degrees F (48 C). A spoonful of mango chutney makes a nice garnish.
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
I'm not sure if I'm quite safe on this thread, but anyway....

For a hot sunny day, which we in the Southern Hemisphere are enjoying many of just now:

=================
SAMOAN FISH SALAD
=================
1 fillet very fresh white fish (snapper is good)
1 can of coconut milk (Samoa Brand is good)
1 red pepper (capiscum) chopped
1 spring onion chopped very finely
1/3 normal onion, chopped very finely
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Salt

Mix ingredients together. Add a small amount of water, if coconut milk is very thick.
Leave to marinade in the fridge for a couple of hours. Then .... dig in!

[ 01. February 2006, 04:46: Message edited by: Cod ]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
And we are off to a great start. I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....
 
Posted by LutheranChik (# 9826) on :
 
Tuna-Cannellini Salad

1 can of tuna, drained
1 can of cannellini or other white beans, drained
1/2 jar dried tomatoes packed in olive oil, chopped, with some of the oil
a generous handful of chopped olive
generous sploshes of balsamic vinegar
a bit more olive oil
salt and pepper

Mix; eat. Tastes even better if you refrigerate overnight and let the flavors blend.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Shortbread

This is from The Ladybird Cookery Book or somesuch but always turns out well and is much nicer than Delia's. In fact I ended up having to take about 3 pieces in my lunch to primary school or there'd be none left for me...

6oz plain flour
1oz rice flour
2oz caster sugar
4oz butter/margerine

Mix the dry ingredients together and rub in the fat until it clumps together. Press into a dish. Prick all over with a fork and make pretty patterns round the edge. Bake at gas 4 (180C) for 20-40 mins or until lightly golden. Sprinkle with sugar and mark into portions while still hot.

Simple! [Smile]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Challenge time.

I am staying in temporary accommodation - so don't have my usual library of cookbooks, cupboards of exotic seasonings, batterie de cuisine etc. Nevertheless, I am planning on giving dinner to a discerning audience tomorrow evening.

I have quite a lot of pork chop. I am thinking some sort of oven braise. Not a casserole - that would be too greasy: I need something that keeps the meat moist, but allows final browning/crisping. Any ideas for a liquid/sauce in which they can cook? (Shallow tray, covered in foil). Then possiby take off foil, sprinkle with topping to finish?
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....

In that case can we ask that the Heavenly hosts would take pity on us and send the last thread to the land of limbo... please?
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
And we are off to a great start. I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....

Er, how did you save it? I thought I'd saved it, but appear to only have a link. Any hints welcome.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I have quite a lot of pork chop. I am thinking some sort of oven braise.

Yes, braise that sucker in a Dutch oven. I've tried also using a foil bag, and the pan braise has always come out a little bit better.

I posted a pork recipe in the previous version of this thread, let me know if you want to see it. I'll post a general brine recipe: I can't stress enough how crucial it is to brine the pork, the flavor and juiciness are a wonderful improvement. A brine keeps meat moist and flavorful.

BRINE

Pork, chicken and poultry respond so well to brining.

In a container big enough to hold the pork plus liquid to cover, add the raw meat and then a 2:1 salt:sugar mixture (two parts salt to one part sugar. Add more sugar if you like a sweeter taste.) Add a palmful of whole black peppercorns, a bay leaf, 1 T. dry mustard, 1 c. dry white wine, 1 t. ground black pepper, and several dashes of liquid hot sauce. Add enough water to cover and let sit for 3-4 hours.

Discard brine when done.

[ 02. February 2006, 21:54: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Challenge time.

I am staying in temporary accommodation - so don't have my usual library of cookbooks, cupboards of exotic seasonings, batterie de cuisine etc. Nevertheless, I am planning on giving dinner to a discerning audience tomorrow evening.

I have quite a lot of pork chop. I am thinking some sort of oven braise. Not a casserole - that would be too greasy: I need something that keeps the meat moist, but allows final browning/crisping. Any ideas for a liquid/sauce in which they can cook? (Shallow tray, covered in foil). Then possiby take off foil, sprinkle with topping to finish?

Here is my favourite recipe for pork chops, which seems to suit your requirements

4oz mushrooms sliced
2 cooking apples sliced
1 onion sliced
4 pork chops
1/2 pint dry cider
2ox dry breadcrumbs
4oz grated cheese

butter a 3pint shallow dish. place mushrooms apples and onions in dish. season to taste. place chops on top. cover with cider. mix breadcrumbs and cheese together and sprinkle on top. bake at 200 degrees C or gas mark 6 for 1 1/4 - 1 1/2 hours.

This ends up with a dry crunchy topping, lovely moist chops, and a soft vegetable base. Great with roast potatoes and a green vegetable. And its the sort of dish you can prepare in advance and leave in the fridge until its time to pop it into the oven, which is sometime useful.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
but allows final browning/crisping.

Whoops, forgot this bit.

After cooking, melt some buttter over the meat and brown it under a hot broiler for a few minutes. Flip meat, coat with butter, broil again.

GB&D.
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
I've had success with layering pork chops with apple sauce and sauerkraut in a casserole. If you buy the sauerkraut in wine vinegar it's less salty I think. It sounds a bit dodgy but even my picky teenagers eat it. Gives a tender but flavoursome result, a little sweet.
 
Posted by Timothy the Obscure (# 292) on :
 
People overcook pork, quite unnecessarily. Trichinosis is a non-issue nowadays. Use an instant-read thermometer and cook the chops to an internal temperature of 145 degrees F (62 C), or 150 if you're paranoid. They will have a faint rosy cast to them, and they will be moist and tender.
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
I don't know if people remember me asking about breadmakers before christmas or not. Anyhow, I bought myself one, and it's wonderful. Haven't bought a loaf since getting it and, when I had shop bread at my parents, it just tasted ghastly in comparision.

I made this a couple of days ago. It's fantastic. Interesting texture, wonderfully fragrant, lovely flavour. It's great plain, and even better with cream-cheese or butter. Highly recommended.

1 tsp dried yeast
1 tsp salt
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 tbs dried milk powder
13 oz/3.25 cups flour, approx half granary and half strong white
a large carrot, peeled and grated.
1 tsp honey
1tbs olive oil
180 ml/generous 3/4 cup water.
large handful pumpkin seeds

Place things in the breadmaker in the order your instructions tell you. For me, that's yeast, then flour, then other ingredients, then water, but your machine may vary. The pumpkin seeds need to be kept back and put in the seed dispenser if you have one, or added when the raisin beep goes if not. Cook on the wholemeal setting.

Its glorious.

Peronel.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I have a pork chop for me tea tonight. I might go and buy some mushrooms and an apple & try Gracious Rebel's dish...
 
Posted by samara (# 9932) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Peronel:
large handful pumpkin seeds

I have never cooked with pumpkin seeds. The only ones I have in the house are heavily salted and still in the shell - is that useable? They seem so big. Or can you buy unshelled?

I [Axe murder] my breadmaker and am always looking for new recipes.
Want a great flax bread recipe?
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
Samara, the ones I buy are unsalted and shelled. (In fact, I didn't think pumpkin seeds had shells. Sure you haven't got a different sort of seed?) They're large, flat and sort of olive green, and are crunchy in the same way nuts are.

Definately yes to the flax bread recipe, please!

Peronel
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
Winter salad

One beetroot (raw, not the icky pickled kind)
One apple
Two carrots
Half an onion
The juice of one orange
A handful of mixed seeds. I usually use poppy, sunflower and pumkin, because I have those around.

Peel and grate everything that can be. Toast the seeds (not the poppy seeds) in a dry frying pan til brown and fragrant. Mix everything together

Quantities can be varied according to what you have around.

I'm living on this stuff at the moment. Its just wrong. Nothing which is pretty much veg should taste this good, but it really does.

Peronel
 
Posted by Back-to-Front (# 5638) on :
 
Thanks for all your help last month on the old thread, folks. I've managed to lose over a stone since then.

I have another question now, though.

I'm lookin for non-dairy fasting cheese. I hear it's available in Greece and wondered if anybody knows how to get hold of any in the UK? It apparently tastes like mild cheddar and behaves like cheddar (melts when heated &c), but uses no dairy. It may be the only thing that gets me through Lent without charges of GBH.

If anybody can help, I'd be grateful.
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Back-to-Front:
I'm lookin for non-dairy fasting cheese. I hear it's available in Greece and wondered if anybody knows how to get hold of any in the UK?

B2F, can I suggest you try a health food shop for vegan cheese?

I seem to recall On the Eights Day, the vegetarian cafe/shop near MMU on Oxford Road in Manchester sold something similar.

Deborah

[One little word makes all the difference...]

[ 05. February 2006, 19:08: Message edited by: rosamundi ]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
I can't help with the cheese thing - I've found that even the half-fat stuff just tastes like soap, so I can't imagine non-dairy cheese.

I'm currently detoxing and so not having dairy at all (just for 4 weeks) and although cheese would be nice I'm managing fine without it (bear in mind that I could easily scarf down a pack of Cheddar in one go). I'm having lots of veg soups, this is one I did today and (though I say so myself) it was delicious. It is also ridiculously easy and a bowl is really filling. I don't know much about Orthodox fasting, but I would think that the olive oil is potentially the only thing that you'd need to omit.

1 onion, chopped
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 litre (1.8 pints) vegetable stock (I used bouillon)
750g (1.5 lbs) veg of your choice (I used potato, sweet potato, turnip, brussels sprouts, broccoli, frozen peas, carrot)
1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil.
1 tbsp fresh mixed herbs or 1 tsp dried herbs
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to season.

Put the onion, garlic, olive oil, veg stock and vegetables in a large saucepan. Bring to the boil and simmer until the vegetables are soft (the recipe says 20 minutes but mine were done in just over 10).

Turn off the heat. Add the seasoning and herbs.

For a smooth soup, liquidise the lot. For a chunkier soup (my preference) liquidise half the soup and return to the pan.
 
Posted by Back-to-Front (# 5638) on :
 
Rosamundi, thank you! That raises my hopes.

I had mailed the Eighth Day cafe not long before posting, and I'm pleased to know that they at least used to sell something like this. If they don't anymore, they may at least know what I'm talking about. I'll post back when I hear from them.
 
Posted by Tabby.Cat (# 4561) on :
 
By weird coincidence, my dad yesterday bought two dairy-free cheeses from On the Eighth Day. We'd never tried it before. Apparently it tastes okay on a sandwich with lots of other stuff...
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
I've not yet come across a vegan cheese I'd actually eat twice.

Sorry.
 
Posted by Tabby.Cat (# 4561) on :
 
Okay, I just went and tried some. It's kind of icky. I had to have a piece of real cheese to take away the taste.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
And we are off to a great start. I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....

Er, how did you save it? I thought I'd saved it, but appear to only have a link. Any hints welcome.
OK, I hope the following makes sense. I put the Recipe thread in "printer-friendly view;" opened a MS Word document in another window; then selected and copied sections of the Recipe thread and pasted them onto the Word document. I had to do it in about 6 chunks -- my computer froze up when I tried to copy and paste the whole thread at once.
One of these days (when I have an hour or two to spare) I'll edit the thing... deleting recipes for nasty things like brussels sprouts [Razz]
 
Posted by AdamPater (# 4431) on :
 
Here is a copy of the recipe thread, but I can't guarantee for how long the link will work.
 
Posted by Back-to-Front (# 5638) on :
 
[Frown] about the stories of vegan cheeses.

I suppose a small quantity first is the best way forward.
 
Posted by Ginga (# 1899) on :
 
There seems to be a lot of salads on this thread. Here's another one. My friend got it from her Bangladeshi contacts but I don't know anyting more about its origins. It's incredibly good with curry as it takes the heat out, and it's also wonderful with plain jasmine rice.

Kuchumber
4 inches of cucumber
1/4 - 1/2 red onion
3 tomatoes
Generous handful of fresh coriander
Juice of one lemon
Pinch of salt.


This makes enough for between three and five servings, depending on the circumstances. Everything can be fiddled with. I don't tend to add the coriander, as the other diner prefers it without. If it's going with very hot curry, increase the lemon juice. Otherwise, you can take it down a bit if you prefer.

Every restaurant I've had this in has the veggies in much larger pieces, but it doesn't taste half so nice. I have been led to understand this is Unauthentic Corner Cutting.

[I hate unauthenticalnesses - AP]

[ 06. February 2006, 06:06: Message edited by: AdamPater ]
 
Posted by Ginga (# 1899) on :
 
That'll teach me to have several browsers on the go. By the time I got back to the Ship the edit window was gone.

Apologies for Unauthentic Apostrophe Usage in the preceding post.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Quoted by me:
quote:
I have a pork chop for me tea tonight. I might go and buy some mushrooms and an apple & try Gracious Rebel's dish...

I was too lazy to go and buy mushrooms & an apple, so made do with shallots (no onions either!) and a leek. It was perfectly acceptable, & different to the plain old roast chop I was going to do. Thanks!
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Back-to-Front:
[Frown] about the stories of vegan cheeses.

I suppose a small quantity first is the best way forward.

This may or may not help, but I find that - in sandwiches, on soups, and the like - toasted sunflower seeds satisfy in much the same salty-chewy way that cheese does. To toast them, just stick them in a hot frying pan (no oil needed) and move them about for two or three minutes until they smell brown and done.

Doesn't help you with cooking, of course, but it may make lent more interesting.

Peronel.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Back to breadmakers - I made a multiseed loaf which worked out perfectly the first time, but every time I've made it since then, almost all the seeds have stayed at the bottom of the pan and not mixed in. This seems to be to do with the consistency of the dough, but I don't know whether I should be adding more flour or more water to sort it out. Does anybody have any suggestions?
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
And we are off to a great start. I saved the old thread to a Word document. At the smallest font available it's still 391 pages [Eek!] . Don't think I'll be printing it....

Er, how did you save it? I thought I'd saved it, but appear to only have a link. Any hints welcome.
OK, I hope the following makes sense. I put the Recipe thread in "printer-friendly view;" opened a MS Word document in another window; then selected and copied sections of the Recipe thread and pasted them onto the Word document......
quote:
Originally posted by AdamPater:
Here is a copy of the recipe thread, but I can't guarantee for how long the link will work.

Fab. Duly saved. Thank you both.
 
Posted by Back-to-Front (# 5638) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Peronel:
quote:
Originally posted by Back-to-Front:
[Frown] about the stories of vegan cheeses.

I suppose a small quantity first is the best way forward.

This may or may not help, but I find that - in sandwiches, on soups, and the like - toasted sunflower seeds satisfy in much the same salty-chewy way that cheese does. To toast them, just stick them in a hot frying pan (no oil needed) and move them about for two or three minutes until they smell brown and done.

Doesn't help you with cooking, of course, but it may make lent more interesting.

Peronel.

Thanks Peronel! I don't know why I didn't post here earlier. The Eighth Day have got back to me. They do a few vegan cheeses, including all of these, which sound rather good. I'll try them and post back to say how they are.

[ 06. February 2006, 12:58: Message edited by: Back-to-Front ]
 
Posted by Foaming Draught (# 9134) on :
 
Ah, trust the Grauniad to come up with an environmentally sound and cheap recipe.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Foaming Draught:
Ah, trust the Grauniad to come up with an environmentally sound and cheap recipe.

This reminds me of the 'flat chicken' indicator of how well the economy is doing.

In Arkansas there are poultry farms which raise broiler chickens in huge quantities. They are also transported in huge quantities. A few usually fall off of the truck. In bad economic times people stop their cars and pick up these chickens before they are squashed; in good times they don't bother. In good times you see chickens on the highway squashed pancake flat.

This is the flat chicken economic indicator.

Moo
 
Posted by LutheranChik (# 9826) on :
 
Speaking of Chicken...

The first dinner I ever cooked as a teenager by my own self, from a recipe in Good Housekeeping , I think. Apologies for American measurements

Stovetop BBQ Chicken
1/2 cup ketchup
1 TBS vinegar
1 TBS brown sugar or honey or molasses or such like
1TBS Worchestershire sauce
1 TBS oil
1 tsp mustard
1 clove garlic, minced or equivalent of garlic powder
1 medium onion, chopped finely
2-3 lb assorted chicken parts

Mix ketchup with seasonings. Place chicken in large frying pan (recipe update: spray with kitchen spray first...sauce can stick a bit); pour sauce over chicken. Cook over medium heat for 45 minutes-hour, turning chicken pieces frequently. You may need to add a little bit of water.

This recipe lends itself to all manner of amendments, depending on your personal tastes and what you have on hand. I've tried it with skinless chicken, and it works fine that way too.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Serendipitous chicken recipes, indeed,

This is an easy recipe for when you want a casual, family-style one pot dinner with a minimum of work. All measurements are US.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

1. Oil or butter a baking pan.

2. Slice enough Yukon Gold potatoes into 1/2" thick slices to cover the bottom of the pan.

3. Mince 4-8 cloves of fresh garlic (depending on taste) and spread them across the potatoes.

4. Heat 1 cup water and dissolve two servings of chicken bouillion in it, then pour over potatoes.

5. Drop on bite-sized pieces of cooked chicken, sausage, cooked pork or any combination of the three.

6. Cover the top of the open pan with frozen peas, cubed carrots, green beans or any mixture thereof.

7. Evenly space eight pats of butter across the top of the veg OR drizzle olive oil on them lightly. Dust with kosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste.

8. Cover dish tightly with aluminum foil and bake until potatoes are tender, about 30-45 minutes. Remove foil and sprinkle top of food heavily with seasoned breadcrumbs and with a hearty mixture of grated Parmesan or Asiago cheese, gouda and cheddar. Bake uncovered for about 5 minutes, or until cheese is melted and crumbs are golden brown. Serve.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Foaming Draught:
Ah, trust the Grauniad to come up with an environmentally sound and cheap recipe.

This reminds me of the 'flat chicken' indicator of how well the economy is doing.

In Arkansas there are poultry farms which raise broiler chickens in huge quantities. They are also transported in huge quantities. A few usually fall off of the truck. In bad economic times people stop their cars and pick up these chickens before they are squashed; in good times they don't bother. In good times you see chickens on the highway squashed pancake flat.

This is the flat chicken economic indicator.

Moo

Over here it's perfect potatoes--not squashed or anything, falling off the trucks and lying along the verge. I preached a Harvest sermon on them one year.
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
I did something vaguely similar to Ken's recipe on Sun. I sauteed some onions and shallots in a big, tough casserole. Then I put in a load of fresh, chopped up veg - leeks, carrots, swede, potatoes. I added about a pint of chicken stock and boiled it all for 10 mins. Then I stuck a cheap cut of lamb on top, together with some rosemary and bay.

I put the casserole, plus lid, in the oven, on low (gas no 3) and we went out to church and for a walk with a friend afterwards, then came back about 3 hours later.

It was received very favourably.

Little washing up, of course, and no work to do when we got home, straight to the table.

[ 07. February 2006, 21:29: Message edited by: welsh dragon ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Years ago I had a recipe for no-bake cookies. They contained rolled oats, peanut butter, and some form of chocolate, among other things.

I was talking to a Tech student yesterday, who said he really liked cookies but didn't know how to bake. He didn't feel he had time to learn. I mentioned this recipe to him, and he was very interested.

I can't find my copy. Does anyone else have it? IIRC this was popular in the 1950s and 1960s.

Moo
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
No Bake Minutes Cookies or No-Bake Cookies might be what you're looking for. The first has cocoa, the second chocolate chips
 
Posted by samara (# 9932) on :
 
Breadmaker recipes:

On my machine, liquid ingredients first, then dry, with yeast in a little dent in the middle.

Also, adding gluten (I buy it in a box at the local grocery store) makes a world of difference for the consistency of the bread. I think bread machine flour has gluten in it, but we just use regular whole wheat and all purpose or white flour, but add 1 tsp gluten per 1 cup white flour, 1 1/2 tsp per 1 cup wheat flour.


I like the flax bread recipe one a lot better than either the white or whole wheat bread recipe that came in the instruction manuel. It is the best one we've found for staying edible past day 1. My sister found it a little sweet to her taste, but that's easy to fiddle with that for personal preference.

(I'll try Canadian bilingual measurements - but this measuring by weight some people appear to do is foreign to me)


Flax Bread
On my machine, I use the basic setting for 1 1/2 pound loaf.



This is one of my other favourites (I'm sure someone asked [Devil] ) It's best lightly toasted with butter and honey for breakfast. Mmmmm. This one is meant to be slightly sweet.

Crusty Cornmeal Loaves
Whole wheat setting on my machine, 1 1/2 pd again

Both of these are adapted from scratch recipes, if anyone wants to make bread the enjoyable but time-consuming way.
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:

I was talking to a Tech student yesterday, who said he really liked cookies but didn't know how to bake. He didn't feel he had time to learn. I mentioned this recipe to him, and he was very interested.


Would he be interested in some really easy biscuit recipes? After all, the only difference between the baked and the non-baked variety is that, after mixing everything, you plunk the tray in the oven for a few minutes.

As baking goes, its as easy as it gets. Pretty much on a par with boiling an egg or making toast in terms of cooking difficulty.

Peronel.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Something very similar to LutheranChik's BBQ chicken recipe also works very well with sausages:

Chop and brown off some sausages (we use 6 for 2 of us) in a little oil, add chopped onions, carrots, leeks etc (I added parsnips yesterday which was rather good) and fry for a few minutes then add a tin of baked beans, a squirt of ketchup, 1tsp mustard, a dash of Worcester sauce, herbs, black pepper and so on - whatever comes to hand really, and simmer on a very low heat for an hour or two until everything is mushy.

It's great with mash or couscous but my latest innovation is to boil sliced new potatoes for about 10 mins and make a sort of hotpot by transferring the sausage mixture to a casserole and layering the potatoes on the top with a few dobs of butter and whacking it under the grill to brown off the top. [Smile]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Thanks, Mertide. The first recipe is the one I was looking for.

Peronel, he really doesn't want to learn to bake anything right now. He's never done it, and he has his hands full with his academic load.

Moo
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I've got a recipe out of a magazine, which as it calls itself "quick and easy" involves a tub of fresh neapolitan sauce "from the chiller cabinet". As these things are way overpriced and I'm not short of time I'd rather make it myself, but am not sure what it involves. Any info gratefully received!
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
Neapolitan can mean your basic tomato sauce, or it can have olives/capers/mushrooms or even ham or sausage added. Depends where you're from, you might want to check what your chiller ingredients are.

Your basic tomato sauce starts with tinned plum tomatos, drained and seeded and pushed through a coarse sieve. Fry some finely chopped garlic and onions gently in some olive oil, add the tomatos, some salt, pepper, basil and oregano. Cook for 15 minutes. If you want to add olives, add some ripe one sliced near the end. You might want to add a splash of red wine if you like. A couple of anchovies don't hurt either. Knock yourself out!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Anchovies - yuk! The rest is pretty much what I thought. Ta, ever so.

Oh, and extra water improved the bread too.
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
I've got a recipe out of a magazine, which as it calls itself "quick and easy" involves a tub of fresh neapolitan sauce "from the chiller cabinet". As these things are way overpriced and I'm not short of time I'd rather make it myself, but am not sure what it involves. Any info gratefully received!

Tomato sauce for pasta is easy and quick to make if you remember to keep a good brand of tinned crushed tomatoes around. Here's my "recipe" (which is really more like a method).

Charlotte
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
Does anyone have a tried and tested recipe for rhubarb crumble?

Ta!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Peronel:
Does anyone have a tried and tested recipe for rhubarb crumble?

Ta!

I don't know if it counts as tried and tested but it worked well when I made it (The Great Gumby doesn't much like rhubarb). Antony Worral Thompson recipe.

Delia's recipes are usually pretty good too. Delia's recipe.

To ask a new question, does anybody have any suggestions for what to do with beetroot. I have just got some by mistake in my vegetable box - I never used to like the smell as a child so I asked for it not to be included. Anyway, now I've got some I figured it might be a good time to acquire a taste for it! So does anybody have any recipes to convince me that I like beetroot?
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Try it roasted. Roast with its skin on (to avert bleeding); it will slip off easily when the beetroot is cooked, then serve with butter or olive oil and freshly ground pepper. Wonderful accompaniment to a roast, especially beef.
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
I've posted an utterly fantastic winter salad recipe involving beetroot on the previous page.

My other favourite thing to do with it is roast it. Coat in olive oil and a litle salt and pop into a hot oven.

Thans for the crumble recipes!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
The winter beetroot salad was lovely and buoyed by that success, I'm going to try roasting beetroot too. I'm just not sure how long for, and at what temperature. Delia says 3 hours at gas 3 but I haven't got time for that! Oh, and how do I get the stain out of my chopping board??
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
When I roasted beetroot I used Delia's "Winter Collection" Roasted Roots recipe, and just added cubed beetroot to the other veg and herbs and whatnot. That worked fine - the oven was (IIRC) on its hottest setting for 35-40 minutes. The only thing with that is that as it's cubed and so not contained in its skin it does turn everything else pink, but it was tasty despite that.
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
If it's fresh, you can clean the board by scrubbing it with salt. If it's a bit older, a bleach solution will get rid of it. If it's really old, it's a decorative feature. [Smile]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Scrubbing the board with salt worked a treat, thanks. I think I prefer the salad to roasted beetroot. [Smile]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I just read an article about bakeries in New Orleans making king cakes for Mardi Gras.

I'd like to see a recipe so I could get some idea of what they're like.

Can anyone come up with one?

Moo
 
Posted by josephine (# 3899) on :
 
King Cake Recipe

I don't know anyone who makes their own. People usually buy them from their favorite bakery.
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
Another beetroot recipe, this time for soup...

1 lb beetroots
4 oz mushrooms
1 onion
2 eating apples
2 sticks celery

a little oil/butter

1 tsp cumin seeds (next time I want to try caraway)
1 tsp dried marjoram
1 bay leaf
juice of 1 lemon

Peel/chop the veg and apple and place in a pan with the oil/butter, and a couple of spoonfuls of water. Sweat with the lid on for 15 mins or so. Add everything else, and cover with water. (Traditionally, it should be beef stock, but I'm vegetarian...) Simmer for half an hour or so until everything is soft.

Blend, and add water/stock if needed to thin it. I'm lousy at judging how much water I need, so I always make soups thick and then thin them down when blended.

Garnish with yoghurt/sour cream/chives/toasted sunflower seeds/etc.

This is particularly good if left to sit overnight.
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
I have been intending for awhile to post the following vegetarian recipe, which if I am not mistaken will work for Orthodox Lent. It is a delicious bean preparation from Georgia (i.e. the Caucasus).

Lobio

Mash one pound of canned kidney beans (or 1 cup of beans that have been rinsed, soaked and cooked) with a wooden spoon.

In a food processor, combine 1 medium red onion, 1 c. walnuts, 1/2 c. fresh cilantro, 1 T. coriander seed, 3 T. red wine vinegar, and 3 T. water or oil. Add the mixture to the beans and combine.

Season to taste with salt and cayenne. Cover and refrigerate for at least 6 hours so that the flavors have a chance to meld.

Serve garnished with onion slivers and cilantro sprigs, accompanied by toasted pita or crackers.
 
Posted by Celsti (# 4523) on :
 
Hey all,

Just wanted to post this recipe. I have had it in my repertoire for several years but I perfected it last week and wanted to share.

Mushroom Risotto

1 kg (2 pounds) mushrooms
2 cups risotto(arborio) rice
3 red chillies
5 cloves of garlic
1 cup red wine
2 stock (bouillon) cubes - beef is good or you can use vego if you are so inclined

water
parmesan cheese
butter
1 cup of spinach leaves

Divide the mushrooms as follows:

Slice half of them thinly.

Cut one quarter of them in half.

Put one quarter of them in the blender and blend well with 1 litre (2 pints) of water - you may need to do this in 2 batches.

Prepare your stock. Put the wine and the blended mushroom and water mixture into a saucepan and heat. Add some more water until you have about 2.5 - 3 litres of stock (5-7 pints). Add the stock cubes.

Chop the chillies very fine. Use the seeds as well, unless you are a sissy. Crush the garlic very fine. Put into another saucepan (something with a thick base works better) with a bit of butter and fry for a minute or two. Add the rest of the sliced/halved mushrooms and cook until they've collapsed a bit. Add the rice and some more butter and heat through.

For those not familiar with making risotto you basically now have to stir the bloody thing for twenty minutes while adding small amounts of your stock. There is no way to cheat. Despite what anyone may tell you.

So yeah, add small amounts of stock and keep stirring until the rice is cooked through. If you've been there for longer than a half hour and the rice is still hard, try using some hot water instead.Then stir through the spinach leaves and give them a minute to cook. Add some butter (about a tablespoon is good) and finish with some finely grated parmesan cheese.

Depending on the kind of mushrooms you use, this could be a sort of pretty grey colour or it could be almost black. It is amazing comfort food. You can freeze it, but top it up with a bit of stock or when you reheat it it will be too dry.

I "stole" this recipe from a vegetarian restaurant that used to be in Mt Lawley called Peppers. I recreated it and have been trying to get it right for ages - but now it's just so. The secret is using the blender - it makes this amazing sort of mushroom gravy in the finished product. Anyway so much for Peppers. One day I went past and it had disappeared.

If anyone else has got other risotto recipes, I would love to see them!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
What's cilantro? [Confused] [Help]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Green Coriander by another name.
 
Posted by ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Can't say that I'm particularly good at following recipes for risotto, but have recently found that leeks are gorgeous in risotto - I think it's the slow cooking does well for them. Grated courgette works well in a tomato-ey risotto.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I know it's Lent but what the hey!

To my risottos I always add a tablespoon of Creme Fraiche just before serving - naughy but VERY nice!
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Ok food brains I have a challenge. A week on Saturday I have my parents for the day. I would like to cook them a meal they would enjoy but each of us are on special diets.

Mum: just diagnosed diabetic, although I know the rules saying nothing special, I would like her not to have to worry so lowish GI please. Mum likes sweet things and dislikes bitter things.

Dad: Chronic mouth infections means no chilli and one or two other things which make it worse, but I can not recall what at present. A tendency towards high cholesterol, high blood pressure and a malformed heart means the food should be low cholesterol, low fat, low salt and high fibre (he also does not like too much carbohydrate). He loves mushrooms!

Me: Permanent milk intolerance of some form (over forty years since diagnosed), plus I dislike throwing out meat so do not cook it at home as a rule.

As this is the first time since mum was diagnosed I would like to give them something that satisfies the whole criteria.

Jengie
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
I still can't get the previous thread to save properly [Waterworks]

I tried opening one frame separately, and it has a different URL <snip> but still saves as a blank page.

ETA: finally got something sorted by selecting and copying the entire page AdamPater linked to.

[Privacy - AP]

[ 03. March 2006, 03:53: Message edited by: AdamPater ]
 
Posted by Ginga (# 1899) on :
 
Jengie Jon,

This is more of a nice lunch deal. If you're after a grand banquet, this probably won't work so well. I'm currently on a huge soup kick at the moment having finally got a blender for the first time in five years.

"Sweet" is screaming carrots at me. I'd knock up a roasted carrot soup:

roast carrots, whole garlic cloves and onion until soft (run a little honey over the carrots for extra sweetness)
blend with low-salt or home-made stock
cook through

You can add chopped fresh coriander before blending if you like, and I'd throw a little cayenne pepper into the oil I'm roasting in because I like it. Cumin seeds in the roasting tin also optional.

You could roast or grill some big mushrooms (with a little oil/butter and rosemary) and chop them up for a garnish.

Serve with good quality not-white bread for carbs and comfort.

Don't know if that's any help. Otherwise, brown rice goes very nicely with roast veggies, especially if there's leeks involved. I don't know how austere your parents like their food. Some people might prefer a sauce with rice, and I can't think of any off the top of my head.


My most recent varient for this soup was nice:
Go to shop
Buy coriander
Make soup without coriander
Remember about coriander while washing up afterwards.

[ 03. March 2006, 03:13: Message edited by: Ginga ]
 
Posted by Ginga (# 1899) on :
 
Meant to say: I wasn't ignoring your dad's no-chilli option, I just mentioned the cayenne for non-parent-feeding reference. It's really nice.

Also, "carbs and comfort" should read "fibre and comfort" [brick wall]

[ 03. March 2006, 03:15: Message edited by: Ginga ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Sounds good. I already do a carrot soup which is good enough to go on the request list at church. But had never thought of roasting carrots before hand.

Jengie
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
How about doing the soup then a nice savoury like stuffed massive mushrooms on toast?

Or forget the toast.

Here is the cheats way:

Get big mushrooms. Dust them a bit. Turn upside down in oiled shallow dish. Spoon pesto into each one, perhaps different pestos for a bit of variety. sprinkle over some real and freshly grated parmesan or pecorino. Bake for 10 minutes or so. Serve with a jacket potato and salad if not using toast.

Mmmmmmmmmmmmm!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
How much is a cup in American recipes? I'm cooking bulgar wheat and the recipe says 2 cups. It's for tonight so if anyone can let me know quickly I'd be very grateful!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think it is about 8 fl oz
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
You know, I was going to say that dry measures and fluid measures shouldn't be mixed, but I ran the experiment by filling my one-cup dry ingredient measure with water and dumping it into my one-cup Pyrex (liquid measure) and it worked. Came right up to the 8 fl oz level. Then I did the same with sugar. Worked the same.

If you fill your liquid measure to the 450 ml level with the bulgur (btw ... that will make a lot), that will give you your two cups US. I understand that American measure sets are available at some British stores these days, so you might want to get one.

Charlotte

[ 04. March 2006, 15:05: Message edited by: Amazing Grace ]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Thanks WW and AG. I know it'll make a lot - but it's for 8 people. [Smile]
 
Posted by AdamPater (# 4431) on :
 
Yesterday I was delighted to find local supplier of Skippy Steaks™, and enjoyed a very lean and flavoursome meal last night with a mushroom sauce.

I've been warned that lean meats, such as Bambi and Skippy, should be cooked quickly, over high heat because of the lack of marbling. What are the guidelines for lean meat for other cooking methods? Can I confidently replace beef in casseroles, pies and what-not? Or is more care required?
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
AdamPater,
I could be wrong about this, but it seems to me that leaner meats would benefit from slower cooking over a low heat, and in some sort of liquid, in order to allow the meat to tenderize.
 
Posted by BassoProfundo (# 11008) on :
 
Some of these fish dishes sound great! I might have to utilise one of the recipes for Good Friday.

[ 05. March 2006, 18:06: Message edited by: BassoProfundo ]
 
Posted by Exiled Youth (# 8744) on :
 
Ok, the cornbread thing on the question thread has got me thinking...and I thought of Sticky Fingers. They're some weird crazy bread dessert type thing, which Dominos have just started making, which is basically dough with sugar and cinnamon on it, and LOTS of butter, served with icing.

Damn tasty, but if anyone knows what I'm on about, what's the proper name, and can I learn how to make it?

P.S I work in a Dominos -- it's basically pizza dough with butter on it, sugar and cinnamon goes on at the end. Just wondering if it was some American specialty we haven't seen yet...
 
Posted by Exiled Youth (# 8744) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
AdamPater,
I could be wrong about this, but it seems to me that leaner meats would benefit from slower cooking over a low heat, and in some sort of liquid, in order to allow the meat to tenderize.

Venison casserole is indeed delicious, I'm sure someone will be along with a recipe shortly, I am currently away from the recipe resource / grandmother. All this recipe talk is making me hungry.

[Frown]
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
Adam: It depends on the cut. I wouldn't waste kangaroo steaks in a stew, they're much better cooked quickly to medium rare. If you're getting tails or other chewy bits, certainly you can casserole them. If you're going to roast skippy, marinade it first, then wipe it completely dry and add some fat - bacon strips, even butter - 2% fat meat needs some help if it doesn't go hard and dry.
 
Posted by Timothy the Obscure (# 292) on :
 
I just made this one, and decided to post it because I did mostly invent it, though it was inspired by something I had at a long-defunct Portland restaurant called 28 East:

Tuna in Sesame-Mustard Crust (serves 2)

2 Ahi tuna steaks (about 1/2 lb. each, at least 3/4" thick)
3 Tablespoons sesame seeds
3 Tablespoons mustard seeds
1 egg white, slightly beaten
coarse salt
freshly ground pepper
oil

Mix the sesame and mustard seeds. Sprinkle the tuna with salt and pepper (if you're feeling creative, use other herbs and spices--sometimes I use a Cajun spice mixture) then dip in the egg white and coat with the seed mixture. place on a wire rack in the refrigerator and let set for at least 1 hour. Heat the oil over medium heat and saute to taste, until the seeds are golden brown (I like my tuna medium rare, about 2-3 minutes per side).

I like to serve this with a sauce--I might saute peppers and onions and garlic, then add some balsamic vinegar and reduce it until it's syrupy, or I might just use Trader Joe's Mango Salsa if I'm lazy.

Wine recommendation: New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc.
 
Posted by A.F. Steve (# 9057) on :
 
Quick and easy pulled pork sandwiches.

Put a pork loin in a crock pot.

Submerge in Coca-Cola

Quarter an onion, break up the layers, and toss it in.

Cook all day.

When finished, pull the pork out, and place in another dish.

Use two forks to pull the meat apart (it should fall apart)

Mix your BBQ sauce of choice into the meat.

Serve on hamburger buns with side of coleslaw.

Collapse on couch to recover.
 
Posted by ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Even if I do say so myself, I did a rather good stuffing inside a roast chicken yesterday.

Breadcrumbs of four slices of granary type bread, a finely chopped red onion and four cloves of garlic, some grated lemon rind, fresh basil, sage and rosemary (that's what I had hanging around my garden/kitchen, I'm sure you could use dry), the juice of the lemon I'd grated and some dried oregano. Binded together with just short of one egg (pour in a bit at a time so it sticks together but isn't runny) and stuffed up the chicken, together with what was left of the lemon to keep it in there.

I mixed some lemon juice and dried herbs with butter and put it under the skin to make the chicken nice and moist as well. Seemed to go down well with the inlaws...
 
Posted by Dave the Bass (# 155) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Exiled Youth:
Ok, the cornbread thing on the question thread has got me thinking...and I thought of Sticky Fingers. They're some weird crazy bread dessert type thing, which Dominos have just started making, which is basically dough with sugar and cinnamon on it, and LOTS of butter, served with icing.

Damn tasty, but if anyone knows what I'm on about, what's the proper name, and can I learn how to make it?

P.S I work in a Dominos -- it's basically pizza dough with butter on it, sugar and cinnamon goes on at the end. Just wondering if it was some American specialty we haven't seen yet...

Anything like Koeksisters? (South African)
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
OK, I'm very excited, I just received Tony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook.

Has anyone else read this? Made recipes from it? I bought it after seeing his tv shows and reading his book, Kitchen Confidential. It was howlingly funny, profane, bluntly honest, and disturbing as hell because I eat at restaurants and I wondered how much of what he wrote about I had... ahhh... experienced second-hand.

I'm leafing through Les Halles now. This sounding really good.

Bouillabaise
Daube Provencale
Roasted Veal Shortribs
Whole Roasted Fish Basquaise
Leeks Vinaigrette
Blueberries with Lime Sugar

Some textual gems:

"But what did I tell you about thinking? And planning, numbnuts?"

"How to hard-boil a freaking egg"

"Warning on Snails: It is a peculiar feature of snails that occasionally they like to explode, spitting a boiling-hot, napalmlike mixture of snail fluids and melted butter at your face and genital region while cooking--and often in the moments after cooking. If you are accustomed to cooking while naked, I would strongly suggest covering startegic areas with an apron and keeping your face out of the way during the crucial time periods."

"Above all, do not be a snob. It's the worst sin there is for a cook. Always entertain the possibility that something, no matter how squiggly and scary-looking, might just be good."

"But then kidneys do inspire that kind of devotion among the cognoscenti."
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
The book sounds great, KenWritez. Do they have a recipe for pea soup (there's a French word for it but I'm drawing a blank)? I always heard that they had great pea soup in the Les Halles neighborhood.
(Les Halles is the former food market in Paris. It's been gone for years, but I have memories of walking down a street in Les Halles when I visited Paris as a college student in the early 70s. I still remember how bad it smelled!)
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
When I went to Les Halles, it just smelled of pee ...

The French really shouldn't try to do shopping malls. [Biased]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Sorry, Mama, no pea soup recipe in the book. If you'd like one, here's what I think is a pretty good one. The recipe is written loosely, so cooks can tweak to their tastes:

All measurements US

Split Pea Soup with Ham


1. Boil wine, stock, ham, and bay leaves over medium-high heat in large covered stock pot. Reduce heat to low and simmer until meat is tender and pulls away from bone, 2-3 hours. Remove ham meat and bone from broth; add peas and simmer until peas are tender but not dissolved, about 45 minutes.

When ham is cool enough to handle, shred meat into bite-sized pieces and set aside. Discard rind and give bone to dog.

2. While ham is simmering, heat oil in large skillet over high heat until oil is shimmering but not smoking. Add onions, carrots, and celery; sauté, stirring frequently, until most of the liquid evaporates and vegetables begin to brown, 5-6 minutes. Reduce heat to medium low; add butter, garlic, and sugar. Cook vegetables, stirring frequently, until deeply browned, 30-40 minutes; set aside. You'll need to stick around for this step, no wandering off to watch tv.

3. Add sautéed vegetables, potatoes, and shredded ham to soup; simmer until potatoes are tender and peas dissolve or turn to mush and thicken soup to the consistency of light cream, about 20 minutes. Remove celery, bay leaves and discard.

4. Using an immersion blender or food processor, puree the soup to slightly chunky consistency, i.e., bits of meat and veg are about the size of wooden pencil leads. Don't strain the soup, you want some bits in there. (If you use a food processor, work in small batches so the container doesn't overflow and your counter ends up wearing the hot soup.) Add cream to pureed soup if you want a cream soup.

Season with salt and ground black pepper to taste. Cook for another 5-10 minutes or until flavor develops fully.

Ladle soup into bowls, sprinkle with parsley, serve.

SERVES 6
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
I think what was wanted was the name for a french soup made with fresh baby peas and (possibly) mint and (probably) heavy cream -- like Potage Cressy is made with young carrots. But I've forgotten the name.

John
 
Posted by Laud-able (# 9896) on :
 
A soup made with fresh green peas alone would probably be purée Saint-Germain.
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Laud-able:
A soup made with fresh green peas alone would probably be purée Saint-Germain.

Recipe here.

Sounds wonderful!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Can anyone give me a recipe for making a mess of pottage (aka red lentil soup)?

During Lent our church is having soup and bread suppers followed by a program. I thought it would be highly appropriate to make a mess of pottage.

Thanks,

Moo

[ 09. March 2006, 00:28: Message edited by: Moo ]
 
Posted by marmot (# 479) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ags:
quote:
Originally posted by Laud-able:
A soup made with fresh green peas alone would probably be purée Saint-Germain.

Recipe here.

Sounds wonderful!

Especially wonderful when garnished with a tablespoon or so of dry sherry at table.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Laud-able:
A soup made with fresh green peas alone would probably be purée Saint-Germain.

That's the one I was thinking of! Potage Saint-Germain. Thank you!
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
What I did for my parents, was I adapted Ginga's recipe.

I am sorry this is all metric, but it makes a decent size bowl of soup for three.

240g carrot (3 approx)
240g parsnip (3 approx)
160g onion (4 small)
3 cloves of garlic
spray of olive oil
tsp of cummin seeds
tsp of coriander
700 ml of vegetable stock


I served with rye bread and a mixed grain gluten free bread.

Jengie
 
Posted by Celsti (# 4523) on :
 
Has anyone ever cooked steamboat (aka hotpot) - an Asian thingy in which you have a pot of hot stock on the table and you cook things in it and eat them? I do have a recipe but I thought I'd ask for tips. If it works out (visitors, Wednesday) I'll post the recipe. If it goes pear-shaped, you'll never hear from me again.

Particularly interested in what you cooked and if it was nice. My recipe calls for squid and slices of meat and stuff. How's tofu?
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
Tofu is OK but what really gives the broth lots of flavor (I always serve it at the end) is a selection of different meats and seafood. We also like a variety of dipping sauces. You can buy them or make your own. Our favorite is a combination of sherry, soy sauce, ginger, garlic, and sesame oil (not too much of the latter).

The raw foods benefit from a bit of aesthetic attention before they are presented at table. Slice them carefully and fan them out on the plate, then garnish with radish roses, scallion brushes, et cetera.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Please does anyone have any idea of what to do with day old French baguette (other than throw it out.) When I'm on my own I buy a half baguette, but I don't even eat all that sometimes. I seem to waste an awful lot of the stuff.
I do sometimes make what I call "French bread pizza" - using the bread as a base, smearing on pesto and adding pizza toppings. But I would like other suggestions if anyone has them.
 
Posted by Peronel (# 569) on :
 
French bread makes great bread andbutter pudding. Let me know if you need a recipe.
 
Posted by Zealot en vacance (# 9795) on :
 
In similar vein to Peronel, it also performs beautifully in apple charlotte.In the morning soak slices in a mixture of egg beaten with a little milk, and fry, a little cinnamon on top, maple syrup, lovely winter breakfast. (Our family call it 'eggy toast' but it has an official name.) Then for lunch convert any still left over into garlic bread, or use as croutons on soup or in a salad.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
Please does anyone have any idea of what to do with day old French baguette

Like saying, "I have too much money!" Oh, to have your problem! [Big Grin]

NB: All measurements US

French toast is the first that comes to my mind. Wonderful breakfast food.

French Toast

1 cup milk
3 large eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt
8 (1/2-inch) slices day-old or stale country loaf, brioche or challah bread
4 tablespoons butter

Whisk together the milk, eggs and salt. Pour into a pie pan and set aside.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Dip bread into mixture, allow to soak for 30 seconds on each side, and then remove to a cooling rack and drain for 1-2 minutes. (Put the rack in plastic wrap-covered sheet pan for easy clean-up.)

Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a 10-inch nonstick saute pan, use medium-low heat. Place 2 slices of bread into the pan and cook until golden brown, approx. 2-3 minutes per side. Remove from pan and place on clean rack in oven for 5 minutes. Repeat with all 8 slices.

Serve immediately with your choice of apple sauce, maple syrup, whipped cream or fruit (bananas go really well with this).

You can also season your your leftover bread and toast it until it's dry, and then cut into croutons. If you need to store them for a time, put them in a zip-top plastic bag, suck the air out, and freeze.
 
Posted by Dymphna (# 11061) on :
 
Although I am the Very Worst Cook in the Whole Wide World, even I can do this, which is extremely scrummy and looks posh to boot.

Serves 2 (normal people or 1 greedy Dymphna)

2 fennel bulbs, quarted
2 garlic cloves, finely sliced or squished up*
5 tbsp light olive oil
300ml hot vegetable stock
60g chestnut mushrooms, sliced finely
100g grated parmesan (optional, as I don't like it much)
150ml single cream

Put the fennel and garlic in a heavy-bottomed frying pan. Cover with the olive oil and stock, then bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer gently for about 15 minutes or until the fennel is nice and tender and the stock reduced by about three-quarters.

Saute the mushrooms in olive oil. Turn the grill on to a hight heat and while it heats up, stir the cream into the fennel. Bring it back to the boil and immediately remove from the heat. Stir in the mushrooms. Sprinkle with the grated parmesan if using, and place under the hot grill for about five minutes.

Tosat two thickly-cut pieces of bread (granary or wholemeal or something similar works best) and put the fennel and shrooms on top, a la beans on toast (but posher.)

Eat like a starving wild boar.
Then persuade someone else to wash up.

* Technical cookery term..
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
Folks,

I wonder if anyone could suggest a starter forcoq au vin . I was thinking something thick and souplike, but worried that there might be too much liquid in the whole meal.

Any ideas?

Thanks
cat x
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
Perhaps a warm(ish) salad? Rocket and baby spinach with goat's cheese, crumbled (just-cooked) bacon and warm dressing, maybe?

I'm assuming it's as cool in N. Ireland as it is in the N. of England!
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
I did go salad, but no goats cheese. Excellent idea, coq au vin is pretty heavy (but extremely tasty with all that red wine!) [Yipee]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
I just made this tonight. Couldn't really find a recipe I liked, so I made this up. It was pretty darn good.

NB: All measurements US

EASY ROASTED CHICKEN BREASTS

Serves 4

CHICKEN
=======
4 lg fresh (not frozen) split chicken breasts with ribs (no boneless/skinless), uncooked
1 T vegetable oil
1 cup white wine
Fresh ground black pepper to taste


BRINE
=====
3/4 cup salt
1/2 cup sugar
1 T whole peppercorns or allspice berries
2 tsp powdered thyme
1 tsp ground black pepper
2 bay leaves
1 T hot sauce
Juice of one orange or other large citrus fruit

1. In a large glass or plastic container, add chicken and brine elements. Add enough water to cover all chicken. Place in refrigerator for 30 mins - 4 hrs.

2. Line a large cookie sheet (should have a high rim, at least 1/3” tall) with foil and place a cake/cookie cooling rack on the rack.

3. Preheat oven to 375 F.

4. Remove chicken from brine. Discard brine.

5. Place chicken in colander in sink and let drip dry for several minutes. Remove chicken and pat dry with paper towels.

6. In large frying pan (no non-stick pans), add oil and heat on medium-high until oil is shimmering. Add as many pieces of chicken as will comfortably fit in pan and sear the breasts until they are golden brown on all sides. You’ll probably need to process in multiple batches. Place all seared chicken on rack in cookie sheet. Put frying pan aside and do not discard contents.

7. Insert meat thermometer (oven-proof or digital) into thickest part of a breast, careful not to let the tip of thermometer probe strike bone or the pan. Bake chicken until internal temperature of the breast is 175 degrees F. Remove chicken and allow to rest for at least 5 minutes.

8. While chicken is baking, return frying pan to medium heat and add wine, black pepper. Deglaze pan bottom, scraping up browned bits with spatula. Reduce heat to medium-low and allow sauce to reduce by about half. Add any drippings from cookie sheet to pan sauce. If sauce is too thin, add 1 T butter.

9. Ladle pan sauce over chicken and serve immediately.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I am planning on making a chocolate fondu when friends come round on Saturday - although I shall have to use my slow cooker rather than a fondue set, as I don't have a fondue set...

I am guessing it is melted chocolate (I thought about Toblerone...) and something like milk/cream to keep it liquid. But in what quantities? Can anyone help with something a bit more exact? Thanks!

By the by, stale French bread and butter pudding was delish. I was also given a savoury cheese and stale French bread and butter pudding recipe. I look forward to trying that too. It sounds yummy.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I don't know which thread to put this on - here or the questions one - but I'm translating a menu which includes "Bauernsauce". Apparently this is a tomato sauce with bacon, sweetcorn and mushrooms. Is there an English equivalent to this? Need an answer ASAP!!
 
Posted by Corpus cani (# 1663) on :
 
Cous cous. Any suggestions?

I prefer it to rice, mainly because it's so easy to prepare, but as it comes it's pretty bland. I have a nice and simple chicken-in-garlic-and-creme-fraiche type dish, so am looking for something to do with cous cous that doesn't involve more garlic, but which makes the cous cous a bit more interesting AND doesn't clash with the garlic in the chicken (of which there's quite a lot!)

I'm sure there are lots of easy things to do with cous cous - what easy recipes can Shipmates suggest?

Corpus

PS Can anybody shed any light on where cous cous comes from? I seem to remember reading recently that it was a N. African thing, but I'd always thought it was Persian. [Confused]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Add lemon juice and lots of herbs to cous cous. You can also add things like poppy seeds and pine nuts. My recipe book says it's North African but no more detail than that.

Here's a recipe off the packet:
Apricot and coriander cous cous (serves 4)
1/2 tsp salt
1 tbs oil
400ml boiling water
250g cous cous
75g dried apricots
chopped fresh coriander
juice of 2 small lemons and zest of 1 lemon
freshly ground black pepper

1. Place the salt, oil, butter and water in a pan and bring back to the boil
2. Add the cous cous and reduce the heat, cooking slowly for 3-5 mins
3. With a fork, fluff up the cous cous and add the apricots, coriander, lemon juice and zest and season to taste.
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
Somewhere someone asked for a recipe for American meat loaf. Can't help there, but my mum's Canadian recipe is quite good.

Mince
Onion to taste
10 ounce can of tomato soup
1 cup of uncooked oatmeal
2 eggs
your choice of spices

Mix all together in a large bowl, and then pack into a large loaf pan, or a uncovered casserole. Place in oven at 350F for about 75-90 minutes.

This makes a very moist meatloaf. People who use breadcrumbs or crackers seldom get this.
 
Posted by ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Oooooh I have a lovely cous cous recipe and what's more, I've got it on this computer...

So here we go, Maisie's (not mine) recipe for...

Spicy Lemon Cous Cous

Ingredients

I pickled Lemon (use skin only, finely chopped)
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 tablespoons lemon oil
25g unsalted butter (or margarine)
1 red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
4 spring onions, finely sliced
450ml/3/4 pint of chicken stock
250g/9oz cous cous
3 to 4 blobs of preserved ginger
1 lime: juice and finely grated rind
2 large plum tomatoes, skinned, deseeded and chopped
1 pack/pot fresh coriander (I usually remove stems and just use the leaves)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil.

Method

Remove the flesh and pith of the lemon, I usually do this with a desert spoon. Then finely chop the skin. Place plum tomatoes in very hot, nearly boiling water, for a very short time. Them remove and skin them and put them in cold water, so that they don’t continue to cook and go mushy. (Leave them too long and they will overcook). Then finely chop all the other ingredients, putting them in separate containers. This can all be done the night before and put in the fridge.

Melt the butter/marge in a large pan and add garlic, chilli and coriander seeds. Cook for one minute, continuously stirring. Then add spring onions and the stock. Bring to the boil and stir in the cous cous, in a thin, steady, stream, stirring all the time with a wooden spoon. Continue to stir until stock is absorbed.

Remove from the heat and set aside for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork after 2 minutes, to separate grains. Fluff up again at the end of the 5 minutes, just to make sure.

Stir in the chopped ginger and grated lime rind. Then stir in the lime juice, tomatoes, pickled lemon rind, fresh coriander and the olive and lemon oil. Mix well to ensure even spread of ingredients. Cover and set aside for up to 6 hours.
 
Posted by Zealot en vacance (# 9795) on :
 
My interpretation of an Indonesian style stir fried rice, at the request of Ferijen. No claims for authenticity, just what I have learned from older members of the family who once lived in Indonesia.

The seasoning is a wet spice mix. The contents of mine includes Garlic, Ginger, Red chilli, (all fresh, equal quantities in volume to the quantity of chilli, chopped small, then pounded in a pestle and mortar) tablespoon sweet soy sauce, piece of lemon grass and galangal, bayleaf, splash of fish sauce, splash of molasses, pinch Cumin, some white wine or beer to loosen it a little, anything else that comes to hand that I feel like lobbing in! Very much an 'adjust to your own liking' recipe in terms of the balance of flavours, and quantity of seasoning used.

Cook the rice, drain, and if possible allow to go cold. (You can speed things on by a quick rinse of cold water, and then draining very thoroughly.)

In a wok (or whatever you use for stir frying) a few tablespoons of groundnut oil, heat gently and cook the wet spice mix for a few minutes stirring frequently. Increase the heat, add a finely chopped onion (or leek) and 2 oz meat per person, cut in thin strips, stir frequently until the meat is cooked, apply full heat, add any vegetable (shredded or chopped small: cabbage, beans, sweetcorn, whatever) and the rice, turning over continuously until piping hot, and a strong toasted rice smell is evident.

This is a dish very suitable for using up leftovers: both the meat and the veg may be the reamins of a previous roast dinner for example, in which case the meat only has to heat before adding the rice and veg.

It is really good eaten with the large prawn crackers from Indonesia, sold as 'Krupuk'; coarser and far more fish flavoured than Chinese prawn crackers.
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
I was going to serve cream of sorrel soup for Easter dinner, but can't locate any sorrel. Does anyone have any ideas for a replacement soup? I want to use the cream soup bowls, and the rest of the menu looks like this:

Butterflied barbecued leg of lamb with garlic and herbs
Garlic mashed potatoes
Green beans
Stuffed tomatoes

Salad with mustard dressing

Lemon charlotte with raspberry coulis

Thanks!
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
I am supposing that you wanted something fresh-tasting and seasonal for your starter.

I would go for asparagus, for a spring menu, as it can currently be had by the armful at a good price from our local market.

But, being lazy, I might just serve the asparagus boiled or steamed, with butter, and forget about making soup!
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
When making cous cous, I normally crumble in a stock cube. That stops it from being quite so bland.

I also use cous cous to make a hot salad like dish (it can also be served cold).

Take a handful of pine nuts and toast them in a heavy bottomed pan. When they are done toss them into a bowl.

Add a little oil to the pan and saute a diced onion. Add in some sliced mushrooms and cook til the mushroom mixture starts to dry out. Toss this on top of the pine nuts.

Cook some veggies. This can be as simple as heating up a handful of frozen peas and sweetcorn, or you can add roasted vegetables, whatever you happen to have at hand.

All of this gets put in the bowl. Add in the cous cous, a stock cube and boiling water. Stir. Wait 3 minutes and stir again. Wait another 2 minutes and fluff up the cous cous, tossing in some fresh corriander leaves, spring onion green, chives or something similar.

This can be served hot or cold. It also is good when used to stuff peppers or marrows.

[ 06. April 2006, 21:30: Message edited by: babybear ]
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
An asparagus soup recipe
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
Brilliant, welsh dragon. Thank you.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteCanada:
Somewhere someone asked for a recipe for American meat loaf. Can't help there, but my mum's Canadian recipe is quite good.

Mince
Onion to taste
10 ounce can of tomato soup
1 cup of uncooked oatmeal
2 eggs
your choice of spices

Mix all together in a large bowl, and then pack into a large loaf pan, or a uncovered casserole. Place in oven at 350F for about 75-90 minutes.

This makes a very moist meatloaf. People who use breadcrumbs or crackers seldom get this.

I feel obliged in this context to offer up for a second time my Canadian mother's meatloaf recipe (it appeared for the first time on a Hell thread of Sine's):

Line a loaf pan with aluminium foil. Heat the oven to 350 degrees (Gas Mark 4). Take a 1 lb block of frozen ground round. Remove paper and plastic wrapping. Place in loaf pan. Open a can of Campbell's Vegetable Soup (the kind with alphabet shaped noodles in it). Pour on top of the meat, spread evenly if desired. Bake until the soup is very dark brown.
Has been known to serve 5 with mashed potatoes and a salad.
 
Posted by Corpus cani (# 1663) on :
 
Mmmmmm. Cous cous sponsored drool escapes corporeal lips... Thanks for the tips - shall have a go.

Cc
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
Saved from the old recipe thread:

Sine's Good but not Ultimate Meatloaf

1 cup bread crumbs (120 grams)
3/4 cup minced onion (150 grams)
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
2 eggs, slightly beaten
2 lbs. ground beef
2 tablespoons horseradish
pinch of salt
1/4 cup milk or water
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1/4 cup catsup
(1/2 cup catsup for top of meatloaf)

Combine all ingredients except the 1/2 cup of catsup.

Place in loaf pan or shape on a baking sheet.

Bake at 400 degrees F. for approx. 40 minutes.

About 15 minutes before meatloaf is done drain fat and spread top of meatloaf with 1/2 cup of catsup.
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
One thing I would add to Sine's recipe is in place of just plain ketchup on top, I would mix the 1/2 cup ketchup with a heaping Tablespoon of brown or Dijon mustard and a generous splash of Worchestershire sauce.
 
Posted by Martha (# 185) on :
 
Dormouse -

hope it isn't too late for the chocolate fondue - my recipe uses 225g chocolate to 200ml double cream, with 2 tbsp brandy added after those have melted together.

I've heard Toblerone fondue is very good...
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Does anyone have any zabaglione tips?

I had planned to serve some with strawberries on Valentine's Day - and then suddenly realised that there might be a reason not to be eating undercooked egg - or alcohol.

Now, it seems like a good time to get out the bottle of marsala and find a purpose for it.

Zabaglione is basically a delicious, frothy, alcoholic custard, a bit like a warm syllabub (though it does also appear in a cold mousse version, and as an ice cream).

Many versions suggest just using egg yolks, although some include beaten egg whites (which would be good cos otherwise you might end up with 8 unused egg whites)

Any tips?
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
If you end up with lots of egg whites you could make meringue.

Or I guess a dieter's egg white only omelette for breakfast the next day to compensate for eating the zabaglione before!!
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Posted by Martha
quote:
hope it isn't too late for the chocolate fondue - my recipe uses 225g chocolate to 200ml double cream, with 2 tbsp brandy added after those have melted together.

I've heard Toblerone fondue is very good...

In the end I just melted the chocklit & slung in cream until it looked like a good consistency. I used 3 bars of chocklit, one of which had nougaty bits in it, as I couldn't find Toblerone. I didn't think of adding alcohol, but perhaps that's all to the good, as the 2 children who had come with their parents joined in (until then they'd sat upstairs with a DVD of The Incredibles & a pizza, while we had adult conversation and steak & ale pie). The marshmallows & strawberries were the most favourite to dip in. It was a most decadent pudding - the only prob is I'm left with loads of little madeleine cakes going stale. I have crumbed many up and made mini-Scandinavian Apple Cakes for the freezer, but there's still a lot left!
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Per Babybear's request, I am finally getting around to posting recipes for Carrot Cake and Oatmeal Raisin Cookies (please be aware these are American recipes that I have tweaked to make my own and hence use American measurements, ie. cups not grams or mils).

Beth's Spiced Carrot Cake

4 eggs
2 cups plain flour
2 cups sugar (either granulated cane or castor or a mix of those with a bit of demerara or brown for extra punch)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon mixed spice
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 cup pecans or walnuts
3 cups shredded carrots
3/4 vegetable or sunflower oil

Grease and flour two 9 1/2 inch cake pans. In a large bowl stir together dry ingredients (including nuts). In a medium bowl combine eggs, carrots, and oil. Add wet ingredients to dry and stir until combined. Pour into prepared pans and bake for 30 to 35 minutes at 350F or 175C. Cool in the pans for 10 minutes then cool thoroughly on wire racks. Ice with a Cream Cheese Frosting (butter, cream cheese, and icing sugar - sorry, can't give you measurements, I just always wing it) that's been flavoured with vanilla essence, maple syrup, or rose essence.

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

3/4 butter
1 cup brown sugar (I mix light and dark)
1/2 granulated cane sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda (bicarb of soda)
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp mixed spice
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla
1 3/4 plain flour
2 cups rolled oats
1 cup raisins

Soften butter (I pop it in the microwave) and place in large mixing bowl. Add sugar, baking powder and soda and spices, and stir until combined. Mix in eggs and vanilla until combined. Mix in flour. Mix in the rolled oats and then the raisins. Drop dough (approximately 1 well-rounded teaspoon) two inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet (the spacing is important as these cookies really spread out). Bake at 375F / 190C for 8 to 10 minutes or until edges are golden. Cool on the sheet for a minute and then cool completely on a wire rack.

This makes about 50 cookies, which is a lot if you are making them for home use, so if you want, you can freeze the cookies. Form the raw dough into balls on the cookie sheets as directed above and then pop the trays into the freezer until the cookies are solid. Remove from the trays and store in a plastic bag or container until ready. Bake from frozen - do not thaw first!

[ 10. April 2006, 16:48: Message edited by: Flausa ]
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
Inspired by LATA's thread on them in the circus, and madteawoman making them, does anyone know a good recipe (with bits and dried fruit) for Hot Cross Buns?
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
(please be aware these are American recipes that I have tweaked to make my own and hence use American measurements, ie. cups not grams or mils).
[...]

3/4 butter

Calling Flausa or other US shipmates...I know I'm probably being stupid, but does that mean 3/4 of a cup of butter?

I have a small jug that measures in cups, but should I really squish butter down into it? I'm happy to do so if necessary, but it seems weird...
 
Posted by Abishag (# 4710) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
Please does anyone have any idea of what to do with day old French baguette (other than throw it out.)

If I have left over bread, I turn it into bread crumbs in the food processor, bag it and freeze it for when I need breadcrumbs in a recipe.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
(please be aware these are American recipes that I have tweaked to make my own and hence use American measurements, ie. cups not grams or mils).
[...]

3/4 butter

Calling Flausa or other US shipmates...I know I'm probably being stupid, but does that mean 3/4 of a cup of butter?

I have a small jug that measures in cups, but should I really squish butter down into it? I'm happy to do so if necessary, but it seems weird...

In the other recipe, you're probably safe assuming it's 3/4 of an (8 oz) cup of oil.

In the second recipe it could be 3/4 cup, 3/4 pound or (as it's US) 3/4 stick (and a stick is 1/4 pound, I believe). My guess would be 3/4 cup, but you'd better not rely on it.

You can either soften the butter and squash it down to the 3/4 mark, and then work it out with a spatula. Ot you can take a larger cup of known capacity (around here, there are 2-cup measures), fill with water to capacity minus 3/4 cup and drop pieces of butter in until the water reaches capacity level.

John

[ 15. April 2006, 01:03: Message edited by: John Holding ]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Catrine:
Inspired by LATA's thread on them in the circus, and madteawoman making them, does anyone know a good recipe (with bits and dried fruit) for Hot Cross Buns?

Hot Cross Buns recipe
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Any great success stories from Easter dinner? Mine was nothing special, just lamb chops (there were just 3 of us this year, so I didn't want to do a big hunk of meat), garlic roasted new potatoes, roasted asparagus, and angel food cake with fresh strawberries. It's almost a cliche of a meal, but it was pretty tasty! I tried out a mixed-herb mediterranean lamb rub from the wonderful spice shoppe near my house.

Any great springtime recipes?
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
We had:

Starter: Olives. Melba toast. Proscuitto. Duck pate with black truffle.

Main: Roast chicken with pilau rice. I stuffed the chicken with a mixture of toasted pine nuts, the juice of two lemons, olive oil, a small amount of venison salami, big handful of parsley and three cloves of garlic, which I crushed and fried gently before mixing in. It was really good.
And a rocket salad.

Dessert: Strawberry pie topped with merangue with almonds in it. Pate sucre base.

Washed down with a bottle of 2005 Matua Valley pinot gris (good wine, but only an average match) and a 1997 Vergenoegd port (which was sublime).

Specific recipes available on request.
 
Posted by Rat (# 3373) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:

In the second recipe it could be 3/4 cup, 3/4 pound or (as it's US) 3/4 stick (and a stick is 1/4 pound, I believe). My guess would be 3/4 cup, but you'd better not rely on it.

You can either soften the butter and squash it down to the 3/4 mark, and then work it out with a spatula. Ot you can take a larger cup of known capacity (around here, there are 2-cup measures), fill with water to capacity minus 3/4 cup and drop pieces of butter in until the water reaches capacity level.

I plumped for 3/4 of a cup and used the squishing method, which was a bit messy. Next time I'll try your cunning water idea, which I'd never have thought of.

It's been pointed out to me that US cups and metric cups are not the same, and I don't know which my jug measures...but I don't suppose it matters as long as the same size cup is used throughout. Goodness, the complications of international cooking.

Anyway, I can report that the raisin oatmeal cookies were delicious, properly soft 'n' chewy, and a great hit with Mr Rat and various visiting relatives. Thanks Flausa.
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by welsh dragon:
Does anyone have any zabaglione tips?

There is a recipe here: zabaglione

And, traditionally they should be served with figs. That said, strawberries are much nicer! Failing that, buy some biscotti and eat them with a glass of the marsala.

<edited to add the alcohol!>

[ 17. April 2006, 08:40: Message edited by: dolphy ]
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
In the end we used a very simple recipe, 6 egg yolks, 6 measures of Marsala wine, 4 measures of sugar (I used an empty half egg shell as a "measure", which one of the recipes I consulted told me was traditional.) As in your recipe, I had scaled down the sugar a bit from the "traditional" suggestion.

The only stainless steel bowl I have belongs to my kitchen mixer & has rubber feet. I was scared the rubber would melt if I used it on the stove, so I tried a glass bowl over a simmering saucepan and whisked the whole lot for about 8 minutes. We ended up with an awful lot of frothy alcoholic custard, and yes, it was very nice with strawberries!

Maybe we can experiment with cinnamon and/or vanilla another time.

I still have to work out what to do with the remaining egg whites though.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rat:

It's been pointed out to me that US cups and metric cups are not the same, and I don't know which my jug measures...but I don't suppose it matters as long as the same size cup is used throughout. Goodness, the complications of international cooking.

Well, I must say, I rather ignore that there are supposed to be differences between the sizes of the US and metric cups, because as you say, as long as you are using the same proportions you should be okay (and all the recipes I've done this sort of thing for have worked out fine).

Oh, and I do the butter squishing thing too. Though I have found the more baking I do, the better I've gotten at eyeballing the right amount.

quote:
Anyway, I can report that the raisin oatmeal cookies were delicious, properly soft 'n' chewy, and a great hit with Mr Rat and various visiting relatives. Thanks Flausa.
Yay! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by welsh dragon:
I still have to work out what to do with the remaining egg whites though.

WD, you could make a pie that needs a meringue on top. Or you could make schaum tortes, which are little circles of baked meringue, into which you spoon whipped cream or ice cream and then top with strawberries. My husband's Wisconsin relatives are of German descent and this is a popular dessert where they live in Wisconsin.

[ 17. April 2006, 17:23: Message edited by: Mamacita ]
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Egg whites -- pavlova. Ask one of the Aussies on board, but basically you make a stiff meringue, spread it in a pie plate, ensuring that there's a hollow in the centre. Bake until hard (but still a little soft inside?). Serve filled with fruit (kiwis -- no not the people or the athletes, the fruit -- are apparently traditional but strawberries or raspberries are wonderful) and cream.

John
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
In other words, a schaum torte! [Biased] (Interesting, they're almost identical recipes. Pavlova here, schaum torte recipe above. And they look the same. Both a good suggestion!
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
For our Paschal breakfast, everyone brings baskets of goodies that are placed on the church porch and blessed at the end of the service. Then we carry the baskets over to the parish hall, where we share a pot-luck meal at about 3 in the morning. I always bring honey bunnies and cheese-and-sausage balls. (When I was cooking yesterday between services, my kids said the house smelled like Pascha!)

Honey Bunnies

4 1/2 - 5 c. flour
2 pkg. RapidRise yeast
1 tsp salt
2/3 c. evaporated milk
1/2 c. water
1/2 c. honey
1/2 c. butter*
2 eggs (room temperature)
Honey glaze (3/4 c. honey melted with 6 Tbsp butter)

* Butter in Washington is apparently saltier than butter in Tennessee. I had trouble with the dough failing to rise the first few times I made it out in this part of the world. You may want to use unsalted butter.

Combine 1 1/2 c. flour, yeast, and salt. Heat the evaporated milk, honey, and butter until the butter is melted and the mixture is very warm (between 120 and 130 degrees). Gradually add the warm liquid to the flour mixture. Beat 2 minutes at medium speed. Add the eggs and 1/2 c. flour. Beat another 2 minutes at high speed. With a spoon, stir in the rest of the flour. Put the dough in a greased bowl, oil the top of the dough. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate from 2 to 24 hours.

Divide the dough into 32 pieces. On a lightly floured surface, roll each piece into a 10-inch rope. From each rope, cut 3 pieces, 1/2" each, for the ears and tail. Coil the top of each rope down and to the left; the bottom up and to the right, to make the head and body. Shape the small pieces for the ears and tail, moisten one end slightly, and attach them to the head and body.

Place the bunnies on greased baking sheets. Cover. Let rise in a warm draft-free place until doubled in bulk. Bake at 375 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes. Remove to wire racks. Brush with honey glaze while still warm.

Cheese and Sausage Balls

1 pound extra-sharp cheddar cheese, finely grated
1 pound hot pork sausage
1 pound Bisquick baking mix

Mix the three ingredients with your hands until evenly distributed. Shape into small balls (about 1" in diameter, or just a bit larger). Place on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake at 350 degrees until lightly browned.

These can be shaped ahead of time and frozen, then popped into the oven shortly before time to serve them.

They're best still warm from the oven, but they're very sturdy and reheat well.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
The Amosling made some delicious oatcakes yesterday. They contained 100 g. flour, 120 g. rolled oats, 60 g. soft butter, a pinch of salt, a teaspoon of fennel seed, which were all whizzed together with the food processor, and then water added to make a stiff dough (a couple of tbsp). She rolled the dough very thin on a floured board, cut it into soldiers, and baked it in a moderate oven (you don't need to grease the baking sheet: they don't stick), just until they were starting to colour. She then let them cool and put them away in an airtight plastic box. They vanished so rapidly that I tried out the recipe myself after church today, substituting for the tsp of fennel seed a tsp of chilli flakes just for the heck of it, and cutting the dough into rounds. These were, I thought a little tougher than hers (probably the dough was overhandled a bit) but also very good.

Both kinds are good with a mature cheddar.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I am usually very reserved about aniseedy flavours, but tonight I put onion, new potatos slices and fennel chunks in a pan with a little butter and vegetable stock, covered, and stewed until all were just nicely soft. Added a couple of spoonfuls of half-fat creme fraiche. Delish.

There is a small amount left, which tomorrow gets married with some very briefly microwaved shredded cabbage and served up with severely grilled sausage.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Has nobody been cooking for a while?? I had to really hunt for this! Anyhoo...

Does anybody have any inspiration for what to do with some (probably) past-its-best asparagus, big field mushrooms, leeks, carrots and onions? I don't have time to buy meat and I need inspiration for this evening's meal!

Ta ever so. [Smile]
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Vegetable stir fry?

John

[damned page change - J]

[ 09. May 2006, 15:07: Message edited by: John Holding ]
 
Posted by sharkshooter (# 1589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:

Does anybody have any inspiration for what to do with some (probably) past-its-best asparagus, big field mushrooms, leeks, carrots and onions? I don't have time to buy meat and I need inspiration for this evening's meal!

Throw them in the garbage and order in a pizza.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
Does anybody have any inspiration for what to do with some (probably) past-its-best asparagus, big field mushrooms, leeks, carrots and onions? I don't have time to buy meat and I need inspiration for this evening's meal!

1 baking sheet, lined fully with aluminum foil
Olive oil
Kosher salt
Fresh ground black pepper
1 t powdered chicken boullion
Balsamic vinegar
2 T butter
1 c white wine
OPTIONAL: Crumbled bleu or feta cheese
OPTIONAL: Cooked bacon pieces, large diced

a) Oil foil on baking sheet thoroughly. Dust with kosher salt and pepper.

b) Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

1. Wash carrots. Peel them if they're thicker than about an inch at their widest. Slice them on the diagonal into 1/4" "coins."

In a 12-inch saute pan over medium heat, combine the carrots, butter, boullion, kosher salt to taste and wine. Cover and bring to a simmer, then stir, reducing heat to low. Cook for 5 minutes uncovered. Remove from heat and put carrots and up to 4 T of remaining liquid in baking sheet. Reserve any extra liquid for another use.

2. Line up your asparagus in a pile, tips all facing the same direction. Hold the tips in one hand, the butt ends of the stalks in other hand. Bend them in half until they snap. Discard butt ends. Toss tips into baking sheet.

3. Using a soft brush or cloth, lightly wipe any dirt or dust from the mushroom. (Do NOT rinse them! They'll sog.) If they're portobellos, use a spoon to scrape off the purplish-black gills under the cap. Discard gills. Slice the mushrooms into steaks. Put in baking sheet.

If you have a gas stove:

4a. Trim both ends off each onion, then place onion in center of stove burner ring and set flame to low. Onion's paper layer will burn off. Gently sear both ends of the onion for 4-5 minutes each, rotating as necessary. Remove from heat and cut off burned bits. Proceed to Step 4c.

If you don't have a gas stove:

4b. Trim both ends off each onion and peel, discarding any filmy or paper layers.

4c. Quarter each onion and then halve each quarter horizontally. Break the layers apart and scatter them on baking sheet.

5. Trim rootball and 1/4" of stalk tips from leeks. Cut each leek in half lengthwise and *swish thoroughly* in water-filled sink or large tub to remove all dirt and sand found outside and between layers. Inspect each stalk closely-- there's always more dirt in there. Remove from water, pat dry, and cut stalks diagonally into 1/2" pieces. Add to baking sheet.

6. Drizzle all veg with kosher salt, pepper, olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Roast veg until some charring occurs, leeks and asparagus are tender. Should be around 15 minutes, but oven temps vary, so keep an eye on yours. If desired, sprinkle cheese and/or bacon on veg for the last few minutes of cooking.

Serve immediately with a squeeze of lemon juice.

Serve with a crisp white wine.

[ 09. May 2006, 16:00: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
New job/workplace dilemna.

We can forget the canteen - overpriced and revolting. Immediate area - a garage shop selling (expensive) sandwiches, doughnuts, crisps etc.

Bringing own is indicated - but office gets strong morning sunshine, so any lunch will spend 3/4 hours at room temperature. Eat at desk, so things should not be too messy/runny/crumby.

I have minimal time in the morning (and I'm not good at planning the night before).

So far, I have managed slices of cheese and cherry tomatoes, plus range of crackers. OK, but a bit too much dairy/wheat - and I can't have that every day.

So any ideas for instant packed lunches?
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
I make lunches everyday- empoverished eternal studenthood dictates that I must...

Many of the things that I have are leftovers ate cold the next day. I am a particular fan of cold cottage pie/lasagne/tomato pasta.

In addition there are the full complement of salads, yes, I know there is prep involved but if you make them at the same time as your evening meal and refrigerate overnight it's less of a chore.

Current favourites include chicken breast chopped, a small orange, some cherry tomatoes, some sultanas and spinach with some vinagrette dressing.

There are also variations which include pasta/rice like about 70g brown rice, sweetcorn, spring onions, tomatoes, small can of tuna.

You can also bulk these up with staples such as lettuce, cucumber, peppers, celery or cheese as required or remove the meat if you are veggie.

Other ideas for salad dressing include tablespoon of lowfat natural yogurt mixed with hot chilli sauce/ dijon mustard and lemon juice/ any of the nice store bought stuff.

In addition to these there are always handmade sandwiches, or wraps made from tortillas are always pretty posh, but cheap to make, and not time consuming.

In the stay away from department there is also cupasoup.

For keeping cold buy one of those small coolbags with the freezer packs and pop a lunchbox in there. There are also lunchboxes that have integrated freezy things but IMO these have never worked for me. Always buy two of whatever cold solution you are adopting, they are generally pretty cheap anyway so that there is always a freezer pack in the freezer.

I also prefer to do it the night before so I can maximise sleep time in the morning, but it is up to you. As an incentive to make it, you could always remind yourself of how grotesque the canteen is.

Hope this essay is of some help.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
for easy instant lunches how about:

Pumpernickel with hummous + any cucumber, tomatoes etc you feel like. Packets of pumpernickel (or other dark, grainy rye bread) keep well in office drawers and make a change from wheat

Tuna and 3 Bean Salad - comes ready prepared in a tin, can't remember the brand - I'm not usually a fan of these ready made tuna filling things as I think they're a bit of a rip off but I'm addicted to this one and tins keep well in office drawers

Tins of soup (assuming you have a microwave available)
 
Posted by GoodCatholicLad (# 9231) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Josephine:
For our Paschal breakfast, everyone brings baskets of goodies that are placed on the church porch and blessed at the end of the service. Then we carry the baskets over to the parish hall, where we share a pot-luck meal at about 3 in the morning. I always bring honey bunnies and cheese-and-sausage balls. (When I was cooking yesterday between services, my kids said the house smelled like Pascha!)

Honey Bunnies

4 1/2 - 5 c. flour
2 pkg. RapidRise yeast
1 tsp salt
2/3 c. evaporated milk
1/2 c. water
1/2 c. honey
1/2 c. butter*
2 eggs (room temperature)
Honey glaze (3/4 c. honey melted with 6 Tbsp butter)

* Butter in Washington is apparently saltier than butter in Tennessee. I had trouble with the dough failing to rise the first few times I made it out in this part of the world. You may want to use unsalted butter.

Combine 1 1/2 c. flour, yeast, and salt. Heat the evaporated milk, honey, and butter until the butter is melted and the mixture is very warm (between 120 and 130 degrees). Gradually add the warm liquid to the flour mixture. Beat 2 minutes at medium speed. Add the eggs and 1/2 c. flour. Beat another 2 minutes at high speed. With a spoon, stir in the rest of the flour. Put the dough in a greased bowl, oil the top of the dough. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate from 2 to 24 hours.

Divide the dough into 32 pieces. On a lightly floured surface, roll each piece into a 10-inch rope. From each rope, cut 3 pieces, 1/2" each, for the ears and tail. Coil the top of each rope down and to the left; the bottom up and to the right, to make the head and body. Shape the small pieces for the ears and tail, moisten one end slightly, and attach them to the head and body.

Place the bunnies on greased baking sheets. Cover. Let rise in a warm draft-free place until doubled in bulk. Bake at 375 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes. Remove to wire racks. Brush with honey glaze while still warm.

Cheese and Sausage Balls

1 pound extra-sharp cheddar cheese, finely grated
1 pound hot pork sausage
1 pound Bisquick baking mix

Mix the three ingredients with your hands until evenly distributed. Shape into small balls (about 1" in diameter, or just a bit larger). Place on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake at 350 degrees until lightly browned.

These can be shaped ahead of time and frozen, then popped into the oven shortly before time to serve them.

They're best still warm from the oven, but they're very sturdy and reheat well.

I am not following you with the sausage recipe, don't you have to add milk? or water? how much liquid? when do you add the cheese? how many cups of bisquick? Is the sausage bulk? How long in the oven? How many balls does this make?
 
Posted by Suzywoozy (# 6259) on :
 
Hubby came home with a few pots of herbs from the garden centre.

Lemon thyme - I love this one and reularly use it with chicken (we already had a pot of this but it slipped his mind).

But the others:
Curry leaf - no idea what to do with it.

Pineapple Sage [Confused] what on earth do you do with pineapple sage - mind you it smells great.

So does anyone know what to do with these especially the pineapple sage?

Thanks
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
What about chopping the pineapple sage onto vanilla ice cream? Or mixing some leaves of it into a salad?

I've just bought a tagine tagine, on a whim, from a food and drink festival.

But, erm, what do I do with it? I know it's traditionally used to cook Moroccan dishes - lamb and chicken (and I don't like lamb [Razz] ) but has anyone got one and could recommend anything to cook in it.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Suzywoozy:
...
Curry leaf - no idea what to do with it.

...er, put it in curries.

(Sorry!)
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Sorry to double post but I thought I'd give a more helpful answer. I looked up curry leaf on one of my favourite Indian food blogs and she came up with the recipe below which sounds yummy.

Another Asian food blogger I read had this post just about curry leaves and a search will reveal a whole heap of recipes.

Kathirikkai sadham (curried brinjal/aubergine/eggplant rice)

Ingredients:

4 cups rice, cooked
2 cups sliced Japanese aubergines (cut them in half lengthwise, then slice into 1/2-cm thick half-moons)
2 tsp ginger-garlic paste
2 fresh green chillies, cut into very thin rounds (optional)
1 tsp salt
4 tsp oil
2 medium onions, sliced thin
1 tsp coriander powder
1 tsp whole cumin seeds
1 tsp mustard seeds
5-6 fresh curry leaves
1/2 tsp garam masala (optional)
2 tsp fresh coriander leaves, for garnish

Method:

1. Sprinkle salt over the aubergines, then mix with the ginger-garlic paste. Place in a colander, and put something heavy on top (a large bowl of water is what I used), so that the bitter juices drain away.

2. In a pan, heat 2 tsp oil and pop the mustard seeds and green chillies if using. Add in the sliced aubergines and stir well.

3. Cook on medium high, stirring occasionally, until the aubergine is cooked and acquiring brownish spots. Ser aside.

4. In a large pan, heat the remaining oil. Add the curry leaves, cumin seeds, coriander powder and garam masala and fry for 30 seconds until the cumin seeds turn a darker shade of brown.

5. Add the sliced onions, mix well and cook on medium high, until they start to turn golden brown. (Add an extra tsp of oil if you wish.)

6. Put in the rice and stir well, keeping it on the heat until it is warmed through. Mix in the cooked aubergines and check for salt.

7. Serve hot with a side of chilled tomato or cucumber raita, pickle and papads.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Curry leaves are a staple ingredient in South Indian food. They are put into the hot oil after the mustard seed but before most other ingredients. They sizzle and add a lovely flavour to the dishes. If they are young they can be left in and eaten with the food but if they are old and large you may wish to take them out - or leave them in and let people eat or not eat them as they choose.

If using dried curry leaves you need to use at least twice as many to get the same flavour.

Having fresh ones available is really useful, we have three or four bushes in the garden so we use them VERY fresh, minutes from garden to pan.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Just tried out a new recipe that was absolutely lovely ... good for vegetarians, as well. Not good for people who don't like eggs, so if you don't like eggs, avert your eyes now! Just going to give a rough recipe as I don't think amounts matter too terribly.

Goat Cheese and Roasted Garlic Tart

1 savory pie shell (surely you've already got a recipe for this or can find one readily [Biased] )
10 cloves garlic (or more!)
250g goat cheese
275g whipping cream
3 eggs
thyme (I used dried, but I'm sure fresh would be lovely)
salt and pepper
2 sliced tomatoes (optional extra that I added)

Blind bake the pie shell. Boil the garlic in skins for 10 minutes and then roast with a bit of olive oil at 180C for about 20 minutes. Mash into a paste and spread over the bottom of the pie shell. Spread the goat cheese evenly over the garlic paste. Beat together the milk, cream, eggs, thyme, and salt and pepper, and pour into the shell. You can add the sliced tomatoes if you desire (if you don't, then serve them with greens to accompany the dish). Bake at 180C for 30 minutes or until the mixture has set. Let sit for a couple of minutes (but don't cool completely) for ease of cutting. Enjoy!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I discovered the following more by accident than design the other night:

Roast Chicken with Fennel and Lemon

Quarter one or more fennel bulbs and put in a roasting tin, dotted with butter. Add chicken. Put lemon quarters in cavity (if a whole bird) or if using pieces, tuck in among chicken and fennel. Roast. Pour off the juices into a saucepan and add creme fraiche.

It is all wonderfully melty and buttery with just enough tang from the fennel and lemon to stop it cloying.
 
Posted by tryingtobefriendly (# 11465) on :
 
I need some help please. My mum and dad are coming to visit tomorrow from Bournemouth and they don't like processed/pre-prepared food so I've been to Asda and bought pork chops, new potatoes and frozen vegetables. I can cook the frozen vegetables and I think I'll manage the new potatoes ok (how much mint should I put in?) but I don't know how to cook the chops. I've looked up recipes on Google but they're all very complicated. Can anyone tell me, in simple English, how I cook them please? I can't multi-task so getting everything ready at the same time will also be a problem. I need timings otherwise it'll all go wrong. I've started writing a list of which things I'll cook first but I don't know about the pork chops. I never cook like this normally because I get so confused about it but I don't want to poison my parents! I've got new potatoes, vegetables and pork chops. How long in advance should I start to make sure they're all ready at the same time? How do I know if the chops are cooked or not? I know I should know this sort of thing but I don't so could anyone help me please? I'd be very grateful.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Don't worry. It will be fine. I have been cooking all my life and still often find that things are finished at different times. So first things first: Are your new potatoes clean? If so, you can just rinse them. If not, you will need to scrub them. Then put them in a saucepan and just cover them with cold water. They will take somewhere between 10 and 20 minutes to cook after the water starts boiling, depending on their size. When they're done, a fork will go into them easily, but they won't fall apart. Then you can drain them, and they will stay hot in the saucepan for another fifteen minutes or so. They're good with melted butter and mint.

Pork chops can be sauteed (cooked in just a little fat in a frying pan), baked, or grilled. You are likely to find grilling them simplest. Put a piece of foil under the rack to catch drips (it makes cleaning easier), and then put the chops on the rack atop the grill pan. Sprinkle the chops with whatever seasoning you're using: pepper, paprika, mixed herbs, are all good, and then, ten minutes after the potatoes have started boiling, turn on the flame over the grill and put the grill pan (with chops) in. Pork really needs to be quite well done: trichinosis is rare nowadays, but people still find underdone pork revolting. I can't tell you exactly how long your chops will take because that depends on their thickness, but if they're about the thickness of the first joint of your thumb, grill them for about 7 minutes on each side. When you turn them, season the side that was underneath. If you're not sure whether they're done (they will be reasonably firm to the touch), make a discreet little cut into one side with a sharp knife. There should be no pinkness. Frozen veg takes about five minutes to do. Start it cooking after you've turned over your chops. At the same time, put your plates on the back of the cooker to warm a bit. You should, in this way, have the dinner done and hot all at the same time.
And if, for any reason, this doesn't work perfectly, don't worry. Your parents will still be pleased. All parents are when their child serves them a meal.

You could always go out and get a jar of applesauce to go with the chops. And ice-cream or something like that would make an easy pudding.

[ 03. June 2006, 12:10: Message edited by: Amos ]
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
A couple of sprigs of fresh mint, chopped, should be enough for three people's new potatoes. If the mint is dried, allow about a dessert-spoonful.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
It sounds as if the best recipe is one where the timing doesn't matter too much.

This one is very easy. You need, in addition to what you have, a tin of mushroom soup. You also need a frying pan, and an oven casserole with a lid.

Heat the oven to a moderate heat - about 5 if you have gas, or about 180 if you use electric.

In a frying pan, put a little oil and fry each chop for just a minute on each side, and then place it in the casserole. When they are all in the casserole, pour over the tin of soup. Put the lid on the casserole and put it in the heated oven for at least 45 minutes. But it doesn't matter if it is in for longer. 50 minutes, an hour - still ok.

If you don't like mushrooms, you can do exactly the same recipe, using apple juice instead. Or cider. Or white wine.

New potatoes should take about 15 minutes. After about 10 minutes, poke a knife into one or two of the biggest ones - when it goes in easily, then they're cooked.
 
Posted by tryingtobefriendly (# 11465) on :
 
Thank you so much Amos. I'm very grateful. That was a great explanation. I've bought fresh mint. But now I can write down all the timings you said and things should be ready somewhere near together. I thought maybe pork was a bit like steak that it was ok if it was undercooked but from your comments I don't think that's right so I'll give it 7 minutes at least on each side. My mum will know how to cook it but I really wanted to prepare something for them without her having to help. I'll tell her that you told me how to do it, she knows I wouldn't know. In my life I just stay with things you can put in the microwave! But I want to cook this meal for them. I'll let you know how it goes. Thank you again.
 
Posted by tryingtobefriendly (# 11465) on :
 
Thank you too Firenze. I think I'll just grill them because I don't have any mushroom soup or cider but I'll write your recipe down because it sounds nice.
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by tryingtobefriendly:
Thank you too Firenze. I think I'll just grill them because I don't have any mushroom soup or cider but I'll write your recipe down because it sounds nice.

I'm a great fan of recipes like Firenze's, where timing isn't crucial. Apart from anything else, "chuck it in the oven and leave it" cookery generally leads to less washing up! [Biased]
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
I made this last night, it's my "I have a cold starting, but I really don't have time to be ill" recipe. I think I took it from BBC Good Food magazine originally, but have adapted it slightly (fresh chilli instead of flakes, added garlic and onion).

Sausage Pea Pasta Thing

Serves 1

3oz dried pasta, such as penne
2 good quality pork sausages
1 onion, sliced into half moons
1 red chilli, de-seeded and finely diced
1 clove garlic, crushed
1tbsp olive oil
2oz frozen peas
Grated zest of 1 lemon
1tbsp wholegrain mustard
½ 200ml tub half-fat crème fraîche
Handful of fresh basil leaves, torn

Cook pasta according to packet instructions. Three minutes before pasta is ready, tip in the peas and cook with the pasta.

Fry the onion, garlic and chilli in the olive oil until softened.

Using a sharp knife, split open the sausages and squeeze out the meat. Add to the onion, garlic & chilli and fry until everything is golden.

Add the chilli and lemon zest to the sausages and cook for one minute. Stir in the mustard and crème fraîche and simmer for 1-2 minutes. Drain the pasta and peas and stir into the sausagemeat mixture. Season well, stir in the basil and serve.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
You're very welcome, tryingtobefriendly! I really hope all goes well and that you have a lovely meal with your parents. I remember the first dinner I cooked for my parents, and the first one the Amosling made for me. On both occasions I was so pleased and proud.

One of my aspirations is to co-author a book about food and drink with Firenze. [Biased]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amos:
One of my aspirations is to co-author a book about food and drink with Firenze. [Biased]

Ready when you are.

Didn't there used to be a Ship Recipe book online?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
There is but there has not been any recent additions. If you want to reactivate it I suggest you contact Babybear.

Jengie
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
I just bottled up some elderflower cordial. Yum.

I couldn't find the recipe I used last time I made it so I had a bit of a search on the internet. There was a huge variation of recipes ranging from 1 pint water to 4lbs sugar to 6 pints water with 2lbs sugar.

In the end I gave in and cobbled together the following. I don't think it's quite as good as I've made before so you may want to scout around and find your own recipe but I thought I'd share.

ELDERFLOWER CORDIAL

First pick your elderflowers

*30-40 florets should do it. UK shipmates have probably got another week or so to do this. If you don't have elderflowers in your country then I'm guessing this isn't going to be a very useful recipe.

*Shake out any bugs and put in large jug

*Melt sugar in water (I used 3pts water to 2lbs sugar)

*Pour over elderflowers.

*Add a chopped up lemon (this really does make a difference - I made 2 batches, 1 with and 1 without, with was definitely better)

*Add 100g citric acid (you may have to ask for this at the chemists)

&Steep for a couple of days stirring occasionally. Strain and bottle.

(Bottles can be sterilized in a low oven. I just poured boiling water in mine)

Given the slightly random quantity of citric acid I used and the fact I'm not entirely confident of how well the boiling water trick will have sterilized the bottles if I give any away I'll recommend it gets used quite quickly. But I have kept it for over a year in the past.
 
Posted by tryingtobefriendly (# 11465) on :
 
Thank you Amos for all that help, the meal went very well and no-one died as a result! This makes me think that it must be possible for me to cook more regularly.

Before I moved here I had alot of support, including meals on wheels because I have so much difficulty with cooking and preparing food. But, here where I live now, I don't get any support, it's up to me to sort it out. This means that I eat alot of Tesco sandwiches (which are very good!) and baked potatoes etc. I'm not talking about fancy meals but about basic cooking, preparing food, freezing food etc.

Sometimes I buy fresh vegetables which look really nice but then I don't really have much idea how to prepare them and all the cook books you can buy assume you already know this and so I end up throwing them away. It's the same with meat, most of the cook books assume you know the basics and they don't explain them. Just very simple things like do you have to peel things or not, that sort of thing.

I'd like to eat proper meals but I don't because I honestly don't know where to start.

I like most things but I've never mastered how to cook them or how to prepare them. It's very hard to find that information anywhere because other people seem to just know it somehow.

This isn't really about recipes per se, it's more about how do you prepare different foods? I'm not sure if this is specific enough for this thread but any general advice about the preparation of normal food would be great. [Smile]
 
Posted by madteawoman (# 11174) on :
 
Tryingtobefriendly, here in Australia we have a cook called Stephanie Alexander. She has written a great cookbook for people who have not done much cooking before. It lists many common (and not so common) foods in alphabetical order, then tells you how to choose them, how to prepare them, how to basically cook them, then she gives you a few recipes for that particular food. I love it because it tells me how to cook things I haven't cooked before, in a simple way. A book like that might be really helpful for you. This one is called The Cook's Companion, but there must be others like it around. My mum had an English one called the Good Housekeeping Cookery Book, but it would be 50 years old now.

I will be giving each of my daughters one of these books as a leaving present (if they ever do).
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
Delia Smith's 'How To Cook' series is a good basic course too.

If you don't want to bother peeling and chopping vegetables, you can buy trays of baby vegetables in supermarkets. (That means small vegetables, not vegetables for babies!)

Usually you get carrots, corn and mange tout (flat pea pods) in a plastic tray. You can just put those into some boiling water for about 5-10 minutes, depending on how crunchy you like them. I sometimes buy French beans as well - they are the tube-shaped ones, which you cook in the same way. You could also put some of these with your microwaved meal if you want.

I'm glad to hear the meal went well. It sounds lovely, and I'm sure your parents were thrilled.
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
Trying to be friendly,

If you buy your meat or veg from a butcher/greengrocer/fishmonger, ask them to advise you as to how to cook them. Any butcher worth their salt will be able to tell you how to cook a roast, at what temperature the oven needs to be, whether it has to be covered or not or any other question that you might think of. Ditto for anything from sausages to steaks. Striking up a relationship with your local shop can be very rewarding as well as benefitting your local community. In addition, they will get to know you and the things that you like.

The same goes for your greengrocer, ask them how they would recommend cooking any vegetable that you require. Take a notebook, write down their suggestions, and you have the beginnings of your own reference guide to cooking. Start with the more basic vegetables, and maybe once a month choose a different one.

Good luck, and with time you'll be creating a great adventure with food.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
When I started at uni I had a book called "How to Boil an Egg" - it really did start that simple - which tells people leaving home for the first time how to do all the things they've never had to worry about before!

Here it is on Amazon .

Recipe books aimed at students usually start from a similar level of assuming that you don't know how to cook anything, and don't have any saucepans etc either! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by tryingtobefriendly (# 11465) on :
 
Thank you, I've just ordered that book on Amazon Karen, thank you for the tip. Catrine, I think you're probably right I should ask but it's a bit embarrassing when you have to ask questions which everyone else knows. I had some very useful pms in reply to this post and so thanks.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I hope it helps! I do still use it to look up how long to boil an egg for. I can remember all sorts of stuff, but not that for some reason! [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Teen Jesus (# 8477) on :
 
I have some "Christian Themed" recipes that are not only delicious, but historically/biblically instructional as well. They might spark some creativity you're looking for.

Two Layer Peter Crucified Upside-Down Cake
"When you are old you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and take you where you do not want to go," said Jesus to Simon Peter in John 21:18. Tradition holds that Peter asked the Romans to crucify him upside so his death wouldn’t be equated with Jesus’. However, his executioners took it one step to far and made his cross spin, while attempting to throw knives at him.

Servings:
12 (change)

INGREDIENTS:

* 1 (10 ounce) jar maraschino cherries, drained
* 1/4 cup butter
* 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
* 1/2 cup flaked coconut (Peter’s crazy request to be crucified upside down was greeted with bewildered looks from his executioners)
* 1 (8 ounce) can sliced pineapple, drained with juice reserved
* 1 (8 ounce) can crushed pineapple, drained with juice reserved
* 1 (18.25 ounce) package yellow cake mix (to signify Peter’s three cowardly replies when asked if he knew Jesus in the early morning hours of his teacher’s crucifixion. The Lion from the Wizard of Oz would have been prowd.)

DIRECTIONS:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Butter two 9 inch round cake pans. Sprinkle the bottom of each pan with 1/4 cup of brown sugar.

2. In one of the pans, sprinkle coconut over the brown sugar. Put the pineapple rings in a single layer on top of coconut. Then gently—gently— place a cherry in the center of each ring. In the other pan, spread the drained crushed pineapple.

3. Mix the cake as directed on package, but substitute reserved pineapple juice in place of water. Divide batter between the 2 pans. Remember which pan has the pineapple rings in it, because if you don’t, certain death will likely follow.

4. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes in the preheated oven, or until a toothpick inserted into cake comes out clean. For added affect, pretend the toothpicks are the nails used to fasten Peter to the cross. Cool in pans for 20 minutes, until rigor mortis sets in.

5. While the bottoms of the cake pans are still warm to the touch, invert the layer with the crushed pineapple out onto a serving dish, then gently invert the layer with the pineapple rings on top of it for a dazzling divine, two layer Peter Crucified upside down cake.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by tryingtobefriendly:
Thank you Amos for all that help, the meal went very well and no-one died as a result! This makes me think that it must be possible for me to cook more regularly.

Before I moved here I had alot of support, including meals on wheels because I have so much difficulty with cooking and preparing food. But, here where I live now, I don't get any support, it's up to me to sort it out. This means that I eat alot of Tesco sandwiches (which are very good!) and baked potatoes etc. I'm not talking about fancy meals but about basic cooking, preparing food, freezing food etc.

Dear tryingtobefriendly, I've been wondering whether the dinner you cooked for your parents had turned out well, and praying and hoping that it did. It's wonderful that you now want to try your hand at more cooking.

Choosing, preparing, and cooking food are learned human activities. If you don't know them, you can learn them. There are lots of people who don't know how to cook, and lots of books are written for them. There are also videos, I believe, of famous cooks preparing things, but they usually work so fast and talk so much that they're not really useful except as entertainment. Plus, they always seem to have 'one they prepared earlier' to show you at the end, which always seems like cheating to me. I want to see how the one they threw together on the TV set turned out. Not well, I imagine.

Anyway, a number of good books have been mentioned here. They all have different virtues: some are good at describing foods (vegetables, for instance) and how to choose them. Others give good, clear descriptions of how to prepare different things: some will even have step-by-step diagrams. There used to be a category of good, basic household cookbooks that told you everything that you could possibly need to know. They still exist, and often the best ones are to be found in second-hand bookshops.

Good luck with your cooking! I hope you will come to enjoy it. We're always glad here to advise or help if we can.

P.S. Delia Smith is good.
 
Posted by Ginga (# 1899) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amos:
[ There used to be a category of good, basic household cookbooks that told you everything that you could possibly need to know.

My mum has bought me two cookbooks in the past year. One is a moderately complicated (but amazing) Madhur Jaffrey one. Very up-to-the minute.

The other is Jane Grigson's Vegetables, which is decades old and absolutely brilliant. The recipes aren't necessarily amazing, as they were written in the days when meat and fat were the base of any dish (I'm vegetarian), but she goes into such depth about every vegetable under the sun: the history, the preparation, how to choose them, and multiple ways to cook them.

Tryingtobefriendly, all the other books mentioned here are great (and I'm forever teaching extremely good cooks how to boil eggs. I don't know why, but no-one I know seems to be able to remember it), so there's not really any need for another recommendation, but I thought I'd mention it in case you're like me when it comes to information: the more I know about something the easier I find it to remember the basics. If not, no matter.
 
Posted by Ethne Alba (# 5804) on :
 
Happy to report that Sausage Pasta Pea Thing works very well!
Sometimes-picky-teenage-child demolished a bowl full and asked for seconds.

This does seem to be the time for elderflower recipes here in the UK .....but then what about the elderberries if I pick the flowers?

Anyone come across deep fried elderflowers?
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Matthew Fort mentioned elderflower fritters in his Grauniad column on Saturday - I can see if I can find it for you, if you like!
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
I imagine they'd be like zucchini blossom fritters to make.

Zucchini blossom fritters are heavenly.
 
Posted by Mary Beth (# 92) on :
 
Help!

I've been given two dozen shelled hard boiled eggs. I'd love to make deviled eggs, but my recipe is so-o-o boring. Just mix the yolk with French's mustard and mayonnaise.

Does anyone have any suggestions or favorite recipe for deviled eggs that I can wow the folks at church with this Sunday?

Thanks.

Mary Beth
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Mary Beth, I add some liquid from a jar of dill pickles to my devilled eggs. They are always well-received.

Here is the recipe.

DEVILLED EGGS

8 hard-boiled eggs
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon dill-pickle liquid
1 teaspoon mustard
Dash of salt
Dash of pepper

Cut eggs in half and remove yolks. Mash yolks and mix in all other ingredients. Stuff whites.

Moo
 
Posted by Mary Beth (# 92) on :
 
Sounds yummy. Mine always needed a little tang. Thanks Moo.

Mary Beth
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
Another way to add a bit of tang to devilled eggs is to make them exactly the way you ordinarily do, but use plain yogurt instead of mayo. It's a subtle change, but good.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
I can't conceive of devilled eggs without cayenne pepper! [Devil]
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ethne Alba:
Happy to report that Sausage Pasta Pea Thing works very well!
Sometimes-picky-teenage-child demolished a bowl full and asked for seconds.

Oh good, I am pleased, especially as I've just spotted a typo in the recipe:

quote:
Add the chilli and lemon zest to the sausages and cook for one minute.
should read

quote:
Add the lemon zest to the sausages and cook for one minute.
I think it's a left-over from the original recipe, which used chilli flakes instead of fresh chilli.

Deborah
 
Posted by Sine Nomine (# 66) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Josephine:
Another way to add a bit of tang to devilled eggs is to...

...garnish them with a bit of inexpensive grocery store caviar.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I had some amazing devilled eggs at a party once and it was only later that my then partner and I discovered the secret ingredient - the people who made them had been smoking a "herb" they'd bought and decided to crumble some into the filling.

[Yipee]

We slept very late the next day and woke up with the munchies.

[Biased]

It was a VERY GOOD party!
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
There you go, Mary Beth!
 
Posted by Mary Beth (# 92) on :
 
Well, I'm about to head off to the supermarket. Wegman's has about everything. I doubt they have that special herb, however. I do know where in town I might acquire some. (By rumor, not experience. [Hot and Hormonal] ) I guess I'll substitute a sprig of parsley instead, even though it might not make for such mellow fellowship.

Being a researcher by nature and profession, I think I'll try a few eggs with each different recipe and observe the reaction of the lab rats, er, I mean my fellow parisheners. Don't worry. They've learned to procede with caution before sampling my previous offerings. They actually enjoyed my chocolate cupcakes before I revealed that they contained sauerkruat. Makes for a very moist cake. [Two face]

Thanks for all of your suggestions. Er, well, the "herb" one was food for thought, and a smile.

Mary Beth
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
From Mary-Beth
quote:
They actually enjoyed my chocolate cupcakes before I revealed that they contained sauerkruat. Makes for a very moist cake.

I have a recipe for a cake made with mayonnaise - when you tell people the reaction is usually "Uurgh!" - but it's only oil & eggs, after all,so I don't know what the problem is.

But sauerkraut...? Uuurgh!
 
Posted by Mary Beth (# 92) on :
 
Hi Dormouse,

The secret is to rinse the sauerkraut well and chop it. Tastes like a rich, moist chocolate coconut cake. If you chop it very finely, it dissolves into the cake and you don't know it's there.

We have a sauerkraut festival in my town each fall and the sauerkraut cake sampling is a big attraction.

That's the most excitement we have all year here in the boonies. [Smile]

Mary Beth
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
I have a recipe for a cake made with mayonnaise - when you tell people the reaction is usually "Uurgh!" - but it's only oil & eggs, after all,so I don't know what the problem is.

I have a muffin recipe that has grated courgettes/zucchini in.

I tend to peel the courgettes, so I don't have to explain what the weird green flecks are in the cakes.

Deborah
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Zucchini Bread (or courgette muffins) is (or are) delicious. The principle is the same as with carrot cake. Personally, I like the little green flecks: if you've got sultanas and chopped nuts and spice in the recipe, green flecks seem perfectly natural. There are also cake recipes whose secret ingredient is a small tin of tomato paste.

[ 18. June 2006, 20:06: Message edited by: Amos ]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Elderflower fritters
For the batter:
1 egg
225ml iced water
140g plain flour
pinch of salt
For the fritters:
16 heads of elderflowers
veg. oil
caster sugar

Beat the egg, then add the water. Slowly sift the flour and salt into egg mix, whisking to make sure there are no lumps.

Fill a wide deep-ish pan with veg oil to come 2-3cm up the sides, almost to smoking point. Dip the elderflower heads into the batter and fry, a few at a time, until golden brown. Drain on kitchen towel, sprinkle with sugar and serve hot.

There was also a recipe for elderflower champagne which sounds interesting.

36 elderflower heads
1 lemon
680g caster sugar
2 tbsp white-wine vinegar
4.5 litres water

Make sure there are as few insects as possible on your flowers ( [Eek!] I don't know why it doesn't say this on the other recipe - maybe because they'll get fried!). Put them in a clean bucket along with the juice and zest of the lemon, sugar and vinegar. Add the cold water and leave for at least 24 hours. You may have to stir from time to time to dissolve the sugar. Strain into sterilised bottles. Put on the lids and leave for 2 weeks. Check fizziness from time to time and let off any excess - to avoid explosions!

NOTE - I haven't tried either of these so blame Matthew Fort and the Grauniad if they go wrong!!
 
Posted by Suzywoozy (# 6259) on :
 
I've just made my first batch of elderflower wine, slightly different recipe from above but pretty similar.

It's hubby's gran's recipe and her advise it to use plastic "pop" bottles as these have some expansion room without exploding. She says to keep for 3 months, but after 3 weeks it's OK as a cordial.

[ 22. June 2006, 13:34: Message edited by: Suzywoozy ]
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
I just bottled up some elderflower cordial.

<snip>

Given the slightly random quantity of citric acid I used and the fact I'm not entirely confident of how well the boiling water trick will have sterilized the bottles if I give any away I'll recommend it gets used quite quickly. But I have kept it for over a year in the past.

Well I was right to be concerned. Have just discovered a thin layer of mould on the top of the bottles. Definitely not enough sugar / citric acid. Sigh. Have scooped it off and put bottles in the fridge where they should be OK for a bit longer.

At least it's an incentive to find the recipe I used before!
 
Posted by Mary Beth (# 92) on :
 
Hi,

Reporting in on my little research project at church last Sunday with the varieties of deviled eggs. I labeled each kind, so that people would know what they were eating.

Most surprising to me was how many people liked the cayenne eggs. I guess we are a spicier lot at church than I realised.

The yogurt and standard eggs did OK, but the out and out favorite was the eggs with pickle relish. (I didn't have any dill juice, so I improvised.)

We even had a gentleman, originally from Ireland, who loved the caviar topped eggs. The ones he didn't eat there, he took home.

Thanks for all your suggestions. It was great fun and there were no eggs left for me to take home.

Mary Beth
 
Posted by Flounder (# 3859) on :
 
This is Nana's Double-Secret gingerbread cookie recipe. It's not for the faint of heart!: [Devil]

2 1/4 c. flour
2 tsp baking soda
2 tsp. ground cloves
2 tsp. ginger
2 tsp cinnamon
1-2 tsp nutmeg (Too much nutmeg can make things bitter)
(Sometimes I add some allspice as well)
3/4 c. shortening, although I substitute butter and margarine. Tastes better.
1 c. sugar
1 egg
1/4 c. molasses

Sift together dry ingredients
Cream sugar and butter; mix in egg and molasses.
Slowly mix flower mixture to the wet ingredients until just combined. The dough will seem wet for this type of cookie, but that is fine. Do NOT overwork the dough or it will become tough.

Chill completely, preferably overnight. This dough is easier to work with when frozen.

My mother's family usually does not complete recipe directions. I've had the best luck with flouring the greased cookie sheets. Roll and cut cookies out and bake in a 325-350F degree oven between 6-8 minutes, + or -. You'll need to experiment... [Razz]

Frost with homemade buttercream frosting (Confectioner's sugar, butter, vanilla, a tiny pinch of salt, and some cream or milk. Do not use the ready-made crap that comes in a can).

BTW, this recipe doubles very well (cut the salt a bit). The dough keeps nicely in freezer so that you can make as many cookies as you need.

Enjoy!

[ 23. June 2006, 19:06: Message edited by: Flounder ]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Flounder that sounds yummy, but can someone remind me of the Brit equivalents of shortening and molasses?
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
Shortening is Trex in the UK. It's hydrogenated vegetable oil. You can substitute butter: it's healthier.

Molasses is black treacle. Yum.
 
Posted by Flounder (# 3859) on :
 
Butter is much better than shortening (hydrogenated vegetable oil), which is what was in the original recipe. The only reason why I use some margarine in the recipe is because butter alone creates a very spread out cookie.

Molasses is yummy by the spoonful, though not as tasty as Northern Comfort. [Big Grin]

quote:
Originally posted by Amos:
Shortening is Trex in the UK. It's hydrogenated vegetable oil. You can substitute butter: it's healthier.

Molasses is black treacle. Yum.


 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
I've got to try the ginger cookies. That sounds just wonderful! And I love the idea of keeping cookie dough in the freezer, to make a few at a time.

Does anyone else have any cookie recipes you can do that with?
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Josephine said:
quote:
I've got to try the ginger cookies. That sounds just wonderful! And I love the idea of keeping cookie dough in the freezer, to make a few at a time.
I believe there are some raisin oatmeal cookies somewhere on this thread that you can do that with. I made them for my Bible Study Group - with the addition of coconut - They were well accepted!
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Josephine, I have found that most of the cookies I've made can be frozen in a pre-baked state. I learned this from working at a place that sold fresh-baked cookies. The cookies weren't actually made on site, but they were shipped frozen and then we baked them. We did this with peanut butter, chocolate chip, oatmeal raisin (my recipe is somewhere on this thread), macadamia and white chocolate, and a couple of other types. The trick is to freeze the cookies in the shape that you want to bake them. I usually freeze them on the baking sheet, then once frozen, remove them from the sheet, and store them in a plastic container of some sort in the freezer. Then you bake the cookies from frozen ... may need a minute or two longer than normal for baking, but nobody but you knows they weren't made fresh that day!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Mary Beth, would you please give us your recipe for sauerkraut cake.

Moo
 
Posted by Flounder (# 3859) on :
 
Just a quick edit re Nana's Double-Secret gingerbread cookies. The original 2 tsp of baking soda:

quote:
2 1/4 c. flour
2 tsp baking soda...

Seems a bit high. I usually cut the amount a little, otherwise the cookies seem a bit bitter. I never seem to do the recipe exactly the same way each time. These unfinished/illegible heirloom recipes! So, remember to taste things as you go along, and good luck...! [Two face]

[ 24. June 2006, 12:43: Message edited by: Flounder ]
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Can anyone advise on flapjack proportions? The Smith woman's recipe has 4oz Sugar to 6oz butter to 6oz oats and a dessertspoon of golden syrup. I made up a double batch, but found the recipe was far too buttery and not sufficiently oaty. I like a flapjack to be quite solid and filling. I was thinking of trying next time with 6oz sugar, 9oz butter and 12oz oats.

But can anyone recommend better? Also, can dried fruit or chocolate chips be added without needing to alter the proportions of other ingredients?
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
My "classic flapjack" recipe has 6oz butter, 5oz golden syrup, 2oz sugar and 9 oz oats whereas the choc & nut one has 8oz oats, 5oz butter, 2oz sugar and 5 tbsp golden syrup. I don't know if that helps at all, or if anyone would like the whole recipes...
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
I'd love the recipes if you have time...
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
As they're from a BBC book I hoped the recipes would be on their website, but no such luck [Frown]

Oh well!
Choc & nut flapjack
8oz oats
1 oz dess. coconut
5oz butter cut into pieces
2oz light muscavado sugar
5tbsp golden syrup
4oz brazil/cashew nuts in large chunks
2oz almonds in large chunks
3oz good dark choc. in large pieces

Makes 12

1.Preheat oven to 180C/Gas 4. Butter a 23cm/9in square tin and line the base. Mix the oats and coconut
2.Put butter, sugar and syrup in a pan, cook over low heat and stir occasionally until butter melted and sugar dissolved. Remove from heat and stir in oats and coconut. Spoon into tin and press down evenly. Scatter the nuts over the top and press lightly into mixture. Stick chunks of choc. between the nuts. Bake 25-30 mins or until pale golden.
3.Mark into bars with back of knife while still warm. Allow to cool completely before cutting and remove from tin.

Classic Flapjacks
6oz butter cut up
5oz golden syrup
2oz light muscovado sugar
9oz oats

Makes 12

1.Preheat oven to 180C/Gas 4. Butter a 23cm/9in square tin and line the base. (Or a 20cm/8in tin for thicker and chewier flapjacks). Put butter, sugar and syrup in a pan, cook over low heat and stir occasionally until butter melted and sugar dissolved. Remove from heat and stir in oats.
2.Press into tin, bake 20-25 mins until golden brown on top. Mark into bars with back of knife while still warm. Allow to cool completely before cutting and remove from tin.
 
Posted by Posy (# 10858) on :
 
Thanks!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
De rien!

Well, I made some ginger biscuits (although not to Flounder's recipe because I didn't have any treacle) and have tried freezing half of them... So we'll see what happens!
 
Posted by Mary Beth (# 92) on :
 
Hi Moo,

I'm at work now and don't have the "official, from scratch" recipe with me, but this works well:

One box of favorite brand chocolate cake mix.
One small can of favorite sauerkraut.

1. Make up cake mix as per box instructions.
2. Rinse* about one cup (handful) sauerkraut, chop to shredded coconut length or smaller, and stir into batter.

* Rinse thoroughly to remove all hint of sauerkraut or, if you are adventurous and like a little tang, rinse only once.

Through previous testing, people varied in which way they prefered it. YMMV. Everyone enjoyed the cake, though.

Please let me know how it was or was not accepted in your neck of the woods. [Smile]

Mary Beth
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I am feeling sticky and pleased with myself having made:
2 jars of Spicy Apricot & Plum chutney
3 jars of cherry & plum jam
6 jars of golden plum & apricot jam
4 jars of sweet piccalilli.

I have the jam-&-chutney making bug. Can anyone suggest any other pickle/chutney recipes. Delia has several plummy ones, but I wondered if anyone had anything different.

And favourite jams...? I may have missed the strawberry season here, but I shall see what's around tomorrow at the Fruit shop.
Would either banana or melon work? If so, how...?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My ma in law makes the best pickle ever in the whole history of the universe! It is really simple, too.

Carrot and Garlic Pickle:

1. Clean a carrot and peel an equal quantity of cloves of garlic.

2. Chop carrot to small dice - if you want you can chop the garlic as well, depends how big the cloves are.

3. Fry the carrot gently for a minute or two, stirring then add garlic and cook another minute or two, still stirring, until it goes light golden in colour. Coconut oil is the best medium but any oil will do except not something strong like olive oil.

4. Remove and drain roughly and put carrot and garlic in a bowl. Add a little salt, a little turmeric and chilli powder to taste. Add back a little of the oil used for cooking and an equal quantity of white vinegar. Stir.

5. Put in jars and leave for at least 24 hours for the flavours to meld.

If refrigerated this will keep a month or so. If not refrigerated probably best to eat it within a couple of weeks.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Welease --

One carrot (no matter how large) plus an equivalent volume? weight? of garlic is not going to fill "jars" unless they're fairly small.

Unless something's missing from the recipe.

(Mind you, it sounds delicious)

John
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
Ages ago (I've only just found this! [Hot and Hormonal] ) someone asked about Japanese Hotpot.... well I grew up there and often serve it when we have dinner guests.

Start with a stock. A proper Japanese one would be fish and kombu seaweed - or use chicken!

To go in, I serve a selection of fish (bream or snapper are good - they need to be meaty and hold together not flake), chicken pieces (buy a whole chicken and de-bone it. You get variety and its cheaper than pieces. And use the bones for the stock!), tofu (essential at the end to soak up the yummy stock) king prawns (thread on wooden skewers and cook with shells, diners shell their own), chinese cabbage, spinich, carrots, and Daikon radish (sometimes known as mooli). Well as much or as little as you fancy really.

For a dipping sauce I mix soy sauce, some of the stock, lemon juice and lime juice. You should use Yuzu juice, but I've never seen yuzu in the UK. When the sauce you are dipping in gets to weak, pour it in to the pot and get some fresh. The stock gradualy gets yummier and yummier, and at the end you add in some udon noodles which soak it all up. (Big fat flour and water noodles). Don't need pudding after all that lot!

But it is really easy to prepare, and lots of fun with friends. One is supposed to serve rice with it, but I normaly don't bother!!
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Welease Woderick - that sounds delicious, but not quite what I'm after...more like a pickle, perhaps - something that you keep in a jar for months and then eat with cold meats or something...

And jams. What is your favourite jam?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
Welease --

One carrot (no matter how large) plus an equivalent volume? weight? of garlic is not going to fill "jars" unless they're fairly small.

Unless something's missing from the recipe.

(Mind you, it sounds delicious)

John

Yikes, I must learn to proof read better!

Yes, we make a fairly small quantity at a time and usually one jar, fairly small, suffices. It is not something one eats by the bucket load unless particularly brave - or foolhardy!
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
Can anyone suggest any other pickle/chutney recipes.

I just this weekend made a chutney from aloo bukhara, a type of dried sour plum available in my local Indian/Pakistani grocery. You soak the plums in water overnight, pit them, then boil them with their soaking water, vinegar and sugar to taste, as well as minced garlic, ginger, and as much cayenne as you like. When the mixture has boiled down somewhat, you add both black and golden raisins and boil it a bit more until it's nice and gooey and sticky. We had it with chicken tonight, and it was phenomenal.
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
Just made strawberry icecream today - got the quantities slightly off I think but still very good. 1 tub of fresh custard from M+S on the way
home mixed with the strawberrys we had left over from jamming (I'm guessing a little over a pound but I'm not sure) blitz and freez. Yumm! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
How about Watermelon Konfyt which has the nice added property that you get to eat the watermelon as well as make the preserve (the preserve is made with the skins). It is delicious.

Jengie
 
Posted by Zorro (# 9156) on :
 
Well, summer's arrived, and with it come Smoothies/milkshakes at Fort Zorro.

I made one for the WC final which had 1 spoon of strawberry jam, 1 spoon of blackcurrant jam, 1/2 spoon of peanut butter and a shot of vanilla. It was really nice, but in small quantities I think, it gets really, really sickly after a while!

BTW, a spoon is a desert spoon, sorry, no accurate measurments available [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zorro:
BTW, a spoon is a desert spoon, sorry, no accurate measurments available [Hot and Hormonal]

Zorro, by tradition many great cooks measure that way. How otherwise do you adjust for the peculiarities that beset cooking like the flour having less moisture in it than the last batch?

Jengie
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
So I bought a bottle of balsamic vinegar at Costco. (It matches the bottle of olive oil. That's my excuse.) There's just one problem. I have *no idea* what one does with balsamic vinegar, other than make salad dressing. Any other creative uses for this condiment?
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I love balsamic vinegar served with steamed asparagus & melted butter. Pity the asparagus season is over...
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
So I bought a bottle of balsamic vinegar at Costco. (It matches the bottle of olive oil. That's my excuse.) There's just one problem. I have *no idea* what one does with balsamic vinegar, other than make salad dressing. Any other creative uses for this condiment?

Baked onions/peppers/mushrooms/sausages with balsamic vinegar is a pretty good combination...
 
Posted by Zorro (# 9156) on :
 
quote:
I love balsamic vinegar served with steamed asparagus & melted butter. Pity the asparagus season is over...

I clicked this "last post" hoping to find other recipes for milshakes.


[Projectile]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I went to the BBC Food website and put "balsamic" into the recipe search. There are 384 hits, which should keep you going for a while!

Here is the search page. Some of the recipes sounded fab. (I was afraid the link to the actual search would break scroll lock.)
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
So I bought a bottle of balsamic vinegar at Costco. (It matches the bottle of olive oil. That's my excuse.) There's just one problem. I have *no idea* what one does with balsamic vinegar, other than make salad dressing. Any other creative uses for this condiment?

Experiment. It is what I would call a 'mellow acid' flavour. In the suggestions given, it is cutting a heavy rich flavour - butter, sausages, oil. So I tend to use a dash when deglazing the pan for meat sauces or stocks. Or a sprinkle over roasted mediterranean vegetables (effectively a hot salad, since they will have been cooked in olive oil). And while on hot salads, very nice with hot potatoes (and diced smoke sausage) with whatever else you fancy - my taste would run to chili or ketchup or mustard.
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
Fry some onion until golden. Add chopped fresh tomatoes and avocados and bits of grilled bacon (assuming you are not vegetarian!) and heat briefly over a high heat. Toss in balsalmic vinegar and the best olive oil you can afford. Mix with hot pasta and fresh basil and serve. Perfect for a warm summers evening.... ahhhhhhhh
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
It's more a question of, what can't you use balsamic vinegar on? I've even seen it reduced in a pan and then dripped over ice cream.

Try it on sandwiches, and it's also great on cooked, salted potatoes. I use it in lots of my soups, stews, etc.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Black pepper and balsamic vinegar on strawberries!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
How about Watermelon Konfyt which has the nice added property that you get to eat the watermelon as well as make the preserve (the preserve is made with the skins). It is delicious.

Jengie

I happened to have some watermelon in the fridge as I read this so I'm now making it. (Literally, it's bubbling away in the syrup as I type).

But what do you eat it with?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I am making a fairly failsafe main course for a dinner party this evening - port escalope braised in apple-juice,with fresh apple and creme fraiche to finish.

My question - anyone got interesting variants or additons to the basic dish they can recommend? Touch of thyme? Dill? Mustard?
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
When I was growing up, I couldn't stand to eat cooked greens of any kind. I just couldn't. But I have realized, in the last few years, that it wasn't the taste that bothered me, it was the texture. Wilted spinach, in a salad or in a Thai dish, is really wonderful. It was the stuff that was canned or cooked for an hour or two that I couldn't stand.

But I'm now living in the Pacific Northwest, where about the only kind of cooking green you ever see is spinach. And I was at the farmer's market a few days ago, and one of the stalls had organic collards and kale and two kinds of mustard greens.

Mustard greens! My grandmother fixed them regularly, and I thought I'd give them a try. Maybe sauteed lightly with some onion in a bit of bacon grease, they'd be good.

They smelled right as I was washing them and breaking out the tough stems. And when they were done, the texture was okay, and if I had to choose between what I fixed and greens boiled for two hours, I'd take mine. But they were unbelievably bitter. Mousethief, who doesn't mind flavors that are a bit bitter, and who likes mustard greens (and who really didn't want to hurt my feelings) wouldn't eat them, nor would his daughter.

So what did I do wrong? These greens didn't look like the ones my grandma fixed -- they had a red or purple cast to them, like red leaf lettuce. The other kind I could have gotten were bright green, with very curly leaves.

Maybe next time I'll try the collards.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
J, how long did you cook them?

Mustard greens are really bitter when under-cooked. You'll need to cook them until the greens are soft enough for your liking and their taste is what you want. Also, do you want to fry, boil or braise them? Each of these methods needs different cooking times.

If frying, I suggest par-boiling the greens for at least 5-10 minutes first. More likely you'll need 20+, but YMMV. Test first. Also, the smaller the size of your pieces of greens, the faster they'll cook.

If braising, then ditto the 5-10-20+ minutes (use chicken or veg stock, not water.) This method will probably take the longest but will add the most flavor to the greens from the surrounding liquid.

If boiling, well, just boil until the greens are to your liking.

Regardless of method, the only real determiner of "done" here is your mouth. Cook them to your desired taste and texture.

It's not uncommon to boil some greens for as much as an hour and change.

[ 18. July 2006, 06:27: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
How about Watermelon Konfyt which has the nice added property that you get to eat the watermelon as well as make the preserve (the preserve is made with the skins). It is delicious.

Jengie

I happened to have some watermelon in the fridge as I read this so I'm now making it. (Literally, it's bubbling away in the syrup as I type).

But what do you eat it with?

Its a conserve, its sweet, its delicious on bread and butter or toast and butter, or serve it over ice cream.

Jengie
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Hmm, maybe I didn't get the cooking right then. Mine has turned out more like chunks of crystalised fruit in a very thick syrup rather than a spreadable jam.

Should I have cut the fruit up smaller? Is it supposed to go soft and sort of mush up?
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Jellies and jams aren't my area of expertise, but if your fruit sugar is crystallizing, I *think* that means the cooking solution is overcooked or didn't have enough water in it. Sugar is hydroscopic, it bonds to water, and if there's enough water and the proper heat, it should remain uncrystallized IIRC. But if the water lessens or it gets too hot, the sugar will recrystallize.

Sorry to be so vague. You might try Googling candy-making sites for info.

Here's one that might help you.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
Hmm, maybe I didn't get the cooking right then. Mine has turned out more like chunks of crystalised fruit in a very thick syrup rather than a spreadable jam.

Should I have cut the fruit up smaller? Is it supposed to go soft and sort of mush up?

You got it right I said delicious on buttered bread and toast, thats why it has to be buttered otherwise the syrup all soaks into the bread. Put a couple of pieces of Konfyt (maybe chop up smaller easy as they are soft) on bread or toast and dribble the syrup over them.

Jengie
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Ooh hurrah. And yum. I haven't sampled any yet as I'm trying not eat sugary things before the wedding season commences (I'm a guest at a couple, not the bride before anyone gets too excited) and I'm fairly sure if I open a jar I won't be able to resist dipping in regularly.

(My syrup is quite thick though - I got sidetracked doing something else - so doesn't cover all the pieces in the jar so I guess they probably shouldn't hang around for too long)
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
Any recipes for marrow which don't involve stuffing them. I've always stuffed them in the past with varying concoctions of cheese and breadcrumbs, mushroomy mixes, wild rice and pancetta etc. But my family are not great fans of that. I'm trying baked marrow with a cheese sauce tonight. Any other suggestions.

Explanation is: I like marrow, I like using seasonal vegetables and I'll never give up trying.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
I haven't had a really big marrow to deal with for a number of years now. When I did, the usual method was, indeed, to stuff it. However, thinking about it, marrow, chopped into chunks, would make a good addition to a dish of roast vegetables: red onions, aubergine, peppers, the aforementioned marrow, all seasoned with olive oil and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar, a few cloves of garlic, and whatever else you like, roasted until they're a bit caramelized around the edges. Serve hot or cold. A less continental version would ditch the oil and vinegar and roast them in a bit of dripping and the juices from the bottom of the pan after your Sunday roast.

Remember, marrow also makes great chutney and pickle (recipes for sweet watermelon pickle can be made with marrow) and can be shredded and used in cakes, muffins, etc. like its smaller relative, the courgette. Google 'zucchini bread' and you'll see.

American gardeners around this time of year suffer terrible gluts of marrows, which are thought of in the US as the zucchinis that got away, that hid under the leaves until they became horribly overgrown. People leave them on other people's doorsteps, ring the bell, and run away. And there are lots of inventive recipes.
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
Thanks Amos, that's brilliant. I hadn't thought of marrow for roasted vegetables, thinking it might be a bit watery (but baking it doesn't seem to produce excess liquid). I also hadn't a clue about preserving/pickling marrow.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amos
American gardeners around this time of year suffer terrible gluts of marrows, which are thought of in the US as the zucchinis that got away, that hid under the leaves until they became horribly overgrown. People leave them on other people's doorsteps, ring the bell, and run away. And there are lots of inventive recipes.

I saw in the newspaper yesterday that one evening this week (I forget which) has been officially* designated "Leave your surplus zucchini on your neighbor's porch" evening.

The town of Harrisville, NH used to have a Zucchini Festival which was great, absurd fun. Among other things there was a greased zucchini toss. People joined this with partners. Participants stood in two lines facing each other, with each person opposite his/her partner. The organizers had collected used cooking oil from restaurants and put it in buckets. (It stank.) The zucchini were dipped in this and then handed to the participants who tossed them to their partners. A zucchini dripping oil is not easy to catch. Moreover, it may begin to disintegrate.

There was also the zucchini look-alike contest. People brought zucchini that they had dressed or otherwise modified to look like some celebrity. This was the year that Vanessa Williams had her Miss America titls taken away because she had posed for nude photographs. Someone entered a very carefully peeled zucchini labelled Vanessa Williams. It won first prize.

People were also warned that if their illegally parked cars were not moved, they would be filled with zucchini.


*It didn't say who the officials were.

Moo
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Marrow and ginger chutney or jam. They had it at the Farmers' Market on Sunday, though we didn't get any.
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
Roasted with aromatic herbs/spices - that's Sophie Grigson's recipe. Off hand I think I remember sage, cumin and coriander (but I could be making that up!)
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by welsh dragon:
Marrow and ginger chutney or jam. They had it at the Farmers' Market on Sunday, though we didn't get any.

Do get it next time; it's delicious. And thanks for reminding me how well ginger and marrow go with one another.
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
Quick question: if a biscuit recepie calls for "all purpose" flour and baking powder, is it safe to just substitute self-raising flour?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I would assume 'all-purpose' = plain. Particularly if the recipe then specifies baking powder, since that is the added ingredient of self-raising. You could end up with some very tall biscuits.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
We are having a visitor for dinner tonight and she is allergic to chocolate. She isn't keen on bananas nor avacados, but will eat them.

The main part of the meal will be chicken or veggie based.I am just plain out of ideas. Actually I have to many things happening in my head just now for new ideas to take place.

Do you have any ideas or suggestions please?
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
Well, for vegetables, ratatouille or a similar vegetable stew type thing is very good at this time of year. You could serve that with simple grilled chicken breasts, which could be marinaded first if you prefered, and plain boiled new potatoes.

For dessert, there's always something like strawberry fool - if the first course has been fairly simple, the dessert can be quite rich, I always think.

I'm hosting my mother's 70th birthday party tomorrow. I need buffet style food for up to 40 guests. Any ideas beyond the salads, cold meats etc.? I'd like it to be reasonably simple to prepare, though I will have some help.
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I would assume 'all-purpose' = plain. Particularly if the recipe then specifies baking powder, since that is the added ingredient of self-raising. You could end up with some very tall biscuits.

All-purpose flour (US) is closer to strong flour (UK) as it has more gluten in than plain flour (UK). Use UK plain flour and add a couple extra tablespoonfuls.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
We are having a visitor for dinner tonight and she is allergic to chocolate. She isn't keen on bananas nor avacados, but will eat them.

If you are looking for a quick, summery pud, you might try this. We did it Sunday and it was light and yummy (this is a recipe I adapted so it contains a mix of measurement types ... sorry):

Berry no-bake cheesecakes

175g gingersnaps
1/3 cup butter
150g cream cheese
150g Greek Yoghurt
3 tbsp caster sugar
a mix of your favourite berries

Grind the gingersnaps until fine. Melt the butter and mix with the gingersnaps. Line 4 small tart tins or ramekins with cling film then divide the mixture between them. Press the mixture into each base and up the sides (I used a small glass to do this). Place in the fridge for an hour to chill.

Mix together the cream cheese and yoghurt until smooth, stir in the the sugar and then chil in the fridge.

Fill the chilled bases with the cream cheese mixture (if you've lined them with clingfilm, carefully remove the cheesecakes) and top them with your berries.

You could do this as a single pie, but you'd have to futz with the measurements to get the quantity you need.

Yum, yum, good.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Okay this is neither chicken nor veggie but He Who Must Be Obeyed marinates seerfish chunks [any firm fleshed fish will do] in crushed garlic, salt, chilli powder and turmeric for half an hour then fries them. That served on a bed of rice with ratatouille or Gado-Gado on the side would be fab!

I'm allergic to chocolate as well so I sympathise with your guest. Have you ever made Summer Pudding? It's not complicated and is delicious! Lots of recipes about for it.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Up until a few months ago I had never met anyone who was allergic to chocolate. I had a friend who was lactose intolerant and so couldn't eat milk chocolate, but I never met anyone who is allergic to the chocolate itself.

Woderwick, you are the thrid person I have come across who is allergic. [Frown]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
. . . and I love it, too.

[Tear]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moth:

I'm hosting my mother's 70th birthday party tomorrow. I need buffet style food for up to 40 guests. Any ideas beyond the salads, cold meats etc.? I'd like it to be reasonably simple to prepare, though I will have some help.

Well, this is a cold meat salad but it's very easy and very good.

Things like onion bhajis and samosas or spring rolls can be bought and only need heating up.

Potato wedges are always good if you want something warm. Here's a fantastic Greek recipe and they taste brilliant cold the next day, too:

900g/2lbs large peeled potatoes
50 ml/2 fl oz olive oil
120 ml/4 fl oz freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 tsp dried oregano
3 cloves garlic, crushed
salt and pepper to taste
120 ml/ 4 fl oz water

Preheat the oven to 230C/450F/gas 8. Cut the potatoes into 1/4s or 1/8s longways and place in a large, shallow, ovenproof dish.

Add the remaining ingredients and stir to coat. Bake at top of oven, uncovered for 1 hour or until light golden and crisp outside and soft inside.

Shake occasionally and add more water if necessary while cooking.

Hope this helps!
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
Thanks! I do cook potato wedges, but I hadn't thought of doing them for the party. That recipe looks very good. I've always done mine without water. Why do you add water? How does it change the cooking process?

The chicken salad looks nice, too!
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I don't know about the water, but I guess it sort of steams them a bit and helps to get them fluffy and soft inside. Come to think of it, I don't know how to tell if more water is necessary - I just copied out the recipe! [Paranoid]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Re buffet: Fiddly, I know - but filled hard-boiled eggs: mashing the yolks with mayo and curry powder, and piling back in again. Getting those jars of lumpfish roe caviar, and putting a teaspoonful per half egg.

Sort-of-bruschetta. Slices of french bread, lightly brushed with oil both sides, slices of tomato (fresh & sundried mixed nice), season, bake until bread browns a little. Sprinkle with fresh basil.

Pita, split and quartered and baked until a bit crisp - and a big bowl of houmous. Or tzadiki. Or both.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Oh, by the way, the recipe says that the wedges serve 6-8 people.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
I can report that the cold chicken curry salad recipe posted by Keren-Happuch is easy to make and yummy! There were several nice comments about it.

I also served wedges, but didn't add water!

[ 05. August 2006, 22:49: Message edited by: Moth ]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
I think this might have been asked before on the last recipe thread, but I couldn't find it.

Does anyone have any good recipes for flapjacks?

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I posted a couple of flapjack recipes on page 5 of this thread.
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
Thanks [Smile]

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
We got a couple of avocados in the veg box this week. Apart from guacamole, does anybody have any suggestions for using them?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Oh, yum. Cut them up and drizzle Italian salad dressing over them. Add other salad stuff if you like, but they're lovely just like this.

Vietnamese style: Add sugar and ice, mix in a blender for a kind of avocado milkshake. Not sure if they actually add any milk....
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Make a nice creamy potato soup and serve with the sliced avocado on top. This is very popular in Ecuador (either avocado or sliced egg, though I much preferred the avocado).

I saw a salad the other day that was slices of buffalo mozarella, avocado, and lovely tomatoes sprinkled with salt, pepper, basil and drizzled with olive oil. Yummmm

Also, I love to eat avocado by itself with a little bit of salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Avocado on toast.

Honest [Biased]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Actually butter the toast and put marmite on it then mush the avocado on top. I need a licking lips smillie for that one.

Have it South African style.
1)Halve and remove pip
2)score the flesh with a sharp knife but be careful not to cut the skin
3)Sprinkle pepper and salt to taste on the inside
4)pour in to taste either lemon or lime juice or a light tasting vinegar.

Actually you can even use malt vinegar; indeed my parents did for years because though they'd buy avocadoes, as a treat if they were perfectly ripe, the finances did not stretch to anything fancier to go on them. This was in the days before people on this side of the pond knew about guacamole and so my mum was the only individual around who knew how to test for a ripe one.

Jengie

[ 10. August 2006, 19:59: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
My SA wife insists that to do anything at all to a good avocado is utter heresy.

Easy to understand why - I have to say that in England one really does miss out on a really good avo.

I tend to have mine with a little bit of balsamic vinegar.
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
How did your mum test for a ripe one, Jengie?
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Mmm, I've got tomatoes and feta - salad sounds like a good option.

After asking the question, I found this which explains about halfway down how to test for ripeness.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Can't find it on that page. This is something that I only partly know. I will describe it as well as I can but let me assure you my mum never taught me this it was gained through observation so my description of what a ripe one feels like is a bit broad.

Apply gentle but firm pressure to the skin near the narrow end of the avocadoe. It should just start to give to your fingers. If it is totally hard then its under ripe and the flesh will be green, if it is too ripe then as the flesh is soft and easily dented, the flesh inside will be brown.

Jengie
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Has anyone tried any of Ina Garten's (" The Barefoot Contessa") recipes? My sister sent me one of her books and I'm curious to see what experience others have had with them.
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
Question for American shipmates:

I have recently been given a copy of the first English translation of La Bonne Cuisine by Madame Saint-Ange. The book has been translated into American English and makes frequent reference to "fatback bacon". What is it?
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
Here's a photo:
"Fatback" -- that is, "American" bacon being wrapped around a lean medallion of meat; our bacon = cured pork meant to be sliced thin and panfried, or used to add needed fats to game and other lean meats, etc.

Sometimes you want more fat and the smoky salty flavor of fat bacon.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
The fourth picture down shows the fatback in more detail with a bit of a description.
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
Brilliant. Roast liver in fatback bacon, here we come!

(last week we had was Beef Wellington, by the way).
 
Posted by Janine (# 3337) on :
 
I had bacon-wrapped grilled oysters as part of my wedding buffet. Mmm-hmmm.

And of course filet mignon, any time I've had that it's always been bacon-wrapped.
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
In the aforementioned book, larding (taking small pieces of fatback bacon and threading them through the top of the meat) is a frequently required method. I wonder if the tools are still made.

There is a translator's note explaining that larding was originally done in order to make the meat more tender, although I'm pretty sure that liver, 100 years ago, would have been pretty tender. I think it's really to make things taste nice [Smile]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Another thing that benefits from being swathed in bacon is meat loaf.

I do one which is mince, onions and a slice of bread soaked in red wine & worcester sauce & ketchup. The whole lot shaped and then covered with a slices of streaky bacon. Cook covered and foil for about an hour, then uncover for and cook until the bacon is crispy.
 
Posted by Curiosus (# 4808) on :
 
Does anyone have any bright ideas about what I could do with a bottle of cassis balsamic vinegar? It's wonderful drizzled on salads but I'm tiring of salads every other night. I'm thinking that perhaps I could use the vinegar as some kind of warm sauce, but how?
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
On strawberries.

Or drizzled with honey over pork before roasting, according to BBC website I just looked at. Duck might be nice that way too. (Assuming you can use cassis balsamic vinager like plain balsamic)
 
Posted by Divine Outlaw Dwarf (# 2252) on :
 
Would also make a nice red onion gravy.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Make a marinade with the vinegar, some oil, chopped scallions, pinch of thyme, fair amount of brown sugar, pinch of chili, tsp of allspice. Very good for pork.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Fast, Simple Garlic Vinaigrette

In a bowl, combine:

1/2 c good quality olive oil
2 T Dijon or stoneground mustard
2 T balsamic vinegar
1-2 T minced garlic (depending on taste)
1 T white wine
Kosher salt (to taste)
Fresh ground black pepper (to taste)

Whip ingredients with a small whisk or fork until dressing thickens and all ingredients have combined (+/- 30 seconds). Serve on salad or cooked eggs.

Makes 3-4 servings
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
Tried that recipe on yesterdays salad. Very nice Ken.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Does anyone have any ideas for cooking quinoa that aren't vegetarian meals? Everything I've seen so far online has quinoa used in vegetarian meals. I like quinoa, but I'm a meat-a-tarian, so I'd like to use it to cook a meal with meat. Barring that, I guess I just save it for when Jack the Lass comes for dinner!
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
Never head of it nor had it, so I went searching.

It sounds really versatile; don't see why it could not be used with a shrimp stirfry or something

Here's the link!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
The packet of quinoa in my cupboard suggests a red quinoa & fruit salad and says it can be served as a meal accompaniment or on its own as a snack:

110g red quinoa
300ml water
25g raisins or currants
25g pine nuts
25g pineapple, fresh or canned
1 tbsp chopped mint leaves
1 spring onion - finely chopped
1 tbsp olive oil
pinch salt and pepper

Rinse Quinoa well before cooking. Add quinoa to 300ml of boiling water, return to the boil and then reduce heat and simmer for approximately 10 minutes until germ separates. Remove from heat, cover and leave to absorb remaining water. Once water has been absorbed leave to cool

Combine remaining ingredients and mix well. Add Quinoa once cooled and mix gently. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

I haven't tried this so can't tell you what it tastes like.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Woooooooo! Catrine tried my recipe and liked it! [Cool] Thank you, C!

[ 26. August 2006, 17:10: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
Does anyone have any ideas for cooking quinoa that aren't vegetarian meals?

I think I tried it once, but it didn't seem to catch on in our house. If it's one of these grains that are hydrated, what about using meat or chicken stock as the liquid? Then dicing the appropriate meat into the result?

Does it have to be served cold? That's maybe why I didn't take to it. I used cous-cous frequently, particularly with grilled lamb.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Firenze, I've not had quinoa cold. I've only had it in heated veggie meals (that were quite tasty). Well, okay, I've not had the grain itself cold, though I have had cereal that had flakes made with quinoa.

I rather like the texture of cooked quinoa - sort of pops between your teeth like fish roe does.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Here is a recipe for a soup with quinoia
quote:


Curried Quinoa-Tomato Soup

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 yellow onion, finely chopped
1 celery rib, finely chopped
2 cups fresh or canned chopped tomatoes
1 ½ quarts chicken stock
½ cup quinoa seeds, rinsed if necessary*
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 ½ teaspoons curry powder
¼ cup cold water
salt and pepper to taste

Cook garlic, celery, and onion in oil until tender. Stir in tomatoes, stock, and quinoa seeds. Simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Combine cornstarch and curry powder. Mix with cold water. Stir mixture into soup and bring to boil, stirring constantly until thickened, about two minutes.

*Put a spoonful of quinoa seed into a glass of water. Stir. If water becomes sudsy, rinse quinoa seeds thoroughly in several changes of water.

It's very good.

Moo
 
Posted by sewanee_angel (# 2908) on :
 
Today, I realized that I am sick* of all the dishes I usually cook for my dinner. I'm going to search the thread for new ideas. I just started grad school so I have little time and less money. I hope to find ideas for cheap and easy** ways to make food taste interesting again.


*not literally!
**I can cook well enough to stay alive and relatively healthy but my skills & knowledge are limited.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
SA, you can't go wrong with some basic cookbooks. One I'd recommend is The Joy of Cooking. You can usually find this in used bookstores for cheap and it's got a ton of recipes, advice, conversion tables, et al.

You can find a bajillion recipes on foodtv.com and epicurious.com. Just a matter of looking for what you like. (Foodtv also has video demos on food prep basics and menu planning suggestions.)

If you live in the US, have cable, and get the Food Network, check out Alton Brown's show, "Good Eats." Rachel Ray's show "30 Minute Meals" is also pretty good for fast, basic cooking if you can stand her OTT perkiness.
 
Posted by sewanee_angel (# 2908) on :
 
Thanks KenWritez. I've seen both of the shows you mention. I can only take Rachael Ray in small doses but I have made a couple of her recipes before and they've been ok. Alton Brown entertains me but I've never been moved to try one of his recipes.

I've got a basic set of recipes that I cook and right now it just makes me go "blah." Tonight, I threw garlic, a touch of olive oil, white beans, tomatoes, spinach, red pepper flakes, thyme & marjoram into a pan and, once cooked, served over rice. It wasn't bad but I guess I'm just hoping for a couple of different spice/sauce ideas.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
sewanee_angel, I think that the thread a few pages back here in Heaven [sorry, I don't know how to make a link to an old thread] called Cheap and Nourishing - Student Cookery might yield a few ideas.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
SA, what sorts of things are you cooking now and what would you rather be cooking? Are you vegan/vegetarian?
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
sewanee_angel, I think that the thread a few pages back here in Heaven [sorry, I don't know how to make a link to an old thread] called Cheap and Nourishing - Student Cookery might yield a few ideas.

Here it is.

Moo
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thanks Moo

[Overused]
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
I tried this recipe recently, and found it excellent

Greek Pizza with Spinach, Feta & Olives

½ Cup mayonnaise
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 Cup crumbled feta cheese, divided
1 12-in pre-baked Italian pizza crust
½ Cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, coarsely chopped, plus 1 Tb. of the oil
¼ Cup pitted Kalamata olives, chopped
1 tsp dried basil
2 Cups baby spinach leaves
½ small red onion, halved and thinly sliced

Adjust oven rack to lowest position, and heat oven to 450 degrees. Mix mayonnaise, garlic and ½ cup feta in a small bowl. Place pizza crust on a cookie sheet; spread mayonnaise mixture over pizza, then top with tomatoes, olives, and basil. Bake until heated through and crisp, about 10 minutes.

Toss spinach and onion with the 1 Tb. sun-dried tomato oil. Top hot pizza with spinach mixture and remaining ½ cup feta cheese. Return to oven and bake until cheese melts, about 4 minutes longer. Cut into 6 slices and serve.
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
I had a really wonderful quinoa dsh recently, involved quinoa, spinach, and a light white cheese, perhaps provolone, and bell peppers. was lvoely.

I use it mostly in chicken and leek soup. it has a lot of calories, so I like to use it sparingly, but it's a nutritional superhero.

I've also made a "rice" pudding with quinoa and is was DIVINE. but again, the calorie count was EVIL.

anyone have a recipe for zuccini cake? I can't find mine.

Comet
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
cc, do you have you recipe for "rice" pudding? That's something I'd like to try.
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
Quinoa Pudding

2 cups quinoa, cooked (cook quinoa: 1 part quinoa to 2 parts water)
3 cups milk
1/3 c honey or 1/3 c brown sugar (I used the honey)
1/2 cup ground almonds or walnuts
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp lemon or orange rind, grated
1 tsp lemon juice
1/2 raisins
1/2 c shredded coconut
1 tsp vanilla
3 beaten eggs
1/8 tsp salt
1 Tbs butter

combine them all and mix. pour into a greased baking dish or greased custard cups. bake in a 350F oven until set - about 45 minutes. serve hot or cold, topped with yogurt, cream, or apple sauce.

with this recipe, I have found a number of others, including
"Chickquinoa Salad"

2 cups cubed cooked chicken
1 cup cooked quinoa
1 cup diced celery
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup (!!!) mayonnaise
salt and paprika to taste

combine and chill.

there's also a wierd lasagna-esque one with burger, if you want to try that.

Comet
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Thanks Comet! Hit me with the weird "lasagna-esque" one as well. I'm willing to try weird as long as it takes good.
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
for the record, these are from a hand-written and photocopied handout from our Earth Day Festival a few years ago. Quinoa is earth-friendly, I guess. I don't know the details.

Quinoa Lasagne
1 can peeled stewed tomatoes, or 4 roma tomatoes, chopped
1 lb hamburger or veggie burger
2 8-oz cans tomato sauce
3 cups cooked quinoa
1/4 lb motzarella cheese, grated/crumbled
1/4 lb parmesan cheese, grated
1/4 c olive oil (!!!)
1 tsp salt
2 tsp oregano
1 c minced onion
1/2 lb ricotta
2 cloved garlic, minced

saute onion and garlic together in oilve oil, add burger, cook until browned. Add tomato sauce, tomatoes, salt and oregano simmer.

turn on yer oven. (350F)

put a layer of sauce in the botton of a 13x9 cake pan. followed with a layer of quinoa and layers of the cheeses. repeat for two more layers, ending with sauce and extra parmesan on top. bake 35 minutes.

let me know how it turns out!

C
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
All you'd ever want to know about quinoa.

When I was testing a gluten-free diet years ago, I used quinoa as a wheat alternative. I liked it, although it was (back then) tough to find except at health-food stores. It soaks up flavors like potatoes do, so I had to use larger amounts of seasonings, but YMMV.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:
Quinoa Lasagne
let me know how it turns out!

Well, it wasn't half bad (in spite of the fact that I stupidly picked up low-fat cheese - bleurgh). I think next time I'd add a green veg in ... maybe mix spinach into the cheese layer or add courgettes (zuchinni) to the sauce. It just needed that little something extra.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
I'm willing to try weird as long as it takes good.

Me too [Big Grin]

Jack the Lab-rat
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Hmmm ... that should have been "tastes good" ... obviously JtL we are now sharing the same brainwaves - eep! I'll be trying my hand at homemade humous next, and hopefully I'll have the perfect recipe when next you come over for dinner.
 
Posted by sewanee_angel (# 2908) on :
 
Moo, thanks for the link to "cheap and nourishing."

I've just started grad school and cheap is good. Nourishing, tasty, and cheap is even better. I've just run out of ideas and since I don't really know how to use spices to their best advantage and/or combinations, I don't always do well "making something up." I'm not a vegetarian but I often eat meat-less meals.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
Speaking of using spices, do people here have certain herbs and spices that add that zing to dishes of certain incredients? I have a friend who swears by putting dill leaf on eggs. I haven't tried it yet. I like oregano on broiled fish. Any favorites out there?
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
dill on salmon. rosemary on chicken or potatoes. Chili in vegetrian dishes. garlic on anything that will hold still long enough.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Seasoning staples in my kitchen:

Garlic (minced, powder and fresh)
Kosher salt
Fresh peppercorns (for grinding)
Old Bay Seasoning (great on eggs, potatoes!)
Dried: cumin, oregano, basil (fresh when I can get it), thyme, dill
Chicken boullion (sprinkle this on cooked veg, eggs, soups, darn near anything.)
Balsamic vinegar

If I had to use a spice cabinet I could fit in my pockets, this would be it.
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:
dill on salmon. rosemary on chicken or potatoes. Chili in vegetrian dishes. garlic on anything that will hold still long enough.

My kitchen reinforces this philosophy.

[ 02. September 2006, 09:22: Message edited by: Catrine ]
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Seasoning staples in my kitchen:

Garlic (minced, powder and fresh)
Kosher salt
Fresh peppercorns (for grinding)
Old Bay Seasoning (great on eggs, potatoes!)
Dried: cumin, oregano, basil (fresh when I can get it), thyme, dill
Chicken boullion (sprinkle this on cooked veg, eggs, soups, darn near anything.)
Balsamic vinegar

If I had to use a spice cabinet I could fit in my pockets, this would be it.

Old Bay!

It's been years since I've had that blend. I'll have to get me a can.

And I just got a jar of chicken granules for a certain chipotle enchilada recipe (I usually use boullion cubes for things) so I'll give it a shot on "darn near anything". [Smile]
 
Posted by Mousethief (# 953) on :
 
My all-purpose, use-on-everything seasoning is Cajun's Choice Blackened Seasoning by Louisiana Foods. Comes in a spice-size glass bottle (net weight 77 grams). Brightens lots of foods. Wonderful on fried catfish, eggs, hamburgers, you name it. I am not being paid a promotional fee here; I really just like it.

ETA: Definitely rosemary on potatoes! Wonderful combination!

[ 02. September 2006, 16:34: Message edited by: Mousethief ]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by sewanee_angel:
I've just started grad school and cheap is good. Nourishing, tasty, and cheap is even better.

When I was in college, I lived on generic mac and cheese from a box, the lowest grade of ground beef with added vegetable protein, white bread and chicken bologna sandwiches, so I've been there and I empathize.

Carbs and starches eill be less expensive than animal protein, which will usually be most expensive.

The key is to maximize your money when shopping. This requires some effort on your part. In my town, the grocery stores send out ad circulars every Wednesday, highlighting their sale items and specials. If you live in the US, likely your local stores do it as well.

Do what I do and scan the ads, looking for the best prices. I even keep track of my staples in an Excel worksheet so I know what I paid for say, a 5# bag of navel oranges or a whole chicken or a 15 oz. can of kidney beans.

Also, take your receipt from your previous grocery shopping trip to another store and see how prices for the same items compare. Oddly enough, a local Target sells canned food at about 1/2 to 3/4 of what my local grocery store charges for the same items, so Target is where I buy my canned fruit, soups and veg.

You can stretch a whole cooked chicken an amazing number of meals, and whole birds are always less expensive per pound than their parts, like breasts. (Chicken thighs and drumsticks are always less expensive than breasts.) You can stretch larger, inexpensive cuts of beef, like London broil, to cover multiple dishes as well.

A general rule is, the more a food is processed, the more expensive it will be.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
More on spices:

Tarragon goes well with green beans. When I steam fresh green beans, I sprinkle a bunch of tarragon in the water, and it gives a nice subtle flavor to the beans.

I also have several blends from this wonderful place: a Sage and Savory blend that I put on chicken breasts and cornish hens; a "Little Italy" blend of oregano, marjoram, thyme and rosemary that I use in a lot of recipes that call for oregano; and a few different pepper blends. Walking into this store is like going into an ancient bazaar -- the aromas are heavenly!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez
A general rule is, the more a food is processed, the more expensive it will be.

Also, the more likely it is to contain excessive salt or sugar, not to mention transfats.

Make your own is healthier as well as cheaper.

Moo
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
Anyone got any ideas for what to do with fresh figs? Every year at this time we have a glut of them from our very productive tree in the garden. I've attempted to dry them, unsuccesfully, in the past, and am getting a little tired of sliced figs on top of my breakfast cereal each morning. Someone told me you could make fig jam but I've never seen a recipe. What else can I do with them?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:
garlic on anything that will hold still long enough.

Absolutely! I've even heard of, though never tried, garlic ice cream!

For spices I really recommend you grind your own pepper, it is so much tastier than the ready ground and mills are available quite cheaply almost anywhere, certainly in UK, and it will be worth it. Black pepper is also a lot tangier than white.

Chilli powder, Coriander powder and Turmeric are all worth having a little of, too - a little spice goes a long way and turns an ordinary dish into something special.

We're lucky here as most of the spices are grown locally - the black pepper from my ma-in-law's garden is amazing!

I'm told there can be problems getting fresh spices in North America so your best bet is to go to your local Asian grocery store and buy the plastic packets, the jars in the supermarket are a complete rip-off.
 
Posted by Gracie (# 3870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Anyone got any ideas for what to do with fresh figs? Every year at this time we have a glut of them from our very productive tree in the garden. I've attempted to dry them, unsuccesfully, in the past, and am getting a little tired of sliced figs on top of my breakfast cereal each morning. Someone told me you could make fig jam but I've never seen a recipe. What else can I do with them?

I made a very delicious fig and lemon jam, Gracious Rebel. Here's the recipe:

2lb dried figs
1 1/2 pints water
3 lb sugar
juice of 2 lemons

Soak figs in water for 12 hours.
Rinse in fresh water.
Cut into small pieces, removing bits of hard stem.
Put into pan with 1 1/2 pints hot water.
Simmer until tender.
Stir in sugar and lemon juice and continue to cook until thick.
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
Thanks Gracie, sounds yummy, but that's for dried figs. Any idea on how to adapt the recipe for fresh ones?
 
Posted by Gracie (# 3870) on :
 
Oops, sorry you're right - I wasn't paying attention [Hot and Hormonal] .

Here is the recipe for fresh figs - which is the one I actually made!! It actually means the figs don't need soaking or pre-cooking before adding sugar if they are very ripe. You need the lemon though, because there isn't enough pectin or whatever in the figs.

1lb fresh ripe figs
1lb sugar
juice 1 lemon

Half or quarter the figs, depending on size.
Put into the pan with sugar and lemon juice.
Heat gently stirring all the time until sugar has dissolved.
Boil steadily until set.

Voilà - it's delicious!
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Anyone got any ideas for what to do with fresh figs?

GR, my copy of Larousse gastronomique says that figs can be used in any recipe calling for apricots. They would make an admirable tart, for example, or you could poach them in red wine, or make a figgy glaze for ham. I like them baked in phyllo and drizzled with a bit of honey.
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
I assume you have to peel the figs first before making them into jam or anything else? When I eat them raw I always peel them, but dried figs always look as if they have the skins still on, so maybe they are edible after all?

You can see that for someone with masses of figs I really don't have much clue about using them!?
 
Posted by Gracie (# 3870) on :
 
Fig skins are edible according to this site I found all about figs. I didn't peel mine, but thought I'd better check just to make sure I didn't lead you into disaster. There's also a similar recipe for fig jam there.
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
Thanks Gracie. I feel really educated now!
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Here is a very practical request. For next Sunday I need a dish that is
  1. savoury
  2. milk free
  3. either vegetarian or with fish in it
  4. suitable for cooking in advance
  5. can be eaten cold or warmed
  6. appealing to the sophisticated older palate (a mix between conservative and adventurous, not quite your standard quiche, sausage rolls, ham sandwiches, lettuce salad and crisps but neither into very exotic food)
  7. suitable for a birthday lunch
  8. easily portioned as a self service buffet

Any suggestions?

Jengie

[ 03. September 2006, 19:49: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by Thistle (# 5142) on :
 
We recently had a buffet lunch for around 50, and as a vegetarian dish, served a spinach and cheese pie, using puff pastry. You could use goats cheese or a sheeps milk cheese if your non-milk drinkers are only bothered by cows milk. If the butter in pastry is problematic, you can use non-dairy margarine if you make it by hand. Alternatively, salmon en croute? Recipe here Of course, the creamy pesto sauce wouldn't work with non-dairy types but could be adapted. Definitely good hot or cold, and easily portionable. And looks suitably festive if you dress it up.
 
Posted by Amos (# 44) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Anyone got any ideas for what to do with fresh figs? Every year at this time we have a glut of them from our very productive tree in the garden. I've attempted to dry them, unsuccesfully, in the past, and am getting a little tired of sliced figs on top of my breakfast cereal each morning. Someone told me you could make fig jam but I've never seen a recipe. What else can I do with them?

Convey them to me, at once.

[ 03. September 2006, 22:02: Message edited by: Amos ]
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
Has anyone here tried larding meat?
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Here is a very practical request. For next Sunday I need a dish that is [...]

I don't know how fancy you want to get, so here's some dishes more sophisticated than average:

Grilled salmon or white fish steaks with a topping of stoneground mustard, white wine and chopped dill. Serve with sushi rice.

Shrimp with herbs and dirty rice casserole

Twice-baked potatoes with soy cheese, rosemary and green onion

Seared ahi tuna crusted with sesame seeds and drizzled with a soy sauce, sherry and wasabi glaze served on a bed of marinated julienned carrot and celery, with chopped mushrooms and pickled red peppers

Casserole of fish balls, fried celery with parmesan cheese, jasmine rice made with fish stock and chopped green onion

Grilled portobello mushroom caps painted with olive oil and stuffed with a filling of chopped crab or fish, spinach, mayonnaise, diced celery, red pepper flakes, and sweet gherkins.

Gazpacho

Ceviche

Spinach raviolis stuffed with chopped crab or fish, soy cheese, and herbs

Is this type what you're looking for?
 
Posted by Suzywoozy (# 6259) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Absolutely! I've even heard of, though never tried, garlic ice cream!


Here on the Isle of Wight we have a whole Garlic Festival , where you can indeed buy garlic icecream - so popular it sold out this year! Also garlic fudge and beer.
 
Posted by basso (# 4228) on :
 
Hmph. An idea stolen from NoCal, I believe. You can also get garlic ice cream at the Gilroy Garlic Festival.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Kenwritez:

You stuffed mushrooms sounds about right, especially stuffed with crab.

Thistle:

Sorry. The milk intolerant is myself and I am high level. I get away with only a very low quantity of soya and milk products. I have so far achieved at least three days off work in the last month because I have over done the milk (i.e. eaten a slice of bread with a normal portion of goats milk on it) [Projectile] . The whole point is to make sure I can eat something, vegetarian/fish just extends the eaters.

Jengie
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Speaking of using spices, do people here have certain herbs and spices that add that zing to dishes of certain incredients?

One spice/herb not yet mentioned is basil which goes well with anything made with tomatoes.
 
Posted by auntie di (# 11521) on :
 
ooh tomatoes! just spent a week in Montenegro, and on our first evening we were recommended to make salad from tomatoes chopped with the local PINK onions (never seen before). together with a bit of cucumber, a pepper, local feta style cheese and a liberal sprinkling of olive oil, one meal and we were hooked. The peppers available were the almost white, jalapeno style, which i never see for sale in the UK, but delicious. We used an old sandwich toaster to toast our bread and discovered it made the best brochette toast possible. One week of ODing on this was almost as good a detox as the chilling out on the beach that accompanied it!
 
Posted by sewanee_angel (# 2908) on :
 
I found a new recipe that I tried last night. It was pretty tasty by my standards. I was most pleased. I have enough left for two lunches, too. The most difficult step was shredding the carrots.

1 sweet potato (peeled & cubed)
2 tsp. olive oil
1 tsp. curry powder
1 tsp. salt
1 15 oz. can of peeled plum tomoatoes (I used a can of diced tomatoes because that is what I had)
1 15oz. can of chick peas
1 cup shredded or julienned carrots
red pepper flakes
5 oz. spinach leaves (I used about a cup of frozen because that is what I had)

Put sweet potato cubes, salt, olive oil, ~1/2 curry powder in a baggie and shake until mixed. Spread sweet potato on cookie sheet and bake at 400 until golden.

Combine remaining ingredients (except spinach) in a pot. Simmer for a bit.* I added more curry powder than the recipe called for. Add sweet potatos and spinach. Cook until spinach leaves wilt (if using fresh spinach).

*basically until veggies are cooked to your preference.

The recipe said to garnish with plain yogurt and cilantro but I didn't have either of those so I don't know how it will taste. I served it with rice. I think pita bread or other bread would be good, too.
 
Posted by basso (# 4228) on :
 
This sounds good, and I'm not a sweet potato fan. I think I'll make it with couscous. Thanks!
 
Posted by Mousethief (# 953) on :
 
Siamese Girl Scout Stew

East meets west in a new twist on an old classic

1 lb. ground beef
1 can coconut milk
1/4 c. stinky fish sauce
2 tbsp Thai yellow curry paste or to taste
3 tbsp lime juice
2 tbsp tomato paste (I used sun dried tomato paste!)
1 can (or equivalent) green beans, drained
1 can sliced mushrooms, drained
1 can sliced bamboo shoots, drained
1 tbsp blackening powder (see advert, above) or equivalent, or to taste

Fry ground beef. Drain. Add all other ingredients. Cook until hot through. Serve over rice.

Very filling, and kind of exotic and homey at the same time.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I have just discovered that I am fairly high cholesterol. Looking at the diet advice, it is all, to be perfectly honest, what I knew about avoiding fat, eating whole grains & oat cereal & being good about exercise. AARGH.

Generally, that's OK. I like fruit & veg, I will miss cheese, but fair enough, I can eat Flora Pro-Active stuff, although it's a tad expensive. All fine.

But Mr D loves his cake & biscuits. And if they are in the house, I will eat them too. I could say "Hard luck, Mr D" but that seems a bit unfair.

Thus I am looking for recipes for no-fat, or very low fat, cakes & biscuits. I have one cake recipe consisting of All Bran, sultanas, 1 egg, & sugar, but that's all. Anyone got any other recipes?

And what's the thinking on sugar for cholesterol? I know it makes you fat, so I ought to try to avoid it to a certain extent, but is it a No-no? And if so, is honey any better? And if so, do I just substitute the same amount of honey for sugar? So many questions...?
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Sugar does not contain any cholesterol. Honey (which is basically flavoured, damp, sugar) might concievably have a trace.

There is argument (to say the least) as to what extent diet contributes to cholesterol in the blood (after all, you make the stuff yourself). But it can't do any harm to cut it out of the diet. All animal foods have some cholesterol, some more than others. Plant foods have very little.

Some people think that being overweight causes us to not get rid of excess cholesterol, in which case its not so much a matter of avoiding "bad" fatty foods as of eating less of everything to lose weight.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Seeing as this is a recipe thread, this is what I ate last Sunday.

First I cooked some rice and put it to one side.

Then I got a small pot and put olive oil in it and heated up a small handfull of dried chillies in the oil.

After a few minutes, before the chillies began to burn, I poured most of the oil into a large pot, and added water to the small pot and brought it to the boil. I then added chopped ginger and garlic to it and the juice of a lime, reduced it a little, and threw away what was left of the chillies, giving me about a cup full of spicy sauce.


In the big pot I fried some mushrooms in the chilli oil, added a chopped onion to it, fried them together for a few minutes, then I cut some haddock into strips about 2 centimetres wide, added those, and added some king prawns. I cooked them for a minute or so, then mixed in the rice and the sauce.

It was rather good.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Mousethief, where do you get the Girl Scouts from, and which advert above??
 
Posted by Mousethief (# 953) on :
 
If you don't know where to get Girl Scouts from, far be it from me to darken your mind with such vile and reprehensible knowledge. One also wonders what you put in your Hunter's Stew or Fishermen's Chowder. [Paranoid]

I posted earlier (on the previous page, I believe) on my favourite seasoning mix, to wit, Cajun's Choice Blackened Seasoning.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Ah, OK. I think Girl Scouts go by the name of Brownies on this side of the pond...
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
Mousethief, where do you get the Girl Scouts from, and which advert above??

Siamese Girl Scouts, no less!
 
Posted by Mousethief (# 953) on :
 
On this side of the pond, Brownies:Girl Scouts::Cub Scouts:Boy Scouts::Bluebirds:Camp Fire Girls (etc)

[ 06. September 2006, 16:05: Message edited by: Mousethief ]
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
Girl Scouts ≅ Girl Guides
Brownie Scouts ≅ Brownie Guides.

The ages are a little different.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Brownies (Scouts or Guides) are much more tender than the older Girl Scouts. Think of the Brownies as veal.

I am envious of MT, that not only can he get Girl Scouts (for some reason rare in my town--even tho' I like mine medium rare. Get it? Heh heh heh) but he gets Siamese Girl Scouts.

Seattle really does have everything!
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Seattle really does have everything!

It's an international, pacific rim city! Sadly, we only have domestic Girl Scouts here.

they're stringier. need longer stewing.
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
Comet,

You might want to try using a meat tenderizer. The brownies, being younger, are more tender, but being smaller, yield less meat.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
This is going to be whats this recipe called. I simply cannot believe I am the first person to make this it's so simple.

Ingredients

Instructions
  1. turn oven on to 150° C
  2. Crush garlic cloves
  3. mix garlic cloves with olive oil and brush on portabello mushrooms
  4. place mushrooms in baking tray
  5. break an egg into each mushroom
  6. bake in oven for around twenty minutes

I ate with rice and a green salad tonight.

Jengie
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
That sounds good, Jengie! (I dunno what you call it. Portobello eggs? )

Mousethief, that Girl Scout Stew recipe is much more exotic than the one my daughter learned. I guess out here in the midwest we just don't have much class:

Tacky Midwestern Girl Scout Stew
1 lb. ground beef, browned

Add:
1 can Spaghetti-O's™
1 can "alphabet" vegetable soup

Heat and serve. Voilà

[ 09. September 2006, 02:07: Message edited by: Mamacita ]
 
Posted by Mousethief (# 953) on :
 
The traditional Girl Scout Stew recipe my mom used was:

1 lb ground beef
2 medium potatoes, diced
1 box of frozen green beans.

Fry together until done.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
Comet,

You might want to try using a meat tenderizer. The brownies, being younger, are more tender, but being smaller, yield less meat.

AS much as a cat?

John
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
Comet,

You might want to try using a meat tenderizer. The brownies, being younger, are more tender, but being smaller, yield less meat.

AS much as a cat?

John

but much fattier. if you get the "nintendo" version of the Brownies, the meat just melts off the bone.

cats are a bit gamey.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Dish for church:

Please note no real warming through unless arranged and I was too busy to do that.

I therefore did seafood, spinach and mushroom parcels instead of seafood and spinach in portabello mushrooms. The recipe was complicated as I decided I needed a creamy base and that had to be vegan. As O soubt anyone would want to duplicate it i am not posting but if you want the recipe shout.

Jengie
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
Comet,

You might want to try using a meat tenderizer. The brownies, being younger, are more tender, but being smaller, yield less meat.

AS much as a cat?

John

It depends. How big is the cat?
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:
Cats are a bit gamey.

This can be minimized if the cat is properly field dressed. I suggest hanging the cat by the hind feet as soon as it is killed (humanely, of course) and cutting the throat so that the blood drains completely. (It is the blood that gives it that "gamey" taste, you know.) You can also soak the meat in brine for a few hours (or even overnight) which will remove any remaining blood. Make sure you change the water several times.
 
Posted by auntie di (# 11521) on :
 
I took inspiration from the Siamese girl scout stew for this one- oh and i had a can of coconut milk in the cupboard that I'd bought ages ago and never seemed to think of using.


start with one large onion, roughly chopped and fried very gently until tender.
add, all in one go;
left over meat from roast 2 days ago (it was duck in my case, but I suspect any would do).
half a teaspoon of each of mashed ginger root, mashed lemon grass (from jars) and dried cumin.
about one clove's worth of crushed garlic (or the puree if you're idle like me).
a little black pepper.
one can of coconut milk.

stir through and raise gently to boiling point. thicken if needed or desired with a little cornflour.
serve with boiled rice.

not kidding, it was yummy, and the leftovers that i took to work for lunch attracted colleagues wanting a taste.
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
Has anyone here got a good recipe for basic beef stock that is not extravagant to make?

I have recipes that make excellent stock, but the household grocery budget does not permit them to be made, as the ingredients are expensive.

Unless I add ingredients such as bayleaves, thyme, etc (which means that they can often not be used in sauces for which beef stock is required), my stocks are rather dull. I don't seem to be very good at extracting the beefy essence. Any tips?
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Why don't you tell us how you usually make it?

Then people can suggest modifications.

Moo
 
Posted by sparklylady (# 4391) on :
 
We have a box of Shiitake mushrooms in the fridge that are begging to be cooked. Does anyone know of a reasonably simple Thai recipe that includes shiitake mushrooms, with maybe some prawns included or perhaps just veg?

We don't have easy access to much in the way of exotic ingredients - the most exotic we can get is stuff like thai curry paste and veg like sugarsnap peas, baby corn, beansprouts and canned stuff like water chestnuts.

Any suggestions would be very gratefully and mouth-wateringly accepted [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cod:
my stocks are rather dull. I don't seem to be very good at extracting the beefy essence. Any tips?

My immediate thought would be that the stock is too dilute, and that simply boiling off some of the liquid would give you a stronger flavour. You end up with less, but with more oommph.

Vegetables can contribute a lot: and wine.

I made a braise of beef last night - just the meat, with 2 onions, 3 carrots and a punnet of mushrooms, quarter bottle of red and let it simmer for an hour or so. The sauce was sensational. While that doubtless owed a lot to the joint, I think the sweetness came from the carrot & onion and at least some of the 'meatiness' was actually the mushrooms.
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
My latest effort was; 2kg of beef bones, sawn up. 3 rashers of streaky bacon, 3 litres of water. I brought this to the boil, skimmed, and them simmered for about four hours before reducing slightly. I got about two litres of stock.

Because I use stock to make sauces which require substantial use of vegitables themselves, I prefer to try and extract the essence of the meat and leave it at that.
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by sparklylady:
We have a box of Shiitake mushrooms in the fridge that are begging to be cooked. Does anyone know of a reasonably simple Thai recipe that includes shiitake mushrooms, with maybe some prawns included or perhaps just veg?

a simple Thai yellow curry (kang karie/kao garie gye) is excellent with shiitakes. Use the prawns as well, and diced potatoes.

do you know how to do a yellow curry?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:

do you know how to do a yellow curry?

Get a green curry, and wait for autumn?

Sorry.

[ 18. September 2006, 07:41: Message edited by: Firenze ]
 
Posted by sparklylady (# 4391) on :
 
No, I dont know how to do a yellow curry. We improvised in the end - made a red curry with some red curry paste, peppers, crayfish, beansprouts, mange tout (sugarsnap peas), baby corn, the mushrooms, some coconut milk and a squeeze of lime. I am happy to say that it turned out great, and I will definitely be improvising again! [Yipee]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Cod, did you roast the bones first?
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
ooooh sparkly, that sounds lovely!

a yellow curry is simple - coconut milk, a dash of fish sauce, and yellow curry paste to taste. then cook your meat and veg in the resulting thick, soupy stuff. serve with rice if you like, or just fill it with enough potatoes and eat it like soup. it's one of the family workday standards here.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
I'd second KenWritez -- most recipes want you to oven roast the bones for a couple of hours at least before you carry on.

When making chicken/turkey stock out of a previously cooked carcase, it's normal to add a carrot or two, an onion or two and perhaps a couple of bay leaves to the water when you start the boil. The same is probably true of making beef stock.

John
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I've discovered the answer to Cod's query.

Gristle.

I had the other end of the joint I braised, but in this case roasted. Beef still very nice, but rather more tough bits on account of the dry method of cooking.

What your stock needs, besides bones, is a nice, gelatinous bit of shin or oxtail.
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I had dinner with friends yesterday, who demanded that I come prepared to make a corn souffle which they've enjoyed in the past. It's not *really* a souffle (doesn't rise like one!) but it is a nice corn dish, one we've used in my family for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners since I was in high school ('way back, yup).

The four of us inhaled this last night; easily doubled & served in a larger pan.

Corn "Souffle"
2 Tablespoons sugar
2 Tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon salt

3 eggs
1 cup milk
16 oz can cream-style corn
2-3 Tablespoons butter

Slightly beat eggs. Mix the dry ingredients and add to the eggs, mix it up. Add the milk and then the corn.

Melt the butter, coat small casserole dish --if it's microwave safe, I just lob the butter in & nuke it briefly and coat the sides & then add corn mixture to it; OTHERWISE--> add butter to other ingredients, pour into casserole and bake at 350 F. for 40-55 minutes, depending on size of the dish & depth of the mixture. Knife inserted in middle will come out clean and the dish takes on a lovely golden brownish top (the edges are lovely and crusty!).
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
Thanks to Firenze and Kenwritez,

Ken, no I haven't tried roasting the bones. What difference does this make to the stock, and how long should I roast them for?

Firenze, advice noted. Down here, oxtail is nearly as expensive as rump steak!
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
I knew a man who could make incredible beef stock and he roasted the bones. Here's a stock recipe involving roasted bones at All Recipes.
 
Posted by Tea gnome (# 9424) on :
 
Can anybody tell me how to make yoghurt? Lakeland sells a yoghurt making machine, and some stuff that comes as a powder, which seems too disgusting for words. I'm getting fed up of the amount of waste I generate as yoghurt pots, and thought maybe I could put them to good use making my own. But I don't know how.
Thankyou,
Gnome
 
Posted by gizzie (# 11715) on :
 
we used to make yoghourt a long time ago, very simply. Mix a couple of tablespoonfuls of good quality live plain yoghourt( best from health food shop or similar) into a pint of milk which is hand-hot ( mustn't be too hot or it kills the stuff). Then put it all into a thermos flask, close and leave overnight. You can then use some of the new yoghourt to make another batch. Never used any of those special powders.
It did work but this was a long time ago!
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
oh, I like that - the thermos idea is very good. Yeah, basically the "yoghurt machines" simply heat the invidiual pots to that bit-warmer-than-body-temperature place at which the bacteria thrive.
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Please excuse the double post but I've been reading through this thread (and saving recipes) and just found that, back in March, Welease Woderick said that coriander and cilantro are the same thing! I never knew that - so do any of you British sorts have a good Carrot & Coriander soup recipe?

It's one of my faves and we just don't DO it over here... but now, knowing that Coriander = cilantro, heh heh heh... *thank you*
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Um, I'm not so sure about that identification. Maybe cilantro is one form of coriander?
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
well, after reading WW's post, I found this site, which seems to indicate American usage is to call the leaves cilantro and the seeds coriander... but what do I know? Not as much as I'd like, and willing to learn.
 
Posted by Mousethief (# 953) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LynnMagdalenCollege:
well, after reading WW's post, I found this site, which seems to indicate American usage is to call the leaves cilantro and the seeds coriander... but what do I know? Not as much as I'd like, and willing to learn.

That's what I've heard. Also "Chinese parsley" for the leaves.
 
Posted by sparklylady (# 4391) on :
 
Oh, I make an absolutely gorgeous carrot and coriander soup and it's so, SO easy. I will make it tonight to refresh my memory and I'll report back tomorrow [Smile]

[ 20. September 2006, 07:41: Message edited by: sparklylady ]
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
I make yogurt same as gizzie, mostly. but I heat the milk (3 cups, maybe?) until it just begins to get little bubbles on the edges. then cool to fingertip temp. then whisk in the tablespoon or two (I've never measured) of live yogurt. then pour into jars - pint size, usually, cap, wrap in warm towels and keep in a warm spot - top cupboard, over the pilot light on the stove top, shelf near the wood stove - wherever you'd keep your rising bread.

next morning, viola! fresh yogurt. ten times better than storebought.

when you get down to your last few tablespoons, make more.
 
Posted by gizzie (# 11715) on :
 
thanks for reminding me , cometchaser , that the milk must be heated up to nearly boiling and then cooled, very important! I must have a go again soon.
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
ooooh, I'm so happy! carrot and coriander soup! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by gizzie (# 11715) on :
 
Cilantro (pron. cheelantro)is Italian for coriander. It seems that in the US this name is just used for the leaves. This side of the pond we say coriander leaves or seeds. If a recipe just said coriander I would presume it meant the leaves.
Soups - I made a lovely one recently with butternut squash using 1 butternut squash, 1 onion, Maggi vegetable bouillon, garlic.
 
Posted by OliviaG (# 9881) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by gizzie:
Cilantro (pron. cheelantro)is Italian for coriander. It seems that in the US this name is just used for the leaves.

In the Americas, you are more likely to hear the Spanish pronunciation, seelantro. OliviaG
 
Posted by Caz... (# 3026) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by OliviaG:
quote:
Originally posted by gizzie:
Cilantro (pron. cheelantro)is Italian for coriander. It seems that in the US this name is just used for the leaves.

In the Americas, you are more likely to hear the Spanish pronunciation, seelantro. OliviaG
Brilliant! I've heard this and never knew what exotic thing it was - and I have it growing, right there on my windowsill [Big Grin] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Here on the west coast of the US, I've always seen and heard "cilantro" (pr. 'see-LAN-trrro', gotta trill the Rs) referring to the whole plant.
 
Posted by OliviaG (# 9881) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Here on the west coast of the US, I've always seen and heard "cilantro" (pr. 'see-LAN-trrro', gotta trill the Rs) referring to the whole plant.

But the ground seed pods are still coriander, right? Or do I have to re-organize my spice rack? [Ultra confused] OliviaG
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Yep, its all coriander. Leaves, flowers, seeds. All the same name.
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
'kay, then what's cumin? I thought it was the ground cilantro seeds?
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Cumin is powdered cilantro/coriander. I don't know if it's leaves + stems or just the leaves, or some other part(s) entirely. ken?

BTW, I ran across this cool foodie website.
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
I though cumin was something quite different. Certainly, I have separate jars of coriander and cumin seeds, and were I to confuse the two, my cooking would have some odd results.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
Yep. Coriander and cilantro are the same plant (Coriandrum sativum) but cumin is a different plant (Cuminum cyminum) from the same family (Apiaceae). Cilantro leaves and cumin are both good in chili con carne. [Yipee]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
I comfortably sit corrected. [Big Grin] The Ship of Fools: Avenue of Education!

[Change of subject]

Has anyone found a retail or online outlet for discounted Le Creuset pans? I really want a 9 quart Dutch oven, but the cheapest LC here I've found is about $160.

[ 21. September 2006, 17:33: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
((Lynn, drumming fingers on desk, hoping sparkly lady comes back soon with carrot & coriander soup... yum!))
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Has anyone found a retail or online outlet for discounted Le Creuset pans?

There is a Le Creuset outlet store quite near me. Let me know if you need any local assistance.
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
By the way, Mr. P and I recently acquired a sausage-stuffing attachment for our KitchenAid mixer. Does anyone have any favorite sausage recipes?
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Comet, I was just about to ask how to make yogurt!

KenW asked on the Scottish thread that I post the recipe for Scottish Tablet. I have never made this traditional confection. However, Zipporah posted the recipe a few years back.

Zipporah's Tablet

[ 27. September 2006, 05:45: Message edited by: babybear ]
 
Posted by Cod (# 2643) on :
 
Is anyone here a dab hand at Bakewell Tart?
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
Pak Choi is my question du jour!

For some unknown reason I want to try it but am not sure how to cook it. I'm assuming that it's good in stir fries but can one have it in place of cabbage with a Sunday Roast, for example?

Any ideas chefs?
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Dolphy, I had no idea what pak choi was until I Googled it and discovered it was my old friend bok choy (aka Chinese cabbage), as it's known in my part of the US.

I've used it in soups, stir-fries and even roasted and sauteed it. IME very hot, rapid cooking is kindest to it, keeping an al dente crunch as long as you don't overcook it.

A stir-fry in a large, cast-iron skillet (if you don't have a wok) is ideal, just start the pan with some vegetable oil (not olive), heat it over high heat until the oil shimmers, then add the chopped bok choy and a few dashes of soy sauce, ditto of white wine, and a tablespoon or three (depending on taste) of oyster sauce. Cook for about 2 minutes, stirring every few seconds. Remove and serve immediately.

Now that I've babbled on, to your question about the Sunday Roast. I'm unsure how to answer it since I don't know what's involved in your SR and how you cook your cabbage for it. ISTM bok choy doesn't require the same long cooking times as green or purple cabbage--bok choy has a more delicate flavor and cellular structure, and long cooking would turn it to mush. However, YMMV. Someone else may know more about this than I do.

[ 29. September 2006, 13:26: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by dolphy (# 862) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Dolphy, I had no idea what pak choi was until I Googled it and discovered it was my old friend bok choy (aka Chinese cabbage), as it's known in my part of the US.

Mea cupla. I also googled it and found out it was also called [b]bok choy[/].
Thanks for your advice, and I will try the stir fry.

As for having it with the likes of a Sunday roastie, I was meaning instead of having cabbage, something to go with lamb chops or whatever...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Going back to Yoghurt - we buy fresh, untreated milk every Sunday when we have lunch in HWMBO's village and untreated makes far better yoghurt than treated. Buffalo milk, if you can get it, makes it better still.

After lunch fresh live yogurt with perhaps a few jaggery banana chips or a small drizzle of honey is simple and so delicious!
 
Posted by Meg the Red (# 11838) on :
 
Does anybody have a nice recipe for brussels sprouts? Canadian thansgiving is coming soon, So I'm re-embarking on my mission to teach my nieces to Try Something New. The last few years, I've made a variation on a Gourmet magazine recipe that involves braising them with some garlic in chicken stock, then tossing them with bacon and Dijon mustard. Goes over well with the oldies, but the girls go all over, like, icky!

Is there something you think might make them more palatable to the Pizza Hut-addicted young'uns? Or should I just give up and throw cheese sauce on anything vaguely vegetable-ish?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Peel them, halve them, halve some button mushrooms and some water chestnut and stir fry them all together [sprouts in first, then mushrooms then water chestnuts] with a dash of soy sauce, or possibly oyster sauce.

Delicious!
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
I'm having a scone dilemma, in that when I make them they are similar to risen rock cakes and pretty dry.

I am also trying to cook them with the sugar substitute stuff, but I don't think that this makes a difference as when I tried it with real sugar it wasn't any better.

They aren't being cremated, and the mixture is pretty moist going into the oven. I suspect that I should cook them at a lower heat and for longer (using up all my daily reserves of patience no doubt), but just wanted to pick your brains about how you culinary geniuses made yours.
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Meg the Red, if you serve several vegetables it's okay for the girls to go "ick!" and leave the nice garlicky-bacony brussel sprouts for the adults and let the girls eat whatever other veg you prepare... I don't like brussel sprouts myself, although with garlic & bacon, I'd be willing to try 'em!

In the meantime, I'm still hoping for that carrot & coriander soup recipe...
 
Posted by Talmudnik (# 9339) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LynnMagdalenCollege:
In the meantime, I'm still hoping for that carrot & coriander soup recipe...

You might like this version (amounts given are approx):

Saute 2 medium, choppped onions in 2-3 tbsp butter. Add 6 medium carrots which have been peeled and chopped. Suate until lightly browned. Add broth (amount will depend on whether you want a thick or thin soup). Season with salt, pepper, and your favourite curry powder (I use a Rajasthani one - rather hot). Cook until carrots are done. Puree the lot. When serving, spoon a dollop of thick yoghurt into each bowl and garnish with chopped cilantro/coriander leaves. This dish also works very well with roasted acorn squash instead of carrots.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
Is there a recipie for red beans and rice buried in here?
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Catrine:
I'm having a scone dilemma, in that when I make them they are similar to risen rock cakes and pretty dry.
{snip} I suspect that I should cook them at a lower heat and for longer (using up all my daily reserves of patience no doubt), but just wanted to pick your brains about how you culinary geniuses made yours.

My guess is that you should cook them at higher heat for a shorter time. I have never made scones, but I have a lot of experience baking cakes, cookies, etc.

The longer I bake something, the drier it gets.

Moo

[ 29. September 2006, 22:31: Message edited by: Moo ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Catrine:
I'm having a scone dilemma, in that when I make them they are similar to risen rock cakes and pretty dry.
{snip} I suspect that I should cook them at a lower heat and for longer (using up all my daily reserves of patience no doubt), but just wanted to pick your brains about how you culinary geniuses made yours.

My guess is that you should cook them at higher heat for a shorter time. I have never made scones, but I have a lot of experience baking cakes, cookies, etc.

The longer I bake something, the drier it gets.

Moo

. . . and use sour milk to make the dough.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
Is there a recipie for red beans and rice buried in here?

I haven't made this, but it looks good:
New Orleans-Style Red Beans and Rice
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
Right on, Ken. The minute I saw your post I thought, "I bet Ken came through for me..."
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Brussel Sprouts can be made into a puree with cream - I've done it, years ago, and the recipe isn't in the book I thought it was in, which means it could take some time to find. Personally, I couldn't see the point, but I like sprouts, anyway.

Red kidney beans and rice is something I used to do in the slow cooker before anyone knew about having to boil the things for 10 minutes plus before eating. It was fine if I left it all day and it was more than cooked when I got back to it, but was stomach ache on a plate at the correct cooking times. The proportions were 0.25kg/0.5lb of uncooked beans and brown rice, 2 onions, 3 garlic cloves, 1 tsp chervil, salt and pepper, water, 3-4 tbs tomato paste, 1 cracked ham bone, 1 tbs oil.
 
Posted by Siegfried (# 29) on :
 
I like marinating chicken breasts in yoshida sauce (asian sauce sort of a cross between soy and teryaki) and onion, then stirfying that with some brocoli, bok choy and onion and some ginger root. Very quick and tasty over rice.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Catrine:
I'm having a scone dilemma,

If you can get buttermilk, there's a versatile dough/batter that I used to use a lot.

The basic ingredients are white flour, sugar, pinch of salt, teasp baking powder and the buttermilk. Made quite runny, and dropped on a hot, greased surface, it makes what I called pancakes, but some would call drop scones. Made firmer, and cut in rings, and deep fried until crisp, then rolled in sugar - gravy rings/doughnuts. Slightly firmer again, some dried fruit, baked in a fairly hot oven - soda bread (if shaped in a cake) or scones.

Sliced apple through as well, also good.

I am sorry to be vague about quantities, but I had it from my mother, whose instructions began 'A handful of sugar to two handfuls of flour...'
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
Firenze, by baking in a fairly hot oven, how hot do you mean and for how long?

I'm feeling the need to bake some tomorrow morning for breakfast...Mmmmmm (hopefully)
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Catrine:
Firenze, by baking in a fairly hot oven, how hot do you mean and for how long?

Ah. This is the problem with Lore Handed Down - and originally road-tested in solid-fuel ranges, or, indeed, gridles over open fires.

This recipe here is, I think, near enough. (You can use wholemeal if you like, but, in our house, it was plain + fruit, or apple, or with a tablespoon of treacle mixed in).

[ 30. September 2006, 18:44: Message edited by: Firenze ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
This conversion website might just help with questions such as "how hot is hot?"

Jengie
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
We had sprout soup with bacon and nutmeg in it at a friend's house once, which was pretty palatable. I don't have a recipe though.

Does anybody have any ideas for healthy ways to disguise the taste of bananas? I need to boost my potassium intake - getting cramps because of pregnancy - but the only way I like bananas is in the form of cake (where the taste is masked with copious quantities of cinnamon)!
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Banana and chocolate milkshake

1 banana
6 tsp drinking chocolate
milk
1 Tsp of boiling water

Put the banana in a blender and blitz.
Put drinking chocolate powder in a mug, and add a tablespoon of boiling water, and mix. Add this to the banana mush. Then add milk to give a total volume of about 500ml, or 1 pt. Blitz until everything is well combined.

The banana gives body and some thickness to the milkshake, but the drinking chocolate hides the taste.

If you don't have drinking chocolate powder, use some cocoa powder and sugar instead.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Just had a thought, and it wsa too late to edit my post above.

Bananas are often though to be very high in potassium, but there are other foods which are quite a few times higher in potassium that bananas. eg. potatoes baked in their jackets and the skins eaten contain one and half times the amount of potassium of a banana (weight for weight).

A kiwi fruit has about the same amount of potassium as a banana. Dried, ready to eat apricots are worth 4 times a banana (weight for weight).

Other potassium rich foods

I rather like a banana chopped over museli, but you could add a handful of dried fruit to breakfast cereal, or some copped apricots. A kiwi fruit makes a lovely little snack, and a handful of raisins could be a tasty treat after lunch.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
That's good to know, babybear - maybe I'll just stick to dried apricots then, which I usually have around anyway! [Smile]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
To bb's recipe I recommend adding a handful of ice cubes and letting the blender crush them. They'll keep the shake colder longer, and add a nice texture. I'd also add a dash each of cinnamon and nutmeg.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LynnMagdalenCollege:


In the meantime, I'm still hoping for that carrot & coriander soup recipe...

Whilst you're waiting on SparklyLady here's one that I just made (and made up!) and am eating now and thoroughtly enjoying. Not as spicy as Talmudnik's, more fresh coriander flavour.

Saute one onion in olive oil.
Add quarter teaspoon ground coriander seed.
Add 8 chopped carrots.
Cover with stock (I used Marigold powder - any veggie stock will do or even water). Simmer very gently for 30+ mins.
Add v large handful coriander/cilantro leaves and stalks. (The amount I used would easily fill my cupped hands together so the flavour really sings out).
Blend.
Season.

Gives you two large bowls or four smaller ones. Add more water/stock if it's too thick after blending. You could also add cream/creme fraiche/yoghurt, but to be honest after blending it was nice and thick so I didn't bother.
 
Posted by GoodCatholicLad (# 9231) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by OliviaG:
quote:
Originally posted by gizzie:
Cilantro (pron. cheelantro)is Italian for coriander. It seems that in the US this name is just used for the leaves.

In the Americas, you are more likely to hear the Spanish pronunciation, seelantro. OliviaG
I really like every herb and spice out there but cilantro. I loathe it
it reminds me of dishwashing soap. Cilantro is like a Bjork CD you either like her or not. I love Bjork's music.
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
Per Cusanus's request over on the Christmas Foods thread, I am posting my recipe for home-candied citrus peel and Anna's Fruitcake.

Candied Citrus Peel

Use a grapefruit spoon to strip away the white pith from the peel of 1 dozen citrus (I like oranges best for the following recipe). Cut into julienne. Place in saucepan and rinse once, then cover with cold water, bring to the boil, reduce heat and simmer 45 minutes. Drain and repeat twice. Drain.

Combine 1 bottle Karo light corn syrup and 1 c. sugar with peel, along with enough water to cover. Bring to boil and simmer briskly until liquid is somewhat reduced and translucent. Let sit 6 to 8 hours or overnight. Drain. Spread on buttered cookie sheet and dry off in slow oven (about 275 degrees F). Yield: about 2 and 1/2 cups.

Anna's Fruitcake

Cream together 1/2 c. softened butter with 1 c. sugar, 1 egg, and 1 t. each almond extract and vanilla. In a separate bowl, mix together 2 c. flour, 1 t. each salt and ground cinnamon, and 1/2 t. each ground cloves and nutmeg. In a pitcher, mix 1 c. plus 2 T. milk and 1 and 1/2 t. baking soda.

Add flour mixture and milk mixture alternately to butter mixture. When done, beat 3 minutes.

Add the candied peel from the previous recipe, 6 oz. toasted slivered almonds, 1 c. chopped marzipan, and 2 c. white raisins. Line bread pans with buttered and floured parchment and pour in batter---this will fill 1 medium and 1 small loaf pan. Bake at 350 degrees F.---45 minutes for small, 1 hour for medium. Unmold after cooling for 10 minutes, then cool completely (very important).

In a pitcher, mix as much Grand Marnier and Amaretto as you like, then paint the cakes with them. Wrap and store in a cool place until Christmas, drizzling the cakes weekly with the liquor mixture.

Eat in good health and with thanks to the good God, Creator of oranges and almonds.

[Angel]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
That's good to know, babybear - maybe I'll just stick to dried apricots then, which I usually have around anyway! [Smile]

I've just done up a batch of apricot/applesauce for the wee wan, but it's yummy enough for me (so I sometimes steal a bite or two).

1 eating apple, diced
5 dried ready-to-eat apricots, cut into small bits

Simmer until soft and then mash. It's good enough to eat as is, but you could add cinnamon or nutmeg and maybe a little sugar if you wanted!
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
And that is soooo not what I come here to post. But I've just remembered ... Kelly, I don't know if you've done the red beans and rice yet, but I've just done some for dinner and tweaked the Emeril recipe a little (for one I didn't want to serve 8 and for two I didn't have 4 hours to cook).

I substituted tinned kidney beans for the dry beans which actually halved the cooking time on the recipe (not to mention I didn't have to soak the beans overnight), because the beans were much softer and were able to be mashed after an hour. The beans were also in a flavoured sauce (chilli and coriander) which added a bit more flavour to the dish. I used bacon instead of ham (it was what I had on hand) and chorizo as the sausage (again for a bit of extra kick). It is very, very yummy and was easy peasy to make.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
That's good to know, babybear - maybe I'll just stick to dried apricots then, which I usually have around anyway! [Smile]

Warning, Apricots have laxative properties that beat figs, licorice and prunes into a cock hat. Even people who are unaffected by the others note the effect of too many apricots.

Jengie
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Combine 1 bottle Karo light corn syrup and 1 c. sugar with peel, along with enough water to cover. Wow, Anna, a bottle of corn syrup isn't sweet enough on its own?! No wonder it's called "candied" !!
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LynnMagdalenCollege:
Combine 1 bottle Karo light corn syrup and 1 c. sugar with peel, along with enough water to cover. Wow, Anna, a bottle of corn syrup isn't sweet enough on its own?! No wonder it's called "candied" !!

I know. If one tastes the resulting syrup at this point---not that I would ever do such a thing, you understand---it induces a lightheaded state that redefines the phrase "sugar high." My mom used to use Karo corn syrup to revive her diabetic cat when he'd go off kilter. I figure that as a true daughter of the Land of Lincoln, it's the least I can do to keep the state's corn industry going.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Tonight for small group I cooked, and worked out two recipes I thought came out very well! They are an entree and a dessert. Both are simple and don't require loads of prep.

Note: All measurements in US!

Dead Red Chili

(This is almost a beef bourgunion with beans, or perhaps a French version of chili: "chilé." I call it "Dead Red" because it's a great way to use up the half-filled bottles of red wine that seem to accumulate.)

+ 5 lbs steak beef, cut into bite size chunks or very coarsely ground ("chili grind")
+ 1 lb coarse ground pork or ground pork sausage
+ 32 oz beef stock (store bought is fine, I recommend Swanson's)
+ 1 T concentrated beef stock
+ At least one 750 ml bottle's equivalent of any dry red wine(s).
+ 1 bottle dark beer
+ 1/4 c vinegar
+ 1 cup orange, cranberry, or raspberry fruit juice (but not apple)
+ 6 medium white or yellow onions, coarsely diced
+ 2 T minced garlic
+ 2 x 6 oz. cans tomato paste
+ 15 oz can tomato sauce
+ 2 x 15 oz cans favorite beans, drained (pinquito, kidney, Great Northern, pinto, black, etc.)
+ Vegetable oil
+ Salt and black pepper to taste


1. In a large, thick-bottomed stockpot over medium high heat, add vegetable oil and heat until shimmering (just prior to smoking.) Sear the beef in batches to avoid overcrowding. Allow the beef to caramelize somewhat. Drain all fat and reserve it for another use.

2. In a frying pan over medium heat, fry the pork sausage until done. Break up pork into crumbled meat. Drain all fat and reserve it for another use.

3. Add beer and all red wine to the stockpot. (Add as much red wine as you like; I'd stop at 2 bottles.) Simmer and reduce by at least 1/2.

4. Add all ingredients to stockpot. Simmer on low heat for at least 4 hours, stirring often. If you can't stir that often, place a comal or a heat diffuser under the pot.

As an alternative to the stove, preheat your oven to 350 degrees F and place the rack on the second lowest position. Bake the chili for the indicated time, stirring occasionally. Meat should be very tender and easily tined with a fork.

5. Remove chili from stove or oven. Serve in warmed bowls with cornbread, rice or buttered noodles. Serve with cold beer or ale, champagne, or a medium red, such as a Malbec.

Serves about 10-12.

=====================

Cranberry Ricotta Surprise

(Because I was surprised this recipe--which I invented as I went--came out so well!)

+ 1 lb fresh cranberries, picked over for moldy berries or detritus
+ 1 lb whole milk ricotta cheese
+ 1 lb graham cracker crumbs (or enough crumbs to fully line the inside of a 9" x 9" baking pan plus 1-2 cups reserved)
+ 1 c + 3/4 c white table sugar
+ 1 1/2 c melted butter
+ 1/2 t vanilla
+ Pinch salt
+ Zest of 1 orange
+ 2 cups orange juice
+ 2 cups orange muscat wine or any muscat
+ 1 c water


1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Grease a 9" x 9" baking pan.

3. In a large bowl, add melted butter to cracker crumbs. Stir thoroughly to saturate crumbs with melted butter.

4. Using your hands, firmly pack the crumbs around the inside of the baking pan to build a crust. Add more melted butter if mixture is too dry.

5. In a large, heavy-bottomed Dutch oven (not cast iron) add cranberries, water, orange juice, zest, wine and bring to a boil.

6. Add 1 cup sugar, stir until all sugar is dissolved.

7. Simmer for 20-30 minutes or until most of the cranberries have popped open, stirring every few minutes. (Note: Mixture will stick and burn if not stirred! Or if any of it gets on your skin.)

8. While mixture is simmering, in a medium bowl, add ricotta and 3/4 c suagr. Stir to combine.

9. Remove berry sauce from heat and allow to cool for several minutes. Add salt, ricotta cheese and vanilla. Stir quickly to incorporate cheese and vanilla.

10. Add mixture to prepared pan. Evenly sprinkle top of mixture with reserved crumbs.

11. Bake 30-45 minutes, depending on taste.

ALTERNATIVE: Do not bake this dessert. Instead, after sprinkling top of mixture with crumbs, chill dessert until mixture is firm but not hard.

Serve with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

Serves about 10.

[ 06. October 2006, 06:56: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Going back to apricots for a moment...

I made an apricot spong for my Mam, who is an apricot lover. It is based on a 3-egg Victoria Sponge recipe.

150g (6oz) Self Raising flour
150g (60z) castor sugar
150g (60z) margarine
3 medium eggs
9 ready to eat dried apricot halves

Make a small dice of the apricots, either by using a knife, or popping the apricots in a food processor. Add in the rest of the ingredients and mix well.

Grease a ring mould (Bunt cake tin), and cook at 180C/350F/Gas 4 for about 15 minutes. When the cake is cooked, remove from the time and apply an icing glaze whilst the cake is still warm.

The important part of the recipe is the ratio of apricots to egg, 3 apricot halves to each egg. This ratio gives a gentle apricot flavour to the cake, and then little chunks of apricot.

You could use any sponge cake recipe you like. You could also change the type of tin you use, eg a sandwich tin, or a Swiss Roll tin. A good filling would be the cream cheese icing/frosting often used on carrot cake.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
apricot spong

Mmmmmmm ... sacrilicious ...
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Flausa: [Razz]

I am after some low GI recipes, particulary for evening meals. I can't 'do' beef, chillies or eggs; they do not agree with my stomach.

Thanks,

bb
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Chickpeas are low GI, according to the can.

We had a chickpea and bacon dish in Greece which was fab. My attempt to reproduce it yesterday wasn't bad either.

Dry fry some bacon cut into tiny dice - they're more for flavour than noticing so use to taste.

Add one tin of chickpeas, half a packet of passata, some herbs (I used parsley, oregano and a bay leaf), black pepper, a dash of Worcester sauce and a dash of ketchup (not very Greek but they tasted nice!). Simmer for 30 mins to 1 hour, making sure it doesn't dry out - I had to add quite a lot of water.

Sorry that's all a bit vague, but it's one of those experimental things!

We served it with cous cous, and I think that's low GI too. Don't know about the bacon!
 
Posted by The Great Gumby (# 10989) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
We had a chickpea and bacon dish in Greece which was fab. My attempt to reproduce it yesterday wasn't bad either.

I can vouch for that. If the bacon's a problem, a pinch of salt would probably do instead - the bacon mainly seems to be there to flavour the sauce.
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
Meat has no GI (or rather, no glycaemic load) as it has no carbohydrate.
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
quote:
KenW said:
I call it "Dead Red" because it's a great way to use up the half-filled bottles of red wine that seem to accumulate.

Not at my house [Big Grin] At my house, it's the white wine that sits around and goes historic on me.

Flausa, I was reading "sacrilicious" and "spong" and I can't tell you how long it took me to figure out that BabyBear meant "sponge" - !!! *slaps forehead*
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
I adore pumpkin bread, and I used to have a recipe for it that was absolutely divine. Sadly, I lost the recipe, so I'm in search of a new recipe favorite pumpkin bread recipe.

Please post your favorites!

Thanks!
 
Posted by fabula rasa (# 11436) on :
 
Ditto here for pumpkin pie.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Here are two of my favorite pumpkin recipes:

Pumpkin Bread
4C flour
1 tsp baking soda
4 tsp baking powder
2 tsp salt
2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp nutmeg
1 can (2C) pumpkin
2C sugar
1C milk
4 eggs
1/2 C soft butter or marg
2 C chopped pecans

Sift together first 6 ingredients. Mix together pumpkin, sugar, milk, and eggs. Add dry ingredients and butter to the pumpkin mixture. Stir in the chopped pecans. Spread into well-greased loaf pan and bake at 350 for 45-55 minutes. (Note: I've found it cooks better in two smaller loaf pans rather than the larger one.)

Frost-On-The-Pumpkin Bars
These always get rave reviews:
4 eggs
1 2/3 Cup sugar
1 16-oz can pumpkin
1C vegetable oil
2 C sifted all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cloves
1/4 tsp ginger
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda

Preheat oven to 350. Beat together in a small bowl the eggs, sugar, oil, and pupkin until light and fluffy. Sift together the dry ingredients, add to pumpkin and mix thoroughly. SPread batter evenly in a 15x10x1-inch baking pan. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until center springs back when lightly touched. Cool, then frost.

Frosting:
1 3-oz package cream cheese, softened
1/2 C butter, softened
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 C powdered (confectioners') sugar

In small bowl, beat cream cheese and add butter. Mix until blended. Stir in vanilla. Add powdered sugar gradually, beating well after each addition. Frost and cut into bars.
(Note: The bars are quite moist; you can possibly cut back to 3 eggs if you're using large ones, or fiddle a little with the eggs/oil ratio)
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Pumpkin Pie

2 eggs
1/2 cup white sugar
1 cup tinned pumpkin (NOT pumpkin pie filling)
[or I suppose you could cook and puree real pumpkin, but that's a lot of work]
1 cup milk
1/2 tsp. each of cinnamon, ginger, allspice

Beat eggs,
Add spices, sugar, pumpkin and mix
Add milk and mix
Pour into Pie shell - probably 8 or 9 inch
Bake at 450 degrees F for 10 minutes
Bake at 350 degrees F until set - if you put a knife in the centre and the cut stays or it looks dry in the cut then it is done.

The centre should look and feel firm-ish.

Serve slightly warm with crystallized ginger and/or whipped cream.

The amount of spice can be increased to taste, but that's probably the minimum amount of sugar. You can use whole milk or partly skimmed, but it's hard to get the custard right if you use no-fat milk.

I normally make double or triple this, but then we usually have people for dinner. Any custard over what the pie shell(s) will hold can be cooked in custard cups.


John
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
This isnt at all meant to be an attack - and probably shows a mistaken belief Ive inherited from childhood...

but if you buy the pie crust, and you buy the tinned pumpkin ... can you really say you made it without any guilt?

I think if you can it would ease my (self imposed?) burden on myself to cook "from scratch" which is usually what I think of if I think "cooking". (ie heating a tin of something up for dinner isnt really cooking....)
 
Posted by cometchaser (# 10353) on :
 
free yourself.

canned pumpkin is not cheating. its not the same as pumpkin pie filling. its just pumpkin. it's just saving a step. and not really any more expensive!

and if i couldn't buy frozen crust i wouldn't ever make pie. my crust sucks.

my pumpkin pie, however, is divine. [Big Grin]

I add the seasonings. I choose the quality of cream. I invented the recipe, and change it every year. I do the beating and the sampling and the baking. it's still art.

Comet

[ 07. October 2006, 06:08: Message edited by: cometchaser ]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
I had a marvelous experience tonight and since my wife was there with me, you guys are the only ones I can tell right now.

The Sturdy Wench had gone through a miserable last few weeks at work, so she was ready to be treated like an adult. She and I went to a new restaurant specializing in "big, rich dishes" and big wines. According to one of the owners (a master sommelier who chatted with us at closing), this restaurant is all about food and wine and not about snobbery or chef's personalities. They're all foodies themselves and they care about what they present to their customers.

Their food and wine bore out that philosophy completely. Something making the evening absolutely special was we were able to try some foods one or the other of us never had before: Foie gras, carpaccio, black truffle, turnips, caramelized onions in wine.

It's a small restaurant, seats around 40 people, located in an unfashionable part of town. (Two doors down a beer joint had their front door open to catch a breeze and prominently displayed was their sign, "No t-shirts, tanktops jerseys." Ah, the irony of juxtaposition.) But the interior is well designed and decorated with light taupe walls and white-painted side pillars, fluted molding, and corbels. The chairs are simple dark cherry armless and the tables are covered with the standard white cloths.

We were met with a small bread plate on which were four slices of a crusty whole olive baguette and several slices of sourdough next to three small ramekins of butter, baba ghanouj and foie gras. The baba ghanouj was a fine puree and we are used to a much coarser blend.

A word on foie gras. The word is "amazing." I, too, dislike liver. The only form of it I will eat is braunschweiger, and that loaded with onion and yellow mustard. While the SW didn't care for foie gras (she hates liver in any form), I basked in its velvety richness, the succulence and power of it, its' elegant yet simple earthy taste and aroma. This is food for the gods. When we left the restaurant, I had swiped clean the ramekin courtesy of a piece of sourdough. My sister would have been horrified, but after tasting this I took no prisoners. Foie gras or my sister's sensibilities? No need to think. Screw her sensibilities.

Starters was the beef carpaccio, with fried capers, arugula, hard-boiled egg slivers, parmesan-reggiano cheese shavings.

The Sturdy Wench ordered the marinated grilled tri-tip with haricot verts, roasted potato, and onions caramelized in red wine reduction.

I ordered the veal and black truffle meat loaf with baked macaroni and cheese, creamed turnips.

She had a 2004 zinfandel from Esca and I had a pinot noir from a winery whose name I have forgotten. The zin was wonderful; rich, fruity, smooth. I wouldn't order mine again, the barnyard aroma was a bit strong for my taste (although it smoothed out after decanting for about 30-45 minutes) but the Esca was delicious all the way through.

The SW and I shared our plates so we could try everything. The tri-tip was one of the finest pieces of meat I've ever had. It had been marinated overnight in a Cuban chimichurri sauce and then grilled to rare doneness. The meat was absolutely tender and the taste was smoky, beefy, with citrus undertones. The onions were rich and complemented the beef.

The potato was creamy without being soggy. didn't get any beans, she beat me to them.

The meat loaf was rich with a more understated beef taste with the distinct grain of typical meat loaf, seeded with truffle and herbs. The creamed turnips were baby turnips, cooked to an al dente creamy goodness. The mac and cheese was simple and hearty rotini, baked with a crispy top. The flavor of cheese carried through very well.

We were too full for individual deserts, so we split a chocolate hazlenut tort with strawberry coulis and premium vanilla ice cream with crumbled pistachio nut.

The owner said while they don't have the room for cooking classes, they do in-home catering and cooking classes. Their price was very reasonable so I think that will be my birthday present next year. I want to learn how to make that trip-tip, the potatoes and the meat loaf.

I wonder if I can get anyone here to volunteer as tasters? [Biased]

This was one of the best restaurant ecperiences of my life, and it could only better when shared with good friends and loved ones. This is what good food and good wine are all about, bringing people together and letting the edible art on their plate and in their glass tell them how much they're loved by the people around them.
 
Posted by Gort (# 6855) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
... I wonder if I can get anyone here to volunteer as tasters? [Biased]

<waves hand from back of room> That was the most orgasmic culinary experience I've read for some time. I'll gladly volunteer to taste the results of your cooking lessons!
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Emma.:
but if you buy the pie crust, and you buy the tinned pumpkin ... can you really say you made it without any guilt?

What Cometchaser said - (assuming you're buying pumpkin in a can, and not pumpkin pie filling in a can (and, this time of year, one must read the labels carefully!). My mom's pumpkin pie, always built off canned pumpkin, is brilliant and has ruined me for less noble pies, I tell you.

Ken, you are entirely right, foie gras is amazing. And yeah, I suspect you'll actually need to run a lottery to narrow down the field of prospective tasters! Count me in, please!!! (hey, I'll let you see the exceedingly low budget movie I produced-- not that it's worth seeing, mind you, just a rare curiosity! [Snigger] ).
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Unfortunately, the only place you can buy cans of pumpkin in the UK is Jerry's in London so we do have to puree the stuff.

Also, we only have pumpkin in the supermarkets for a few weeks at the end of October in the run up to Hallowe'en. I love pumpkin soup and fried pumpkin seeds, but only get them once or twice a year. Unless you grow them yourself or cook and freeze them yourself, of course.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
Here are two of my favorite pumpkin recipes:

Pumpkin Bread ... Frost-On-The-Pumpkin Bars

Mamacita, I've just used one of your pumpkin pie recipes that you've previously posted and yum! So I will be making another trip to the store to buy another pumpkin (and chopping, steaming, straining, and pureeing it, cuz no tinned pumpkin available here) to try one of those recipes. I also intend to freeze some of the pumpkin so I'll have it available for another time of year. I may even be willing to give pumkpin soup a try if comet posts her recipe (I'm always looking for different vegitarian recipes to try for when Jack the Lass comes to visit)!
 
Posted by The Prophetess (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
I had a marvelous experience tonight and since my wife was there with me, you guys are the only ones I can tell right now.

The Sturdy Wench had gone through a miserable last few weeks at work, so she was ready to be treated like an adult. She and I went to a new restaurant specializing in "big, rich dishes" and big wines. According to one of the owners (a master sommelier who chatted with us at closing), this restaurant is all about food and wine and not about snobbery or chef's personalities. They're all foodies themselves and they care about what they present to their customers.

Their food and wine bore out that philosophy completely. Something making the evening absolutely special was we were able to try some foods one or the other of us never had before: Foie gras, carpaccio, black truffle, turnips, caramelized onions in wine.

It's a small restaurant, seats around 40 people, located in an unfashionable part of town. (Two doors down a beer joint had their front door open to catch a breeze and prominently displayed was their sign, "No t-shirts, tanktops jerseys." Ah, the irony of juxtaposition.) But the interior is well designed and decorated with light taupe walls and white-painted side pillars, fluted molding, and corbels. The chairs are simple dark cherry armless and the tables are covered with the standard white cloths.

We were met with a small bread plate on which were four slices of a crusty whole olive baguette and several slices of sourdough next to three small ramekins of butter, baba ghanouj and foie gras. The baba ghanouj was a fine puree and we are used to a much coarser blend.

A word on foie gras. The word is "amazing." I, too, dislike liver. The only form of it I will eat is braunschweiger, and that loaded with onion and yellow mustard. While the SW didn't care for foie gras (she hates liver in any form), I basked in its velvety richness, the succulence and power of it, its' elegant yet simple earthy taste and aroma. This is food for the gods. When we left the restaurant, I had swiped clean the ramekin courtesy of a piece of sourdough. My sister would have been horrified, but after tasting this I took no prisoners. Foie gras or my sister's sensibilities? No need to think. Screw her sensibilities.

Starters was the beef carpaccio, with fried capers, arugula, hard-boiled egg slivers, parmesan-reggiano cheese shavings.

The Sturdy Wench ordered the marinated grilled tri-tip with haricot verts, roasted potato, and onions caramelized in red wine reduction.

I ordered the veal and black truffle meat loaf with baked macaroni and cheese, creamed turnips.

She had a 2004 zinfandel from Esca and I had a pinot noir from a winery whose name I have forgotten. The zin was wonderful; rich, fruity, smooth. I wouldn't order mine again, the barnyard aroma was a bit strong for my taste (although it smoothed out after decanting for about 30-45 minutes) but the Esca was delicious all the way through.

The SW and I shared our plates so we could try everything. The tri-tip was one of the finest pieces of meat I've ever had. It had been marinated overnight in a Cuban chimichurri sauce and then grilled to rare doneness. The meat was absolutely tender and the taste was smoky, beefy, with citrus undertones. The onions were rich and complemented the beef.

The potato was creamy without being soggy. didn't get any beans, she beat me to them.

The meat loaf was rich with a more understated beef taste with the distinct grain of typical meat loaf, seeded with truffle and herbs. The creamed turnips were baby turnips, cooked to an al dente creamy goodness. The mac and cheese was simple and hearty rotini, baked with a crispy top. The flavor of cheese carried through very well.

We were too full for individual deserts, so we split a chocolate hazlenut tort with strawberry coulis and premium vanilla ice cream with crumbled pistachio nut.

The owner said while they don't have the room for cooking classes, they do in-home catering and cooking classes. Their price was very reasonable so I think that will be my birthday present next year. I want to learn how to make that trip-tip, the potatoes and the meat loaf.

I wonder if I can get anyone here to volunteer as tasters? [Biased]

This was one of the best restaurant ecperiences of my life, and it could only better when shared with good friends and loved ones. This is what good food and good wine are all about, bringing people together and letting the edible art on their plate and in their glass tell them how much they're loved by the people around them.

You made that up.
 
Posted by Moth (# 2589) on :
 
Dearie me. I have just had a double culinary disaster! My apple crumble (made with apples from my tree in the garden) has boiled over, and my baked apples have exploded!

I wouldn't mind, but these were to take to a barbecue this afternoon! I should have stayed in the kitchen, rather than browsing the ship!

I have sort of salvaged the crumble by wrapping the now very sticky dish in a cloth; the baked apples are beyond salvation, though probably quite tasty!

The caremalised apple that boiled over out of the crumble, is, however, very, very good, and I'm eating it now. The way today is going, I'll doubtless spill it on the keyboard any minute now, but never mind!
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Dave took me on a motorcycle tour of Brittany a couple of years ago. On the advice of one of my work colleagues, we discovered the logis de France .

A logis is a 2 star hotel, with an excellent restaurant attached. We would arrive late and in motorcycle leathers, and the proprieter of the restaurant would knock up a little multi-course gourmet feast.

One night, for example this included Kir royale, foie gras pan fried with fruits including ripe figs (this was excellent), turbot, pork cooked with caramelized apple and iles flottante (a sort of marshmallowy meringue floating in an eggy custard) or chocolate mousse.

When we went to Mont St. Michel, our logis produced an amazingly good value feast, which included a mountain of assorted shellfish topped with langoustine, an excellent bottle of Muscadet and a choice of puddings to follow. The crepes Suzette was pretty fantastic. What crowned it all was the magnificent view of the salt marshes around the craggy medieval "island" that we enjoyed while we were eating.

When we stopped off in the "enchanted forest" of Arthurian legend, Broceliande, we stayed in the old inn in the village. They had mixed up our reservation, so were surprised to discover they had an extra pair of bikers for the evening. The proprietress popped off to the kitchen and put together a pair of seafood salads, just what we wanted on a hot August evening, strewn with prawns and salmon and garnished with caviar, perfectly complemented with cold Chablis and excellent breads from the village bakery. We were totally disarmed, and it turned out the reason for the disorganisation was that the son of the house was getting married in the old abbaye in the village the next morning - we enjoyed watching the couple trundle round the village in a horse and cart piled high with the bride's white lace train.

We hadn't intended to hit gastronomic high spots every day - it just seemed to happen that way, as good food is so important in French culture.

I think France may be your spiritual home, ken.

Btw, I have just finished Kate Muir's book "left Bank". Her character Olivier evokes the spirit of French gastronomy very well!
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
At RuthW's request in another thread, here is my pumpkin bread recipe. My college roomie's mother used to send this to us:

Mrs. D's Pumpkin Bread

2 cups canned pumpkin
1 cup oil (OR 1 cup applesauce) **
3 cups granulated sugar
4 eggs, beaten
3-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp ground cloves
1 tsp ground nutmeg
2 tsps salt

Mix ingredients together well and pour into two greased 8x4 or 9x5 loaf pans. Bake 1 hour at 350F.

** Original recipe calls for oil. In an effort to reduce the fat content, I began substituting the applesauce. It's more tender with the oil and a bit denser and chewier with the applesauce, but is really good either way. I usually add a dash or two each of white pepper and ground ginger in addition to the spices listed.
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Unfortunately, the only place you can buy cans of pumpkin in the UK is Jerry's in London so we do have to puree the stuff.

Thank you for the link - I thought it would be Jerry's but instead it's a lovely short essay on pumpkins, how to bake them, and several recipes. [Big Grin]

Ah, Welsh Dragon! I forgot about the logis de France - in 1990 I made a trip w/some friends and my son, 20 that year, and our driving portion from Paris down to Avignon took us through lovely valleys with fall-changing leaves. We took our time and stayed in 3 different places... lovely indeed! Great image, the bride and ooodles of lace in the horse-drawn cart...

I have some comparative pumpkin bread baking to do now - what a sorry state. [Biased]
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
My favorite pumpkin pie recipe is on the label of Libby's brand canned pumpkin found here. I add extra spices though. (cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, allspice, white pepper) I always prefer mine to anyone else's [Biased]
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
I found canned pumpkin online here . (scroll down a bit)

I might get some in at some stage - does anyone have an opinion on the sort they sell & its suitability for pumpkin pie?

[edited to add - cross posted with Penny Lane, and it is the brand she is recommending!]

[ 07. October 2006, 21:04: Message edited by: welsh dragon ]
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by welsh dragon:
I found canned pumpkin online here . (scroll down a bit)

I might get some in at some stage - does anyone have an opinion on the sort they sell & its suitability for pumpkin pie?

[edited to add - cross posted with Penny Lane, and it is the brand she is recommending!]

Yes, and no! What shows in the link is pie filling . It's already spiced and sweetened. What I use (and recommend) is the plain tinned pumpkin (same brand name, different product)
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
OK...on the same site, I found the canned pumpkin here .

Yikes! Can't believe the price! It's under a dollar here.
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
sheeesh, 4.40 pounds for the pie filling? At 2.89 the tinned pumpkin is better, but still so expensive - sorry, guys! I know it would cost more to ship it, but perhaps the next time I fly to the UK I'll bring some canned pumpkin... [Biased]

And yeah, the Libby's pie recipe is very nice, exactly as is - I'll have to try your additions of allspice and white pepper, Penny [Big Grin]
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
oooh, thinking of recipes that we get from packaging, my late and well-beloved Dad used to make fudge from the Hershey's Cocoa tin and one time they had a different selection of recipes on the container! He wigged out and from then on made sure to keep the paper label, back in the days when they had paper labels, for future reference. But now you can find it online - the only difference I see is that they now recommend lining a pan with foil (rather than lots of butter... but lots of butter has its own appeal!)

[ 07. October 2006, 21:39: Message edited by: LynnMagdalenCollege ]
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LynnMagdalenCollege:
oooh, thinking of recipes that we get from packaging,

They changed the recipe for Fantasy Fudge printed on the Kraft marshmallow creme jar. Fortunately, the original (and superior) one is available online. [Big Grin] My favorite fudge recipe (well, ok, fudge-like, if you're a purist...) is appropriately called 'Instant Relief Fudge'...perfect for those times when you Must Have Chocolate.

4 T butter
3 oz unsweetened chocolate
1/2 C light corn syrup (Karo)
1 T water
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 lb confectioners' (powdered) sugar
(optional: 1/2 C chopped nuts or 1 C miniature marshmallows)

Melt butter and chocolate together over low heat. Stir in corn syrup, water, and vanilla. Remove from heat and immediately stir in confectioners' sugar. *Spread into buttered 8-inch square pan. Cool and cut into squares.

From the * on is optimistic. In reality, as soon as the sugar is fully mixed in, one is spooning healthy chunks into one's mouth. After one is slightly sick, then the balance can be spread in a much smaller pan and left to cool. Let's be real here! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cometchaser:
free yourself.

canned pumpkin is not cheating. its not the same as pumpkin pie filling. its just pumpkin. it's just saving a step. and not really any more expensive!

and if i couldn't buy frozen crust i wouldn't ever make pie. my crust sucks.

my pumpkin pie, however, is divine. [Big Grin]

I add the seasonings. I choose the quality of cream. I invented the recipe, and change it every year. I do the beating and the sampling and the baking. it's still art.

I didn't realize till just now that the "filling" had the eggs and cream already in it! I thought it was just pre-spiced.

My paternal grandmother, whose pies were To.Die.For., always used canned pumpkin (she, of course, mixed her own eggs and cream in).

Neither my mother nor I, despite our other kitchen accomplishments, can "do piecrust" (although I keep trying) and my instructions are to get a pumpkin pie (and sometimes a berry pie - we all loves our berries) from a particular bakery whose PP are even better than Grandma's en route. (Meaning no disrespect to her memory - hers were the gold standard.)

Mom's Thanksgiving motto is "Keep it simple". Most things we make (my mother's giblet gravy is seriously good stuff), some things we buy. Before she got arthritis so bad, she was more than capable of putting on T-day dinner for six with some "strong man" help from my dad (and table-setting/dishwashing help), without making herself crazy and stressed out and not very thankful. Delegating the pie (and playing to her strengths) is part of the plan [Big Grin] .

Christmas is more flexible because we didn't feel socially obligated to eat pumpkin pie. *Sigh* - now I'm remembering my maternal grandmother, who used to make things like eclairs and buche du Noel for Christmas dessert, for twenty people - totally from scratch. I miss them both.

Charlotte
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
buche de Noel? Is that rather like one of those mini cream puff/profiterole wedding cakes popular in parts of Europe? (oooh, just looked it up - a yule log cake! I've had this, I just didn't know the name - buche de noel) how neat that you come from an elegant cooking tradition! My family cooking tradition involves the tremendous skill (which I don't believe I have) of feeding 25 men noontime dinner in the middle of threshing, where the whole thing has to be hot, good, ready to go, all at the same time.

One of my mom's piecrust secrets is using lard - it is better than either butter or shortening, makes for a very lovely flaky crust, as long as you don't overwork it. Obviously not vegan... [Biased]
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LynnMagdalenCollege:
One of my mom's piecrust secrets is using lard - it is better than either butter or shortening, makes for a very lovely flaky crust, as long as you don't overwork it. Obviously not vegan... [Biased]

I was taught to make shortcrust pastry with half butter and half lard.

Deborah
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I'm allergic to lard (and everything else that comes from a pig), so I make my pie crust with butter.

I cut frozen butter into pieces and put it in the food processor with flour. Then I pulse it until the butter is in very small pieces. Then I put it in a bowl and add just enough ice water to make it all stick together.

The flour you use to make pie crust is also very important. Flour that has a lot of gluten makes tough piecrust. I use White Lily flour, which is available in the South. Elsewhere, look for pastry flour.

Moo
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Well, I grew impatient waiting for comet to post her soup recipe (and Jack's over for lunch today), so here's what I've come up with (mixing some recipes together to come up with something that is very tasty, rich, and very autumnal).

Coconut-Curry Pumpkin Soup

1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic
2-3 carrots
500 g pureed pumpkin
1 sweet potato
1 tsp mild curry powder
1 tsp garam marsala
4-5 cups good vegetable stock
1 can coconut milk

Saute onions, garlic and carrot and sweet potato in butter or oil with the spices until onions are tender. Simmer in vegetable stock until the carrots and sweet potato are tender. Add the pumpkin puree and blend until smooth in a blender or food processor. Return to stove, add the coconut milk and simmer for 10 minutes (do not allow to boil).

Enjoy!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Welsh dragon's talk of the logis reminded me of a night a group of us spent in a gite one night. The lady of the house didn't realise that vegetarian don't eat meat [the French, on the whole, do not understand veggies very well] but she was up to the challenge and produced an omelette that in it's folded siize filled a meat platter and was filled with sauteed turnip! It was spectacular!

There were eight of us at the table and there was food left over - I shudder to think how many eggs went into it!

[ 08. October 2006, 13:02: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:

The Sturdy Wench ordered the marinated grilled tri-tip with haricot verts, roasted potato, and onions caramelized in red wine reduction.


Er, what's 'tri-tip'???

And as far as I'm concerned the least said about foie gras the better

(Cruelty aside, the one time I tasted it I thought it tasted revolting, far too fatty - your mileage obviously varies [Biased] )
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Dave seemed to like it at the time (but was surprised when I wrote the above to think that it was foie gras we had had). He also raised ideological objections (in retrospect). So we might think twice about having foie gras again when dining out...
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:

The Sturdy Wench ordered the marinated grilled tri-tip with haricot verts, roasted potato, and onions caramelized in red wine reduction.


Er, what's 'tri-tip'???

And as far as I'm concerned the least said about foie gras the better

(Cruelty aside, the one time I tasted it I thought it tasted revolting, far too fatty - your mileage obviously varies [Biased] )

Tri-Tip is a triangular-shaped piece of beef.

It's central to California central coast-style barbeque, marinated and barbequed. In the funny way such things happen, it was originally popular in cattle country because it was cheap meat and needed to be marinated to be tasty, and is now pricey because it's "traditional" and thus in demand (sort of like skirt and flank steak). Like flank steak, it is served sliced.

KW - Here's how I do it. Bonus recipe for Lamb on a Stick!

Re foie gras - had it once, when I was treated to dinner at a two-star restaurant in San Francisco (Aqua). Very, very interesting but I'm not a huge fan.

Charlotte
 
Posted by fabula rasa (# 11436) on :
 
Oh my word! I'm having MAJOR transatlantic culinary flashbacks! [Yipee]

Thank you so much to John Holding and Penny Lane for the recipes and PL and Curiosity killed... for info on where to find tinned pumpkin in the UK. I had no idea it was available and had resigned myself to pureeing it--so [Overused] !

Now, there's another American thing I'd like to get but can't remember what it's called. They're large, thin, very densely chocolaty wafers used for making something called "ice box cake"--layres of the wafers interspersed with whipped cream. (Kind of like an extended Oreo, but MUCH better.) I think they used to come in a yellow box. Can any kind passing Yank remind me of the name? And does any UK resident have any idea where to get them? (Couldn't see them on cybercandy.)

And now, not that I could ever top Ken, but my recommendation for the best Stateside culinary experience ever.

I will preface this by saying two things--I was very very very lucky to spend 10 years living around the corner from Chez Panisse, and love California cuisine. And I'm not much of a meat eater--it just doesn't really float my boat.

Having said that, the most incredible meal I ever had was at a place in San Diego called "Ruth's Chris's Steak House" [sic]. IIRC, there was an original "Chris's Steak House" somewhere (New Orleans???), and then someone named Ruth copied it...you get the idea.

They take top quality Aberdeen Angus (you know, the kind where each animal has its own human slave, who hand-picks the juiciest clumps of grass and feeds it to said beast while he reclines listening to the more soothing bits of Chopin...). Then they put it in a special oven at about 800 degrees, so it gets sealed immediately, and is sort of flash-cooked. It's utterly, utterly amazing. I was with an older friend--a v v trad Brit who never darkens the doors of anyplace that doesn't have at least two Michelin stars. He said it was the best beef he'd ever eaten.

I think Ruth's Chris's are in several places. If there's one near you, save your pennies and go try it.

here endeth the advert...
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by fabula rasa:
Now, there's another American thing I'd like to get but can't remember what it's called. They're large, thin, very densely chocolaty wafers used for making something called "ice box cake"--layres of the wafers interspersed with whipped cream.

Nabisco Famous Chocolate Wafers. They're actually sometimes difficult to find here. When they're available, they're usually found with the ice cream toppings, for some strange reason. The ice box cake you mention is delightful and so easy. Just layer whipped cream between wafers, making a 'log', then cover the entire with whipped cream. Refrigerate to let the cream soften the wafers, then slice on the diagonal to serve so the layers show. The recipe is on the package.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I do a similar pudding with ginger biscuits and cream - sometimes brandy whisked into the cream, or cocoa or both. Stick the biscuits together to make a log and then coat with cream, left to blend overnight.

You can also present it as a hedgehog by changing the shape and using sliced almonds as spines and currants for eyes and nose.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
When I still ate milk products I did a similar one with Tate and Lyle's Jamaica Ginger Cake, but I guess it could be done with their chocolate one, but the texture would be wrong.

Jengie

p.s. Imagine doing a baked Alaska with one of those cakes.
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
I do a similar pudding with ginger biscuits and cream - sometimes brandy whisked into the cream, <snip> You can also present it as a hedgehog by changing the shape and using sliced almonds as spines and currants for eyes and nose.

That sounds divine. I'll have to keep that in mind. The hedgehog sounds cute, too.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Prophetess:
You made that up.

[Confused]

[ 09. October 2006, 00:27: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
I know how foie gras is produced, veal and chicken as well. My family was in the dairy industry, after all. My conscience is untroubled when I eat these foods, so it's not an issue for me (shrug). I realize some people have different opinions and I respect them.
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I don't eat veal, but primarily because I don't like the taste of it, although I'll admit I'm more disturbed by the treatment of mammals than by the treatment of birds. I would love to see a world in which factory farming was not a reality - but that's not a world that we inhabit, and hardly any can (do you know how much hard work it is, being a "farm wife"?! *yikes!*). But hey, if any of y'all want to set up your compassionate farm and massage your cattle, etc., I'll be very happy to buy from you. [Big Grin]

Ruth's Chris Steak House (yes, Ruth bought out the existing "Chris Steak House" and stuck her name on the front) does all that - and they put butter on the steak, too... just in case it wasn't high enough in flavor and fat content! [Snigger]

Thanks for the recipe, Flausa - sounds yummy!

KenW, I think Anna was pulling your proverbial leg. I know, I know, we're supposed to leave your proverbial leg for the Sturdy Wench... but hey, sometimes it happens (here's hoping I'm right - at least, I though it was very funny!).
 
Posted by RuthW (# 13) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny Lane:
At RuthW's request in another thread, here is my pumpkin bread recipe.

Many thanks! I'll be trying it in about a week.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Posted by BabyBear on a different thread:
quote:
'frin has a lovely recipe for Brownies in a Jar. All the dry ingredients are layered up in a large jar, a pretty covering is made for the lid, and the recipe and instructions are tied on with ribbon.
Sounds great - does 'frin hang out here, or would I be best to PM her?
Anyone else have this recipe?
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Got it on the other thread - Thanks Baby Bear!
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I have such a problem. I'm baking an Onion Pie (w/cheese & curry - yum!) and the house is fragrant with the odor - and I can't eat it! I'm taking it to a pot-luck this evening at church with some very special First Nations friends.

So I figured I'd share the recipe with y'all, so you too can suffer this delightful torment. [Big Grin] I got this from my Mom - it was in one of her first cook books when she got married in 1946. She observes that women tend to like it more than men (hmmm - the "quiche" thing?!), so KenW, report back.

Curry Cheese-Onion Pie
1 ½ c. coarse ground soda crackers (saltines)
¼ tsp. curry powder
6 T. melted butter
Mix together; reserve ¼ to sprinkle on top. Line 9” pie plate with the rest.

2 T. butter
1 ½ c. onions, sliced (about 2 medium onions)
1 ¼ c. milk
¼ tsp. paprika
½ - 1 tsp. curry powder (I prefer the full amount)
dash of cayenne pepper
salt (I don’t use any as I’m using salted butter – add, if you like more)
1 T. cold milk
1 ½ c. grated sharp cheddar cheese (my mom has often used Velveeta...)
2 eggs, beaten

Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees.
Saute onions in butter until tender but not brown. Spread over cracker crust.
In a double boiler heat milk; when it is hot mix the spices with the tablespoon of cold milk (do NOT do this in advance; it will thicken!) and then add the liquid spice mixture to the hot milk. Add the grated cheese and stir until melted. Beat the eggs and gradually add to the hot milk mixture (so as not to cook them in the process!). Pour milk/cheese mixture over the onions. Sprinkle the reserved cracker mixture on top and bake for 35-40 minutes. Serves 4-6.

I use a cast-iron skillet to cook the onions and then use the same skillet (unwashed) for heating the milk, but I'm careful with the heat and use a diffuser. It's lovely with a green salad...
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
Here are two of my favorite pumpkin recipes:

Pumpkin Bread ... Frost-On-The-Pumpkin Bars

Mamacita, I've just used one of your pumpkin pie recipes that you've previously posted and yum! So I will be making another trip to the store to buy another pumpkin (and chopping, steaming, straining, and pureeing it, cuz no tinned pumpkin available here) to try one of those recipes.
Wow! Thank you, Flausa, for the compliment. I'm so glad you enjoyed the recipe. I love this thread! (And I'm drooling like one of Pavlov's dogs from reading Kenwritez' restaurant review above.)

I just found this website called Cooking for Engineers while googling for a Shrimp Scampi recipe (frozen jumbo shrimp having been on sale at the supermarket). Don't know if the recipes are any good, but I loved the format with all the photos and charts.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
I had a go at making yogurt, and whilst it tastes fine, it is rather thin. Is there any way to thicken yogurt?

What would happen if I reduced the milk before adding the yogurt? Would it result in a thicker yogurt?
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I'm sure other folks will understand better than I, but reducing would require full-on boiling, right? That *might* interfere with the milk's ability to culture... [Confused]
 
Posted by Tea gnome (# 9424) on :
 
I made yoghurt too! [Big Grin] I think it tastes quite nice, and it doesn't seem to be a curdled mess, and it was dead easy! It did have quite a bit of wateryness on the top, but I drained that bit off. And now I'm stewing some apples with raisins to go with it. [Big Grin] Thankyou for the recipe!
Gnome
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Reduction can take place at a simmer (~85C) but it takes longer for it to happen that if it were boiling.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Would a small quantity of cornflour (arrowroot) serve the purpose?

I notice that about a tablespoonful with thicken an entire fondue.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Mamacita, that recipe site looks great - thanks. I've bookmarked it.
 
Posted by Timothy the Obscure (# 292) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
I had a go at making yogurt, and whilst it tastes fine, it is rather thin. Is there any way to thicken yogurt?

What would happen if I reduced the milk before adding the yogurt? Would it result in a thicker yogurt?

Probably you just needed to let it ferment a bit longer (though some batches never seem to get as thick as you'd like, no matter how long you wait--natural products just vary that way. Commercial yogurts mostly have gelatin added for a thicker consistency).
 
Posted by Tea gnome (# 9424) on :
 
Would it make a difference if you used a thicker yoghurt for the culture? I used a yoghurt which is not my usual brand, which is a set yoghurt which often has wateryness. And that's what I got for my yoghurt. Maybe next batch I'll buy a little pot of a different kind, and see if it makes a difference to the result. Or would using full fat milk change it?
Gnome
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Usually home made yoghurt thickens up after a few days - it's how much culture there is in the mixture - but not always.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I had to revise dinner plans rapidly yesterday as when I cut open the squash from our veg. box it turned out to be completely unripe. So, now it's been cut, how long can I keep it, and will it ripen? And for future reference, how do I tell whether or not it's ripe in the first place??
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Mamacita, that recipe site looks great - thanks. I've bookmarked it.

Me too! I particularly loved the diagram at the end of the recipes, it suits the panic cooking scientist in me.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Can anyone identify this mystery vegetable? It was in this week's box and I don't know whether to cook it like cabbage or pak choi or something, or whether it's more like lettuce! [Help]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Swiss Chard?

If so you can cook the leaves like spinach and treat the stalks like asparagus as the simplest ways of getting the flavour.
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
Looks to me what you have is tatsoi. I'd eat it fast, it has a short shelf life, but it's a nice mustardy addition to salad greens or you can wilt it in a warm salad or shred it in some soup right at the end of the cooking. More a lettuce than a spinach, though.
 
Posted by LynnMagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
images of Swiss Chard show it with red stalks, which I'm not seeing in your photo... I suspect Mertide is right... do let us know, okay? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I think mertide has it! I'll let you know how it turns out. [Smile]
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
I hope I am. [Smile] Otherwise, you could always taste it, and if it's too bitter raw you could cook it.

BTW, McDonalds uses tatsoi here in their salads, but I doubt serious foodies on this thread would recognise it from that context. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Swiss chard can have either red or white stalks and veins. But I don't know whether this is it.

John
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
It not being the time of year for salads, I added the mystery vegetable (the taste of which matched the description of tatsoi!) to a stir fry right at the end so it was just wilted. Very nice! [Smile] I think the flavour might be a bit strong for me in salad, but I'd be willing to give it a go...
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
I ran across these sites today and they seemed appropriate for this thread:

à la carte

and...

tastingmenu.com
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
KenW baby (did you know I have an 'adopted' Chinese son named Kinwa?! no, of course not--) - WHERE have you been? such silence from your environs...

You've provided links to tasting menu before (thank you) but the first one is new - cool! I love cruising these places; cruising and drooling, that's me [Big Grin]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
I am looking for healthy lunchbox ideas for myself and the cubs. Any ideas of website that might help?
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
You could try this one. or this. It really depends on what you and the cubs like, and how old they are. And, of course, how much time you want to put into lunch. There's not much more frustrating than preparing well balanced and creative lunches that boomerang in the lunch box. You might do your chicken and walnut salad pita and have the kids say all they want is peanut butter sandwiches. Every day. For 12 years.
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
This is a bit late, but just to say that to thicken home made yoghurt, mix a dribble of your UHT milk with some dried skimmed milk powder (a table spoon or 2? I don't ever bother to measure!) before adding in your yoghurt starter. Makes it creamier too!
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
(Sorry for the double post - it's just that no body else has posted in the last 20 mins or so!)

OK I give up. I hadn't read this thread for ages and ages and ages and I come back and someone mentions a Scottish thread and I just can't find it. It might have had a recipe for Black Bun on it. Can anyone give me one that works? I got one off the net last year and it tasted yucky and didn't hold together and was generaly awful. I can do a decent Christmas pud and cake and stuff so I don't THINK it was me [Hot and Hormonal] Can anyone help??
 
Posted by Tea gnome (# 9424) on :
 
Tried making yoghurt with a different kind of commercial yoghurt as a starter, and lo, it was runny, but thick and mild, quite different from the first lot. (Actually, it was a bit like custard)
Gnome
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Has anyone got a good recipe for an authentic Hungarian Goulash?
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
re: yogurt thickness. the runniness is pretty normal, and yes most commercial yogurts have geletin added. that's probably your easy answer - add geletin.

the other is to strain it for a few days, then it becomes a very thick consistancy, a bit like ricotta. I use it for baking and have been experimenting with pie fillings.

fit a wire strainer over a bowl, line it with one or two paper towels (or a really clean tea towel) and pour your fresh yogurt into the strainer. cover with another tea towel (plastic wrap is probably fine) and refridgerate the bowl-strainer assembly for two or three days. quite a lot of thin, almost transparent liquid will strain into the bowl, leaving most of the solids behind.

Another strategy is to use heavy cream instead of milk. (calorie alert) I Iearned this from russian friends, who call it smetana (not the composer). you heat, cool, wisk, and set just like regular yogurt. the end result is thicker, closer to grocery store variety, though still not as jellied, but more creamy. the flavor is spectacularly rich. I use it as the cream in cream soups, and the flavor is amazing. A dollop on oatmeal is also a wonderful treat.

I have also made a chocolate pudding with the smetana and ate far too much of it.

[ 23. October 2006, 18:39: Message edited by: comet ]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Comet, wouldn't that be the proper use of cheesecloth? (the straining the yogurt thing). And I don't know about anybody else, but I would have no idea how to add gelatin to homemade yogurt - when would you add it? Unlikely to DO it, mind you, just curious! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
Made yoghurt yesterday. Children ate it all today. Will now go and make more, which they no doubt will not eat before we go away on Friday leaving it to grow blue fluff over the long weekend.....
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
I made Mamacita's "Frost on the pumpkin bars" for coffee hour, to rave reviews - I put some Halloween candy on each piece for decoration. (I used five-spice for spicing, with an extra hit of ginger.)

But I've got a quarter can (4 oz) of pumpkin puree left, because I cut the recipe to 3/4 to fit my 13 by 9 pan instead of the 15 by 10 specified. (do the math)

Any ideas? Pumpkin pudding or mousse? Pumpkin custard in a ramekin? I've got eggs and cream in the house.

I can obviously take a bigger recipe and whack it down to size. Indeed I'm going to be checking the pumpkin pie filling recipes in my Fannie Farmer book with that in mind, but I wondered if the assembled Panel of Experts had any ideas.

Charlotte
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
pumpkin custard is easy -- somewhere up-along there's a recipe for pumpkin pie -- that will give you an idea of the proportion of milk to egg to sugar to pumpkin. Use the same spicing as you liked for the other. Just make it the way you prepare any custard, pour into a large basin or separate custard cups and cook in the oven like any other custard. I don't bother with putting the cups in water and they work out just fine.

John
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
Comet, wouldn't that be the proper use of cheesecloth?

oh probably. I am not completely sure what cheesecloth is. how is it different than bandage gauze?
quote:
And I don't know about anybody else, but I would have no idea how to add gelatin to homemade yogurt - when would you add it? Unlikely to DO it, mind you, just curious! [Big Grin]
I dunno.

***flips through books. tosses books away. reads back of Knox box***

geletin needs to be added to hot liquid and stirred well to fully disolve. so.... how about for every cup of milk, an envelope of geletin, and wisk it in with your live culture? (or earlier, when you take the milk off the flame) then whisk like mad.

it doesn't work, you're out a cup of milk.

if anyone tries it, let me know how it works!

Buffalo stew tonight, with garden toms and carrots and potatoes. *big sniff* Ahhhh....
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
oooh, I'll bet one packet per cup of milk is an awfully high ratio of gelatin to (potential) yogurt. At least I think so, because the yogurt will thicken somewhat on its own; the gelatin is just to stiffen it up a bit, you know? Otherwise, well, you know you could probably make Naughty Toys with that much additional stiffening power... (I'm celibate, I don't want to go there, thank you very much. Ah, but it's my nature... *sigh* [Help] ).

But I'd love to hear a report come back on the pros and cons of adding gelatin to yogurt. [Big Grin]

Cheesecloth is an open weave, but not as open as bandage gauze... it also sometimes has a waxy quality to it. There is a very brief Wikipedia article on it... I just figure, if they use it to drain cheese, it would be good for draining yogurt...?
 
Posted by Laud-able (# 9896) on :
 
Powdered gelatine should be well moistened with cold water and then dissolved with the required amount of water (or other liquid) that is very hot, but off the boil.

Adding hot water directly to unsoftened gelatine is likely to form lumps.

The dissolved gelatine should be cooled before being added to other ingredients. In particular, mixtures of gelatine and milk do not respond well to heating: the milk solids invariably curdle.

Leaf gelatine is more expensive than powdered gelatine, but it does not have that faint taste and smell of glue size: it is softened in cold water and then dissolved in hot, and used as above.
 
Posted by lazystudent (# 5172) on :
 
A month back into student life and I must say I'm pretty fed up with the standard pasta-and-tomatoey stuff / pasta-and-cheesy stuff / pasta-and-pesto / egg fried rice / dahl / sandwiches / toast and toppings fare I can be bothered to rustle up.

My desperation is such that I find myself wishing I was living back in College, with College food. Goes to show just how fed up I am!

I'm a vegetarian of the no meat no fish variety. I don't have an oven, but I do have a microwave, two electric rings, a kettle, a toaster and a fridge. Difficult to pronounce items or foodstuffs not listed in my Dutch phrase book are off-limits.

Any original ideas from the Ship's galley?
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Stir-fry.

Ok not great on an electric hob, but not impossible. Rice in one pan on one ring and then do the veggies on the other.

Try:

Green leaves (if you can find a Chinese grocery store then choy sum or pak choi will be readily available, otherwise use spinach) with garlic and dark Chinese vinegar - I used to live off this!!

Egg & Tomato
a classic northern Chinese dish and one of my favourites
make an omelette, break it up and set it aside
clean pan and fry spring onion, garlic and ginger. Add quartered tomatoes. Cook for a bit and then add in the omelette. Stir. Add salt if necessary. (Dark Chinese vinegar can be added at the cooking tomato stage if you like)

Slice tofu cooked with chilli paste is good as well though does have a tendency to smoke the kitchen out!
 
Posted by lazystudent (# 5172) on :
 
Thanks Yangtze!

Forgot to mention that I'm in a bedsit, so anything that's going to smoke out my 'kitchen' will also have the same effect on my sitting room, work area and bedroom...!
 
Posted by lazystudent (# 5172) on :
 
Forgot to add that there's a Chinese shop on my way home - didn't look at the veg last time I was in there but will do next time.

Must buy a wok!
 
Posted by Stoo (# 254) on :
 
You don't have a wok?

Ha! We have found you out! You cannot be a real student.

You must be a fake.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Woks are good for cooking things like risotto in - you can do good veggie versions like risi e bisi, which is rice and peas, flavoured with onion, garlic, reasonable stock and a parmesan like cheese (parmesan not being veggie, but there are veggie versions). It also tastes good with brown rice. Or mushrooms make a good risotto.

The Cranks Recipe books have lots of recipes. A way of dealing with casseroles in a bedsit is a slowcooker. OK as a student - put together in morning before you leave, come home to warm cooked meal.
 
Posted by lazystudent (# 5172) on :
 
I am a real student, I am! It's just that arriving to an unfurnished room - a horrible surprise - meant I had to buy absolutely everything new, and my budget only stretched to two pans. I might see what I can do about a wok now, though.

Cranks' cookbook is going on my Christmas list - thank you, Curiosity killed... and others.
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
a friend of mine (who was a loony messianic Jew but we won't go in to all of that!) when he was a student used to live of flat breads (flour, water, oil, and an egg if he was feeling rich, made in to a dough and cooked like chapati's in a dry frying pan) with cheese or baked beans on top.

As for Christmas lists, Lakelands to a Tefal slow cooker for one that is also a rice cooker or a steamer. I got one for my sister and it is fantastic. Do a stew in it one night (it does enough for about 3 servings) and eat with pasta or baked potatoes, and then the next night reheat the stew whilst cooking some rice in it. If you ate meat I would say "The nice thing about slow cooking is you can eat all the really cheap cuts of meat from the butcher like shin, stewing mutton, and the like." But you don't. But I will leave it in for others that might be perusing the thread..... do hope you don't mind. But you can do good vege curries with chickpeas and things in them as well, soups, risotto's and all sorts of things. Just make sure you cut root veg small as they can take ages to cook.

If I can get this right, here is a link to it: Lakeland 3 in 1 cooker
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lazystudent:
pretty fed up with the standard pasta-and-tomatoey stuff / pasta-and-cheesy stuff / pasta-and-pesto / egg fried rice / dahl / sandwiches / toast and toppings fare

If you are ok with milk, cream and cheese, then the World of the Potato opens up.

Mash beaten up with milk and topped with grated cheese used to be a standard when I were a student.

Also, potatoes (and other root veggies) braised in stock (slow pan with lid) can be delicious.

Not forgetting the potato salad - cold with onion and mayo, or hot, with a spicy tomato dressing.

And for really nice stodge on stodge, puff pastry (score the top so that it forms a lattice) stuffed with thinly sliced potato and cheese and baked is ace.

In fact, if you can thole pastry, the amount of fillings that can be enclosed is endless. Or, reverting to the potato, turned into a pie/flan and then topped with potato (and cheese, of course).
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I forgot, this comes from Katharine Whitehorn's Cooking in a Bedsitter which isn't all vegetarian, but is a way of doing pizzas.

You make a quick pizza base by mixing self-raising flour and plain yoghurt, then kneading into a disc. (Plain yoghurt - a neighbour of mine used raspberry to peculiar results). Fry (in oil) one side of this base in a pan until golden brown. It also puffs up. Turn, top with anything else you want on top - made tomato paste, vegetables, olives, cheese. Cook other side, which will heat through the topping and melt the cheese if it's soft enough. It's quite greasy, but if you're craving a pizza it works. You can also cook the base in the oven.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I'm just imagining a pizza crust with a faint raspberry tinge to it... so it could be a dessert pizza with chocolate sauce instead of tomato and fresh fruit slices... that could be nice, actually... Hmmmm, must experiment! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Moo requested a cinnamon pecan recipe.

The way I make them is simple.

Heat a frying pan over medium or slightly hotter heat. Cover the bottom with a single layer of pecans (taste pecans first). Add enough sugar to go halfway up the pecans. Liberally sprinkle with cinnamon. Add a couple of tablespoons of water or so (enough to liquify the sugar mixture). Stir until the water evaperates and the sugar carmelizes. Remove from heat and pour on some wax paper.

While the sticky mess cools put a couple of cups of water in the pan and heat. The pan is now easy to clean (do not put hands in heated water to clean). After you clean the pan your pecans will (hopefully) not be sticky anymore and be perfect for eating.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amazing Grace:
I made Mamacita's "Frost on the pumpkin bars" for coffee hour, to rave reviews - I put some Halloween candy on each piece for decoration. (I used five-spice for spicing, with an extra hit of ginger.)

But I've got a quarter can (4 oz) of pumpkin puree left, because I cut the recipe to 3/4 to fit my 13 by 9 pan instead of the 15 by 10 specified. (do the math)

Any ideas? Pumpkin pudding or mousse? Pumpkin custard in a ramekin? I've got eggs and cream in the house.

I can obviously take a bigger recipe and whack it down to size. Indeed I'm going to be checking the pumpkin pie filling recipes in my Fannie Farmer book with that in mind, but I wondered if the assembled Panel of Experts had any ideas.

Charlotte

So glad the pumpkin bars worked out well! I'll be making a batch for our All Saints' festive reception. (Actually, I made a batch today to take to our son for Parents' Weekend; they're his favorite.)
I cast my vote for pumpkin pie filling in a ramekin, fiddling around with the quantities from your favorite pie recipe. Whenever I make pumpkin pie I have extra filling, and it goes into custard cups. That gives me a couple of servings of crust-free, guilt-free pie, which of course means I get an extra dollop of whipped cream!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lazystudent:
Forgot to add that there's a Chinese shop on my way home - didn't look at the veg last time I was in there but will do next time.

Must buy a wok!

You can do the green veggie thing in a microwave. Lay out flat on one plate, slice garlic very finely, drizzle over vinegar and soy sauce, cover with another plate and nuke for a minute or so. Easy, tasty and very quick (as long as the rice is already made!)

The brand of dark Chinese vinegar I've been banging on about is called Chinkiang. Well worth it if you can find it - your Chinese grocery store should have it. That, together with garlic, ginger and spring onion will pretty much give any motley collection of veggies a Chinese flavour. Add the vinegar at the end and cover quickly if you don't want too strong a vinegar smell in your bed sit!

I also discovered anew last night how tasty a fried egg is over fried rice (or indeed any rice/veggie combo with a bit of spice to it). Yum. A sort of easy nasi goreng.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Instead of a wok, I suggest buying a cast iron skillet, at least a 10" -12" /25 - 30 cm. A wok is fine if you have a powerful heat source underneath it, like a high output gas jet. For your two-ring stove, though, a skillet with its broad, flat base will perform better for stir-fries, plus you can use it as a skillet for foods requiring that type of pan.
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nats:
(Sorry for the double post - it's just that no body else has posted in the last 20 mins or so!)

OK I give up. I hadn't read this thread for ages and ages and ages and I come back and someone mentions a Scottish thread and I just can't find it. It might have had a recipe for Black Bun on it. Can anyone give me one that works? I got one off the net last year and it tasted yucky and didn't hold together and was generaly awful. I can do a decent Christmas pud and cake and stuff so I don't THINK it was me [Hot and Hormonal] Can anyone help??

Nats, the Scottish Thread is here, currently languishing on page 2 of AS.

Despite the fact that I've just eaten, my mouth is watering after reading this thread. I love pumpkin in risotto. Must go and buy a small one, since they're in season atm.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Does anybody have a to die for apple pie recipe? I am suppose to bake one for thanksgiving and my usual pie has alcohol in it. Since my dad is alcoholic this is not an option. I would be grateful for any help.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
I second the motion for cast iron. though I have that and a wok. (I actually have two iron skillets and a dutch oven. but I admit I have a problem. my dad is worse - 9 dutch ovens. he needs an intervention)

Does anyone have suggestions for shaking up a gluten-free diet? I dont want recipes for bread, etc, made from rice flour or whatever, that's not my concern. I don't like pretending I can eat the stuff.

I'm pretty much all about rice for my grains and I'm sick of it. I need new really unique ways of preparing it, or dinner menus that dont have any gluten but that someone under the age of 16 might actually eat. i.e. soul food without the macaroni or pizza crust or biscuits.

FTR my rice standards include risotto and 500 varieties of that, though my favorite is with shiitakes; fried rice; and what I call "rice-agna" which is just basmati with all my lasagna ingredients minues the noodles and baked. it's really quite amazing.

I've been "wheat intolerant" for a few years and therefore cheated and ate wheat all the time. Well, guess who just got lots sicker! so I have to quit screwing around.

goodbye cookies! [Frown]

again, my big wishlist would be alternatives to soul foods, so things with salt and fat and cheese and sugar!

thanks, everyone.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Can you eat millet? Because there's a recipe for millet cooked in the pot first in oil until golden brown and toasty smelling. Then fry up some onion and root vegetables, add the millet, enough stock to cook and stew gently until the millet is soft and fluffy (20 minutes odd). Serve with chopped parsley and grated cheese. Leftovers make good burgers held together with an egg.

Potatoes cooked in either milk or stock or a mixture - boulangere - layers of finely sliced potatoes and onion, ending with potatoes on top, add stock or milk (milk is richer and more comforting) cooked slowly in the oven until the onion is cooked and the top layer of potato is crunchy.

Buckwheat or kasha - as flour can be used to make pancakes - a recipe suggests filling with cooked butter beans and pesto. Also the buckwheat groats can make different tasting casseroles - the recipe I use for this version with mushrooms adds cheese to make a richer more soul food version.
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
Comet

Can you eat oats and maize? Can you get things like soya flour and potato flour there? You can use oats instead of flour in crumble topping. I use sweet potatoes (pureed or baked) when I'm bored by rice.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/mostof_coeliac5.shtml

includes a recipe for choc fudge pudding.

[edited to remove duplication]

[ 29. October 2006, 21:27: Message edited by: Landlubber ]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Don't believe me without checking, but I believe that oat grains can contain gluten - though not as much as wheat or rye.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
Roasted veggies served on a bed of lentils

This is a recipe that starts with the idea that you will know how long to cook certain types of vegetables.

Take some onions and root veggies, put into a plastic bag with a little oil and toss. Transfer into a roasting pan and start roasting. Leeks, broccoli, corn, peas can be added later in the cooking if you wish.

Start the lentils cooking at a suitable time so that they are cooked just before the veggies are ready. About 10 mines before that, take a handful of feta cheese cubes and put them on top of the veggies. Take a little pesto and dot that around too, and drizzle some balasmic dressing over it all.

Serve the veggies and cheese on top of the lentils.

Tomato and lentil soup

1 onion
little oil
500g jar of tomato sauce for pasta
250g red lentils
1 pt of stock
poling water

Dice and saute the onion in a little amount of oil. Add the jar of pasta sauce, rinse out the jar with water and toss that into the pot too. Add in the stock and the lentils. Cook slowly for at least 30 minutes.

This is a gluten-free, rich, thick soup that is easily made from items in the store cupboard. I like to make this soup first thing in the morning, then re-heat it at lunch time. The extra sitting time brings out the flavours.

I have a couple of friends who are unable to have gluten, and they like white sauces made using potato flour, or cornflour. Cauliflower cheese, served with roasted chicken, roasted carrots and parsnips is generally very well received.

Lots of vegetables can be stuffed with a bolognaise sauce, cooked and then served with a salad. Lentils and beans make a good gluten-free base for a meal too.

A couple of friends found that after they had been on a gluten-free diet for 6 weeks they were able to tolerate the odd bread roll or cookie without any ill effects. This isn't true for another friend though, and any gluten makes her ill. However, it is worth bearing in mind that you might be able to have the odd cookie from time to time.

[ 29. October 2006, 21:57: Message edited by: babybear ]
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
A good paella.

Ingredients
chicken (dark meat), sausage, pork, whatever.
bell peppers, onion, garlic, anything else you feel like.
white wine
chicken stock
thyme, bay leaves, parsley, seasonings of your choice.
shrimp, lobster tails, mussels, clams, heck try crap legs.
saffron if you want

Largest pan/wok/whatever brown non seafood meats, and vegies. Deglaze with wine. Add rice, chicken stock, and saffron cook a few minutes add whatever seafood you choose and cook some more. Add chicken stock when the mix dries to much. Keep cooking until done.

Beware, it is a terribly precise recipe (not). [Biased] But it does feed an army.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
You might want to search for some Atkins diet or South Beach diet recipes. Some of those will contain gluten but I am willing to bet there is a lot of non-gluten recipes for those two diets.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Not forgetting polenta (which is cornmeal really).

By itself, it can be pretty flavourless, but if you dissolve a stock cube in the water with which you make it up, that can cheer it up. As can stirring in lots of grated cheese (and some chili doesn't hurt) spreading it out, topping with more cheese and grilling.

If you are ok with potato, that is all the human frame requires. Potatoes with fish, potatoes with cheese, potatoes creamed and rolled in egg and crumb and deep fried, potatoes chipped, potatoes roasted (with seasalt and thyme), potato dumplings, potato bread, potato saute, potato mash, potato rosti...
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Not forgetting polenta (which is cornmeal really).

By itself, it can be pretty flavourless, but if you dissolve a stock cube in the water with which you make it up, that can cheer it up.

Or make it with olive oil in it.Or garlic and well-chopped onions. Or even peas. Ground pepper. Or make it, let it cool, form it into little cakes, and fry it in olive oil.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
My mother-in-law used to make Japanese delicacies with rice flour. You might get hold of a Japanese cookbook and see if anything appeals.

One dessert you could make is something called Angel Pie. The crust is baked meringue; you use the egg yolks in the filling. If you want a couple of Angel Pie recipes, I'll post them.

Moo
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I don't know about comet, but I'd like to see some Angel pie recipes - never heard of it but I like baked meringue... [Big Grin]

I have also made the "Frost on the Pumpkin" bars - very yummy indeed. I reduced the oil to 3/4 of a cup instead of a full cup and it was *still* plenty moist - I think I'll do it again with something closer to 2/3 of a cup and see if that's still workable...
 
Posted by teddybear (# 7842) on :
 
Any suggestions on making a decent meatloaf? I love really good meatloaf..light, juicy, full of flavor. Mine has the flavor and juicy parts, but tends to be relatively heavy. My mom used to make wonderful meatloaf and I've tried and tried to do it like she did, but with no success. Unfortunately, mom has been dead 14 years so I can't ask her what I'm doing wrong. I usually use 2 pounds ground meat (all beef or sometimes half beef and half ground pork), a finely chopped onion, a pinch of garlic powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup evaporated milk and a half cup of rolled oats. Mix together lightly and quickly, form into a loaf, cover with ketchup and bake about an hour. Any advice? Anyone care to share your favorite meatloaf recipe?
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
Instead of just ketchup on your leatloaf, try mixing 1/2 cup ketchup with 2 Tbsp. brown sugar and 1 tsp. dry mustard. Pour over the meatloaf for the last five minutes or so of the cooking time.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Didn't Tim Curry/Frankenfurter serve Meatloaf in Rocky Horror Picture Show?

[Snigger]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Soak a slice of good white bread in red wine, Worcester sauce and ketchup. Mix together with the meat and onions. Use just one egg to bind. Cover the loaf with strips of streaky bacon.

Cook in a moderate oven for an hour, then take off the foil and up the heat to crisp the bacon.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
My Grandma's meatloaf recipe:
1 1/4 lbs mince
3/4 lb sausage meat
1 small green pepper finely chopped
1 large onion
3 slices bread (crusts removed)
1 tsp mixed herbs
1 clove garlic, crushed
2 tbsp milk
1 beaten egg
salt and pepper

Blend all the ingredients except the bread, milk and egg together in a large bowl. Soak the bread in the milk, squeeze out and add to the mixture. Mix well and add the egg to bind. Pack into a loaf tin and bake at gas 6 (400 F) for 15 mins. Turn the heat down to gas 4 (350 F) for another 45 mins.

I usually have breadcrumbs in the freezer and add enough to bind with the egg rather than soaking the bread and have also used porrige oats or crushed weetabix if I didn't have enough. Usually served with either Campbell's tomato soup or passata plus Worcester sauce, herbs and black pepper as a sauce.

That's my basic recipe but here's a more time consuming one, to prepare the day before a picnic, camping trip etc.

Meatloaf with Bulgur Wheat:
115g (4oz) bulgur wheat
2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
285 ml (1/2 pint) boiling chicken stock
1 green, 1 yellow and 1 red pepper, de-seeded and two rings cut from each, the rest finely chopped
1 tbsp olive oil
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 medium onion, peeled and finely chopped
1 egg, beaten
450 g (1 lb) pork sausagemeat
2 level tbsp tomato purée

Put the bulgur wheat in a bowl with the parsley and the stock. Soak for 15-20 mins until all liquid absorbed.

Cut the pepper rings in half and arrange them in the base of a greased loaf tin, overlapping slightly.

Preheat the oven to 180C (350 F, gas 4). Heat the oil in a frying pan and soften the chopped peppers, garlic and onion for 10 mins.

Stir half the beaten egg into the bulgur wheat and mix the rest with the sausagemeat, tomato purée and pepper mixture in a separate bowl.

Spoon 1/3 of the sausagemeat mixture over the pepper rings, layer with 1/2 the bulgur wheat and repeat finishing with a layer of sausage. Level the top and cover with foil.

Stand the tin in a roasting tin holding enough hot water to come halfway up. Bake 1 1/2 hours or until firmly set and cooked through. Drain off any excess fat.

Allow it to cool in the tin and refrigerate overnight and serve cold.
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
I can't provide exact quantities because I just don't cook that way! I make a fairly small meatloaf as there are only two of us, and only I like meatloaf sandwiches.

1.25-1.5 lbs ground beef (I use extra lean 93/7)
teaspoon or so powdered beef bouillon
tablespoon or so dried onion flakes
garlic powder or minced garlic clove
about 1/2 cup rolled oats
teaspoon or so each dried basil and parsley
black pepper to taste
1 egg
liberal quantity of ketchup to make a very moist loaf

Combine all ingredients well and form into loaf shape. Bake at 350F uncovered about 45 minutes. Since I have the oven hot, I usually throw in a couple of potatos to bake along with it. The meatloaf just holds together; doesn't seem dense at all. If I'm using at least two lbs of meat, I'll use a packet of Lipton's dry onion soup mix in place of the bouillon and dried onion.
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
How hot is Thai red curry paste? I came across a chicken curry recipe in this morning's paper that sounded really good, but it calls for 4 Tablespoons of red curry paste, along with 1 Tablespoon of curry powder. I enjoy a nice zing, but not a mouthful of fire. I usually buy mild prepared salsa, but can tolerate small amounts of medium. Am I likely to find red curry paste too hot?

[ 30. October 2006, 12:38: Message edited by: Penny Lane ]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I would have thought it would depend on the brand. It's fairly hot I think, but you could always put less in and gradually add more until you reach your limit!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
I don't know about comet, but I'd like to see some Angel pie recipes - never heard of it but I like baked meringue... [Big Grin]

ANGEL PIE

CRUST

3 egg whites (room temperature)
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
1/8 tsp. salt
3/4 c. sugar

Combine egg whites, cream of tartar, and salt. Beat until frothy. Gradually add sugar and beat until stiff peaks form. Make sure sugar is completely dissolved.
Spread over bottom and sides of a well-greased 9" pie pan. Build up sides.
Bake in 275° oven 1 hour or until light brown and crisp. Let cool in pie pan. Spoon in filling and chill.

VARIATION
Sprinkle 1/3 cup chopped walnuts or pecans on bottom of meringue shell before baking.


FILLINGS

1. FRESH FRUIT
Fill baked shell with berries or fresh fruit, sliced and sweetened. Add whipped cream or ice cream if desired.


2. CHOCOLATE FILLING

3/4 c. semi-sweet chocolate pieces
1/4 c. hot water
1 tsp vanilla
1/8 tsp. salt
1 c. heavy cream, whipped

Melt chocolate in top of double boiler over hot, not boiling water. Add hot water, vanilla, and salt. Cook and stir until smooth. Cool.
Fold in whipped cream and pur into pie shell. Chill at least four hours. Serve with more whipped cream on top if desired.


3. LEMON FILLING

4 egg yolks
1/2 c. sugar
1/4 c. lemon juice
1 Tblsp. grated lemon peel
1 c. heavy cream, whipped

Beat egg yolks until thick and lemon-colored. Gradually beat in sugar. Stir in lemon juice and peel. Cook over in top of double boiler over simmering water stirring constantly, until mixture is thick, about five to eight minutes. Mixture should be thick enough to mound slightly when dropped from spoon. Cool

Spread cool lemon mixture into pie shell. Top with whipped cream. Chill at least 12 hours.

[ 30. October 2006, 17:14: Message edited by: Moo ]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
wow, neat stuff happened on this thread overnight! I am now craving meatloaf (uh, not the singer...) [Big Grin]

Moo, a question please: you specify melting the chocolate over hot-not-boiling water - what difference does that make? How does it impact the chocolate if the water is boiling? I'm just curious. I recently learned that room-temperature egg whites whip up better, so that one I get... thank you!
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Because the texture of chocolate depends very very strongly on the temperature you heat it to and the boiling point of water is too hot for the best flavour
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
For meatloaf I form small mounds on a cookie sheet. That way you can drain the grease easier. And everybody has their own little loaf. I also use a ketchup brown sugar and mustard mixture not unlike Cambellite's. I use about half the mixture to coat the tops and I use the rest to put on the slices as they are eaten.
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
Penny Lane: For most Western palates, 1-2 tablespoons of red curry paste per pound/500g of meat/chicken/fish works out ok. Some recipes add extra chilli for bite. If you're reducing the amount of curry paste, you might add a little tomato paste to hold the red colour - the paste is a colour as well as a flavour. The coconut milk/cream cuts the burn, but you might want to cross culturally have some yoghurt available to help with mouth burn if you're not sure. If it's real Thai, remember that the curry is more of a condiment, the rice and soup are the main dishes. It can be exceptionally hot because it's not expected to be eaten in quantity.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
Angel Pie looks like my Holiday Solution. Many blessings on your head, Moo.

I also get ill with oats and other gluteny (!) grains, but no as much. Wheat is by far my worst offender. I occasionally make oatmeal cookies with cornstarch, and will eat one or two without getting too sick.

unfortunately it's this kind of cheating that has my doctor tapping her foot and glaring at me.

I have no idea about millet. barley is out (I love barley! [Waterworks] ) but according to some readings, buckwheat is okay...? I didn't know that. I also use quinoa fairly often, FTR.

I've not ever gone the polenta route because the samples I've had were dead boring. I'll try Firenze's ideas, though - this may be the solution I'm looking for!

you all rock.

The discussion of ramakins (sp?) for pumpkin pie is intriguing. Whoever does it, please report back on how you did it!
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
ken, thank you! - I didn't realize that and I will be more careful in future chocolate-melting events.

comet, can you eat flax?
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Buckwheat and quinoa aren't grass seeds. They are related to spinach and stuff like that. Very different proteins from wheat, rye, barley etc.
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mertide:
Penny Lane: For most Western palates, 1-2 tablespoons of red curry paste per pound/500g of meat/chicken/fish works out ok.

hmmm...the recipe calls for 4 Tbs to about 1.25 lbs of chicken. Coupled with the curry powder, this might be quite hot.

quote:
If it's real Thai, remember that the curry is more of a condiment, the rice and soup are the main dishes. It can be exceptionally hot because it's not expected to be eaten in quantity.
Don't know how authentic it is, but it is billed as a main dish to be served with jasmine rice and snow peas. The ingredients include coconut milk, chicken, potatoes, onion, fish or soy sauce, sugar, and the red curry paste and curry powder.

Thanks for your help. I'll have to think about it....
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by teddybear:
Any suggestions on making a decent meatloaf? I love really good meatloaf..light, juicy, full of flavor. Mine has the flavor and juicy parts, but tends to be relatively heavy.

Tonight I had an amazing dinner (roast tenderloin of wild boar on a bed of Alsatian sauerkraut with horseradish potatoes, quince tart tatain) at my favorite restaurant. Remembering your post, I asked the chef what you could do to lighten your meatloaf.

He said if a meatloaf is too dense/heavy, it's got too much meat : filler ratio. When he makes a 5 lb. meatloaf, he'll add 7 eggs, 5 chopped onions and a quart of breadcrumbs. (He chops and sautees the onion at the beginning, then adds to cooked onion to the raw meat as it goes into the grinder.) Of course, his meatloaf is also made with black truffles and veal!

Best meatloaf recipe I've ever made. Nummy, nummy, nummy!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by comet:


Does anyone have suggestions for shaking up a gluten-free diet? I dont want recipes for bread, etc, made from rice flour or whatever, that's not my concern. I don't like pretending I can eat the stuff.

Indian food uses gram flour quite a lot which is from chickpeas. So maybe a trawl through some Indian cookery blogs could throw up some interesting dishes if you don't happen to have any array of Indian cookbooks. I've been working on improving my Indian cookery recently and can PM you some links if you like.

I once had dumplings in India that had been made from gram flour and were delicious. And gram dosas are pretty much like pancakes so would definitely counts as soul food in my book.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
If you want gram flour or chick pea or dosai or dal south Indian recipes I'm happy to ask both HWMBO and his mum, both excellent cooks. The best Indian cookbook I have ever come across is Lord Krishna's Cuisine by Yamuna Devi, published by Century Hutchinson in UK but it is origianlly an American publication, probably the same publisher - it is all veggie stuff and has an amazing variety of recipes.

Gram flour is great stuff and very versatile. Chips/French Fries here are often soaked in a thin gram flour batter [with a little chilli powder, a little turneric and a little salt in it as well] before frying - they are yummy!
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
I made pumpkin pudding when I was having problems with gluten - just grease a casserole dish and bake the same filling you'd normally use, possibly for slightly less time.

Here is a recipe for Indian Pudding, which contains cornmeal. I used a lot of cornmeal at that time - including cornmeal porridge for breakfast - very nice with treacle (molasses).
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
If you want gram flour or chick pea or dosai or dal south Indian recipes I'm happy to ask both HWMBO and his mum, both excellent cooks.

Oh my. Have you ever thought about hosting a Shipmeet and asking them to do the cooking (hint, hint, heavy hint [Smile] ) I'd find that worth getting on a plane for.
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by teddybear:
Any suggestions on making a decent meatloaf? I love really good meatloaf..light, juicy, full of flavor. Mine has the flavor and juicy parts, but tends to be relatively heavy. My mom used to make wonderful meatloaf and I've tried and tried to do it like she did, but with no success. Unfortunately, mom has been dead 14 years so I can't ask her what I'm doing wrong. I usually use 2 pounds ground meat (all beef or sometimes half beef and half ground pork), a finely chopped onion, a pinch of garlic powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup evaporated milk and a half cup of rolled oats. Mix together lightly and quickly, form into a loaf, cover with ketchup and bake about an hour. Any advice? Anyone care to share your favorite meatloaf recipe?

Try using only one egg.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
If you want gram flour or chick pea or dosai or dal south Indian recipes I'm happy to ask both HWMBO and his mum, both excellent cooks.

Oh my. Have you ever thought about hosting a Shipmeet and asking them to do the cooking (hint, hint, heavy hint [Smile] ) I'd find that worth getting on a plane for.
When we get the new house finished and the 'home-stay' business up and running you will all be welcome - only half an hour from the airport! A special rate for Shipmates, only 50% more than normal!

[Snigger]

I jest - you will all be welcome just as long as you don't refer to HWMBO and I as Hosts!!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Oooh, ooh, build quicker, build quicker.

(Can you guess that after four years of working for a charity that worked in India and Nepal I'm having withdrawal symptoms - haven't been there for almost two years now :-( )
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Best meatloaf recipe I've ever made. Nummy, nummy, nummy!

Looks very interesting (too much pepper for me, but I'm funny--) - can you tell me what he means by "broken carrots"? This is terminology I've never heard. [Confused]
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
I have never heard of gram flour, though use chickpeas elsehwere, mostly in hummus and a great chickpea curry.

can it bee used in the place of wheat flour?

as for recipes for dumplings/pancakes - yes please! I'd love to try those.

has anyone used almond flour?
 
Posted by SemiFae (# 11972) on :
 
Millet is definitely gluten free, the flakes make a good alternative to oats for porridge.
 
Posted by Sine Nomine (# 66) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
can you tell me what he means by "broken carrots"? This is terminology I've never heard. [Confused]

In the context of the recipe I'd say it means don't try putting a whole carrot in the food processor. Break it into a couple of pieces first.
 
Posted by fabula rasa (# 11436) on :
 
I have to tell you, I LOVE this thread. I think you're all culinary geniuses.

And now, I have to add my own very recent, very exciting discovery: goose eggs. (OK, so I was given exactly one, but it was a moment of epiphany.) I'd read in Prue Leith (author of rather serious, academic-y referenc-y cookbooks) that goose eggs make wonderful cakes. The one I had looked funny--two yolks (no idea if that's standard) and a white that looked a bit cloudy and uninspiring. But when beaten it producted the most wonderful frothy, foamy texture--somehow much more ebullient than hen's eggs. (Think bubble bath vs shaving foam.)

They cost the earth, but I'm LONGING to try lots of different recipes with them. Does anyone else have experience/advice?

[ETA: sorry--got carried away and forgot to say:
Comet, have you tried rice noodles? Easiest thing in the world to prepare (just pour boiling water on them and soak for a few minutes, and they form the basis of loads of incredibly yummy Thai dishes--think coconut milk, lemongrass, garlic, bit of curry.

[ 01. November 2006, 21:44: Message edited by: fabula rasa ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Chick pea flour is used for popadoms and some other Indian recipes. I like the taste, but I'm not sure you'd want to cook with it in sweet dishes.

Japanese tempura uses corn flour to make a batter to deep fry the vegetables (and fish, but I've never tried that).

Tortilla should be made using corn flour according to my recipe book, although wheat flour can be used. I've made the wheat versions. That means nacho chips and the other mixtures that you could cover with refried beans, sour cream, guacamole, cheese, etc.
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
Lot's of Japanese food is Gluten free (in fact oats and wheat were fairly unknown in alot of the country until recently) but not "comfort foods" really. Buckwheat is gluten free, but not all buckwheat noodles are. Look for 100% Buckwheat Soba noodles, cook as per packet. Be aware that most soy sauce is also NOT gluten free, although you may be able to get away with some, and I do belive that there are gluten free varieties available now if you know where to look - I don't I'm afraid. I cook Japanese but don't have a Gluten problem. My biggest comfort food is Miso soup and that is gluten free. But you need to get hold of good miso. Then make a stock (either use instant Japanese stuff, a chicken stock or a fish stock, or a vege stock would do but not as good) and then disolve your miso in to taste. If you want vege's in then cook then in the stock first. You can add fresh tofu too which is lovely, or dried Wakame seaweed. V easy and what I cook if I have a dicky tummy.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
fabula rasa - I used goose eggs for making Faberge style eggs* around presents a few years back. I decided I didn't like the taste of the eggs, even buried in cakes or quiches.

*You can either blow the eggs, or very carefully saw off the tops, or crack them off and deal with the unusual shaped edge. If you hinge the two parts back together, paint in turquoise or other jewel like colours, "jewel encrust" it, including stand and paint the insides, you can use it as a display piece that can hold a present.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
I discovered soy sauce has wheat in it the hard way. [Projectile]

but that's okay, because I'm not a big soy fan anyway.

Also not a big cornmeal fan. I am okay with corn tortillas, but not thrilled. same with corn chips. I have a guacamole obsession, but I dip veggies in it. corn fritters, bread, and breading etc, are not my thing.

We use rice noodles constantly. if I could find a good mac and cheese alternative with them, we'd be a happy family. but meanwhile, pad thai is a regular dish here, and I used them also for a marinara type sauce as well.

Hmmm.... I think pad thai sounds good tonight...
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
I've been given a Thai food lovers survival kit, and now need to know how to use the contents. It contains. Thai rice (can deal with that OK), Red curry paste (fry something, add paste, add coconut milk, bubble and serve - think I can mange that but any extra tips welcome), Kaffir Lime leaves (hey????) and sweet chillie sauce.....(drizzle on what??) Anyone able to help?

Oh and I'm still after a black bun recipe... I have posted on the Scottish thread too....

[Help] [Help] [Help] [Help]
 
Posted by Eloise (# 4292) on :
 
I would try kaffir lime leaves in SE Asian-type curries. I have a beef rendang recipe that uses them, if you'd like. I use sweet chilli sauce in stir-fries and marinades, and use it as a dipping sauce for spring rolls, samosas etc. Potato wedges are also really good with sour cream and sweet chilli sauce.
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
On the subject of gluten-free recipes using almond flour (aka almond meal), may I recommend the utterly delicious orange & almond cake. There are any number of recipes for this around, some with syrup, some with longer lists of ingredients. All are, I think, indebted to Claudia Roden for the original idea. It's easy to make, dresses up very well for parties, and is always popular. I've sometimes thought of making it and cooking the mix in muffin tins so I can freeze them for individual indulgence from time to time, but haven't ever got round to it.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Comet, have you tried melting some butter, some heavy cream and some gorgonzola together and tossing the noodles in that? Add chopped mushrooms or chopped peppers or both to tart it up a bit if you want. A shake of Tabasco or similar goes well with it, too.

The cholesterol content is high but what the heck!

[ 02. November 2006, 11:04: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Made Flausa's curried pumpkin soup yesterday, although without the sweet potato, and it was lovely! Thank you! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nats:
Lot's of Japanese food is Gluten free but not "comfort foods" really.

My priest's Japanese wife (well, his only wife-- [Biased] ) says that she has two stomachs and a meal without rice leaves her hungry, no matter how much food she eats. She's not such a big miso soup fan (but I love it); I think her comfort foods are all rice-based.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
I bought up supplies today and so... let the comet pre-season test kitchen commence! tomorrow, I'm trying Cranmer's amazing looking almond orange thing. I will report.

I also bought a 2 quart casserole/rammekin thing, and will make pumpkin "pie" custard. should I put it in a pan of hot water in the oven?

and this weekend, the angel pie crusts are planned.

I'm very excited. I love you all!

[Yipee]

(Woddy - I'll get gorgonzola next time I'm in town and try it. maybe I'll try it with my parmesan too...)

comet

(also bought a beeeeeyoooootiful new saute pan today. cost me a fortune...)

[ 03. November 2006, 06:48: Message edited by: comet ]
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I have a packet of curry leaves - dried little things they are. How should I use them?

I popped some in the water in which some chopped pumpkin was simmering, in preparation to be added to an already made veg curry that needed padding, but I don't know if that was the right use.

Can anyone enlighten me?

I love this thread. It's made me hungry in readiness for my lunch out at Gerard's bar - it''s sure to be:
- thick slices of auvergne cured ham, with gherkins and butter, and a salad with a good peppery French dressing.
- slow braised meat, that falls off the bone, with a thick gravy, and some kind of potatoes (I hope it's his creamy Dauphinoise)
- a cheese board that varies between heels of evil looking blue and wizened goats cheese, to a plate of delicious looking blue, fresh goats and a sharp St Nectaire. It just depends on when we arrive...
- And probably the fruit bowl, but sometimes slices of Vienetta ice cream cake, and one magical time, it was two delicious cream cakes.

All for ten euros (about £7.50), wine included. Not bad, eh?!
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by comet:
(also bought a beeeeeyoooootiful new saute pan today. cost me a fortune...)

I bought 3 last weekend, because I couldn't quite decide in the stores. Brought them all home to compare. Naturally I liked the most expensive one best [Waterworks]

(note to self: get the others back to the stores this weekend!!!)
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny Lane:
Naturally I liked the most expensive one best [Waterworks]

Naturally. It's called "champaign taste on a beer budget".

I suffer the same affliction.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Going back to the Thai food lovers kit, my Thai recipe book suggests that Sweet Chilli Sauce should be served with spring Rolls or other similar Thai dishes.

I bought Kaffir lime leaves as the yellow chicken curry recipe wanted it served with the leaves chopped on top - they taste like lime zest would, but milder.

Red curry paste is a milder version of the curry pastes that are the basis of most Thai curries. I have recipes using it fish cakes, steamed fish, pork curry with aubergine, barbecued chicken etc.

Thai food is one of those that's dairy free, so I cook a fair bit.

[ 03. November 2006, 22:08: Message edited by: Curiosity killed ... ]
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
quote:
Originally posted by Penny Lane:
Naturally I liked the most expensive one best [Waterworks]

Naturally. It's called "champaign taste on a beer budget".

I suffer the same affliction.

Hello. My name is comet and I'm a CTBB afflicted cook.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cranmer's baggage:
On the subject of gluten-free recipes using almond flour (aka almond meal), may I recommend the utterly delicious orange & almond cake. There are any number of recipes for this around, some with syrup, some with longer lists of ingredients. All are, I think, indebted to Claudia Roden for the original idea. It's easy to make, dresses up very well for parties, and is always popular. I've sometimes thought of making it and cooking the mix in muffin tins so I can freeze them for individual indulgence from time to time, but haven't ever got round to it.

!!!

that's amazing. I'm scarfing right now.

next time, I will reduce the sugar by about a quarter, I like it a bit tarter than this calls for. but OMG is that divine. thank you!

it's on the list for Christmas!
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
Glad you enjoyed it. The Almond and orange cake, along with the berries in champagne jelly, are my two standard gluten free desserts. Both delicious, both relatively easy, and both very popular. Can't do better than that, I reckon.
 
Posted by Ethne Alba (# 5804) on :
 
tangent reminder...
food left to cool in the oven causes clouds of smoke if not removed in time for the next person to use
end of tangent.....
off to fumigate oven before baking
 
Posted by fabula rasa (# 11436) on :
 
Cranmer's Baggage--the orange/almond thing looks amazing, and the berries in champagne jelly looks wonderful. Did you by any chance post a recipe for the latter somewhere, and I missed it? If not, do you have a link easily available? (If not, sorry to trouble you--I'll dig up a recipe and report back.)

Now, help please feeding large numbers of toddlers and grownups together. (I know that no challenge is too great for for the Ship's cooks!)

Problem: a meal for 10ish families with children ranging from 0-3. Issues:

1. It has to be reasonably easy and cheap to prepare.

2. The food has to be simple enough that there will be something for, say, a 10-month old to munch on.

3. It has to be very healthy--so no salt, little if any sugar, etc.

4. It has to appeal to a wide range of palates/dietary needs, and not be the kind of thing that parents have to force their kids to eat.

5. It has to be a nice treat for the grown-ups, who probably have little enough time for proper, grown-up food.

So far I've been doing very simple roast chicken, rice, broccoli and carrots (that's it--total ingredients just named) w/ a separate sauce for those who want it. Fruit for desert. No one's been poisoned, but I don't think anyone's going to include it in their list of "10 most inspired meals I've ever had". Any help/thoughts very much appreciated!!!
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
I often do baked potatoes in these circumstances. A selection of toppings could include, cheese, baked beans (of course!) tuna mayo, ratatui (sp?!), chilli concarne - all depending on how adventurous you were feeling and the varying dietry needs. For pudding, a simple pineapple upsode down pudding with custard will meet most peoples needs!

An alternative first course could be spag bol. stick in some lentils to lower the cost and up the nutritian, but there needs to be no vegetarians coming!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by comet
next time, I will reduce the sugar by about a quarter, I like it a bit tarter than this calls for. but OMG is that divine. thank you!

Thanks for that, comet. I copied the recipe but haven't tried it yet. Since I don't like things that are very sweet, I reduced the sugar in the recipe.

Moo
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
Good options for feeding the multitude:
Lasagne
Pasta bake (3 cheese sauce, or tuna & cheese sauce)
Quiche (for a big crowd I'd do a mixture of vego & not)
Potato bake (slice potatoes, onions, carrots, and other vegetables to taste - layer in large baking dish or roasting pan with grated cheese and bacon if desired. Make a 'custard' of eggs & milk, pour over layered stuff. Bake in moderate oven until custard is set.)

Berries in 'Champagne' jelly

Ingredients
750 g. mixed frozen berries
30g. powdered gelatine
1 cup apple or apple/blackcurrant juice
1 750 ml bottle sparkling white wine (or non-alcoholic sparkling wine if preferred)

Method
Heat juice in saucepan over low heat, or in a bowl in the microwave until nearly boiling.
Dissolve gelatine in juice, allow to cool slightly.
Place gelatine solution in a large (1.5 litre minimum) bowl.
Slowly add sparkling white wine, stirring continuously. If a ‘head’ forms on the jelly, you may wish to skim this off.
Allow jelly to cool, but not set.
Prepare 1.75-2.0 litre jelly mould (if you don’t have a large jelly mould, a large fluted cake tin will work just as well).
Pour enough jelly into the mould to cover the base.
Refrigerate to set.
Pour a layer of berries over the jelly, and cover with more jelly. Return to fridge until set.
Repeat with layers of berries and jelly until all are used.
Refrigerate overnight, or until very firm.
Unmould onto serving plate.

Warning: since you do not cook this, the alchohol content of the bubbly remains. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by fabula rasa (# 11436) on :
 
Oh, Nats and CB--thank you both for your thoughts, and CB, for taking the time to type out the champagne/berries thing, which I look forward to trying.

I somehow have the feeling that my young families are going to be a bit better fed than previously!

[eta: just to be clear, I'm noit intending to feed alcohol to 2-year-olds....]

[ 06. November 2006, 12:27: Message edited by: fabula rasa ]
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
I am sure that I made the orange and almond cake as an experiment from one of my Dad's Claudia Roden books some years ago. It tasted fine but IIRC was a little solid in texture (though that may well have been my fault and not the recipe!).
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by fabula rasa:

Now, help please feeding large numbers of toddlers and grownups together. (I know that no challenge is too great for for the Ship's cooks!)

The baked potatos sound good. A secret to nice fluffy baked potatos is when they are ready to be served squash them then push the two ends in. Top with butter, sour cream, cheese, bacon, chives, and chopped barbeque beef. Trust me its good.

If you are intersested I'll try to get Pata to post her home made noodle(thick doughy noodles) recipe. It goes great with roast chicken.

Spaghetti and meat sauce goes well.

I hope it turns out great Fabula Rasa.
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
The orange and almond cake does have quite a dense texture. It's certainly not a sponge cake, or even a tea cake texture. More like the sort of texture of a chocolate mud cake (and I've got a flourless chocolate cake recipe somewhere, too, I just remembered). The texture can surprise if you're not expecting it, but it's fairly common for middle-eastern cakes (and that's it's origin, after all), and quite delicious.
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
Please excuse the double post. Here's a recipe for the flourless chocolate cake if anyone's interested.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Feeding the 5000 without loaves and fish?

I'm thinking you don't want salads etc over there at this time of year?

Curries. Casseroles done in slow cooker if liked.

Zucchini slice which is absolutely yummy even if children don't normally like vegetables.

Tortellini, ravioli etc with a sauce. My grandchildren love them and call them "little pies."

Savoury mince, browned, a dash of curry, Worcestershire sauce, tomato sauce and lots of vegetables. Other herbs and spices and grate carrots etc to fool the little ones if they are picky. Mine aren't, fortunately.

Lots of bread rolls.

Tins of tuna in a white sauce, not too runny. In a baking dish with cheese and breadcrumbs on top and browned. Again can be padded with vegetables.

Risotto. There are even recipes for oven baked which taste quite good and eliminate lots of time stirring. Stirred are better, but these pass.

Over here we can get "lovely legs." These are like drumsticks with bone chopped off. Easy to eat. Put in baking tray. Mix lemon or orange juice with some honey and soy sauce. Pour over and bake. Good finger food for littlies.

Sausage sizzle is popular with children. BBQ'd or baked thin sausages rolled in bread or a roll.


Camp standby of dessert - an apple crumble or apricot. Use large tins of pie apple, now called "baker's apple" down here or apricot or peach. Place in baking tray and cover with crumble mix of flour, brown sugar and butter rubbed together. Bake till crunchy. Can be served with cream or custard.

Will try to think of more.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
Cb, you are my hero. I also have a hazelnut gateau that I'm planning to alter to get the wheat out of. I'll report back.

The almond orange cake is very dense, and very moist. and rich! small pieces. with cream. oh my...
[Axe murder]

Fabula: for finger foods try "bugs on a log" 2-3 inch sections of celery, peanut butter filling the rib, and raisins stuck in the peanut butter. not for any really small ones due to nut allergy concerns, but fabulously popular in the preschool set.

I would also put out little condiment bowls with raisins, goldfish/cheddar bunnies (little crackery things), and maybe mozerella cheese sticks. little ones just want to graze, smear with goo, and move on.
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
Glad to be of service, Comet.

Minor victory tonight. I had some left-over mash & veg from the other day, and had another attempt at potato fritters. After 30 years of trying, I finally made them to my satisfaction.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by fabula rasa:
[qb]
If you are intersested I'll try to get Pata to post her home made noodle(thick doughy noodles) recipe. It goes great with roast chicken.

Yes please.

I used to live off thick noodle soup cooked with lamb broth at a certain small restaurant when I lived in northern China. And then I had the best thick homemade noodles ever up in the mountains of southwest China. But you can't find them in Chinese restaurants here and I've never even thought about making them myself for some reason.
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
[QUOTE]And then I had the best thick homemade noodles ever up in the mountains of southwest China. But you can't find them in Chinese restaurants here and I've never even thought about making them myself for some reason.

I'm not sure they'd be the same as what you recall, but if you can buy packaged won ton wrappers, they can be sliced into strips and cooked in broth.

Along that vein, (US) Southern-style chicken & dumplings can always feed a crowd. In this case, dumplings are wide, thick noodles. It's basically just stewed chicken, seasoned with chopped onions, celery, carrots, and the dumplings cooked in the broth. I've always used frozen dumplings, so I don't have a recipe, but perhaps someone else does.
 
Posted by fabula rasa (# 11436) on :
 
Thank you all so much for your help/advice--I'm really, really grateful. I have just a few questions:

rugasaw (BTW--complete tangent--how is one meant to pronounce your name?)--for the fluffy baked potatoes, do you mean roll them around a bit before you cut into them?

Lothlorien--is zucchini slice a sort of loaf made with eggs? or something else? (And thx for so many ideas--I hold these lunches all the time, so v grateful!)

comet--just to say that the little condiments thing is brilliant. A lot of the kids are just too distracted to sit down and face a plate of food, but might well graze at stuff in bowls.

Thanks thanks thanks to all! [Overused]
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by comet:
I have never heard of gram flour, though use chickpeas elsehwere, mostly in hummus and a great chickpea curry.

can it bee used in the place of wheat flour?

as for recipes for dumplings/pancakes - yes please! I'd love to try those.

has anyone used almond flour?

Chickpea pancakes (socca in the South of France) are yummy and easy to make. I combine the chickpea flour and water till it looks to be the right consistency (stirring hard to get the lumps out), and add salt/pepper. Then cook. How I usually like them is inbetween French crepes and American pancakes in consistency - still foldable but not wafer thin like a crepe.

Wrap them around something savory and you have mighty fine eatin'.

Look for it at: health food store, Italian grocer, East Indian grocer.

Charlotte
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by fabula rasa:
rugasaw (BTW--complete tangent--how is one meant to pronounce your name?)--for the fluffy baked potatoes, do you mean roll them around a bit before you cut into them?

rugasaw = cut and paste of rugby and chickasaw.

About the potatoes, I mean squash them to about half the size. It really loosens up the insides of the potato.

Yangze, I'll get to work convincing her to figure out the measurements she uses.

Comet for a pie crust you might use crushed pecans and butter mix pressed into a pie pan. The crust may fall apart but will taste wonderful.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
rugasaw = cut and paste of rugby and chickasaw.

I can't help it - I'm seeing an otherwise chiseled and noble Native American face with a well-broken classic rugby-injured nose...!
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
rugasaw = cut and paste of rugby and chickasaw.

Does this mean I have to stop calling you "rugbychick"? [Biased]
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
rugasaw = cut and paste of rugby and chickasaw.

Does this mean I have to stop calling you "rugbychick"? [Biased]
You can keep calling anything you want until we are both at the same shipmeet [Snigger]

Lynn if you knew some of the games that chickasaws play you might include broken noses in those chiseled faces. By the way the only chiseled native american faces I have seen are those with out enough food. [Biased]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I have a Cree friend who has something of a chiseled face... but yes, I have noticed that *some* First Nations people tend to go a little soft; of course, having gone A LOT soft myself, I completely understand!
 
Posted by Anna B (# 1439) on :
 
I'm happy to report that I've settled on a Thanksgiving menu.

Silver-dollar crab cakes with red pepper sauce

Roast turkey (a Bourbon Red heritage bird, brined)
Truffled mashed potatoes
Cranberry sauce
New England Dressing (with sausage and apples)
Lidia's brussels sprouts (leaves separated and sauteed in garlic and olive oil)
Roasted winter vegetables
Fennel-celeriac slaw

Champagne

Fruit platter
Pumpkin, apple, and pecan tartlets

Coffee and tea

[Axe murder]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Anna, how do you separate brussel sprout leaves? The one time I worked with 'em they seemed nearly sealed shut.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
cut the bases off and rub them between your fingers.
 
Posted by Anna B (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
Anna, how do you separate brussel sprout leaves? The one time I worked with 'em they seemed nearly sealed shut.

You need a sharp paring knife and a lot of patience. The results are worth it, though. This is how I do it.

1) After washing, cut off the stem end and remove any outer leaves that are discolored.

2) Then core the sprout. You should wind up with two pieces, one of which is conical in shape. Discard this.

3) Start peeling. I find it's easier to work from the bottom, which will have been loosened by now.

4) When you get to the hard whitish part that is very, very tough to peel, simply mince it and add it to the pile of fluffy leaves.

I'd just add that brussels sprouts are even tastier if you buy them still attached to the giant stem on which they grew. (This never fails to spark conversation with fellow shoppers.)

[ 10. November 2006, 20:41: Message edited by: Anna B ]
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
I have a recipe for Cattern Cakes (traditionally served by lacemakers on St Catherine's Day, November 25th):

Cattern Cakes

9oz/275g self-raising flour
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1oz/25g currants
2oz/50g ground almonds
2 teaspoons caraway seeds
7oz/200g caster sugar
4oz/100g melted butter
1 medium egg, beaten
A little extra sugar and cinnamon for sprinkling

Preheat the oven to 200 C/400 F/gas 6.
Sift the flour and the cinnamon into a bowl and stir in the currants, almonds, caraway seeds and sugar.
Add the melted butter and beaten egg, and mix well to give a soft dough.
Roll out on a floured board into a rectangle, about 12 x 10-inches/ 30 x 25 cm.
Brush the dough with water and sprinkle with the extra sugar and cinnamon. Roll up like a Swiss roll and cut into 3/4 inch/2 cm slices.
Place these slices, spaced well apart, on a greased tray and bake for 10 minutes.

Cool on a wire rack. Sprinkle with extra caraway seed if you like.

Anyway, almonds have a tendency to make me messily and unhappily unwell - can I replace the ground almonds with ground rice? I know it won't taste the same, but would it break the recipe entirely?
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
According to my Margaret Costa's Four Season Cookery Book you can replace 1.5oz of ground almonds with 1oz of flour (self-raising flour in this recipe).

It's in the options to the seed cake recipe and I remembered that from a time I cooked it and didn't have ground almonds.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rosamundi
Anyway, almonds have a tendency to make me messily and unhappily unwell - can I replace the ground almonds with ground rice? I know it won't taste the same, but would it break the recipe entirely?

I think ground rice would be a bad idea. Rice is pure carbohydrate, and almonds are largely fat.

Are you intolerant of all nuts or just almonds? If you can tolerate other nuts, grind some and see if the recipe works that way.

Moo
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Are you intolerant of all nuts or just almonds? If you can tolerate other nuts, grind some and see if the recipe works that way.

Moo

Intolerant of all nuts, I'm afraid. I'll try Curiosity killed...'s suggestion of a touch extra flour.

Deborah
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rosamundi:
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Are you intolerant of all nuts or just almonds? If you can tolerate other nuts, grind some and see if the recipe works that way.

Moo

Intolerant of all nuts, I'm afraid. I'll try Curiosity killed...'s suggestion of a touch extra flour.

Deborah

How are you with pinenuts? I ask, coz they're not really nuts so you might be OK with them, and ground up they'd be quite oily as well like the almonds - they'd add a flavour too which is what the almonds would and flour won't.
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
How are you with pinenuts? I ask, coz they're not really nuts so you might be OK with them, and ground up they'd be quite oily as well like the almonds - they'd add a flavour too which is what the almonds would and flour won't.

Pine nuts I'm ok with... Might give them a go.

Oh, and I sort of made this up on Friday night (AKA what happens when there's a lemon and a tin of white crab meat reduced in the supermarket, and you fancy something comforting and fairly quick for dinner):

Crab risotto

This quantity serves 1:

4 fl oz risotto rice
1/2 pint vegetable stock (you may not need all this, it depends how thirsty your rice is)
1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tin white crab meat (170g undrained weight)
4 oz frozen peas
Juice of 1 lemon
butter
lots of Parmesan, to serve.

Soften the onion and garlic in a pan with the butter (about 15 minutes or so - the onion should be transparent, rather than coloured). Stir in the rice so it gets coated with the butter, cook for a couple of minutes. Add the lemon juice and stir until it's all absorbed. Gradually add the vegetable stock, stirring after each addition until it is nearly all absorbed before adding the next bit of stock. When it is nearly cooked, stir in the drained crab meat and the frozen peas, stirring until the peas are defrosted and the rice is thoroughly cooked. Serve with lots of grated Parmesan cheese stirred in.
 
Posted by Corpus cani (# 1663) on :
 
I had some friends for lunch on Sunday (- and they tasted great! Ba-da-boom-tish!)

Believe it or not, it was the first time this true blue Englishman has ever cooked roast beef.

All went well BUT:

I gather it is wise to leave a joint on the side for a while after roasting - something to do with making it easier to carve? - but

a) how long should one leave it and
b) how does one leave it to stand and yet serve meat that is not stone cold by the time it's carved, on the plate, everybody's helped himself to roast pots'n'pars, veggies, Yorkshire puds &c and is ready to eat it?

Cc
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
It's important to all full-cooked meats "rest"--uncut--for at least 5-15 minutes after you remove them from the oven. (For a very large piece of meat, like a whole turkey or a beef primal, let it rest 20-30 minutes.) If you cut into the meat before then, the fluid in the meat will drain out and the meat will be dry and less tasty.

[Boring lecture on heat and capillary action discarded.]

To keep the meat as warm as possible, tent or wrap it in aluminum foil. I suggest letting the meat rest in its pan so you can make a pan sauce with drippings plus whatever juice does leak out of the meat.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
thanks for explaining this; I was pretty close, in my guess (yay for me [Big Grin] ).
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
Mmmmm,

Roast Beef.

My Dad has just bought a barbeque with a rotisserie on it and we spit roasted a peice of beef the other week for a dinner party....soo goooood.

Thanks for the orange and almond cake recipie Cranmer, My Mum had just discovered she is wheat intolerant and that one will be a great christmas dessert!
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
I'd like to make garlic butter that has a good garlic flavor without being overpowering. In the past I've used garlic powder, but I'd like to try using cloves of garlic put through a garlic press. Any suggestions for ratio of cloves to butter?
 
Posted by Laud-able (# 9896) on :
 
I suggest a cautious start with one or two cloves of garlic to half a cup of butter, one or two teaspoons of finely chopped parsley, and salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Put the unpeeled cloves of garlic on a chopping board under the flat of a cook's knife, and give the knife a sharp smack with the ball of your thumb. The papery skin of the clove will then come away easily. Chop the garlic very finely – with the parsley if you like – and knead into the butter, salt and pepper.

Many cooks advise against using a garlic press which, they say, brings out an acrid taste in the garlic (and it's also one more utensil to be washed).
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I find you can exert enough pressure on a clove of garlic with just about anything solid (the bottom of a glass, for instance) - just press. It doesn't take much to break that seal, as it were, and then the papery skin pulls right off. Not need to whack anywhere around a knife blade [Big Grin] (too many "oops!" experiences here...).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I use a cleaver and press with the flat of the blade and it works fine.

An alternative method for peeling garlic is to drop the cloves in a cup of boiling hot water for a moment then fish them out with a spoon and the skin should peel off quite easily. It's not my method of choice but it does work.
 
Posted by Dee. (# 5681) on :
 
I have also found that rubbing salt on your fingers removes the smell of the garlic...rub in the salt...rise off...smelly hands all gone.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
You can also brown the garlic in a little olive oil over medium heat to cut down the "power" of the raw garlic. This brings out the nutty aroma and really rounds out the garlic flavor into more mellow tones.
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
Julia Child once said:
quote:
You can never have too much garlic.

 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I should have known she was a soul-mate!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Garlic and Coriander [Cilantro] Curry.

MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Do tell, please, WW-- (I can smell it from here... [Big Grin] ).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It's really simple, quick and delicious - a recipe given by a friend many, many years ago long before I ever even thought of visiting India.

Chop some onions, peel A LOT of garlic, have some chopped tomatoes ready [tinned will do] and a fair amount of chopped fresh coriander/cilantro. As I now live in South India I would start off with some coconut oil but used to use sunfower oil in UK.

Heat a little oil in a pan, when it is hot add a teaspoon of black mustard seeds.

When they start to pop add the chopped onion and fry until soft.

Add the garlic [I prefer whole cloves but it is up to you] and fry, stirring, for a few minutes until they begin to change colour.

Add spices to taste - I would use turmeric, coriander and chilli along with some salt to taste. Instead of chilli powder adding a couple of green chillies sliced open works just as well.

After a minute or so add chopped tomatoes to moisten rather than drown.

Cook for 15 minutes or so then stir in two thirds of the herb.

Cook another 5 minutes, take off heat, check seasoning and balance if required.

Add remaining herb and serve.

There are loads of modifications possible such as adding a little creamed coconut with the tomatoes or, if you are feeling fancy, stirring in a little creme fraiche before serving - not very Indian but it tastes good!

It's one of those basic recipes that can be tarted up in so many ways. It is best as a side dish rather than main dish, a sort of garlic bhaji - but make sure you serve yourself some first or it might all go!

The most important thing is to ensure your partner eats some too, otherwise it could be seen as being antisocial.

[ 17. November 2006, 02:30: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We're just trying to make our own crystallised/candied ginger - loads of recipes on the net so we're just giving it a go. I'd better go and give it a stir, will report back later.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Complete disaster - in the final stages I took my eye off it for a few minutes and the whle thing caramelised.

[Waterworks]

We are going to try again next week.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
[Frown] - so many foods have that last critical moment where the right thing happens to finish it off, but half a second later the WRONG thing happens to ruin it.

So I don't suppose there's anything you can do with caramelized ginger?!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
HWMBO whizzed it in the blender to go in sauces, I'm not sure what sauces but . . .

Actually it tasted kind of interesting.
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
A lot of things can be whizzed beyond recognition in a blender.

Useful kitchen tool, that!
 
Posted by Binker (# 8878) on :
 
Wonder if anyone can help me: A woman at work this week told me about a chocolate cake recipe she used to make from a magazine 30+ years ago. She no longer has the recipe, and about all she could remember was that it used cocoa powder and hot milk, which made it very moist.

Given that Mr Binker is a coeliac, I thought the extra moistness might help if the cake was translated into gluten-free. BUT after googling hot milk etc for some time, I can't find any chocolate cakes using hot milk. Does anyone here know of such a thing?
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
HWMBO whizzed it in the blender to go in sauces

I initially read this as "whizzed* in the blender...." [Eek!] [Projectile]

Yeah, I bet it was more interesting! [Help]


========
* "to whiz" is US slang for urinate.
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
Binker, A quick search and I can't find one either using hot milk. But there is this one. And, if my childhood memory serves me right, it is moist.

Chocolate mayonnaise cake
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
I have a great recipe for a chocolate cake which uses corn oil. It makes a fab moist cake!

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by frin (# 9) on :
 
I googled without the word hot (recipe cake milk) and found this:

Hot Milk Cake

'frin
 
Posted by Penny Lane (# 3086) on :
 
I have a chocolate cake recipe that uses cocoa, buttermilk, and boiling water that is very moist. I imagine it is a variant of "Texas Sheet Cake", which you may also want to Google for ideas.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
You know, oil and mayonnaise and the like do make for a very moist cake but Texas sheet cake is made with black gold, Texas crude straight outta the ground, and it makes for a REALLY moist cake!!! [Snigger] You'll really find yourself running on it... of course, If you must you can use a can of 10-40 in lieu of the Texas crude, that's a fair substitution...

<I am kidding [Eek!] y'all know that, right?>
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Re chocolate cake. I don't have a recipe to offer, but if you want something a) moist and b) gluten free how about mousse?

This one sounds good (though I haven't made it so can't endorse it practically.)

It might be even more decadent with a bit of alcohol in it! And I think it would be gluten-free (as long as the chocolate is. I imagine chocolate usually is).

By the way has anyone either eaten food by Heston Blumenthal or cooked any of his recipes?
 
Posted by Binker (# 8878) on :
 
[Overused] Thanks everybody!

PeteCanada - I can't quite imagine a chocolate cake involving mayonnaise. It just seems wrong. [Projectile]

'frin - ta for that. I'm pretty sure Crystal said it was a chocolate cake, but it wouldn't be hard to throw a bit of cocoa or something into that recipe.

Welsh dragon - Yep, chocolate is GF (unless it has tricky fillings etc), so mousse is good - anything that's pretty much just chocolate and cream with a little coffee or Baileys or the like can hardly fail! But I was really looking for the original recipe (to impress the woman at placement! [Big Grin] ), and then as an add-on, thinking it might be good GF.

Binker
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Binker, you might also try looking up recipes for "flourless chocolate cake," which is I think a somewhat different consistency than a regular cake but sounds rich and yummy. As to the hot milk cake recipe, I have an old (1950s) cookbook downstairs which I'll check in the morning (is waaay past my bedtime).
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Binker:
Wonder if anyone can help me: A woman at work this week told me about a chocolate cake recipe she used to make from a magazine 30+ years ago. She no longer has the recipe, and about all she could remember was that it used cocoa powder and hot milk, which made it very moist.

Binker, I found this recipe in my old copy of The Settlement Cookbook, copyright 1965. I hope it works for you. I haven't tried it, but it sounds very moist.

Cocoa Cake
Preheat oven to 350 (moderate oven).

Cook the following until thick, then cool:
3/4 C cocoa
3/4 C sugar
1 egg yolk (reserve the egg white)
1/2 C milk

Next part:
1/2 C butter
1 C sugar
1 whole egg
1 egg yolk (reserve this egg white too)
2 C flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 C sour cream
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp vanilla
and the 2 reserved egg whites

Cream butter and sugar well. Add 1 whole egg and 1 egg yolk. Mix thoroughly. Sift flour, measure and sift three times with baking powder. Add flour gradually, alternating with sour cream well mixed with the soda. Add cocoa mixture. Stir well, add vanilla, then fold in the 2 stiffly beeaten egg whites. Bake 20-30 minutes in two well-greased and floured 9-inch layer pans. Fill and frost with chocolate butter cream frosting.
-----------
That's the recipe as written. I think I've read somewhere that nowadays flour is processed such that multiple siftings (such as the above instructions to sift 3 times) aren't necessary. I sure don't do it! Anyway, good luck with the cake. I just might try this recipe!
 
Posted by Binker (# 8878) on :
 
Thanks for that Mamacita. Certainly sounds like about the right era. And who knows, I may even try it this weekend! Mr Binker isn't really that fussy about how his chocolate cakes happen, as long as they happen [Biased] .
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
While we're talking about cake, it's baby b's 2nd birthday just before christmas.

I would like to make him a cake this year but am thwarted by the fact he is allergic to dairy and eggs. The dairy isn't a problem as we have soy substitutes for just about everything. Eggs, however, are proving to be somewhat fundamental to the cake-making process.

I know I could just do a heap of flapjacks or biscuits, but I'd really like to do a proper cake, that I can at least stick a couple of candles in.

Any ideas?
 
Posted by MouseThief (# 953) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
I know I could just do a heap of flapjacks or biscuits, but I'd really like to do a proper cake, that I can at least stick a couple of candles in.

One can get "egg substitute" at health food type stores -- made from potato flour or something. I would suggest a heap o' experimenting before the Big Day.
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
While we're talking about cake, it's baby b's 2nd birthday just before christmas.

I would like to make him a cake this year but am thwarted by the fact he is allergic to dairy and eggs. The dairy isn't a problem as we have soy substitutes for just about everything. Eggs, however, are proving to be somewhat fundamental to the cake-making process.

I know I could just do a heap of flapjacks or biscuits, but I'd really like to do a proper cake, that I can at least stick a couple of candles in.

Any ideas?

Ca va?

PS, I just googled for this, I haven't tried out the recipes...

[edited to add some more, also here & here ]

[ 23. November 2006, 20:57: Message edited by: welsh dragon ]
 
Posted by MouseThief (# 953) on :
 
Google for "lenten cake".

Here's one that works for us -- this is the spice cake variation. I assume you can fiddle with it to make different flavours. It sounds weird but it really works!

----------------------------------------------

SISSY YERGER'S LENTEN TOMATO SOUP CAKE

Cream together:

1/2 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
1 tsp baking soda
1 can condensed tomato soup

Soft together and add to the preceding:

2 C flour
2 tps baking powder
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp ground cloves
1 tsp nutmeg
1 c nuts (optional)
1 c raisins (optional)

Cook at 300F in a tube pan or loaf pans. (that's what the recipe says -- we always use a 9x12 pan).

The recipe doesn't say how LONG to cook it -- check at about 25 minutes -- as with any cake, toothpick inserted into the middle should come back clean.

---------------------------------------------

LENTEN CHOCOLATE CAKE

3 C flour
2 tsp baking soda
6 Tbsp cocoa
1 tsp salt
2 C sugar or brown sugar (packed)
1 Tbsp vinegar
2 tsp vanilla extract
3/4 c corn oil
2 C cold water

Mix dry ingredients. In a separate bowl, mix wet ingredients. Mix together and pour into greased 9x12 pan. Bake at 350F for 45 minutes.
 
Posted by MouseThief (# 953) on :
 
I didn't make clear -- those are 2 independent recipes. We have used both repeatedly with success.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Following on from Birdie's request, I need ideas to suit the following...

New Years Eve requirement: scrumptious food for between five and seven people. Including someone who doesn't eat dairy, eggs or nuts, someone who doesn't like most red meat (mince in a lasagne is OK) and someone who isn't great on exotic vegetables.

Any suggestions (particularly for dessert, where fruit salad gets a bit boring and, oh, the non-dairy/nuts/eggs eater doesn't like summer pudding?)

[ 24. November 2006, 08:13: Message edited by: Ferijen ]
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Jelly (with fruit or alcohol or both) comes to mind. Gin and tonic jellies or champagne jellies or rose wine jelly with strawberries or raspberries.

Personally I love baked apples, and you could have an option of clotted cream or soya ice cream to go with.
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
Over on the Cake thread, Babybear queried about Oatmeal cake.

I don't like chocolate (intolerant of dairy), and white cakes can get boring.

Over thirty years ago a colleague gave me this recipe. It's worked for me when I've wanted a cake.

So with fear and trepidation, I offer it...

Oatmeal cake

1-1/4 cup boiling water
½ cup margarine or butter
1 cup oatmeal
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1-1/3 cup unsifted flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
½ tsp nutmeg
1 tsp vanilla
raisins
nuts

Mix boiling water butter, and oats in a mixing bowl. Let stand for 20 minutes.

Add sugar and eggs. Blend.

Add remaining ingredients. Stir to mix.

Turn into a greased and floured cake pan.

Bake at 350F for 35 minutes or until the cake springs back when touched with a finger.

I sometimes just dust it with some freshly crushed cinnamon and fine sugar while it is still hot.

Lemon frosting is good too if you must frost it.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
I found a vegan chocolate pudding that sounds rather interesting recipe.

Something that is rather lovely are fresh pears poached in red wine and served with a raspberry sauce. You could of course go for something like a cranberry and orange sauce. That would work just as well.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Yes that would work. Cream like substance can be made by beating in a liquidiser Silken Tofu and Coconut Milk. Possibly add vanilla essence. This makes huge quantities. Well beaten you almost could serve it as an alternative to whipped cream.

Other substitutes for cream that can be made in smaller quantities include ground cashew nut mixed in Soya Milk or other milk substitute will create a single/double cream. Equally if you want a substitute for double cream rather than single cream you can ground cashew nuts to the shop ones and it will thicken it. However these will not whip up.

Jengie
 
Posted by Bittersweet (# 10483) on :
 
Birdie - there are masses of vegan cake recipes out there (no eggs, no dairy, ideal). I would post, but only having English ones which I know work, am a bit chary of advising to you without knowing if you could get everything. However, googling "vegan cake recipe" should get you some good places to start - and if you see any credited to Leah Leneman, do try them, she tends to be scrummy.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Birdie

Rose Elliot has a Vegan Sponge (Layer) Cake. I have not made it but what I know of her recipes it is likely it will work really well. I will pm you it rather than infringe copywrite.

Jengie
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I can recommend PeteCanada's cake - we use Jaggery which is a bit like Muscovados for the sugar to give a richer taste and we have also used half sugar and half honey. It is a flexible recipe and very tasty.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
You probably all know this, but what is the difference between baking soda and baking powder?

What are the equivalents in England?

PeteCanada's cake sounded lovely and I want to try it!
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate.

It makes a good fizz in the presence of acid and is indispensible for making up fun "science lessons" to impress 8-year-old children. Its also got half a dozen uses in cooking other than just a rising agent, and can be used for cleaning people and things.

Baking powder (in England at any rate) is a mixture of baking soda, some sort of acid, flour, and the usual drying agents and preservatives. I suppose the flour is in there to bulk it out.

Self-raising flour is flour with added soda. Its good for cakes and so on.

A recipe that calls for baking powder will work with baking soda as long as there is some source of acid present. If there is none in the recipe (fruit juice, yogurt, etc) you can add a little tartaric acid.
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
Thank you muchly for these. I will certainly give one of them a try.

Bittersweet - I am in Britain (tho not England) so recommend away, if you want!
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Baking powder (in England at any rate) is a mixture of baking soda, some sort of acid, flour, and the usual drying agents and preservatives. I suppose the flour is in there to bulk it out.

Self-raising flour is flour with added soda. Its good for cakes and so on.

It's also tartaric acid (cream of tartar) in the baking powder - and baking powder (not soda) in self-raising flour.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I've also got a dairy/nut/chocolate intolerant child - much older though. Have you tried making rice pudding with coconut milk? I tend to sweeten it with dried fruit and add cardamon pods to the mixture.

Cake recipe from Gail Duff - she describes it as light and very crumbly, more a cross between cake and shortbread.

Dairy-free Vinegar Cake

UK/US versions
225g (1/2lb or 2 cups) wholemeal/grain flour
2.5ml (1/2tsp) bicarbonate of soda (US=Baking soda)
125g (1/4lb/1/2cup) vegetable marg/shortening
125g (1/4lb/1/2cup) brown or Barbados sugar
50g (2oz/1/3cup)raisins
50g (2oz/1/3cup) sultanas/white raisins (muscats)
30ml (2tbls) malt or cider vinegar
90ml (6tbls) natural apple juice
extra margarine/shortening for greasing
450g (1lb/3cup) loaf tin/bread pan

Heat the oven to gas mark 4/180C (350F). Put the flour and soda into a bowl and rub in the margarine. Toss in the sugar, raisins and sultanas (white raisins) with your fingers. Make a well in the centre and pour in the vinegar and apple juice. Mix everything to a dough and press it into a greased 450g (1lb) loaf tin (3 cup bread pan). Put the cake into the oven for 1 hour Turn the heat to gas mark 2/150C (300F) and continue cooking for a further 15 minutes. Very carefully turn out the cake onto a wire rack. It will be very crumbly, but will hold together better as it cools.

When I used to make it I held it together with icing. And I had a chocolate version too, but I'm not sure where I've put that recipe.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
I rather think Pete's receipe was originally out of the "More With LEss" cookbook put out in the mid-1970s by the Central Committee of the Mennonite CHurch. I think I saw a revised version of the book at a UNICEF stand the other day.

It is an excellent cake and we've used it a lot, and all three children liked it too. Good cookbook in general, as well.

In any case, you can also top the cake with a mixture of brown sugar, butter (or margerine) and crushed walnuts/grated coconut/something smiliar and run it under the broiler just until the topping starts to bubble. WHich may be what the children liked, rather than the cake itself, of course, but whatever works...

John
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
I was wanting to try a recipe posted some time ago by one of our UK Shipmates. It calls for demerara(sp?) sugar. Is there a US equilavent or adequate substitute?

Thanks in advance.
 
Posted by MouseThief (# 953) on :
 
I believe the equivalent is "blonde sugar" -- the brandname "sugar in the raw" should be what you want.
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
If it's in a plastic bag or there is a picture, it should be light brown but granulated (fairly big granules too).

Re the vegan cake, I can vouch for the tastiness of the Lenten chocolate cake. My co-workers couldn't believe it had no butter or eggs! (I should make it for coffee hour some time ... we have a new child at the church who can't eat dairy.)

Charlotte
 
Posted by MouseThief (# 953) on :
 
Should add that lenten/vegan cakes tend to be on the moist side, so a well greased-and-floured pan is essential.

When making a chocolate cake, instead of flouring the pan, use cocoa powder. Same effect, and doesn't discolour the cake.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
I was wanting to try a recipe posted some time ago by one of our UK Shipmates. It calls for demerara(sp?) sugar. Is there a US equilavent or adequate substitute?

Light brown sugar is the closest thing we have in the supermarkets.

If you try a natural food store, you may find some.

Moo
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
Campbellite:

you can buy Turbinado or Sucanat sugar at "Heath food" stores. I use Sucanat for lots of recipes.
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
Thanks ya'll. That really helps.

I don't know if I posted this before, but this is an old family recipe* I prepared for Thanksgiving. You might want to try it for Christmas dinner.

Aunt Gerry's Sweet Potato Casserole
2 cups shredded sweet potato (about 1 med. potato)
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
2 eggs
1/4 dry sherry
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground cloves
1/2 cup chopped pecans

Mix all ingredients in mixing bowl. Pour into a 1 1/2 quart oven proof dish and bake at 300F for 45 minutes to 1 hour.

The sweet potato I used yielded 3 cups, so I multiplied the recipe accordingly. There were no leftovers. [Smile]

My Aunt Gerry made this every year for family gatherings. She used to use home grown pecans from my grandfather's trees.

*stolen from an old family. <jk>
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Campbellite -- This sounds good. I will give it a try. Are the shredded sweet potatoes uncooked? Also, am I correct in thinking it's 1/4 cup sherry? (As opposed to 1/4 of the contents [Razz] ). Thankx.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Isn't it awfully sweet? A cup of sugar to two cups of sweet potato strikes me as an open invitation to a diabetic coma. We had baked sweet potatoes for dinner the other day -- just baked in the oven. A small pat of butter, nothing else. And they tasted just fine.

John
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
Mamcita, 1/4 bottle would be interesting, [Two face] but you are right, it is 1/4 cup sherry. And yes, the potato is peeled and shredded uncooked.

John Holding, my aunt's original recipe called for two cups sugar. While they are called sweet potatoes, the are not really all that sweet on their own. And I love baked sweet potatoes, which are tasty and nutritious, (until they are slathered with great gobs of butter and brown sugar and cinnamon like at a certain steak house I frequent). [Eek!]
 
Posted by Tabby Cat (# 4561) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteCanada:
Oatmeal cake

I was intrigued by the idea of oatmeal in a cake and made this a couple of days ago. It was delicious and I've just finished the last piece. Thanks PeteCanada!

However, while eating it I realised that I was in fact familiar with oatmeal as an ingredient in Yorkshire parkin. This cake reminded me of a particularly nice parkin.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
I'm trying to find a recipe for a cranberry jelly with vodka I can can at home, but zero success yet, even my standbys Food Network and epicurious bring me no joy. I've found some in Google but they're in cookbooks I have to buy.

Anyone have such a recipe or know where I can find it?

Also, is there any danger vodka would interfere with the jelling process?
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
I can't help you with a recipe, Kenwritez, but I don't think the Vodka will affect the jelling process. I've made various jams and jellies with different spirits - brandy & port usually. Is there any reason vodka would behave differently?
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
I was wanting to try a recipe posted some time ago by one of our UK Shipmates. It calls for demerara(sp?) sugar. Is there a US equilavent or adequate substitute?

Light brown sugar is the closest thing we have in the supermarkets.

If you try a natural food store, you may find some.

Moo

Mirabile dictu! I found a Kroger in town (not the one I usually shop in) which has a British import section. There, lo and behold, was demerara sugar! In a 500g box. They also had jars of Marmite! As I was looking at the jar, a gentleman behind me (with a very definite British accent) said, "Jolly good on toast, you know, with a little butter." [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Also, is there any danger vodka would interfere with the jelling process?

Depending on how much vodka it could have an effect on the gelling process. There's a limit to the amount of alcohol you can use and still have a set jelly.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
I would think that it is a matter of how much liquid is left in the gelling process. If you make the jelly normally put in the vodka(replace water with vodka) and reduce until the right consistency.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
They also had jars of Marmite! As I was looking at the jar, a gentleman behind me (with a very definite British accent) said, "Jolly good on toast, you know, with a little butter." [Big Grin] [/QB]

Obviously a person of great refinement and good taste! So unlike a certain pesky Canadian who, when visiting, turned up his nose at such wondrous provender!
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MouseThief:
quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
I know I could just do a heap of flapjacks or biscuits, but I'd really like to do a proper cake, that I can at least stick a couple of candles in.

One can get "egg substitute" at health food type stores -- made from potato flour or something. I would suggest a heap o' experimenting before the Big Day.
I found some yesterday in a local health food place - I don't know how I hadn't noticed it before as it was in the same section I get baby b's dairy-free stuff from.

Anyway I am hopeful that with experimentation (oh no! experimental cake to taste! how awful!) this will mean I can use one of my own recipes.

Thanks all.
 
Posted by Mary Beth (# 92) on :
 
I know that this is probably anathema, but I would like to make a mince meat pie for Christmas and use as a base a store bought filling. I don't have the time or talent to make it from scratch.

What could I add to flavor it up or make it reasonably edible?

Would generous portions of rum or brandy do? [Two face]

Thanks.

Mary Beth
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary Beth:
Would generous portions of rum or brandy do? [Two face]

if you're generous enough, they always do.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary Beth:
I know that this is probably anathema, but I would like to make a mince meat pie for Christmas and use as a base a store bought filling. I don't have the time or talent to make it from scratch.

What could I add to flavor it up or make it reasonably edible?

Would generous portions of rum or brandy do?

In the cook, if nowhere else.

What I usually dislike about bought mince pies is that they are too sickly sweet and rather runny. I would be minded to add sultanas marinaded in brandy or liqueur, or something like those jars of Polish cherries, chopped up. Or fresh orange rind.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
My Mum makes fabulous mince pies (and mine are improving!) but only ever with shop mincemeat. The problem with bought mince pies is usually with the pastry and that there's too much of it in proportion to the filling which makes them dry. So if you're OK at pastry and use a good quality bought mincemeat you should be fine IMHO. [Smile]

Mind you, adding brandy improves most things! Try heating your mince pies, taking off the top, adding a generous dollop of brandy butter and then sandwiching it back together again. Eat over a plate to catch the drips! [Big Grin]

I've also got a good recipe for mincemeat streusel, which is lighter than mince pies as you only have one layer of pastry, if anyone's interested.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
[QUOTE]Mirabile dictu! I found a Kroger in town (not the one I usually shop in) which has a British import section. There, lo and behold, was demerara sugar! In a 500g box. They also had jars of Marmite! As I was looking at the jar, a gentleman behind me (with a very definite British accent) said, "Jolly good on toast, you know, with a little butter." [Big Grin]

Only a "little" butter? [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary Beth:
<snip> I don't have the time or talent to make it from scratch. <snip>

I usually make my own mincemeat for mince pies. It really, really, isn't that arduous or difficult. Peeling and chopping the apple is probably the most fiddly bit. It's my personal 'christmas is coming' marker as it fills the house with the most tremendous smell.

I can post the recipe I use if you like.

(Failing that, yes, I would say slinging some extra booze into purchased mincemeat is No Bad Thing!)
 
Posted by Mary Beth (# 92) on :
 
Thanks for your suggestions.

I was thinking of buying the mince meat filling in a jar (None Such™), making yummy additions, and placing in a ready made, unbaked pie shell. (I know my limits. [Hot and Hormonal] )

Keren-Happuch, please post your mincemeat streusel recipe. I'd like to give it a try.

Thanks.

Mary Beth
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
The recipe came from my Mum so it's a little vague, but here goes:

Mincemeat Streusel
Make pastry using 6oz (175g) flour*
2 standard jars mincemeat

For the topping:
3oz (75g) white self-raising flour
1.5 oz (40g) semolina
1 oz (25g) caster sugar
3 oz (75g) butter

Roll out the pastry to a little larger than a 12x9" baking tray, line the base and sides with it, trim and patch any gaps. Spread with the mincemeat.

Put the flour, semolina and sugar in a bowl. Melt the butter, allow to cool slightly and pour onto the dry ingredients. Mix to a dough. If you have time, chill it in the fridge for half an hour. Grate the dough using a coarse grater** and spread over the mincemeat. Bake at gas 6 (don't know electric, sorry) for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown.

I tried this last year and it was very well received. [Smile]

* Here's Delia's recipe for pastry using 4oz flour.

** I found it easier just to crumble it with my fingers.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
...
Try heating your mince pies, taking off the top, adding a generous dollop of brandy butter and then sandwiching it back together again. Eat over a plate to catch the drips! [Big Grin]

I'm so glad I'm not the only one who does this. I always get told off by my family when I do it in public (though I'm pretty sure they taught it to me in the first place)
 
Posted by Mrs Wogan (# 11103) on :
 
Hi Yangtze,

I'm glad I'm not the only one who indulges in this behaviour! I feel that the heat of the mince pies melts the brandy butter nicely. I don't like shop-bought mince pies as they are too sugary and have a little too much filling for my taste. I'll bake some to share with you [Smile]
 
Posted by Mary Beth (# 92) on :
 
Thanks Keren-Happuch for the recipe. I've printed it off.

Birdie, could you post your mincemeat recipe? I somehow missed your last post.

I googled brandy butter, which I hadn't heard of before (pond thing?), and am looking forward to making up a batch.

It looks like it's going to be a very Mer-r-ry Christmas.

Mar-r-ry Beth
 
Posted by Mrs Wogan (# 11103) on :
 
Sorry Keren-Happuch, I didn't see that you had started the discussion about mince pies! For a discussion of brandy butter, see Nigella Lawson's books. She feels the ground almonds make for a more velvety texture. My family just put in rather a lot of brandy and icing sugar. Cointreau butter was an interesting departure, but I'll stick to brandy for now. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I can check with my mum for proportions but my grandfather's recipe for brandy butter was along the lines of "very good dear, needs more brandy"! I know it's unsalted butter whisked together with icing sugar and my mum just adds brandy until the butter won't hold any more [Big Grin]

I don't think I started the discussion really, Mrs Wogan so no apology necessary!
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
I know it's unsalted butter whisked together with icing sugar and my mum just adds brandy until the butter won't hold any more [Big Grin]

Have just asked my mum for her rum butter recipe, which I guess is similar. This is a traditional Cumbrian recipe.

Melt 4oz butter over a gentle heat, then stir in light muscovado sugar until it's absorbed all the butter. Depending on the sugar, the butter, the phases of the moon, et and so on, this can be anything between 8 ounces or 1lb of sugar. Turn the heat off, add two tbsp (ish. I find I have a very wobbly hand at this point) rum, stir gently, pour into container, leave to set.

Deborah
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Mincemeat! wow... I've never had mincemeat; I've never had the nerve. I was traumatized in childhood (stop laughing, KenWritez! I can hear you sniggering from here!). You see, being an impressionable young thing of 4 1/2 years or so, I understood my mother to say men's meat and I was appalled, appalled I tell you! How can you eat men's meat? She went on to tell me how delicious it was and how much my Daddy enjoyed a men's meat pie (horrors!). I already had a sense that the Eucharist was a one-time deal and we weren't supposed to eat anybody other than Jesus...

And not too many years later she stopped making mince pies, so... Birdie, I'd love to see your recipe from scratch - it would give me some sense of whether I might attempt one, for curiosity's sake or not [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
For those folks like me who can't use alcohol [I tried my best for 22 years, but that's another story] taking the top off a warm mince pie and adding a generous dollop of either whipped cream or creme fraiche is delicious. Otherwise take the top off a cold mince pie, add some crumbled cheese of your choice - the purists will probably say Wensleydale but many will do just as well, I think St Agur is pretty wonderful - replace lid and then warm the pie so the cheese begins to melt down into the fruit.

Scrumptious!
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
Hello again.

I generally use Delia Smith's recipe from Delia Smith's Christmas which can be found here.

That makes a lot - I think I usually make about half that. Don't for a minute think you have to do it exactly that way though - I often fiddle about with the amounts, using fewer currants and more raisins, for instance - either because of what I happen to have in the cupboard the day I make it, or just because I prefer it that way!

Dead easy though - you don't even have to peel the apples.

Somewhere else (Nigella, possibly) I have also seen the tip that if you find shop-bought mincemeat too sweet, grating over some sharp apple, or stirring in some lemon juice, will improve it.

b
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
I have always found commercial mincemeat far too sickly, too.
I find that mixing a chopped cooking apple into the stuff from the jar, in addition to a little brandy, cuts the sweetness and makes it much more palatable.
I like a dollop of creme fraiche with my mincepies, the sourness goes well with the sweetness pof mincemeat.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
Oops, cross posted with birdie, thanks to a phone call in the middle (wrong number, too!)
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I have a recipe for mincemeat that doesn't use suet - I'm not sure if the French have suet, so I thought it best not to use it - which is for vegetarians. It has apples & currants etc in & sounds good. I plan on making some mince pies for my friend's party on Sunday.

But, because it is for vegans/vegetarians, the recipe says to use vegan sugar. But why isn't normal sugar vegan? Do manufacturers usually use something non-vegan for an anti-caking ingredient or something?
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
I like a dollop of creme fraiche with my mincepies, the sourness goes well with the sweetness of mincemeat.

Since moving to North Devon I'm a convert to having clotted cream with mince pies. My wife makes mincemeat (based on Delia Smith's recipe but replacing some of the dried fruit with a quantity of dried cranberries) and a delicious pastry made with orange zest and ground almond (I think it's an Ainsley Harriott recipe so could probably be found on the BBC food website). The rich pastry and the mincemeat both absorb and begin to melt the clotted cream into a buttery, sweet, heavenly sauce.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spawn:
[QUOTE]. . . The rich pastry and the mincemeat both absorb and begin to melt the clotted cream into a buttery, sweet, heavenly sauce.

Okay, who else is salivating now?
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mrs Wogan:
Hi Yangtze,
.... I'll bake some to share with you [Smile]

Oh yum. Please tell me you're London based and planning on coming to a shipmeet. [Biased]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
thank you, birdie! Now - who can explain to me the difference between sultanas and raisins? [Confused]
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
thank you, birdie! Now - who can explain to me the difference between sultanas and raisins? [Confused]

Definition of 'raisin'.
Sultanas are a paler, seedless version, also known a 'golden raisins'. The best flavoured raisins are made from muscat grapes, but they are big raisins with big seeds in them so need chopping and deseeding when being used for cakes.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
For mincemeat, as for fruit cakes and fruit puddings, what matters is the total weight (UK) or volume (US) of dried fruit. You can play any games you want inside that total, mixing up whatever amounts you like of the different kinds of raisins, currents, dried cranberries, dried blueberries and so on. I substitute preserved pineapple for the cherries you find in some recipes, so I suspect you can happily substitute different fruits (within the total weight) as you like.

John
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spawn:
My wife makes mincemeat (based on Delia Smith's recipe but replacing some of the dried fruit with a quantity of dried cranberries) and a delicious pastry made with orange zest and ground almond (I think it's an Ainsley Harriott recipe so could probably be found on the BBC food website).

No it isn't, alas, at least as far as I can see. Drooling minds need to know. Any chance of a recipe?

John
 
Posted by Kasra (# 10631) on :
 
One of the weekend papers carried this recipe for alcoholic jellies. They suggest using Sloe Gin, but state that one can "dabble with other spirits, such as... vodka".

This recipe will apparently make 16-20 shot glasses-full of jelly.

400ml water
200ml gin/vodka etc (or more alcohol and less water)
120g caster sugar
3 sheets leaf gelatine

bring water to the boil, add sugar, stir until dissolved and remove from the heat. Soak the gelatine leaves in a shallow bowl of cold water until soft. Squeeze out the water, add to the syrup and stir until disolved. Add alcohol then pour into shot glasses. Refrigerate until the jelly is set (usually a couple of hours).

I don't know what this is like as I haven't tried it yet. But it might work, or at least be a reasonable quantity guide!
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
All this talk of alcoholic jellies has made me think of the ever popular party favor.... Jello shots. It may not e what you want but after a few shots you won't care. [Biased]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Assorted flavors of jello shots were very popular at science fiction conventions about 5-6 years ago; they seem to had faded into the background roar somewhat...

It would be fun to make "finger jello shots" - basically flavored jellow with unflavored gelatin added, so it can actually be served as "finger food" - good fun for 2 year olds... and SF fans, I daresay [Big Grin]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Sounds good! I'm trying to make jelly to give as Christmas gifts, tho, so it has to be able to travel via mail or sneaker post.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I forgot until just now, but I had a friend years ago who used to make champagne jelly; it was lovely. Sadly this was decades ago and she has moved and we've lost touch, so no recipe... [Frown]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
So IOW you posted merely to torment me with the unavailability of your friend's champagne jelly recipe? LMC, yer a crool, crool wummin.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
well, I wouldn't want you to think too highly of me... [Snigger]
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
I forgot until just now, but I had a friend years ago who used to make champagne jelly; it was lovely. Sadly this was decades ago and she has moved and we've lost touch, so no recipe... [Frown]

I once made a poor man's 'Bucks Fizz' jelly...orange jelly made up wth Cava. After the company reeled away from the table we decided that maybe the addition of a little orange juice to the mix would have been sensible.
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
quote:
Originally posted by Spawn:
My wife makes mincemeat (based on Delia Smith's recipe but replacing some of the dried fruit with a quantity of dried cranberries) and a delicious pastry made with orange zest and ground almond (I think it's an Ainsley Harriott recipe so could probably be found on the BBC food website).

No it isn't, alas, at least as far as I can see. Drooling minds need to know. Any chance of a recipe?

John

Here it is. [Smile]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I googled champagne jelly recipes and got a lot of hits. Here they are. You can decide which appeals to you.

Moo
 
Posted by Belle (# 4792) on :
 
I have an Edmonds Cook book, bought because my boyfriend is a Kiwi. I know that the banana cake is good, because I've had it. I have the bananas and last night I looked up the recipe - horrors - it calls for Edmonds butter cake mix, which I can't get. Does anyone know what that would contain? Is it the dry ingredients - flour, baking powder and sugar? Any help gratefully received.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spawn:
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
quote:
Originally posted by Spawn:
My wife makes mincemeat (based on Delia Smith's recipe but replacing some of the dried fruit with a quantity of dried cranberries) and a delicious pastry made with orange zest and ground almond (I think it's an Ainsley Harriott recipe so could probably be found on the BBC food website).

No it isn't, alas, at least as far as I can see. Drooling minds need to know. Any chance of a recipe?

John

Here it is. [Smile]
Thanks -- I was trying under "pastry" expecting just the pastry, not the whole things.

John
 
Posted by GoodCatholicLad (# 9231) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
I forgot until just now, but I had a friend years ago who used to make champagne jelly; it was lovely. Sadly this was decades ago and she has moved and we've lost touch, so no recipe... [Frown]

I once made a poor man's 'Bucks Fizz' jelly...orange jelly made up wth Cava. After the company reeled away from the table we decided that maybe the addition of a little orange juice to the mix would have been sensible.
When I saw the word "jelly" the first thing that came to mind was a spread one puts on toast like marmalade. Then I remembered "jelly" is the American "Jello" or gelatin desert, that powder that makes me sneeze when I open the package, then you add a cup of hot water and a cup of cold water and can add addtional ingredients then put in the refrigirator to congeal. My aunts used to make these elaborate "jello" deserts that had mandarin orange slices and pineapple in these fancy molds. It's very "after church services luncheon" by me.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by GoodCatholicLad:
When I saw the word "jelly" the first thing that came to mind was a spread one puts on toast like marmalade. Then I remembered "jelly" is the American "Jello" or gelatin desert [....]

You were right the first time. "Jelly" is usually what we spread on toast-like substances. "Jell-O"™ is the trade name of a popular gelatin dessert.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Sounds good! I'm trying to make jelly to give as Christmas gifts, tho, so it has to be able to travel via mail or sneaker post.

Ah! So you mean the jam-type jelly. I did wonder how you were going to get a gelatine dessert through the post [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
ah, yes, another cross-pondism! "Jelly" is rather like jam only without seeds and noticeable pieces of fruit, if that makes any sense... Terms like biccies (cookies, except I am told chocolate chip cookies remain chocolate chip cookies--), chips (french fries), crisps (potato chips), and rubbers (erasers) can all be confusing to uninitiated Americans.

I don't think it's true of NZ and OZ; I expect they're far more likely to use British terminology. Plus chook... I've never heard that in the UK.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
We do have the jelly preserve over here (mostly for seedy fruit like redcurrants or blackberries), but cranberry and vodka jelly did sound like a rather grown-up party dessert. [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
Can I just tell you all that I've put the fruit, juices and sugar into a bowl for my mincemeat and it is sitting quietly downstairs mingling before being put in the oven tomorrow?

It smells fantastic.

People keep telling me that tomorrow is going to be a horrendous day weather-wise, so I am all set for a very cosy afternoon in the house, with the rain lashing down outside, and the house full of the. most. delicious. smell.

Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

[Smile]
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by birdie:
Can I just tell you all that I've put the fruit, juices and sugar into a bowl for my mincemeat and it is sitting quietly downstairs mingling before being put in the oven tomorrow?

It smells fantastic.

You are so marvellously domesticated! Coming to stay with you is always fab because I get yummy food (well and obviously I like to see you and the boys!!)

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by JonJim (# 12134) on :
 
Making your own mincemeat will earn you years out of purgatory, I bet. I've been embarassed into making my own marzipan this year for the Christmas cakes. It was one of those things which I was brought up with buying in a packet... anyway, easier than I thought and, of course, therapeutic. [Biased]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My mum and I were terrified of making choux pastry until one day when dad was out gardening or something and we decided to give it a go and if it didn't work no-one would be any the wiser - we tried it and it was so easy! All our fears disappeared.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
My brother's vegetarian girlfriend (eats eggs and dairy) will be staying with my parents for Christmas and my Mum isn't used to cooking for veggies. Does anybody have any ideas for easy and tasty things that she can stick in the oven along with the roast turkey etc? There will be plenty of vegetables and potatoes already.

Ta!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
I'm cooking for two veggies this Christmas (myself and my sister-in-law - though I actually eat meat as long as it was free range) and I'm thinking the best way to go is some kind of nut or pulse loaf with onion/mushroom gravy. Then we can have the roasties, veggies etc with the rest of the family. If you start going down the route of little tartlets / casseroles /omelettes etc they just don't go with the trimmings of roast dinner.

I've found quite an interesting Chestnut Loaf recipe online though as I haven't tried it yet I don't know what it tastes like. I am planning on making whatever I make a few days earlier and then will just heat it up in the microwave when I turn up at the family on Christmas Day. You really don't want to be faffing around making nutloaf on Christmas Day morning.

If your mother has a good stuffing recipe that doesn't involved meat that could also be an easy way of having a veggie main dish - just serve a slice!
 
Posted by Freelance Monotheist (# 8990) on :
 
My cousin came for Christmas last year and brought a nut roast from a supermarket with her...
Or you could do veggie sausages (Linda Mc Cartney ones are yummy).
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
For a vegetarian alternative to Christmas dinner I make a cashew nut and parsnip loaf with a layer of mushroom through the middle that comes from Sarah Brown. There is a version >>>here which goes nicely with mushroom gravy and all the other normal trimmings.
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
Those vegetarian recipes sound far more interesting than roast turkey to me... but then I alway prefer the trimmings (lots of chestnut stuffing, bread sauce, cranberry sauce, chipolatas etc) to the actual roast!

Now I need help to find a pudding on Christmas Day for my mother who is diabetic. Any suggestions? I've done fruit salad for her in the past but that doesn't seem very Christmassy. I've also done a baked apple with spiced dried fruit stuffing, which was quite nice, and one year I invented a spiced apple pancake that I cooked the day before and reheated in the microwave. Any other 'Christmassy' (by which I guess I mean spicy) desserts that can be made with minimal sugar?

[ 10. December 2006, 20:37: Message edited by: Gracious rebel ]
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
You could do a chocolate mousse. Just use splenda instead of sugar and sugar free whipped topping instead of whip cream. Put it into a pie crust made of nuts flour and butter. And you must remember chocolate is always ok for the holidays.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Now I need help to find a pudding on Christmas Day for my mother who is diabetic.

How about pears poached in mulled wine? if you make your own mulled wine to start with you can control the amount and type of sweetening agent you use.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Well I do a winter fruit salad, plenty of spice plenty of alcohol not difficult.

Get a packet of dried fruit or selected your own, but I find I enjoy even fruit I steer clear of when I make it this way

Other ingredients are water, spice and brandy.

Simply put the dried fruit and water in a bowl overnight. Then add spices and heat gently, do not strenously boil, until quite a lot of the excess water has evaporated. Turn off heat and add brandy to taste and sweeten if necessary, leave to cool!

Quantities, what are those? Quantites are up to the individual on the occasion, I am never snoop with the spices or the alcohol.

Jengie
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
Thought I'd throw in a couple of specialities I do:

1. Glacé cherries for grown-ups.

Take a large tub of glacé cherries, and fill up the container with just of the boil water (with the cherries in). Pour it off and repeat until you're pouring off water instead of syrup.

Fill container (with cherries still in) with brandy.

Leave for a few days; the longer the better.

Pour off brandy. Unfortunately, it's so sickly now that it's not of any use to man nor beast, except possibly to a desperate alcoholic who doesn't want his teeth.

Melt a couple of bars of the best, highest cocoa content fairtrade (plug, plug) chef's chocolate. Pick the cherries up on cocktail sticks and swirl them in the chocolate. Let the excess choccy drip off, then push the cherry off with another cocktail stick onto a sheet of greaseproof paper to set.

Put the set cherries into petit four cases and hand them round at Christmas. You will get your hand bitten off, so be careful.

2) New for this year. - Fruit'n'Nut for real men

Get about a pound of raisins and sultanas. Put them in a bowl and cover them with rum. Leave for a couple of days until they've swollen up and most of the liquid has been absorbed.

Mix with a bag of chopped nuts and another couple of melted bars of the aforementioned chocolate. Press into a baking tray and stick in the fridge until it gets as hard as it's going to (depends on the exact amount of chocolate). Cut into bits and stick them in petit four cases again.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Now I need help to find a pudding on Christmas Day for my mother who is diabetic.

How about pears poached in mulled wine?
Or Figs in Coffee?
The recipe I have includes sugar, but dried figs are probably sweet enough not to need it , and it is rather too sweet for my taste if I follow the recipe exactly.

Dried figs have a GI index of 61, (medium rated) if that's of any help.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
Thought I'd throw in a couple of specialities I do:

1. Glacé cherries for grown-ups.

Take a large tub of glacé cherries, and fill up the container with just of the boil water (with the cherries in). Pour it off and repeat until you're pouring off water instead of syrup.

Fill container (with cherries still in) with brandy.

Leave for a few days; the longer the better.

Pour off brandy. Unfortunately, it's so sickly now that it's not of any use to man nor beast, except possibly to a desperate alcoholic who doesn't want his teeth.

Melt a couple of bars of the best, highest cocoa content fairtrade (plug, plug) chef's chocolate. Pick the cherries up on cocktail sticks and swirl them in the chocolate. Let the excess choccy drip off, then push the cherry off with another cocktail stick onto a sheet of greaseproof paper to set.

Put the set cherries into petit four cases and hand them round at Christmas. You will get your hand bitten off, so be careful.


Ooooooh - is it too late to do them for this Christmas?

[Eek!]
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
Sparrow - if you get your skates on, you could just about do it. The fruit'n'nut doesn't take long at all - only a day or to to soak in. If you put the cherries on now, you could be coating them on Chrimmy Eve and they'd be pretty good.
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Now I need help to find a pudding on Christmas Day for my mother who is diabetic.

How about pears poached in mulled wine?
Or Figs in Coffee?
The recipe I have includes sugar, but dried figs are probably sweet enough not to need it , and it is rather too sweet for my taste if I follow the recipe exactly.

Or figs in rum? I soak the dried figs in water overnight, then stew gently adding whatever amount of rum is necessary (which is usually quite a lot) serve with creme fraiche.

Dried figs have a GI index of 61, (medium rated) if that's of any help.


 
Posted by les@BALM (# 11237) on :
 
Anyone know the best way to cook a 5kg duck? and what is the best sauce to have with it? Thought orange is best, but can't find a decent recipe?
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by les@BALM:
Anyone know the best way to cook a 5kg duck?

In the oven?

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by les@BALM (# 11237) on :
 
AD, I know that, but for how long, which temp, on a tray or a rack etc, etc, glazed or not glazed?????????
 
Posted by Auntie Doris (# 9433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by les@BALM:
AD, I know that, but for how long, which temp, on a tray or a rack etc, etc, glazed or not glazed?????????

Ah. No idea then! [Biased]

Auntie Doris x
 
Posted by Scooby-Doo (# 9822) on :
 
I always cook a whole duck on a rack over a large roasting dish. Cook for 20 mins on a gas mark 7 (120 deg), then reduce temperature to gas mark 4 (80 deg) for 20 mins per per pound of the ducks uncooked weight. Check it 15 minutes the end of cooking time if you like it 'pink'.

If I'm cooking duck breast, I use a dry ribbed skillet or ribbed electric griddle.Remove 1/3 of the skin and cook skin side down for 25 mins on a med-high heat, turn and cook for a further 15 mins.

[ 11. December 2006, 18:30: Message edited by: Scooby-Doo ]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by les@BALM:
Anyone know the best way to cook a 5kg duck? and what is the best sauce to have with it? Thought orange is best, but can't find a decent recipe?

Duck (hahahahaha) is a vewwy wich-- no, wait, stop, I'm doing my Elmer Fudd Cooks impersonation.

Rewind, try again.

Easy Twice-Cooked Duck
Basic Roast Duck w/ Orange Sauce
Brined, Steamed Duck

Some notes:

Duck fat is a wondrous elixir--don't discard any of it. Instead, refrigerate any left over and use for frying or sauteeing veg or adding in small amounts for richness to soups or stews. French fries done in duck fat are excellent, AIUI.

You didn't say if your duck is wild or domesticated. If wild, your bird will likely have a stronger taste, so be aware.

More than you want to know about game bird storage and prep.

I don't recommend stuffing the cavity of any bird to be cooked. Too much chance of undercooked (and thus potentially unsafe) stuffing and overcooked meat. Make your stuffing in a separate pan. I'd put only aromatics (herbs, zests, etc.) in the cavity. This applies to all birds: chicken, turkey, pheasant, whatever.

Cooking meat solely by time is rarely a good idea. "Bake at X degrees for Y minutes" can easily lead to under- or over-cooking because all ovens vary in their temperature stability, even when set to the same mark. The only sure way to know when your meat is done is to use an instant-read probe thermometer, something like this instant-read thermometer. Before putting the meat into the oven or grill, drive the probe into center mass of whatever meat is to be cooked; stay clear of any bones. This nifty gadget allows you to monitor the meat's doneness.

Duck should be cooked to an internal temperature of... well, there's room for discussion. Cook's Illustrated says 160 degrees F. The US gubmint says 165 degrees F. Split the difference and you should be okay.

Be aware of carry-over heat. When you remove the bird from the oven, it continues to cook and its internal temperature will rise several degrees. I'd say pull the bird out when its internal temp reaches 158 degrees and let carry-over heat take it to 160-165.

Don't cut into a hot piece of meat immediately after removing it from the oven, or you'll bleed out its juices and the meat will be dry. (This goes for all meats.) Let it rest undisturbed 5-15 minutes (longer for larger pieces like whole roasts).
 
Posted by les@BALM (# 11237) on :
 
Ken, thanks very much for your helpful advice I will print it all of and use on Christmas Day to cook the Duck at my mum's. I don't know the source of the duck, only that its being purchased from a local butcher.Thanks for the useful links, will follow your advice and that of the Basic Duck roast recipe.

Also thanks goes to Scooby for advice given.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
For Comet and all the other non-gluten people. Gluten Free Girl is an interesting web site. I saw this on Food TV and thought it was interesting. It seems to have alot of recipes on it. Hope this helps all you out.
 
Posted by Lots of Yay (# 2790) on :
 
I just made a very tasty lunch. Some would call it a dessert. It's a low fat variation on creme brulee. Why should triglycerides through the roof stop me using my blow torch??

Apologies for fuzziness of details. Such is life when cooking with Yay.

So, ingredients (substitute for high fat as desired):
Low fat natural yoghurt (about a cup)
Low fat thickened cream (also about a cup)
Fruit - I used home-stewed cherries in one, fresh chopped mango in one, frozen mixed berries in others.
Vanilla bean or essence
Demerara sugar (or any other sugar I imagine)

1. Place fruit in ramekins.
2. Mix together cream, yoghurt and vanilla essence (in later trials I put some passionfruit pulp in as well - haven't tasted these ones yet).
3. Pour cream mixture over fruit.
4. Sprinkle sugar over the top with a generous hand.
5. Fire up blow torch (you *can* use a grill but that doesn't sound like as much fun)
6. Make the sugar go all brown and melty.
7. Consume.

An even quicker version is a tub of flavoured yoghurt, such as Vaalia berry duo, stirred into some complementary fresh/stewed fruit and given the flame treatment.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
After further perusing of the website I mentioned earlier it seems not to be as useful as advertised. I hope that it can still help those of you afflicted and I am sorry that my attempt was not as good as I wished it to be.

Yay you have me wishing for a blow torch for christmas. That sounds really yummy. I may have to try it with out the crunchy melty sugar top(or run to the hardware store).
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
I've discovered a less expensive way to order higher end meat cuts: Try your favorite restaurant. The local meat market wants $6.50 lb for choice grade (one grade below prime) beef standing rib roast. (He's all out of prime - that was $12 lb.)

I talked to the owner of my favorite restaurant and he can order a prime grade (best cut available) beef standing rib roast for about $7 lb. The only drawback is I have to buy the entire rib section = 25 lbs. This means we have *serious* quality leftover roast for the post-holidays! (Good news: The in-laws have volunteered to help pay for the meat, so it's not as big a financial hit.)

I'll use Alton Brown's recipe.
 
Posted by Lots of Yay (# 2790) on :
 
I found this recipe last week when I was going through my rather extensive recipe department. My grandma sent it to me when I was about 6 because I'd sent her a recipe for apricot balls.

Gingernut Tasty Morsels (I just made up that name)

250g pack of gingernut biscuits, crushed.
90g butter
2 tablespoons golden syrup
1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk
1 tsp vanilla essence
1 cup sultanas
1 cup or thereabouts dessicated coconut

So you melt the butter, add the syrup, essence and condensed milk, stir til smooth. Take saucepan off the heat, add biscuits and sultanas, stir again, cool to room temperature, roll into balls and roll those in coconut. Then refrigerate til a bit more solid. Or just eat them.

I am not very patient and my biscuits were not particularly well crushed. My mother thought this would be a disaster however I just stirred them in, put the lid on the saucepan then went and watched tv for an hour. I returned a few times in ad breaks to give it another burst of heat and stir - by the end of some Australian children's drivel, everything was fine. I think this actually worked really well because it meant that there were gooey, chewy AND crunchy bits of biscuit in the end result.

Highly recommended.
 
Posted by Lots of Yay (# 2790) on :
 
Oh, I thought I should add that I did make these yesterday - I wouldn't review as being highly recommended something that I thought was tasty when I was six. Tomato sauce on rice anyone?
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
My name is KenWritez and I dance the Dance of Happy Anticipation!

Hnads up! Hands down! Arms out, biiiig circles, back in! Step slide left, step slide right. Hop in place as we spin it all around....

My prime rib came in a day early and the chef happily agreed to remove the silverskin and the chine (backbone) for me, and said he'd rub the ribs down with peppercorns and the like! Woooeee! Now I get to age it in my fridge until Sunday night! This is gonna be so cool as I learn how to cook this thing.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
KenW, that's soooo cool! And thanks for the heads up about ordering large chunks of high-end meat from restaurant owners... I imagine that, if you're a good customer of the restaurant, it earns them a lot of goodwill. Have a great, grand, TASTY time!!! BTW, don't trip over your shoelaces dancing. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
re duck, I want to cook a post- ********* lunch for some friends. I am pretty confused about the brining, steaming, water bath and so on. I quite fancy trying a spicy brine but I don't think I have found a recipe yet that sounds just right.

Ken's Mighty duck recipe involves chopping the duck up which I don't want to do, I don't want to do it a l'orange again and I would rather not use a water bath (due to lack of the appropriate equipment). Though thank you, Ken, for those very interesting links.

Anyone got any more brining ideas?

[50 \/\/h4t is l33t anih0\/\/? [Snore] ]

[ 23. December 2006, 21:27: Message edited by: welsh dragon ]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
mayday! mayday! going into the drink! well, it's a BRINING idea anyway (a short trip to the seaside, eh wot?)--

[hoping to please Stoo, who is a triple decker sauerkraut and toadstool sandwich. With arsenic sauce.]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I have just one thing to say. Soup.

So far, Artichoke and Bacon; Curried Vegetable with Crispy Chorizo; Chinese Chicken and Mushroom; North African Spiced Tomato and Vegetable.

It's cold, it's December, I drank too much last night. I just want to be left alone with my soup.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Mmmmm, a nice bowl of chunky hot home made soup and some GOOD bread with plenty of real butter!

Delicious!

Here we have Rasam which is not quite the same and I don't hanker after soup enough to be willing to return to a cold climate to enjoy it, but it's a nice thought.

Rasam is a sort of tomato pepper water that is served hot and taken alongside a traditional south Indian meal. If anyone is interested but can't find a recipe I'll beg one off HWMBO.
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
This is an adaptation of a recipe from some TV chef. He was talking about cooking the perfect turkey. I used it for chicken though.

Slice up 2 onions and lay them on a roasting pan. Place the washed chicken on top of the onions, then add about a pint of boiling water. Use some foil to make a 'tent', and twist the ends and sides to get a very close fitting seal around the roasting pan.

Pop the pan in a low oven and let it cook for a few hours. My oven's lowest temp is 100C, and it was in for about 3 hours. I did the prep before church on Christmas morning, and when we got back the chicken was thoroughly cooked. However, the skin had not crisped, so I removed the tent of foil, drained the onions and liquid (to make gravy). I put some butter on the skin and then a sprinkling of salt, and then popped it back in the oven, but this time at 180C. The skin was beautifully crispy within 20 minutes.

To accompany the roast chicken I took a handful of lardons (chopped bacon bits) and cooked them, added in some of the cooked onion, and then deglazed the pan with some of the chicken stocks. Then some par-boiled, halved brussle sprouts were added. It proved to be very, very tasty and very not bitter.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
My name is KenWritez and I dance the Dance of Joyously Fulfilled Expectation!

If ever you want to truly experience the sublime bovine goodness that beef can be, arise from you couch, hie you to a local butcher or high-end restaurant, and order a prime grade standing rib roast, loin end. (UK and other countries probably use a different beef grading system.) Have the seller remove the silverskin and the chine (backbone). This cut of meat will cost you out the ying-yang, but it's worth every dime or ducat.

I followed Alton Brown's Standing Rib Roast recipe with two variations:

+ My roast had little carry-over heat. As soon as we removed it, the temp dropped a degree, so I turned up the oven temp to 500 deg F and slide the roast in for crusting.

+ There was clear fat, but not much fond, so the au jus idea was scrapped. We never missed it; some salt and pepper were the only things necessary, and horseradish was nice for those who wanted it.

Anyway, the meat came out wonderfully rare and medium rare--perfectly pink and tender. The meat itself you could cut with a fork, and it had a wonderful buttery, beefy flavor. I paired it with a Rombauer 2004 zinfandel because the beef was mild enough it didn't need the huge tannins of a cabernet sauvignon. So far I have yet to drink an inferior wine from Rombauer. These guys make good wine!

We served the beef with mashed potatoes and gravy, green bean casserole, collard and mustard greens with sausage crumbles. It was one of the best dinners I've ever had.

[ 27. December 2006, 21:16: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I got two cookery books as presents - one, recipes in the style of various authors. Mildly amusing. Possibly the best is the Irvine Walsh Fuckin Chocolate Cake.

And one, which appears to have been written by harrupmphing old fogey, which begins each recipe by explaining how to kill and butcher the bird/animal to be cooked. While I shall, of course, remember to tie off the weasand of a sheep to stop the stomach contents spilling when I upend the carcass, I have to say, I can see easier ways of getting hold of a lamb chop. Oh, and if you want fancy stuff like pastry, you phone up A Woman* and ply her with gin.

*any woman, apparently, will gladly turn up on your doorstep with a rollling pin at any hour.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I got two cookery books as presents - one, recipes in the style of various authors. Mildly amusing. Possibly the best is the Irvine Walsh Fuckin Chocolate Cake.

I Googled said cake, but got no joy. Any info on author & book title?

quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
And one, which appears to have been written by harrupmphing old fogey, which begins each recipe by explaining how to kill and butcher the bird/animal to be cooked.

Is that by Robert Farrar Capon?

quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Oh, and if you want fancy stuff like pastry, you phone up A Woman* and ply her with gin.

Well duh! Of course! And if you need any animal killed, you phone up a Man and ply him with some strong drink and a peek of cleavage*.

======
My cleavage has yet impress any man... or woman. I'm about ready to demand my money back from Sine for that "How to Score" magazine he sold me.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
I ate christmas dinner at my brother's house. He smoked a standing prime rib roast. It was a little over done and turned out medium instead of medium rare. For new years eve I am going over to his house to show him how to make deer chile. On the same note Firenze can I have a word with you about that book?
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
Googling Irvine Wesh got me this book.

[ 28. December 2006, 08:12: Message edited by: Roseofsharon ]
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
Googling Irvine Wesh got me this book.

That was Welsh, with an 'e', and an 'i'.
I'm not well this morning!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
The gralloch your dinner cookbook is called Countryman's Cooking by W.M.W. Fowler, Ludlow; Excellent Press, 2006 [orig pub 1965] ISBN 1900318296.

The other title is Kafka's Soup: a complete history of world literature in 14 recipes by Mark Crick, Orlando, Harcourt Inc, 2006. ISBN 0151012830.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
The gralloch your dinner cookbook is called Countryman's Cooking by W.M.W. Fowler, Ludlow; Excellent Press, 2006 [orig pub 1965] ISBN 1900318296.

Sounds just the thing for my parents. It will complement the Food for Free by Richard Mabey* I bought them when it first came out. Thank you.

* I don't recommend the acorn coffee.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
What can I do with about 1/4 of a jar of leftover mincemeat?

I suggested various things to my mum but in the end, b's gf turned up with a nut roast she'd made herself so no need.
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I have just one thing to say. Soup.

So far, Artichoke and Bacon; Curried Vegetable with Crispy Chorizo; Chinese Chicken and Mushroom; North African Spiced Tomato and Vegetable.

It's cold, it's December, I drank too much last night. I just want to be left alone with my soup.

I made Italian Wedding soup last night. (Actually it was my easy-peasy version, with meatballs and chopped chard provided courtesy of Trader Joe's.) It's cold, it's December, I've got something resembling a cold, I ate a lot over Christmas weekend; chicken-vegetable soup is my friend.

Curried lentil for New Year's.

Charlotte
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
What can I do with about 1/4 of a jar of leftover mincemeat?

Mixed with apple and the remains of the cranberry sauce, it makes a great pie filling

(edited because MD failed to take proper care with the original)

[ 29. December 2006, 17:04: Message edited by: My Duck ]
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
You don't have to do anything with it just now. It will keep for quite some time.

You could keep it til February and add apples, and make it into a Christmas Crumble.
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
I have decided to brine my duck. It has been sitting in a potful of cold water, happily defrosting surrounded by orange quarters, onion quarters, coriander seeds, juniper berries, quite a lot of salt, sugar,honey and pepper, a cinnamon stick, some cloves and a fair bit of parsley.

I am now wondering whether I should
a) stick it in the fridge to dry out the skin before I cook it tomorrow
b) cook it slowly at a low temperature and then put it in the fridge and then cook it at a very high heat tomorrow (which would follow one Nigella suggestion)
c)leave it in its nice very cold bath overnight and then cook it nice and slow tomorrow and then give it a bit of a blast at the end

(Just wondering who knows about brined birds on the Ship. Any ideas Ken?)
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by welsh dragon:
(Just wondering who knows about brined birds on the Ship. Any ideas Ken?)

Hmmm, I usually proceed straight from brine to full cooking, so I'm unfamiliar with brining and then waiting. My instinct is to go with a modified B. It's parcooking (partial cooking), which is a traditional method, I've just never done it with duck. I don't understand the reason for the waiting period between the parcook and the final high heat cook (unless it has to do with flavor development), so I would go straight from the first to the second.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
What ever you decide rememberto rinse the duck and pat it dry before cooking. If you do not rinse the skin will be extremely salty.
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Ah. I popped it in the oven about half an hour ago (for the slow cooking with final blast) and the skin has already started to cook. Never mind. We will see how we get on with the alty skin!

Maria
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
On the other hand, the salt should act to crisp it.

Are you able to say yet, WD, how it's turned out?

I will be doing something duck-based on New Years Day, so I'm interested.
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
I will report back this afternoon! I used a variation of a recipe for turkey - which didn't say to rinse it.
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
It turned out rather well! The only problem was that the people for whom I was cooking it did not turn up, which was a shame. I had used 2&1/2 oz in total salt in the brine, which I think is on the low side anyhow, and the skin did not taste overly salty, despite my failure to rinse it, but was flavoursome.

[ 30. December 2006, 21:43: Message edited by: welsh dragon ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Ingrates.

Anyway, I think it will be Duck Bits tomorrow, as I doubt my competency to tackle a whole bird after the kind of New Year's Eve we usually have.

I expect it will be with either honey & grapes, or orange & marmalade.
 
Posted by AdamPater (# 4431) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Photo Geek:
I need advice. I'm a horrible cook. I want to learn how to make a proper roast (moist and tender) like mom made. The Christmas roast beef was a disaster [Hot and Hormonal] . Tomorrow I plan to have a small 3 lb. pork loin roast for dinner and I don't want another disaster. Help [Help] [Help]


 
Posted by marmot (# 479) on :
 
Photo Geek, check your PMs. I have a couple of files for you.
 
Posted by Photo Geek (# 9757) on :
 
Marmot,

I have sent you my Email address.
 
Posted by les@BALM (# 11237) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
quote:
Originally posted by les@BALM:
Anyone know the best way to cook a 5kg duck? and what is the best sauce to have with it? Thought orange is best, but can't find a decent recipe?

Duck (hahahahaha) is a vewwy wich-- no, wait, stop, I'm doing my Elmer Fudd Cooks impersonation.

Rewind, try again.

Easy Twice-Cooked Duck
Basic Roast Duck w/ Orange Sauce
Brined, Steamed Duck

Some notes:

Duck fat is a wondrous elixir--don't discard any of it. Instead, refrigerate any left over and use for frying or sauteeing veg or adding in small amounts for richness to soups or stews. French fries done in duck fat are excellent, AIUI.

You didn't say if your duck is wild or domesticated. If wild, your bird will likely have a stronger taste, so be aware.

More than you want to know about game bird storage and prep.

I don't recommend stuffing the cavity of any bird to be cooked. Too much chance of undercooked (and thus potentially unsafe) stuffing and overcooked meat. Make your stuffing in a separate pan. I'd put only aromatics (herbs, zests, etc.) in the cavity. This applies to all birds: chicken, turkey, pheasant, whatever.

Cooking meat solely by time is rarely a good idea. "Bake at X degrees for Y minutes" can easily lead to under- or over-cooking because all ovens vary in their temperature stability, even when set to the same mark. The only sure way to know when your meat is done is to use an instant-read probe thermometer, something like this instant-read thermometer. Before putting the meat into the oven or grill, drive the probe into center mass of whatever meat is to be cooked; stay clear of any bones. This nifty gadget allows you to monitor the meat's doneness.

Duck should be cooked to an internal temperature of... well, there's room for discussion. Cook's Illustrated says 160 degrees F. The US gubmint says 165 degrees F. Split the difference and you should be okay.

Be aware of carry-over heat. When you remove the bird from the oven, it continues to cook and its internal temperature will rise several degrees. I'd say pull the bird out when its internal temp reaches 158 degrees and let carry-over heat take it to 160-165.

Don't cut into a hot piece of meat immediately after removing it from the oven, or you'll bleed out its juices and the meat will be dry. (This goes for all meats.) Let it rest undisturbed 5-15 minutes (longer for larger pieces like whole roasts).

Ken, I followed the link you gave for Basic Roast Duck and enjoyed an excellent Christmas dinner, the duck was awesome, thanks again.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Wooo! Thanks for the news! [Yipee]

I worked my little fingers to nubbins posting those links--nubbins I tell you!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Uncharted territory here.

I have just put together a casserole of some buffalo I got in a farmers' market a few months ago.

I sealed it in hot oil with some fatty bacon cubes, onions and carrots, and then covered with beef stock and a dash of Worcestershire.

Anything else I should add to the stock? What would be a good accompaniment?

I have looked at web recipes, but they seem mainly to deal in throwing great slabs of it over a barbeque, presumably while singing Yippee Ay Yo a lot.

[ 03. January 2007, 17:09: Message edited by: Firenze ]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
You're looking at the wrong sites.

It should be "Yipee Ay Yay."

Buffalo is new to me, too, so I'm guessing here. I know it's extremely lean, and fat carries flavor, so be aware you might want to boost your flavor compounds. You haven't said how much meat you've got nor what taste you're seeking, so I'm not sure what to advise you other than the basics: Red wine reduction, baked garlic smashed and added, bay leaf or two, maybe some beef bouillon and a pat or two of butter if the bacon fat is insufficient.

Is your bacon smoked or unsmoked?

Toward the end of cooking, I would remove and discard the veg, then add new amounts of the same, roasted in a hot oven just before use, as the previously cooked veg will have given up its flavor already.

[ 03. January 2007, 17:21: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
It is quite a small quantity - just for two.

What is in there in the veg line is onion - which will stew into the sauce - and carrot chunked large. But it sounds as if more onion, roasted, plus chunks of roasted butternut squash could go in.

As to wine - I have slightly declining '96 burgundy which is in the cooking pile, but decided this wasn't its moment (whereas I think a large potroast of brisket could be). Given that I am adding sweet vegetables, I think finish with some sweet soy or barbeque sauce.

Thanks for the steer (as we say on the prairie).
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Reporting back.

It was majorly delish. Lighter than beef, less gamey than venison. It was definately not one to do with wine: much better pushed towards the smokey/tomatoey/piquant end of the spectrum. The American fries were not inappropriate, but next time I think the cheesy polenta or other corn-based product.
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
"The boar's head as I understand is the finest dish in all the land" - so says ye olde carole.

Recent events in Creamtealand have made me sorely tempted to try it out. Has anyone on here ever tried it, or has the recipe (and the desire to eat it) completely died out?

Here, we had roast local pheasant for one of our Christmas meals, as it is my son's favourite. A brace of pheasant will do 4 people, but watch out for shot!
 
Posted by chukovsky (# 116) on :
 
I've not had a head of boar, but pieces (ribs/chops/a leg I think) which were lovely - very unlike pork, much richer but not really fatty, and very flavoursome. We just cooked them like you would pork (i.e. fairly well).
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
You're looking at the wrong sites.

It should be "Yipee Ay Yay."

Kenwritez, in the famed Ghost Riders in the Sky, the ghost riders sing both (phonetically) "yippee-eye-oh" AND "yippee-eye-ae!", so either "yippee-ay-oh" or "yippee-ay-aye" are correct, though never "yippee-ay-yo" or "yay".

"Yo" is a demotic American greeting, popular in certain US subcultures and with those who emulate them; and "yay" is a general US expression of happiness. Neither has any place in a ghost rider's cry. Please make a note of it.

Now to the buffalo.

Buffalo mince can be treated like any minced beef and done the same with. It is not terribly gamey, generally. I hvae buffalo burgers every now and then at a place I like to stop in every now and then.

Buffalo meat can similarly be treated like similar beef cuts, keeping in mind that it is typically leaner than beef.
 
Posted by Meg the Red (# 11838) on :
 
Ditto Laura on the the buffalo burgers - love 'em! We have a lot of bison farms 'round these parts, and so it's easy to get a variety of buffalo bits, including sausage. On the suggestion of a nice lady at the farmer's market, I bought some of her buffalo Italian sausage and used in in the stuffing for the Christmas turkey -yummy.

I'm just contemplating what to do with the lovely ring of buffalo garlic sausage in the freezer; maybe I'll revert to my German roots and steam it with sauerkraut. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I'm not sure of the provenance of the buffalo I ate. Maybe, like so many novel foodstuffs in Scotland these days, it came from eastern Europe. Perhaps it was part of the Danube bison.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Laura:
Kenwritez, in the famed Ghost Riders in the Sky, the ghost riders sing both (phonetically) "yippee-eye-oh" AND "yippee-eye-ae!", so either "yippee-ay-oh" or "yippee-ay-aye" are correct, though never "yippee-ay-yo" or "yay".

Ah, Laura, I fear you have fallen sway under the hypnotic, glowing red eyes of the thundering Devil's Herd churning across the raging sky. Understandable, really; you're not to be blamed, no matter what anyone else says.

I cite as my authority no less a personage than Johnny Cash, who trumps any other claimant and who clearly sings "yippee ay yay" in the first chorus.

Please make a note of it.

Thankseverso.
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
Kenwritez:

I hang my head in deepest shame.

Then cowboy change your ways today or with us you will ride Trying to catch the Devil's herd, across these endless skies

Yippie yi Ohhhhh
Yippie yi Yaaaaay

Ghost Riders in the sky
Ghost Riders in the sky
Ghost Riders in the sky

 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Buffalo burgers are good. As far as the buffalo sausage I would slice up some potatos and onions and saute them. Slice and fry the sausage. And enjoy.

As far as the cowboy yodel goes Johnny Cash can say it anyway he likes. All others must be wearing boots and preferably waving a cowboy hat while yelling it. [Biased]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I never feel very confident cooking chicken because my mother never cooked it. She said roasted chicken looked like ccoked baby and she couldn't do it.

So, what parts of the chicken are the giblets? (I tried Google but got a lots of unhelpful information).

Thanks, o knowledgable ones.

Huia
 
Posted by ananke (# 10059) on :
 
Giblets = guts I think.

My favourite method for roast chicken is to rub the skin (and as far under the skin, between the muscles, as possible) with a mixture of butter, herbs, salt and pepper. Then I put some more of that into the cavity with a lemon cut in half. Then roast at a fairly high heat until juices from the leg run clear.

The other way I do it is to chop it into pieces then cover in a char siu mix. I generally use char siu sauce, oyster sauce, soy sauce, mirin and honey. Then bake at a really high heat until done.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
So, what parts of the chicken are the giblets?

If I buy a chicken 'with giblets' I expect to get the neck, gizzard, heart and liver.

These I usually put in the tin around the chicken: they roast to a shrivel, but contribute their juices to the gravy. (You discard them afterwards).

On the subject of sauce/gravy: I line the roasting tin with tinfoil, with sufficient to go over the top of the bird (butter/grease the foil before you place the chicken on it, and try and wrap it loosely - but well sealed - so that it doesn't stick to it). Anyway, what you should have is a chicken in a little foil tent in the oven, with whatever aromatics - garlic, quartered onion, lemon, butter, spices etc - you want to flavour it with. Half an hour or so before serving, open the foil. You should have a moist - albeit pale - bird, with a fair amount of liquid around it. Carefully pour this off into a saucepan (and tip the bird, so that juices drain out of the cavity).

The juices will have fat on the surface. This I usually skim off and ladle back over the exposed chicken, which is returned, unwrapped and thus basted, to a hot oven to brown.

Meanwhile, add to white wine or French vermouth (this last is very good if you have roasted the chicken with tarragon, say). Bubble the saucepan until the gravy is reduced by about half. At this point I often stir in a tablespoon of creme fraiche.

The chicken should now be crisp-skinned, but so tender that it scarcely needs carving, it just falls apart.

Well, that's what I'm doing this evening.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
When I roast a chicken I cover the breast with cheesecloth (I think the Brits call it butter muslin.). Then I saturate the cheesecloth with melted butter. This keeps the breast from drying out.

Be sure to use 100% cotton cheesecloth. Something that's part synthetic might melt.

Moo
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Or cover the bird in strips of streaky bacon. Remove for the last 15/20 minutes of browning - by which time they will deliciously crisp. If I'm doing this, I usually put pieces of banana, wrapped in more bacon in the roasting tin as well and/or stuff the chicken with a mixture of banana mashed with breadcrumbs.

You need to skim a bit more fat off the juices with this one. But making up the gravy with orange juice does well.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks ananke, Firenze and Moo. I'm making some chicken soup to start with, but I think I might try a roast when I have visitors. With only me to eat up the bits I could get a bit tired of roast chicken, though I suppose it could be minces and made into a pie or something.

Huia
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
Having been dared by divers shipmates, and being in an unusually benign mood due to a good meal and some fine wine, I have decided to take the dare.

Does anyone have a recipe for chocolate soup?

A large virtual prize will be given for the most inventive/creative replies.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Huia, you could practice on poussin. Or on chicken pieces.

As intended for this evening, I did a whole bird in foil - with just garlic and a bay leaf for seasoning. It got probably about three-quarters of an hours more cooking than it needed, but, thanks to the method, didn't dry out, just got even more tender than usual. It matched superbly with the '03 Cava.

However, tomorrow is fresh tuna steaks, which I am not so practised with. Any suggestions welcome.

[ 06. January 2007, 20:42: Message edited by: Firenze ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
It depends on how pink you can face your tuna - the TV chefs go for very pink, which my daughter won't eat. It can dry out if you grill it to go brown throughout. I find it's more tender if you poach it or bake it in a parcel, like your chicken recipe above.

I've also tried and liked treating it like steak au poivre, sort of getting a crust on to hold in the inner moisture?
 
Posted by ananke (# 10059) on :
 
Curiosity is right - tuna is a steaky fish. I like it marinaded in teriyaki or with garlic cream sauce.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Tuna steaks yum. Combine 1/2 cup soy,1/2 cup honey, and 1/4 cup wasabi. Use Half for dipping and the rest to marinade. Sear the Tuna steaks in sesame oil. You want rare to medium any more done just isn't worth it.

Huia a roast chicken carcus makes a good chicken stock. I am sure a roast chicken would make a good begining of a really good soup. On the other hand it is time consuming.

Hmmm chocolate soup. If Pata stops by this thread I am likely to be required to try and make any posted recipes.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
There are many, many chocolate soup recipes available but most seem to be dessert soups, which is cheating a bit. However, all is not lost, if you do a search for chocolate mole sauce you will find a savoury Mexican chocolate sauce [usually served with chicken or steak] which could easily be adapted as a soup. I rather fancy adding coriander/cilantro leaf to it.

Sadly I won't be able to eat any, damned allergies, but it sounds good.
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
There are many, many chocolate soup recipes available but most seem to be dessert soups, which is cheating a bit. However, all is not lost, if you do a search for chocolate mole sauce you will find a savoury Mexican chocolate sauce [usually served with chicken or steak] which could easily be adapted as a soup. I rather fancy adding coriander/cilantro leaf to it.

Actually that was what was going through my mind - I have heard that Mexican recipes use chocolate and of course cocoa powder is entirely sugar-free. I seem to remember in that excellent film 'Chocolat' the heroine made a feative dish of chicken with some sort of chocolate sauce...
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
wanders off to find Mexican cookery book

Your chocolate sauce with chicken was probably a version of Mole de Guajolote

This is similar to the recipe I have and saves me typing it out. I haven't tried this, but it looks interesting.
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
Speaking of cowboys, I made buckwheat pancakes this a.m. Talking with elderly relatives, buckwheat used to be far more commonly used in the US. It's tasty, gluten-free, has protein and loads of fiber. Why is it so little used here anymore? In europe, buckwheat - groats and the wheat are used for all sorts of dishes -- probably kashi is the best known. But you'd think something so tasty and healthy would be more widely eaten here.
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
Buckwheat pancakes? All the butter and syrup in the world won't cover the taste enough to make them palatable.

I don't even like the taste of honey from bees that have dined on buckwheat.
 
Posted by Anna B (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Josephine:
Buckwheat pancakes? All the butter and syrup in the world won't cover the taste enough to make them palatable.

I agree. We like to make blini during Shrovetide---I have a wonderful recipe, using white flour, from a Russian cookbook. One year I decided to use part buckwheat. The results were truly horrible; every year since then, my husband says, "Be sure to make the regular blini, the ones without any buckwheat."
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Oooohhh ... I love buckwheat. I have to grind my own buckwheat flour (use a mortar and pestle) because I can't find the find, but I did find some whole kernels. I usually add it to my multigrain bread, but now I'll have to try it in some pancakes.

And on a completely different note, here's hoping that pinto beans work as a suitable substitute for kidney beans in red beans and rice, because I picked up the wrong can. D'oh!
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Josephine:
Buckwheat pancakes? All the butter and syrup in the world won't cover the taste enough to make them palatable.

I don't even like the taste of honey from bees that have dined on buckwheat.

(Can't help myself from offering standard cook reply)

But you haven't tried my buckwheat pancakes.

I love buckwheat. It's good and nutty and substantial. I find white pancakes a bit boring.
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
And on a completely different note, here's hoping that pinto beans work as a suitable substitute for kidney beans in red beans and rice, because I picked up the wrong can. D'oh!

They'll be fine.
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep (# 5267) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
However, all is not lost, if you do a search for chocolate mole sauce you will find a savoury Mexican chocolate sauce [usually served with chicken or steak] which could easily be adapted as a soup. I rather fancy adding coriander/cilantro leaf to it.

AAAH! EEP! ACK! I'm glad I wandered by.

Mole 'sauce' is more of a paste than a liquid. If you try to make it at home, you need several days, an industrial spice grinder, and about 20 different types of chiles to get it just right. And it does not taste like chocolate at all. Tastes like chiles. Yum.

Having said that, the 'secret' ingredient in my home-mixed chili powder is finely grated dark chocolate.

My Duck, what are you looking for in a chocolate soup?
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Well, the brown beans and rice turned out just fine. The other change to my previously posted recipe was that I put in a few dashes of junkanoo hot sauce rather than just cayenne pepper. It gave a bit more depth to the flavour.

And Laura, please post your buckwheat pancake recipe (I feel a Saturday morning treat coming on)!
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
My Duck, what are you looking for in a chocolate soup? [/QB]

Weeeeeeeeeeeeeelllllllllllllll................

I really have a totally open mind. I posted the request because I mentioned 'chocolate soup' as a joke originally and two shipmates dared me to ask for a recipe and so I did.

But to be more practical, I do think there must be something savoury that would have chocolate as an ingredient. I suppose I am looking for innovative ideas with which to impress guests, as well as a sort of intellectual search for a different way to combine flavours successfully.

Does this make sense? I think I need to take my medication [Paranoid]
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
My Duck, I often toss dark chocolate into my chili con carne as it lends a lovely full-bodied richness to the dish. You don't actually taste the chocolate itself.
 
Posted by Lots of Yay (# 2790) on :
 
Hmmm I think that chocolate, potato and leek soup would be interesting.

Or chocolate pumpkin soup.

Or chocolate minestrone.

I don't have any recipes - just find one and add chocolate.

I don't think that chocolate would go too well in canned soup because they are too salty and sugary.

It'd be interesting to try in some of the spicy south east Asian soups too...

*nibbles at another square of Lindt 70% cocoa*
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
I will look up my new Green & Black's cookery book tonight. It does have a mole recipe, and a recipe for chocolate and coffee lamb, but I can't remember if it had any savoury soups.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Not strickly a recipe but chocolate covered potato chips are surpisingly good. My mom use to make chocolate covered pretzels. It seems that salt and chocolate are not that bad of a combination.
 
Posted by duchess (# 2764) on :
 
buckwheat pancakes might be lower GI. I might be interested in that recipe too. [Smile]
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Flausa:
And Laura, please post your buckwheat pancake recipe (I feel a Saturday morning treat coming on)!

I really like this recipe from Allrecipes.com (a terrific resource, by the way):
Best Buckwheat Pancakes.

They combine buckwheat and white flour for a lighter fluffier buckwheat experience. And on allrecipes recipes, you can change between metric and US and change the number of servings as well. And I would definitely follow the advice of a couple of the reviewers and add cinnamon (and I also add a pinch of nutmeg).

[ 12. January 2007, 00:43: Message edited by: Laura ]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
chocolate covered potato chips are surpisingly good.

I warn anyone contemplating making these things: The sweet, salty, crunchy, chocolatey, savories are snack heroin.
 
Posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep (# 5267) on :
 
Ok, here, try this:

1 16oz can pumpkin puree
1 cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon cayenne
3 oz grated dark chocolate
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Tofu. Something I want to add to the diet, mainly in light soups.

However, it is possibly the most taste-free foodstuff I know.

Today, I tried first dicing it and sloshing it in Japanese soy, then frying it - before adding it to the soup. That did confer a scintilla of savouriness.

Any other ideas for marinades?
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
When Neals Yard had a bakery it used to sell tofu cheesecake which was delicious, the tofu provided the creamy texture to cheesy bit. If I find a recipe I'll add it because it's one I want to use.

Tofu is OK in stir fry with whatever you throw in to flavour the veg - soy/rice vinegar/stock/etc. It's also supposed to be good with Japanese noodles and miso soup and vegetables. It also worked in veggie kebabs when it was marinaded in oil/vinegar/herb/garlic mix before grilling.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
This is a fabulous was to cook tofu which come from Deborah Maddison's That Can't be Tofu via The Hungry Tiger (Do click on the link as she explains more)

INGREDIENTS
1 package firm tofu, drained
1 tablespoon olive oil or other tasty oil
salt
2 tablespoons soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, tamari, or what have you
freshly ground pepper

TO DO
Cut the tofu into six slabs, crosswise. Blot dry. Heat the oil in a nonstick pan over medium-high heat. Place the tofu in the pan, sprinkle with salt, and let cook, undisturbed, for five minutes. As the water evaporates, it may jump around a bit, but it will settle. (While it is cooking, heat your vegetables and cut your scallions. Or whatever.) Flip the tofu and cook five minutes more.

Now take the two tablespoons of sauce and sprinkle over the tofu. Let it cook a minute or two more, until the liquid has reduced away. Now the tofu is seasoned and beautifully glazed. Season with pepper and serve as you please.
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep:
Ok, here, try this:

1 16oz can pumpkin puree
1 cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon cayenne
3 oz grated dark chocolate

Thanks Spiffy, it looks good. All I have to do is locate some canned pumpkin, and we have liftoff! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Melangell (# 4023) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by My Duck:
Thanks Spiffy, it looks good. All I have to do is locate some canned pumpkin, and we have liftoff! [Big Grin]

Waitrose branches in Surrey had Libby's canned pumpkin in stock late last year - I don't know if they always have it, or just stocked it for Thanksgiving...
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Speaking of tofu, does anyone have a recipe for miso soup?

Moo
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Lazy wench that I am, I keep some instant miso soup in the pantry. But here's a recipe from a Cooking Light™ publication that sounds good. It's a little different, but perhaps you can fiddle with it if it isn't quite what you want.

Miso Noodle Soup
1 tsp dark sesame oil
1 tsp minced peeled fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves minced
3 14-1/2 oz cans vegetable broth
2 c chopped broccoli florets
1 cut carrot, sliced diagonally, 1/8-inch thick
1 c vertically sliced onion
1 tsp Thai chile paste
2 c cooked chinese egg noodles (4 oz uncooked)
1/4 c white miso.

Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add ginger and garlic, saute 1 minute. Add broth, vegetables, and chile paste; bring to a boil. Reduce heat,s immer uncovered 2 minutes. Stir in noodles and miso; cook 1 minute or until miso is blended. Yield 8 1-cup servings.

eta: I just reread this and realized it doesn't call for tofu. Ooops. It looks like it could be added, though.

[ 13. January 2007, 04:44: Message edited by: Mamacita ]
 
Posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep (# 5267) on :
 
How I cook tofu:

Open the package, drain the water. While still in the package, cut it into thin slabs. Fill package up with red wine, wiggle the slices so it gets everywhere. Let marinate for 30 minutes up to 24 hours in the fridge.

When you're ready to start cooking, cut up a carrot and half a medium onion, and toss it in the bottom of a 9x9 pan with about two tablespoons of olive oil, and add about 2 tablespoons of wine. Lay the slices over the top of the veg. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, oregano and basil and put in a 375F/190C/Gas mark 5 oven. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until the top turns kind of brown. Flip tofu over and cook for another 20 minutes.
 
Posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep (# 5267) on :
 
Double poster of DOOM, but here's a lot of miso soup recipes.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Thanks, Mamacita and Spiffy.

Moo
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
Has anyone got a really good roquefort recipe that they would like to share? We have some left over from Xmas and I'd like to find a suitably gorgeous way to use it up!
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
Advice sought on pheasant. A friend dropped a brace of cock pheasant round on Saturday evening. The last time I plucked a pheasant was when I was a kid and I've never had responsibility for the whole process of hanging, plucking and drawing. They're decent-sized birds hanging out in the shed and the temperature in the next week is not predicted to rise above 11 degrees. Am I going to be okay if I leave them to hang until Friday (pluck and draw them then) and eat them on Saturday night (a complete week between shooting and eating)? Any tips for plucking, drawing etc gratefully received.

As for cooking, my first instinct is to roast them. But I usually get game from a butcher who is able to tell me whether they're young or mature birds - so has anyone got a foolproof way of ageing them? If they're mature I might joint them and casserole them.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by welsh dragon:
Has anyone got a really good roquefort recipe that they would like to share? We have some left over from Xmas and I'd like to find a suitably gorgeous way to use it up!

Though purists might disagree I think it melts down well with an equivalent amount of heavy or double cream and a knob of butter to make a spectacular and very rich pasta sauce - this can be done in a microwave or in a double saucepan. You can also chop peppers/capsicum and/or mushrooms into it before adding the pasta. A smidgeon of Tabasco or similar and lots of freshly ground black pepper and fresh parmesan also add gorgeousness to it.

Serve with a salad in a sharp dressing.

Alternatively you can get some big mushrooms. Remove the stalks and then turn upside down on an oiled baking sheet. Coat the inside of each mushroom with a little pesto then crumble on the Roquefort. Bake for 10 minutes at a moderate heat, taking out halfway through to grind fresh black pepper over them, and serve as a fab starter.

Roquefort also tastes brilliant melted on to crumpets or as the blue bit in tricolour cheese on toast.

I'm hungry now!
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spawn:
Advice sought on pheasant. A friend dropped a brace of cock pheasant round on Saturday evening. The last time I plucked a pheasant was when I was a kid and I've never had responsibility for the whole process of hanging, plucking and drawing. They're decent-sized birds hanging out in the shed and the temperature in the next week is not predicted to rise above 11 degrees. Am I going to be okay if I leave them to hang until Friday (pluck and draw them then) and eat them on Saturday night (a complete week between shooting and eating)? Any tips for plucking, drawing etc gratefully received.

According to this website,Gourmet Food Source, in colder weather you can and should hang the pheasant for more than 3-4 days or you won't get the desired gamy flavor.

quote:
Generally speaking, a pheasant, for example should hang for three to four days during a mild autumn spell but considerably longer as the temperatures fall through the winter months.

 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Spawn, you could try Pheasants braised in Madeira; the recipe is available at www.deliaonline - just type in "pheasant" in the Ingredient box and scroll down. I tried it a few Christmases ago - it was dead easy, and right good.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Catrine (# 9811) on :
 
Spawn, you could always ask your butcher on how to prepare it (pluck and remove insides), or ask him/her to do it for you.

Hope you enjoy it!
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Spawn, you could try Pheasants braised in Madeira; the recipe is available at www.deliaonline - just type in "pheasant" in the Ingredient box and scroll down. I tried it a few Christmases ago - it was dead easy, and right good.

[Smile]

This is a good recipe, even better if you replace the madeira with a mixture of sherry and port or red wine for a more definite flavour. we find that Delia's dishes tend to be a bit bland.
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Catrine:
Spawn, you could always ask your butcher on how to prepare it (pluck and remove insides), or ask him/her to do it for you.

Hope you enjoy it!

I'm determined to do it myself (my six-year-old son is keen to help me pull the guts outs [Big Grin] ) but I've also got Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's meat cookbook to help me. However, there's no substitute for asking people with personal experience of doing it (why I posted the questions here) so I will have a word with my butcher. Thanks Laura for the confirmation on hanging. Thanks piglet and My Duck for the recipe suggestions - both madeira and the port/sherry suggestions sound very tempting.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Catrine:
Spawn, you could always ask your butcher on how to prepare it (pluck and remove insides), or ask him/her to do it for you.

As butchers have to be able to track back the meat on their premises to source, and are governed by many regulations concerning food hygeine, they are unlikely to want to prepare meat from an unknown, unverifiable and undocumented source.

I know, we've tried unsuccessfully to enlist the help of our, usually very obliging, butcher in dealing with roadkill!

You'll probably get useful advice on what to do, though.

nice simple recipe: joint pheasant, brown in butter, add sliced mushrooms, orange juice, stock and white wine. Cook in oven
until tender.

[ 16. January 2007, 12:16: Message edited by: Roseofsharon ]
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
I know, we've tried unsuccessfully to enlist the help of our, usually very obliging, butcher in dealing with roadkill!

Mmmmm, roadkill. Dinner at Roseofsharon's!!!


[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Pheasant should be hung for a week in warm weather but ten days or more in cold weather according to Margaret Costa (Four Seasons Cookery Book). She says it's hung enough when the tail feathers come away with very little resistance. You can also hang until it's bien faisande or high and that's identified by having a greenish tinge in the thin skin over the abdomen - personally that's too much.

You are supposed to be able to age them by the flexibility of the beak - the more flexible the younger, but I guess that takes experience and practice.
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spawn:
I'm determined to do it myself (my six-year-old son is keen to help me pull the guts outs [Big Grin] )

This will be a good experience, but beware the liver! If it bursts open while still in the bird, it will spew bile onto the meat rendering it literally inedible. (Apologies to anyone who didn't want that little bit of information [Biased] ).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thank you Flausa for sharing that with us.

[Projectile]

[Biased]

Actually I think it is a valuable piece of information and just one more reason to remain a veggie pescatarian.

[ 17. January 2007, 03:41: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Laura:
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
I know, we've tried unsuccessfully to enlist the help of our, usually very obliging, butcher in dealing with roadkill!

Mmmmm, roadkill. Dinner at Roseofsharon's!!!
[Big Grin]

Wait until the spring, when I can get out to weed the garden, then we can have my speciality, ground elder (aegopodium podagraria) as an accompaniment [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
The tale of the pheasants. Well I finally got round to plucking and drawing them on Saturday afternoon. Not a job I'll want to do too often. I got a little impatient at times and broke the skin in a few places - so it was a good job I'd decided to joint them and braise them. The guts were pretty foul-smelling but thankfully I didn't spill the bile over the meat (thanks Flausa). My son helped me pluck but got bored before the drawing. My other two didn't want anything to do with it. I had planned to use the carcasses to make a stock but frankly it was all such a feathery mess that I just shoved them in a bin bag and got rid of them.

I braised the pheasants with red wine, and marsala. Delicious but the legs were so tough they were literally inedible, the breasts however were perfect. Had I known I could have saved myself a great deal of time and just cut the breasts off.
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
[teacher voice]

Now, class: let's all thank Spawn for sharing a pretty strong argument for vegetarianism!
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I have some cold boiled rice to use up but the BBC food site does not have any recipes. Am I right in thinking that it is not a good idea to reheat rice that has been cooked and cooled?
If so has anyone got any suggestions about how I can use the rice without resorting to boring rice salad? Anyway it's too cold for rice salad...
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
If it's not so old you'd worry about it growing nasties, I'd have no problems reheating it. You could use it as a base for fried rice if it's long grain, or steam it warm, or add a little more water and microwave it, or use it to make some rice fritters if it's a short grain. Or you could make a rice pudding with some milk, egg and sugar, and some sultanas.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
Am I right in thinking that it is not a good idea to reheat rice that has been cooked and cooled?

Its no big deal. A day or two should be OK. There are nasty things that can happen to rice but they aren't that common and once you've smelled or tasted rice that has gone off you won;t forget it!

What you probably ought not to do is reheat it, then leave it lying around for a long time again, or cook it a third time. Recook it then eat it there and then. If you are feeling lazy then rice heats up pretty well with a quick nuke in a microwave, especially if it is reasonably dry and fluffy.


quote:

If so has anyone got any suggestions about how I can use the rice without resorting to boring rice salad?

Eat it with the hottest possible curry! As long as its at room temperature and not actually chilled it should be fine.

Rice salad need not be boring! Plenty of salt and spices, some chopped spring onions, coriander leaves, azuki beans, bits of salted fish, finely chopped chili, prawns cooked in garlic, sliced mushrooms fried in butter till crispy, Egyptian ful, roast chickpeas, pistachio nuts, spinach leaves, grilled cubes of halloumi cheese ... what's boring?
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Ken said
quote:
sliced mushrooms fried in butter till crispy
OOH I've got some mushrooms and like the sound of this ~ a bit of parsley, a lot of garlic... Lunch suddenly excites me. I'm off now to start chopping.
[Smile]
Thanks!
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
A challenge to American cooks. I've got some slow roasted pork shoulder left over and I want to have it tomorrow with a barbecue sauce. Now my list of ingredients would be: onion, tomato garlic, mustard powder, cumin, cayenne, vinegar, soft dark brown sugar, seasonings (I might even stick in a shot of whisky). Am I going wrong on this? I've had some great pulled pork with barbecue in various parts of the US and it is always different but excellent. My version doesn't quite come up to scratch.
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
Spawn, the recipe I have nearest to hand says this:

5 oz dark soy sauce
23 oz tomato juice
5 oz worcestershire sauce
12 oz ketchup
1 cup apple cider vinegar
1 cup brown sugar
juice of one lemon
1 tsp red pepper
1 tsp black pepper
1 tsp dry mustard
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp onion powder
1/2 tsp oregano
1/2 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ginger
1/2 tsp basil

Mix all ingredients in sauce pan and simmer one hour. Let stand several hours before serving. yields 1/2 Gal.

You are, of course, free to experiment with various combinations and ingredients, but this will give you a rough idea for proportions.

[ETA: Got the hard words right, and misspelled jiuce!]

[ 26. January 2007, 20:29: Message edited by: Campbellite ]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Here's a good bbq sauce recipe:

1 x 15 oz can tomato sauce
2 x 28 oz cans whole tomatoes in juice
1 x 6 oz can tomato paste
1 1/2 c. distilled white vinegar
1/2 c. dark brown sugar
2 T molasses
2 T paprika
2 T chili powder
2 t salt
2 t black pepper
1/2 c orange or pineapple juice
1 x 12 oz bottle pale ale
1/4 lemon or lime

Seed the tomatoes and discard seeds. Add all ingredients except lemon/lime to pot, cover, and bring to low simmer (occasional bubble) for 2 hours or until reduced by at least 1/3. Stir mixture with stick blender until smooth. Strain through fine strainer or paper towel/cheesecloth to remove any solids. Adjust seasonings to taste. Squirt lemon or lime juice from reserved 1/4 onto sauce immediately before serving.

(For a richer taste, add 2 T butter to sauce and dissolve a few minutes before serving. For a more unusual spin, add 1 1/2 T butter, 3 T black coffee, and 1 T dark chocolate shavings a few minutes prior to serving.)

[ 27. January 2007, 02:43: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
A last-minute request. I need to bring a salad to church on Sunday. Well, to the post-Annual-Meeting lunch, to be exact. I'm fresh out of ideas. I could wimp out and bring a bag of baby carrots and some ranch dressing, but I did that last year. I'd like to actually do something nice this time. Any clever salad ideas out there?
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
Pears should be in season where you are, so you could try Pear, rocket and walnut salad. Should travel ok if you give the pears 5 minutes in some lightly lemoned water when you slice them. Or you could do something nice with asparagus, or perhaps a Beetroot Salad. You could marinate some mushrooms in lemon and olive oil with some herbs overnight. Or there's always a platter of fresh vegetable crudites with a dip or two.
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
My fave salad is fresh pineapple, watercress and toasted flaked almonds. V simple but fresh and stunning -it makes a great starter.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Bulgar Wheat, Carrot and Cranberry is a fab salad (and I don't even normally like fruit in salads)

Soak bulgar wheat in water till swollen (c 40 mins). (Any excess water can be squeezed out in a clean tea towel). Mix with grated carrots, lime juice, bit olive oil and dried cranberries. Make up in advance so all the flavours mingle.

Sorry for lack of quantities - I think I normally use pretty much 50:50 bulgar wheat and carrots with enough cranberries so they mix through and lime juice and oil to taste. Doesn't really matter though - whatever suits. You can also make it without the bulgar wheat. I guess it might also work with rice or another grain though I've never tried that.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
These are wonderful, thanks. Whatever I end up taking to church, I'll try the rest at home. (I've never worked with bulgar wheat, Yangtze, but I can probably buy a small quantity at Whole Foods and try it; it sounds like a great winter salad.)

I googled "vegetable rocket" and found it's what we call arugula over here. I thought it would be romaine lettuce because that's shaped a little like a rocket!

I would love to make a salad with fruit in it (I want to use dried cranberries for certain) but I wonder how long they can sit. It's only 5 minutes to church, but then 1 hour for the service and 90 minutes for the meeting. Will pears or apples last that long after soaking in citrus?
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Spinach (or any salad greens), peeled grapefruit sections, dried cranberries, and walnut chunks make a good salad. For greater flavor, mix the walnuts with brown sugar and carefully toast them in the oven in a sheet pan.
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
Mamacita, I think the pears would hold longer than apples ... it'd be very tasty with walnuts (candied or not), maybe some blue cheese, and perhaps some of the craisins.

Charlotte
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
I think I have a great cold fix. It might not cure a cold but it makes you feel better, tastes good and might just help get rid of the symptoms. The drawback is how long it takes to prepare.

Make a garlic and chicken consume similar to what follows.
Instructions
  1. Chop up the chicken and fry in hot oil until starting to brown, put in a casserole dish.
  2. refresh oil and fry onion, carrot(or other root veg) coriander, cummin, peppercorns and cloves until onion is going soft. Add to casserole dish.
  3. chop the green veg and add to casserole dish
  4. peal the cloves of the garlic head and add to casserole dish.
  5. cover with boiling water, if using the hob add 2 inches of boiling water to allow for evaporation
  6. cook on a slow heat for as long as possible (at least four hours.
  7. turn off heat and leave to cool for a couple of hours
  8. strain liquid into a jug, maybe chop chicken finer and re-add. Empty veg and spices into bin as the goodness has all gone into the consume.
The consume should now either be cooled quickly of reheated immediately. I suggest one portion is set for reheating and the rest is decanted to boxes and cooled.

When using as medicinal purposes.
ingredients

instructions
  1. reheat consume so it is about to boil
  2. take off heat and pour into bowls
  3. add whisky and lemon juice
  4. eat immediately

Jengie
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Jengie, that seems a conflation of the Jewish (chicken soup) and the Scottish (whisky) remedies for all ills.

As such, it ought to be doubly effective.
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
I have heard chicken soup referred to as "Jewish Penicillin".

[speeling]

[ 27. January 2007, 23:19: Message edited by: Campbellite ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Jengie, that seems a conflation of the Jewish (chicken soup) and the Scottish (whisky) remedies for all ills.

As such, it ought to be doubly effective.

Its actually got a third in which is the high dose of garlic so hopefully triply effective. [Biased]

Jengie
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Jengie, that seems a conflation of the Jewish (chicken soup) and the Scottish (whisky) remedies for all ills.

As such, it ought to be doubly effective.

Its actually got a third in which is the high dose of garlic so hopefully triply effective.
My god, a few chilies and you've got the elixir of life.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Thanks again for the salad suggestions, folks. I decided not to risk the fresh fruit, but settled on romaine lettuce with craisins, pecans (I candied them myself -- I'm so proud), lots of blue cheese, and a balsamic/olive oil dressing. Taking home an empty bowl from a potluck is always rewarding!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We reckon Jambalaya made with homemade chicken stock is good for a cold - that adds garlic and chilli to the mix. It certainly makes you feel better, and it's tasty so it's not bland as chicken soup can be with a cold. I've not tried adding whisky too, yet.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Bland with a whole head of garlic, plus various spices! This is garlic and chicken soup not the other way around!

Yes Firenze there will be Chilli in todays along with tumeric as well.

Jengie
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
Thanks again for the salad suggestions, folks. I decided not to risk the fresh fruit, but settled on romaine lettuce with craisins, pecans (I candied them myself -- I'm so proud), lots of blue cheese, and a balsamic/olive oil dressing. Taking home an empty bowl from a potluck is always rewarding!

That sounds lovely (I adore blue cheese in a salad) but what on earth is a craisin? A typo or some kind of mutant cranberry raisin?
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
You've got it Yangtze. The word craisins was actually trademarked by Ocean Spray.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Anyone got any bitchin' lentil recipes? Particularly any loaf ones (OK for dahl and soup) and/or ones that go well with sausages?

Open to input on polenta/cornmeal as well. At the moment I usually make it up with vegetable stock, then top with parmesan and bake.

I am looking, you see, for 'fillers' that aren't based on potatoes, rice or pasta.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Rose Elliot in Vegan Feasts gives a rocking recipe for Mixed vegetable Dal. Its worth getting the book for that but there is also a lentil loaf a couple of pages on.

Jengie
 
Posted by Freelance Monotheist (# 8990) on :
 
There's a lentil paté recipe on Channel 4's Come Dine With Me show web page, it's from the latest series and was made by a woman called Sue.
It looked really yummy!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
I've just found the yummiest ever lentil recipe. It's from Ruth Watson's Fat Girl Slim which is a cookery book well worth investing in whether or not you're trying to lose weight.

Cook one chopped onion, 2 crushed garlic cloves and 1 small chopped chilli in some olive oil for 10-15 mins. Add wee pinch of turmeric, a cinnamon stick, 1 star anise, 4 bashed cardamon pods - fry for a minute or so. Add 175g lentils and about half a litre of stock*. Bring to boil then simmer uncovered for 15-20 mins. Season then add two chopped tomatoes and some chopped coriander or parsley. Should be sloppy but not runny/soup like.

*I think it depends what type of lentils you use as to how much stock to add. I used green which needed only about 400ml - she suggests Puy and 700ml.

I didn't have star anise or tomatoes or coriander to hand at it was still delicious. I don't think I added salt at all.

I'll definitely be making it again.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I make a similar mixture up as a lentil quiche filling, particularly good for irritating real men who neither eat quiche or lentils, but very tasty. It comes from Gail Duff's Wholefood Cookbook.

Fry 1 large onion and finely chopped garlic clove in 45ml (3tbls) oil until golden, stir in 225g (1/2lb) red lentils and cook for 1 minute, add 575ml (1pt) stock and bring to the boil. Leave to simmer with a bayleaf for 45 minutes until have a thick puree.

Scald, skin and roughly chop 225g (1/2lb) tomatoes (or used tinned chopped tomatoes). Put in a pan with 30ml (fresh) (2tbls) chopped basil, 15ml (1tbls) chopped thyme and 15ml (1tbls) chopped parsley and cook for 15 minutes so they are soft and pulpy. Gradually beat the tomatoes into the lentils.

Put mixture into pre-baked 20cm (8") wholemeal pastry case and sprinkle 50g (2oz) grated Cheddar or Gruyere cheese on top. Bake for 20 minutes.

Also makes little quiches done as above, but using bun tins to give little finger versions for buffets and picnics or packed lunches.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Thanks for these. I am printing them off carefully. I'm sensing a symbiosis between the lentil and the tomato and the cheese - which is all to the good.
 
Posted by Papio (# 4201) on :
 
Anyone for burnt veggi sausages, slimy mushrooms and over-boiled veg? [Hot and Hormonal]

If I can't even get that sort of thing right.....

What an idiot I must be. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Papio:
Anyone for burnt veggi sausages, slimy mushrooms and over-boiled veg? [Hot and Hormonal]

Fry some finely chopped onions with butter in a largish frying pan.

Chop your failed sausages, mushrooms, up into pieces about a centimetre or two across, put them in the pan.

Add fresh ground pepper, and some herbs, and slightly too much salt.

Bind it all together with a couple of eggs and perhaps a sprinkling of grated cheese, and call it a Spanish omelette. No-one will know the difference. Not even you, if you are the only one eating it.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
I think you mean chargrilled sausages, champignons a l'escargot and legumes a la ma grand mere (snail mushrooms and veggies like my nanna's, without the accents).

There will always be other meals.

ETA: or do Ken's suggestion, sounds tasty and its true, anything suits an omelette.

[ 29. January 2007, 19:12: Message edited by: Ferijen ]
 
Posted by Papio (# 4201) on :
 
Thank you. Will do that, then. [Smile]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
1 small chopped chilli

In recipes like this, what kind of chili do you use? (I'm guessing not jalapeno, maybe green chilis?) Also, fresh or canned?
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Fry some finely chopped onions with butter in a largish frying pan.

Chop your failed sausages, mushrooms, up into pieces about a centimetre or two across, put them in the pan.

Add fresh ground pepper, and some herbs, and slightly too much salt.

Bind it all together with a couple of eggs and perhaps a sprinkling of grated cheese, and call it a Spanish omelette. No-one will know the difference. Not even you, if you are the only one eating it.

This reminds me of a family special, compote de réfrigérateur. This is how we get rid of fruit or veg that is near to going off, but too good to toss out. If it's fruit (any kind), you slice it up, dot it with butter, sprinkle with cinnamon and nutmeg, and make a streusel sort of topping (combine a little, brown sugar, cinnamon and ground whatever-nuts-need-to-be-used and mix with melted butter) and cover it, then bake in oven at 350 for 40 minutes. Serve with vanilla ice cream or trickle cream over it.

If it's vegetables, we give it the ken treatment above for a brunch or dinner "fritatta". It tastes great anyway, but serve with champagne just in case. Nobody will remember a thing! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by basso (# 4228) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
1 small chopped chilli

In recipes like this, what kind of chili do you use? (I'm guessing not jalapeno, maybe green chilis?) Also, fresh or canned?
If I were making that recipe I'd probably use a serrano (or two - I like 'em spicy), but a jalapeno would do well.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
1 small chopped chilli

In recipes like this, what kind of chili do you use? (I'm guessing not jalapeno, maybe green chilis?) Also, fresh or canned?
Honestly I don't think it matters. (Though probably best not to use a pickled jalapeno.) I'd go for a red chilli for preference though - depends on your taste as to how spicy a one you pick. I either just used a random one picked up in the greengrocers, or the remants of an old one slowly drying in the fridge or quite possibly didn't use one at all but added a bit of chilli powder.

Having said that, I don't think you want anything too searingly hot - it's good to have the flavours of the cinnamon and star anise shine through. For that reason I probably wouldn't use a Scotch Bonnet (whihc are the hottest ones easily accessible around here). The whole feel of the dish is more North African than Carribbean or Indian.

I forgot to say that it definitely gets even better with age - good one to keep in the fridge for a day or two.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
So I have this problem.

I want to make a sort of borscht. For once I have a recipe and intend to follow it, sort of. I do not intend to do as suggested, however, and purchase smoked chicken wing tips (where in heaven's name do you buy smoked chicken wing tips) to boil up as the basis of the stock.

Chicken stock I have. How do I get the smokey dimension the tips would have provided? Smoked sausage? Smoked chicken (that one can buy in a deli, rather like "smoked ham")? Ideas, anyone.

(The recipe is from Gourmet, so it assumes a whole lot -- most of which I can actually manage for once. But smoked chicken wing tips? I ask you. It should produce a borscht like the one I ate as the first course at a dinner catered by the local Russian Orthodox church. Yummm.)

John
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
Borscht normally uses a beef or pork base IME, so I'd probably substitute some form of smoked pork, either in the piece or as a smoked sausage. Most recipes I see for smoked chicken wings involve removing the tips before smoking anyway.
 
Posted by duchess (# 2764) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mertide:
Borscht normally uses a beef or pork base IME, so I'd probably substitute some form of smoked pork, either in the piece or as a smoked sausage. Most recipes I see for smoked chicken wings involve removing the tips before smoking anyway.

I would actually attempt this recipe, provided it was not extremely time consuming and hard to follow. I would attempt it IN SECRET since I am a horrible cook. I want to live dangerously though and I have NEVER EVER had a good borscht!

Recipe anywhere? [Axe murder]
 
Posted by WatersOfBabylon (# 11893) on :
 
Josephine's birthday is coming up, and she wants a stop-your-heart decadently rich chocolate cake with a frosting of the same calibur.

Help! Any suggestions?
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
I like this rich chocolate mud cake with chocolate ganache. The recipe specifies a particular brand of cream, because it's put out by that company, but any thickened cream (35% butterfat) would work equally well. Of course, this recipe only works if the birthday celebration is before the beginning of Lent. [Razz]
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
This one gets the thumbs up from my sister-in-law the chocoholic cake lover. She even had chocolate cake for her wedding. Just use good semi-sweetened chocolate or even bittersweet and you won't go wrong.

If you have only 9" pans bake it for no more than 50 minutes. This is very rich, more than most chocolate cakes.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
I heard that if you use Coke or Dr. Pepper instead of water that your cake will be very moist.
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
This may be a trans-Pacific thing, but I find the idea of putting cola in a cake (especially alongside the sort of quality ingredients in the recipes Mertide and I linked to) really hard to come at. I imagine that the sugar would be what makes a difference to the moisture level. While it might be interesting to try with a simpler cake recipe, I'd be very wary of tinkering like that with a more elaborate recipe.

I'd be interested to hear other people's experience, though - after all, several of my friends swear by a scone (US biscuit) recipe made with lemonade.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
From a friend of my sister, warning this is very rich.

Tracey's Chocolate Cake

ingredients

(Preheat oven to 180° C, 350° F or gas Mark 4)

instructions
grease and line a 8-9in cake tin. Mix all ingredients together in a bowl. Stir gently to begin with until all are combined. Then beat hard for two minutes. Put in cake time and bake in the centre of the oven for about 1 hour until well risen and firm. Leave the cake in tin for 5 minutes then turn onto wire tray to cool. Put cream in the middle and decorate top with chocolate.

Jengie's changes to make a chocolate and cherry cake
I soak cherries in Kirsh over night and break up a bar of Green and Blacks cherry chocolate. Drain the cherries and stirr in just before I put into the cake tin. Instead of cream in the middle I put a tin of drained cherry's in with a cherry jam and mix together.

My sister ganache for the top
The ingredients are a bar of the best quality cooking chocolate (the higher the cocoa content the better) and a small quantity of single cream (1 tablespoon). Melt the chocolate but do not let the water boil below it, add the cream and stirr. You can substitute kirsh for the cream.

Jengie
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
If that were any more decadent, I would have to preach against it. Wow!
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
I wonder if the phosphoric acid in Coke reacts with the rising agents? I could see it making it fluffier, but not so sure about moister. I have heard Coke is very good for removing baked on grease from pans, perhaps that's what makes the cake taste better. [Smile]
 
Posted by WatersOfBabylon (# 11893) on :
 
I've used both Coke and 7up in cakes before. (Though not the same cake. Bleh!) But they were most definitley fluffy and moist...
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cranmer's baggage:
This may be a trans-Pacific thing, but I find the idea of putting cola in a cake (especially alongside the sort of quality ingredients in the recipes Mertide and I linked to) really hard to come at. I imagine that the sugar would be what makes a difference to the moisture level. While it might be interesting to try with a simpler cake recipe, I'd be very wary of tinkering like that with a more elaborate recipe.

I'd be interested to hear other people's experience, though - after all, several of my friends swear by a scone (US biscuit) recipe made with lemonade.

It's just a way adding flavor/fluffiness/moistness by replacing water. If your recipe uses coffee or other types of liquid I would not tinker with it.

What I should have posted earlier is: For surprising results you can use Coke/7-up* in a store bought mix. Use a good frosting such as buttercream. It will taste oh so much better.

*coke for chocolate and 7-up for vanilla.
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
You'd substitute the water and sugar for the coke or 7-Up, surely, or at least part of the sugar? Otherwise you're adding a lot much syrup or HFCS than the recipe would seem to need, almost a teaspoon of sugar per ounce of Coke.
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
What I should have posted earlier is: For surprising results you can use Coke/7-up* in a store bought mix. Use a good frosting such as buttercream. It will taste oh so much better.

*coke for chocolate and 7-up for vanilla.

I can see how that might work. I guess I wasn't thinking in terms of packet mixes because I never use them.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
In a fit of overenthusiasm I appear to have sprouted a rather large quanitity of mung beans. Anybody have any good ideas of what to do with them beyond snacking and adding to salads?

[Edited for clarification - it's mung bean sprouts I have a lot of, not just the dried mung beans, though I have those too!]

[ 01. February 2007, 09:45: Message edited by: Yangtze ]
 
Posted by Cranmer's baggage (# 1662) on :
 
Mung bean sprouts - use them in a stir friy or curry laksa?
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
I've been making lots of ice cream at the moment, which tends to mean that I've left with a lot of egg whites. Any suggestions, apart from meringue (which I've also been making in large quantities, though I'd appreciate a perfect recipe for that too), for what to do with the eggwhites?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
I am in a bit of a silly mood, so if you have greasy skin, beat up an egg white, mix in lemon juice and use as a face pack.

Another easy is to make Chinese scrambled eggs. They beat the yokes separate from the whites and only quickly combine just before frying. You therefore do not need a one to one ration of egg yokes to egg whites.

Jengie

[ 01. February 2007, 18:33: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by My Duck:

But to be more practical, I do think there must be something savoury that would have chocolate as an ingredient. I suppose I am looking for innovative ideas with which to impress guests, as well as a sort of intellectual search for a different way to combine flavours successfully.

Does this make sense? I think I need to take my medication [Paranoid]

Tonight Foodtv aired battle chocolate on Iron Chef America. And yes there was savory dishes. Including a version of Spiffy's pumkin soup. This show is a must see. Unfortanately the show has now upped the stakes on Valentines day dinner. And yes I shall have to cook since Pata does not wish to battle crowds this wednesday.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
I've been making lots of ice cream at the moment, which tends to mean that I've left with a lot of egg whites. Any suggestions, apart from meringue (which I've also been making in large quantities, though I'd appreciate a perfect recipe for that too), for what to do with the eggwhites?

If meringue or pavlova doesn't appeal, freeze them for when it is appealing (clip lock or clip zip plastic bag, labelled with the number of egg whites)

Alternatively, it is a great binder for things like rice bakes (cooked rice, green onions, salmon or tuna, bit of cayenne, garlic and parsley with perhaps a little soy sauce for saltiness mixed with egg white and baked in a moderate oven for about half an hour)

C
 
Posted by babybear (# 34) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
what to do with the eggwhites?

Angel Food cake uses 12 egg whites!

If you are making an ordinary sponge cake or carrot cake you can substitute 2 egg whites for 1 egg in the recipe. I would suggest that you only do it for one of the eggs. The same thing can be done with omlettes, use 1 egg and two egg whites instead of 2 eggs. Some recipes for omlettes only use egg whites.

Another suggestion is chocolate mousse. These generally use double the number of egg whites to egg yolks.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
"Death by Chocolate"

Step 1 - the brownie

Step 2 - cocoa meringue

Step 3 - chocolate mousse

Step 4 - chocolate ganache

Step 5 - mocha mousse

Step 6 - assembling Death by Chocolate

I have not yet made this, but I've heard stories.... This is *big* chocolate juju, not for timid or nervous persons, nor those given to fits of the vapors.
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
I've been making lots of ice cream at the moment, which tends to mean that I've left with a lot of egg whites. Any suggestions, apart from meringue (which I've also been making in large quantities, though I'd appreciate a perfect recipe for that too), for what to do with the eggwhites?

Make sorbet using the beaten egg-whites to lighten the frozen fruit puree. Or fruit mousse which is very nice with home-made ice cream too.

<My Duck drools quietly into the keyboard>
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
What can I do with about 1/4 of a jar of leftover mincemeat?


quote:
Originally posted by babybear:
You don't have to do anything with it just now. It will keep for quite some time.

You could keep it til February and add apples, and make it into a Christmas Crumble.

I made something along those lines, but in a more Ready Steady Cook manner, in the end yesterday. I sliced some eating apples and layered them with the mincemeat, to which I added a good slug of rum - we'd inexplicably run out of brandy and the mincemeat was rather dry. Put some more rum on the top for good measure and topped with crushed digestives dotted with butter. I shoved it in the oven for a while at gas 4 and served it with vanilla icecream. Worked pretty well, though that might just have been the rum!

Failed to knock the Keren-Gumblet out for the evening though... [Two face]
 
Posted by caty the southerner (# 11996) on :
 
I have managed to accumulate rather a lot of minced beef and diced steak in my freezer. Other than cottage pie, spag bol, and casserole (which I have done a couple of times each) and chili (which I am not especially keen on), does anyone have any suggestions for what I could do with it?
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
Mix the mince with chopped onions and other veg, herbs, spices and use to stuff peppers, tomatoes or other suitable veggies.

Pie or pudding with the diced steak; mushrooms are a favourite addition at My Duckery as is red wine or ale of course.
 
Posted by Freelance Monotheist (# 8990) on :
 
Wowx, Ken, that recipe for The Chocolate-iest Pudding of All Time (TM) has turned me into a pool of drool [Razz] (this being the early stages -desperately need a drooling smiley), I may have to try that even if it does involve undoing all my good work mentioned in The Fitness Freaks thread [Two face] .
Stuffed tomatoes or peppers sound yummy, I second them for using up leftover beef mince.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Aubergines are also good stuffed. You could make meatballs with a tomato sauce too or there were loads of meatloaf recipes on here a while back...
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
You could make 'jiaozi' or Chinese Dumplings (or potstickers) which is particularly timely as they're eaten a lot at Chinese New Year.

Traditionally made with pork, but perfectly OK to use beef or any other meat. Huge faff to make but delicious. If you can find the wrappers in a Chinese grocery shop it will be much, much easier!

Don't forget the Chinese vinegar to dip them in. Yum.

Couple of recipes here and here .
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by caty the southerner:
I have managed to accumulate rather a lot of minced beef and diced steak in my freezer. Other than cottage pie, spag bol, and casserole (which I have done a couple of times each) and chili (which I am not especially keen on), does anyone have any suggestions for what I could do with it?

Little meatballs mixed with whatever interesting goodies you've got lying around, with finely chopped onion and garlic, mixed in with herbs and grated parmesan, shallow fried in olive oil and butter, first at a higher heat and then a lower heat to cook through. Great with rice or noodles.
 
Posted by Cusanus (# 692) on :
 
Little meatballs go really well with heaps of root vegetables in a tomato-ey sauce and coucous.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
In winter, little meatballs , especially with lots of parsley or other herbs, are delicious additions to soup.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Goodness, it looks as if Aussies really like meat balls. Three posts in a row, all from Aussies.

Actually meatballs like that are one of the few ways I will eat red meat.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by caty the southerner:
Other than cottage pie, spag bol, and casserole (which I have done a couple of times each)

This puzzles me. A casserole is a cooking utensil, not a recipe.

There are lots of different recipes, using diced beef, that can be cooked in a casserole. Do you only know one? What are the other ingredients for it?

I will be casseroling some diced shin of beef later today: probably with onions, carrots, celery, beef stock and red wine.
I could make a goulash, spicing it with paprika, or maybe casserole the meat with lots of onions and beer, or with diced (bell) peppers, onions and tomatoes.
If I had a more tender cut of beef I could cook it with mushroms and cream, and maybe some wholegrain mustard.

The possibilities are endless ! [Razz] [Razz]
 
Posted by caty the southerner (# 11996) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
There are lots of different recipes, using diced beef, that can be cooked in a casserole. Do you only know one? What are the other ingredients for it?

I will be casseroling some diced shin of beef later today: probably with onions, carrots, celery, beef stock and red wine.

If I'm casseroling beef I usually do some combination similar to this, depending what veg happens to be around. The question was intended more as - what can I do with the diced beef other than cook it in a casserole?

I tend to have poultry/pork/fish a lot more often than beef so I have a lot more receipes for those than I have for beef. So having somehow accumulated stacks of beef in the freezer, I've been trying work out as many different things to do with it as possible.

Thanks for all the suggestions. I'm definitely going to have to try doing meatballs now.

And I do like the sound of casseroling with mushrooms, cream and wholegrain mustard.

[ 14. February 2007, 14:01: Message edited by: caty the southerner ]
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by caty the southerner:
The question was intended more as - what can I do with the diced beef other than cook it in a casserole?

Well. once it's cut up there's not a lot you can do with it other than cook it with a sauce...apart from kebabs if it's a tender cut.
The other alternative is to use one of the many casserole recipes, thicken the sauce more than usual, add a topping to the cooked dish, and Voila! A pie! (I usually strain off most of the liquid and serve it separately)

Suggested toppings:
Pastry, obviously, but apart from puff pastry or plain shortcrust pastry which can be bought ready made you could make herb pastry or a cheese pastry.

Or make a beef cobbler: cover the filling with overlapping circles of scone dough (unsweetened of course) Again you could do a herby or cheesy variation.

Or a beef crumble: Again, an ordinary crumble mix, minus the sugar. Plain, herby, cheesy, or with chopped nuts in it.

Or a crumb topping : whiz a couple of slices of buttered wholemeal bread in a food processor, adding herbs or cheese if you prefer, spread over the cooked filling, sprinkle with sesame seeds, return to the oven until piping hot.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Re: minced beef; you could also use it in a Tex-Mex recipe: Tacos, taco salad, enchilada, burrito, sope (pr: SO-peh, a fried cornmeal bowl, usually packed with taco fillings), tostada, beef empanada, beef and rice, albondigas (meatball) soup.

Cornish pasty comes to mind, as does beef pot pie.

Swedish meatballs (with mushroom gravy over noodles), Italian meatballs (in tomato sauce).

Heck, if nothing else, form them into patties and have hamburgers!
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
More minced( ground) beef recipes:
Moussaka
Poor Man's moussaka (as the above, but substituting potato slices for the aubergine (eggplant))
Bobotie
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Brown beef, saute onions and garlic maybe peppers. Add seasonings (oregeno, cumin, garlic, basil, whatever). Add rice and beef or chicken stock. cook until rice is done. I like to add some habenero sauce to it. I do this all in one pan.
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
Well, there's also always rissoles - like large meatballs with finely chopped onion, a little tomato sauce if you like, an egg, and a little fresh breadcrumbs, rolled into balls about 4-5 cm or more if you like, and browned, served with gravy (brown gravy), mashed potato, and whatever other veges you have. From the 1960's school of Oz cookery, still faithfully followed here.

Or curried mince, mince browned with chopped onion, and some curry powder/paste and other chopped veg if you like, cook with a little stock and cornflour if too runny(add sultanas according to traditional Mum cookery) and serve with rice. Or savoury mince (as above, but with a little mustard and Worcestorshire to taste instead of curry). Or there's always the old favourite "Chinese mince" which stirfries mince, onion, carrot, celery and vast quantities of cabbage with soy sauce (again, add veg as you please). This is actually not too bad if you bung in some garlic and chilli at the beginning, and when cabbage is cheap, a little mince goes a long way. You can use less cabbage, add some noodles, and call it chow mein. Hobart was quite eclectic in the 60's. [Smile]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Are we talking minced or diced?

Minced I assume means ground to little wormy splidges, but diced is chunks anything from a centimetre to an inch across.

If chunky, fry it.

Put mushrooms in pan first, with olive oil, fry for about ten minutes, then add the beef and a few cloves of garlic and some baby onions - or larger onions chopped into pieces about the same size as the beef - and cook in oil for ten minutes or so, until its all browned off, adding more oil if it gets dry or sticky, then add a little coriander (seeds and leaves, why skimp?) and some ground black pepper, and splash red wine all over it, and cook very gently for another ten minutes or so, maybe with some basil or even rosemary.

Eat it with the potatoes you cleverly remembered to have already cooked.

What could be wrong with that?

Or for the full-on Normandy style, cook in butter rather than olive oil, skip the coriander, use loads of ground pepper, replace the herbs with chopped apples (cook them till almost soft) use cider instead of wine (calvados if you are putting the boat out, but cider is very cheap and tastes nicer) and mix it with cream just before eating.

We've got to keep those cardiologists in business.
 
Posted by Cusanus (# 692) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
This puzzles me. A casserole is a cooking utensil, not a recipe.

Around these parts it's both - just like a terrine or a tagine in other culinary contexts.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
FAST & EASY BROCCOLI SOUP

This is the best-taasting, easiest, fastest broccoli soup recipe on the planet. You truly cannot screw this up. (This is from Gordon Ramsay's "F Word" show.)

Note: I followed this recipe with fear and trembling, convinced it was going to be a bowl of watery bleah. No! It was thick, tasty, savory, and all before I added salt or olive oil! I now prefer it adding nothing at all.

SERVES 4

+ 2 lbs broccoli florets (stalks cut into 1/2" wide discs)
+ Boiling, salted water

In a large saucepan or stockpot, add the broccoli to the rapidly boiling, salted water. Cook for 4 minutes. Remove broccoli with slotted spoon but do not discard water yet.

Pour broccoli into a blender and add enough of the cooking liquid to come 1/2 way up the jar.

Secure the lid to the blender top and place a small towel over the lid (remember: You're blending hot food!). Pulse the blender until the broccoli is pureed (five or six one-second pulses). Add salt and/or olive oil to taste. Add more cooking liquid and pulse again if too thick.

Serve in warmed bowls.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
It's mad isn't it how broccoli and water combine to make a creamy soup. First time I made it I was stunned as well.

Tis good with a swirl of yoghurt and some parmesan shavings.

[ 15. February 2007, 22:01: Message edited by: Yangtze ]
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
You could make 'jiaozi' or Chinese Dumplings (or potstickers) which is particularly timely as they're eaten a lot at Chinese New Year.

Traditionally made with pork, but perfectly OK to use beef or any other meat. Huge faff to make but delicious. If you can find the wrappers in a Chinese grocery shop it will be much, much easier!

Don't forget the Chinese vinegar to dip them in. Yum.

Couple of recipes here and here .

I was very amused the first time I saw them referred to as "potstickers" as the Cantonese word for them is (something like*) "wor-tip" which basically means "things that stick to your wok"

*I don't know anything about the Cantonese transliteration conventions.

Dumplings are great to have on hand in the freezer. If, like me, you don't have a non-stick pan, you can boil them. Bring a saucepan of water to the boil, throw in a handful or two of frozen dumplings. Stir them around a bit to prevent sticking to the saucepan. When the water bubbles, add half a glass of cold or room temp water. When it boils again and the dumplings float, they're ready. No frying = no added oil = healthier!
 
Posted by Liza (# 4366) on :
 
I haven't tried that soup yet, Ken. I admit I was rather skeptical when I heard about it (I thought it was on Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares, but perhaps it was on the F Word too, I don't remember). But with your recommendation, maybe I'll try it. It is certainly simple enough!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ecumaniac:
Dumplings are great to have on hand in the freezer. If, like me, you don't have a non-stick pan, you can boil them. Bring a saucepan of water to the boil, throw in a handful or two of frozen dumplings. Stir them around a bit to prevent sticking to the saucepan. When the water bubbles, add half a glass of cold or room temp water. When it boils again and the dumplings float, they're ready. No frying = no added oil = healthier!

Oh absolutely. Boiled - either drained or with some of the water as a sort of 'soup' - is how I generally have them. Fried is a special occasion kind of thing.

I was taught that you add a large ladleful of cold water (say half a cup) bring it back up to the boil and then do that two more times (ie three times in total) and that's when they're cooked.
 
Posted by Athanasius+ (# 11978) on :
 
As it's Shrove Tuesday ...

As usual on Shrove Tuesday, we ate pancakes this evening. A few years ago I tried sprinkling Angostura bitters on them, along with sugar. Heavenly! I've carried on doing this every Shrove Tuesday since. Maybe I should try rum or brandy in future, but the herbs in the bitters are so good in pancakes!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Re Ken's warning about blending hot soup, get a hand-held blender - I think Braun make one. You plug it in, hold the business end in the soup, press the button and whizz round until the soup is the desired consistency. That way you don't even need to take the soup out of the pot you cooked it in. Better still, to clean it you just switch on and run the blade end under a hot running tap. How easy is that?

[Smile]
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Re Ken's warning about blending hot soup, get a hand-held blender - I think Braun make one.

Your idea sounds good, but IMO it's not the best way to handle this recipe.

Initially, you want to add about half a blender-full of cooking liquid to the cooked broccoli pieces in the blender jar. Stick-blending the broccoli in *all* the cooking liquid will result in a diluted soup. Not good eats.

You could end up adding more or less than half a blender jar full of cooking liquid, depending on taste.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
FD has just discovered corned beef, courtesy of my mother and is now keen for any interesting ways of serving it.

I think this might be an Aussie terminology and am not sure whether it is/was common elsewhere under another name. By corned beef I mean a piece of brisket or silverside simmered with vinegar, brown sugar, herbs and spices. As a child the traditional serving was either cold on sandwiches (not so great unless with a ferocious chutney) or served hot with a sauce and veges. Does anyone have any ideas?
 
Posted by Flausa (# 3466) on :
 
Over here in the UK, they call it salt beef. I grew up in the USA having it every Saint Paddy's Day cooked slowly with potatoes, onions, carrots, and cabbage. Yummm.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
In the US, the two ethnic groups most often identified with corned beef are the Irish (hence Flausa's St Pat's day dinner) and Jewish. My experience of corned beef is at the deli, piled high on rye bread, slathered with mustard. And a kosher pickle on the side.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'd never tasted salt beef until I came to Newfoundland, where it's an essential element of a Jiggs' Dinner - the beef is boiled with potatoes, turnip, carrots, cabbage and pease pudding. It's served either as it is or accompanied by roast chicken or turkey with savory-flavoured stuffing. When cooked by someone who knows what they're doing, it's a feast fit for a king.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I'd never tasted salt beef until I came to Newfoundland, where it's an essential element of a Jiggs' Dinner - the beef is boiled with potatoes, turnip, carrots, cabbage and pease pudding. It's served either as it is or accompanied by roast chicken or turkey with savory-flavoured stuffing. When cooked by someone who knows what they're doing, it's a feast fit for a king.

[Smile]

Wow. This is definitely FD food. I think I need some recipes for pease pudding as well
 
Posted by AdamPater (# 4431) on :
 
I'm inspired to hark back to childhood and experiment with making some ginger beer. (The embryonic plant is sitting in the kitchen as I type - no action yet.)

Different recipes call for addition of lemon juice and pulp. Lemon is likely to be more attractive than ginger in the home: how much lemon do you reckon the brew could stand before the acidity affects the fermentation and carbonation?
 
Posted by ramsey (# 12412) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
FD has just discovered corned beef, courtesy of my mother and is now keen for any interesting ways of serving it.

I like hot slaw with corned beef. To wit:
HOT CABBAGE SLAW

1/2 head cabbage
1/4 c. oil
1/4 c. sugar
1/4 c. vinegar
1 tsp. dry mustard
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 onion, chopped
1/2 tbsp. celery seed

Cut cabbage and onion in small pieces. Sprinkle celery seed over this. Bring other ingredients to a boil and pour over cabbage mixture. Serve warm.

[Edited for code -- Mamacita, Heavenly Host]

[ 05. March 2007, 04:00: Message edited by: Mamacita ]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Welcome, ramsey!

I edited your thread to fix the coding. There's a thread on the Styx board where you can practice doing quotes and other such formatting (using the nifty buttons at the bottom of the screen you post on).

Enjoy your time on the Ship!

Mamacita,
Heavenly Host
 
Posted by ramsey (# 12412) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
Welcome, ramsey!

I edited your thread to fix the coding.

Thank you very much, Mamacita. I'm afraid it was inattention instead of ignorance, however.
 
Posted by Anna B (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
In the US, the two ethnic groups most often identified with corned beef are the Irish (hence Flausa's St Pat's day dinner) and Jewish.

I had the best brisket ever (not corned) at a neighbor's Passover dinner. Heavenly and very easy.
 
Posted by Tiredwalker (# 12202) on :
 
Heavenly if you love eggplant, hell if you don't

-Slice eggplant into 1/8 inch rounds
Sprinkle rounds with salt on both sides and let sit for 10 minutes (takes away bitterness).
-Rinse and very lightly coat with olive oil.
-Place tomato slices on each round and sprinkle with italian spice blend
-Broil @ 400 on a rack until eggplant & tomatoes looks a little soft and a little sunken.
-put shredded or crumbled cheese (anything you like) and let melt and brown a little if you like.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Dumb question about eggplant: Are you supposed to peel it? (The recipe sounds good, btw.)
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
No, I don't peel aubergine. It goes very mushy when cooked, so apart from anything else, you need the skin to hold it together.

There is also a school of thought which says you don't have to salt them before cooking. That the aubergine we buy is young and tender, and the process was meant to improve older, tougher ones.
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
i love aubergine...

what does "broil" mean though? Does it mean I put it in the oven (we would say bake) or under the grill (wed say grill?). It sounds like "boil" to me but i take it you dont mean to put it into a saucepan on the stove!!
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
Emma: grill is broiling (a USA term)
 
Posted by AdamPater (# 4431) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
There is also a school of thought which says you don't have to salt them before cooking. That the aubergine we buy is young and tender, and the process was meant to improve older, tougher ones.

I think I only ever did that once, the first time, when I was intently following the recipe book. After that I couldn't be bothered, and things seemed to taste okay in spite of it.
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
FD has just discovered corned beef, courtesy of my mother and is now keen for any interesting ways of serving it.

I think this might be an Aussie terminology and am not sure whether it is/was common elsewhere under another name. By corned beef I mean a piece of brisket or silverside simmered with vinegar, brown sugar, herbs and spices. As a child the traditional serving was either cold on sandwiches (not so great unless with a ferocious chutney) or served hot with a sauce and veges. Does anyone have any ideas?

Corned beef in the UK comes in a tin. It's a bit like Spam (only made of beef, durr...) but more crumbly. Cheap food, which can nevertheless be made to taste good, particularly at the end of the month when we're broke! (We cook a pan of potatoes, carrots and onion boiled in stock, and then add the corned beef and continue to cook till it all goes mushy. Nice with a pastry lid on top too.)
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Thanks Ramsey and everyone for scrummy ideas. Might be trying a few of these this week...
 
Posted by Ethne Alba (# 5804) on :
 
There's a bowl of cheap lemons sitting in the table & they need to be used before the weekend.

Short of chopping them up and throwing them in the water jug for supper each evening ( which is lovely) what can I DO with them?

thanks
 
Posted by Meg the Red (# 11838) on :
 
Faced with a surplus of lemons or limes, I usually zest and juice them. I freeze the zest in a ziploc bag, and the juice in an ice cube tray; once the juice-cubes are frozen, I pop them into a freezer bag and take them out as needed for recipes.

Otherwise, you could make a big pot of lemon curd and try not to eat it all at one sitting. [Smile]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Or you can do the middle-eastern thing, and pickle them.

There are a range of recipes on the net, but as far as I remember all I did was cut the lemons in four - but not all the way down - place in a kilner jar and top up with seasalt. Seal and keep for a week or so.

The process softens and mellows the rind (the brine and pulp you can discard), and it makes a nice relish, or addition to casseroles or tagines.
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Meg the Red:
Faced with a surplus of lemons or limes, I usually zest and juice them. I freeze the zest in a ziploc bag, and the juice in an ice cube tray; once the juice-cubes are frozen....

Meg, you're a star! I don't do lime sodas quite as often in Canada as I did in India, but I do like to have lime juice available and fresh.

eta ellipsis

[ 07. March 2007, 18:05: Message edited by: PeteCanada ]
 
Posted by Meg the Red (# 11838) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteCanada:
Meg, you're a star!

Thanks, m'dear. [Big Grin]

To befit my newfound stellar status, I shall presently obtain an entourage [Cool]
 
Posted by Talmudnik (# 9339) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I'd never tasted salt beef until I came to Newfoundland, where it's an essential element of a Jiggs' Dinner - the beef is boiled with potatoes, turnip, carrots, cabbage and pease pudding. It's served either as it is or accompanied by roast chicken or turkey with savory-flavoured stuffing. When cooked by someone who knows what they're doing, it's a feast fit for a king.

[Smile]

Wow. This is definitely FD food. I think I need some recipes for pease pudding as well
Piglet - [Overused]

Pease pudding, Clarence, is dead simple. We use dried split yellow peas. Rinse them well under cold water. Place into a cloth bag and tie the bag shut, leaving some room at the top since they will expand about 1.5 times. They are boiled in a very large pot with salt beef (or salt pork ribs) for 3 hours so that they puree.

If you want to go Jigg's, add your quarted head of cabbage 75 mins before serving (when I was a kid, the cabbage was boiled for 2.5 hours...), then whole peeled carrots 15 mins later along with peeled and sliced turnip, and after another 15 mins add your peeled and halved potatoes. There is no way to imitate the flavour without the salt beef or ribs. We serve it with either roast chicken or roast beef. The turnip was mashed with a little butter and seasoned with pepper. The rest of the veggies are served as they are.
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ethne Alba:
There's a bowl of cheap lemons sitting in the table ... what can I DO with them?

My wife has a recipe somewhere for a Shaker Lemon pie. (The Shakers had a thing for lemons, don't you know.)

I don't have the details in front of me, but it involves slicing the lemons, rind and all, paper thin. Arrange in a bowl in layers and add sugar to each layer. Roughly fifty-fifty sugar to lemons. Let it stand overnight (or longer). This softens the rinds.

In a pie pastry, arrange the lemon slices and as much of the liquid as seems right. You don't want it runny. I think you can use a top pastry on this, but I don't remember for sure. Bake according to pastry recipe.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Lemon meringue pie - Delia's recipe . There were quite a few other interesting looking lemon recipes on that site too.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Make lemonade!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Cut the lemons in slices, and freeze them either in Ziploc bags or wrapped in cling-film - that way you have an instant ice/lemon mixture for your GIN.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Or you can do the middle-eastern thing, and pickle them.

There are a range of recipes on the net, but as far as I remember all I did was cut the lemons in four - but not all the way down - place in a kilner jar and top up with seasalt. Seal and keep for a week or so.

The process softens and mellows the rind (the brine and pulp you can discard), and it makes a nice relish, or addition to casseroles or tagines.

The only problem is that if they're cheap lemons they're probably waxed. I wouldn't bother preserving waxed lemons or doing much with them at all. The flavour of wax gets into lemon tea, gin and tonic etc.

On preserved lemons, you can keep them for months (if sealed properly), but give them about two weeks from the salting process before you start using them.

Good recipe here from the BBC website.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Yes, I had forgotten the waxing - since we habitually buy the unwaxed.

Though I do then forget and toss them in the fruit bowls with everything else, and then have to retrieve them a few days later (it's a warm kitchen) all blue and furry.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Thanks Talmudnik for the Jiggs and pease pudding recipes. This is definitely getting a work out once it gets cooler here (30 degree Celcius days don't seem appropriate somehow) and the winter veges are more widely available. [Frown]
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
OOOH, Clarence, you are confusing! I keep thinking "I've not posted on this thread recently," and then I discover you have!

Still. We're friends. We can share an avatar can't we? [Biased]
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Yes please!
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Jolly Good!
Got any good Ozzie recipes to share with me as well as an avatar?!

ETA to add...to share with me AND the others!

[ 10. March 2007, 10:49: Message edited by: Dormouse ]
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
I'll work on it! The OzMates are all great cooks so I should stir them to action. Actually, will have to be very careful because the Kiwis all lay claim to the things the Aussies lay claim to, like pavlova, lamingtons, lemon delicious... [Big Grin]

BTW I also need to work out where our avatar is from (if anywhere). I just liked it for being, well, not specific!
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I chose it because I thought I knew where it came from & the artist. But I find I don't.

Anyway.
End of personal chats. Back to the Food....
 
Posted by basso (# 4228) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spawn:

On preserved lemons, you can keep them for months (if sealed properly), but give them about two weeks from the salting process before you start using them.

Good recipe here from the BBC website.

My favorite recipe for preserved lemons is from the Hungry Tiger. I haven't actually had a chance to try it, but if I come into a couple of pounds of good lemons I know what's happening to them.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Does anybody know what seasonings go well with roast venison? I thought I might cut the roast into chunks and cook it in a wine/broth mix with garlic and onions. I intend to pour the mix over noodles to serve. Am I bonkers to try this and is there a better way to cook a roast of venison?
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
what seasonings go well with roast venison?

Traditionally, redcurrant jelly.

Red wine in general. Even Port.

Black pepper

Or red wine (big Burgundies), garlic, fried wild mushrooms

Or white wine, shallots, and cream, with cracked black pepper

Or lovage, rosemary, thyme in a sauce with any or all of the above.

A damson (or plum) sauce with lemon, wine, garlic, herbs

Gravy made from the meat juices and a heavy red wine

Did I say black pepper?

Roast celery, cooked till its soft.

Crisps, AKA "game chips" (honest!)
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
I made pita today.

it was good.

[Yipee]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rugasaw:
is there a better way to cook a roast of venison?

If it's a roast, bit of a waste to casserole it.

What's wrong with slow roasting on a bed of root vegetables? Thicken the juices with red wine or port and redcurrant jelly.

When I casserole venison, I tend to cut it half and half with beef.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
I've never cooked venison, but I wonder if you could do so as a roulade? Perhaps a filling of herbs, mushrooms, onions, celery root, and maybe sweet potato?

Also, here's a recipe that sounds pretty good: Pan Roasted Venison with a Tangerine and Roasted Jalapeno Sauce and Sweet Onion and Sage Gratin

Venison, because it's a game meat, will have very little fat, and fat carries flavor, so flavor will be less than you might expect. You'll need some aggressive assistants to help bring out the meat's flavor without overpowering it. I'd think a white wine like a chardonnay or a sweeter one like a Rieseling would help, and fruit would be a good choice (esp. cranberries), as well as perhaps a grainy mustard and definitely herbs and peppers as above.

YMMV.
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
I once had a venison stroganoff which was quite outstanding.
 
Posted by Talmudnik (# 9339) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
Thanks Talmudnik for the Jiggs and pease pudding recipes. This is definitely getting a work out once it gets cooler here (30 degree Celcius days don't seem appropriate somehow) and the winter veges are more widely available. [Frown]

You're welcome, Clarence. Let me know how it turns it out once you try it!
 
Posted by Izzybee (# 10931) on :
 
Does anyone have a good recipe for Hot-Cross buns - English style, not the US version which seems to be a regular bun with an icing cross on top of it (or perhaps I'm just not lucky everywhere I look)?

Are they difficult to make?
 
Posted by Ags (# 204) on :
 
You probably can't get much better than Delia for hot cross buns.

Yummy!
 
Posted by Izzybee (# 10931) on :
 
Thanks, Ags!

They look just about at my limit of baking - something fun for the Izlet and I for a wet saturday [Smile]
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
After defrosting the venison roast I discovered a mistake. I did not have a roast but several venison steaks that had been tenderized. They had been stacked on each other so that frozen they appeared to be a roast. I remembered that my brother mentioned most of the people he knew eat deer steaks that have been chicken fried.* Keeping this in mind I seasoned the meat (thanks Ken) and coated it in flower. I then browned the venison in a heavy pot. I deglazed the pot with a good merlot added beef broth and a quartered onion returned the venison and simered in the oven for about 30 minutes. I was very impressed with the results. Not only was the venison tasty but I ended up with a very good brown gravy.

To chicken fry something you dregde it in flour and fry it in a pan.
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
A neighbor has been diagnosed with a terrible and aggressive form of cancer, and I'm part of her family's dinner rota. I wonder if the crowd here might be able to suggest good rounded meals for eating by three people. Simple, organic, low in refined flours and sugars, and savoury to tempt a crappy appetite, but simply seasoned. Chicken or fish are okay but no red meats. I'm going to bring quiche and salad tomorrow, figuring quiche can be easily eaten at any time of day. But I expect to do this once a week for the forseeable future, so any suggestions would be appreciated.
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
Laura: Poach some fish filets in water to which a little lime juice has been added (or lemon juice) Add some colourful vegetables. Brocolli is suposed to be good as a cancer retardant (I don't know about that really, but ever since I've had cancer I eat a lot of brocolli. And spinach. I'm still cancer free.) And I drink lots of green tea.

I used to survive on pasta with a nice bland tomato sauce, or macaroni and cheese, and I did find that when I was in chemotherapy that I craved sweets - actually not just me, but everyone else in the hospice. The desserts that came in on Friday were gone by Saturday evening. I kept a carton of oatmeal cookies in my locker.

It's been 5 years now, but if I can think of more things I'll post them.
 
Posted by ten thousand difficulties (# 9506) on :
 
No simnel cake recipes the day before Mothering Sunday? I'm shocked. I could have done with one earlier but made do with Mrs Beeton. Am now exhausted and waiting for it to come out of the oven.
 
Posted by Qoheleth. (# 9265) on :
 
Unaccountably, the question was raised here.

The flat is currently resplendent with the odour of this which promises to be excellent when topped and toasted tomorrow.

Q.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Somewhere, SOMEWHERE, there must be recipes for successful, marinated, preferably pulse-based salads.

I need the kind of thing I can hash together in the intervals of making dinner, and leave in the fridge. The following day I take it into work and have for lunch. By which time it should not be wilted/acidic/still tasting obstinately like cold tinned beans.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Somewhere, SOMEWHERE, there must be recipes for successful, marinated, preferably pulse-based salads.

Have you tried this one ?
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
There's a whole stack of bean-combo salads here you might like to try. I think I would adapt the dressings to include some oil, as totally fat-free doesn't appeal.
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
Daughter has some friends visiting from out of town, and had requested acorn squash with dinner. I ran out of time to bake it, so here's what I did instead:

Slice 1 acorn squash, peel each slice, and cut slices into chunks.

Put all the chunks in a glass casserole, add about an inch of water, maybe a little less. Cover with plastic wrap, zap in the microwave 5 minutes.

Add a bit of butter, stir, re-cover, and zap another five minutes. Pour off the water, add a handful of raisins, stir, re-cover, and let it sit for five or ten minutes to soften and plump the raisins.

Stir in a couple of large spoonfuls of yogurt and serve.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
There's a whole stack of bean-combo salads here you might like to try.

Thanks, Rose. Those look promising.

If I can once get a recipe - and particularly a dressing - that works, then I can do variations.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
the marinade in this recipe looks tasty!
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
I've got three cornbread recipes and I'm unsatisfied with all of them/ Does anyone have an "I swear by it" recipe they can share?
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
The cornbread recipe on the side of the Albers cornmeal box. It's about as bulletproof as you'll find, and darn good, too.

When my brother and I cook this, we add grated cheese, some diced mild peppers, and corn kernels to give it more zip.

Bake it in a cast-iron skillet greased with bacon fat!

If you can't get Albers in your town, here's the recipe:

1 cup yellow or white corn meal (I prefer yellow)
1 cup all purpose flour
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup vegetable oil (I prefer melted butter)
1 egg, slightly beaten
1 cup milk (For a tang, use buttermilk. Otherwise use 2% or light/regular cream--not 1/2 & 1/2.)

Combine corn meal, flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in medium bowl. Combine oil, egg and milk in small bowl and mix.

Add milk mixture to flour mixture, stir until *just* blended. Pour into greased cast iron skillet.

Bake in preheated 400 deg F oven for 25 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Serve warm.

[ 22. March 2007, 07:05: Message edited by: KenWritez ]
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
My grandmother's cornbread recipe:

2 c. stone ground cornmeal
2 Tbsp flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/3 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
1 egg, lightly beaten
2 c. buttermilk

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Put some bacon grease in a cast-iron skillet and start heating it -- you want it almost to the point of smoking at the point you've mixed your ingredients.

Mix dry ingredients. Make a well in the center. Add egg and buttermilk and stir to mix -- use a light hand, like you're making waffles or muffins.

Pour into the skillet, pop in the oven for 20-25 minutes.
 
Posted by Lots of Yay (# 2790) on :
 
I am about to start the research and development stages of making a recipe for gluten-free gingerbread. I have a packet of cornflour (not wheaten), a packet of rice flour and a packet of gluten-free "all purpose flour" (a mix of rice, corn and some other things).

I am thinking that a simple substitution will probably not give the desired result. For the purposes of ginger bread houses, I think that the gluten in wheat flour would provide an element of structural stability. Gluten free baked things tend towards the crumbly side....

Does anyone have a good recipe for gluten free gingerbread?

Another option that I have up my sleeve is to make a gluten free ginger cake and then stick it in the dehydrator [Big Grin]

In other news I made two most excellent cakes on the weekend - flourless chocolate (with 70% cocoa Lindt in it) and an orange poppy seed syrup cake. Anyone want recipes?
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Can anyone tell me what to use in making meatloaf if you can't use eggs?

My daughter is breastfeeding her baby; the baby has eczema, and my daughter is on a very restricted diet.

I was staying with her last week, and I wanted to make a meatloaf with ground turkey. However I didn't think it would stick together without egg or some substitute. Does anyone have any ideas?

Moo
 
Posted by DaisyM (# 9098) on :
 
Well, I think my mother used to put ketchup in as well as on top of meatloaf, although she also used an egg.

Ketchup, ketchup . .
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
There are non egg binders available for those on a vegan diet or a kosher one. Don't know any brand names which might be available abroad though.

I use eggs, a can of tomato soup and oats rather than breadcrumbs, it makes a very moist meatloaf.
 
Posted by Lots of Yay (# 2790) on :
 
I had some rissoles (ie. meatloaf in... a form somewhat akin to burger but not really) a while back which were just minced beef and basil pesto (from a jar). I really didn't think they'd stick together but somehow they did. If a rissole can survive being cooked on a bbq, I can't see why the same thing wouldn't happen with meatloaf.

Pesto is just basil, olive oil, pine nuts and possibly a few other things. I guess it's the olive oil that does it.

I also second the tomato sauce/ketchup suggestion. Maybe tomato paste would be worth a try too. Or cheese!! Cheese is great at sticking things together and I'm sure I've had it in mince constructions at various times. Although possibly forbidden by diet restrictions as well...
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Unfortunately she can't have tomatoes or dairy products either.

Moo
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
I've made meatloaf without eggs (by necessity) and although it was a bit crumbly, we just served it from the pan and it was good anyway. I use Worcestershire sauce, onions and bread crumbs, but fewer bread crumbs if no eggs.
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
If she can eat bacon products, you could try lining the pan with bacon. That should hold it together. For a bit of colour and flavour if you can't use tomatos maybe some grated zucchini, finely chopped peppers or grated carrot could help, along with some green onions for turkey meatloaf. Some fresh breadcrumbs moistened with chicken stock could lighten it a little perhaps. If you do them as mini-meat loaves you won't need to slice them so much, so any crumbiness won't be such a problem. Maybe cook them in big muffin pans as individual meatloaves?
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
No bacon allowed. No pork or beef at all. That's why we were dealing with ground turkey. It doesn't stick together nearly as well as beef or pork.

Moo
 
Posted by Henry Troup (# 3722) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Can anyone tell me what to use in making meatloaf if you can't use eggs?

Ground turkey makes ok burgers with no binder.

Otherwise, you could try flax seed or a commercial egg replacer.

Grabbing my copy of The Allergy Cookbook I find a "teriyaki meat loaf" with cooked rice, soy, and honey to bind it.

There are many, many allergy recipe sites on the internet, of course.

[ET: remove tomato refernce [Hot and Hormonal] ]

[ 27. March 2007, 11:56: Message edited by: Henry Troup ]
 
Posted by Henry Troup (# 3722) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lots of Yay:
In other news I made two most excellent cakes on the weekend - flourless chocolate (with 70% cocoa Lindt in it)

How did your flourless chocolate cake turn out? Mine had a tall and crispy edge, a lower and moister centre. But people ate it up and it certainly was chocolatey. I cut it in squares from a square pan.

Somebody makes a "maze" pan for people who like brownie edges; that would have been the ideal tool.

It makes me want to explore chocolate souffle; in spring when I can get goose eggs. (My wife has a sensitivity to chicken eggs, so major egg dishes have to be other kinds of eggs. I can often get quail eggs (tiny!) year-round; goose in spring and sometimes in summer; we just scored some pheasant eggs this week.)
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
I think I have a solution for you Moo well for a cold meat loaf and I got it by accident.

Chicken Jelly

Buy some chicken wings (I suppose turkey wings would do but they don't sell them here). Cook in water to cover for a long time. Leave to cool and it will set pretty well. So to make the meat loaf all you'd need to do is to roast the turkey, break it up, mix with slightly warmed jelly and leave to set.

I am pretty sure this must have been known to cooks in the past but the tendency to get de-boned meat

Jengie
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
Anybody with any suggestions for enlivening my children's school packed lunch. I tend to give them a sandwich or roll, a tupperware of fruit segments, or fruit salad which I've cut up myself and a yoghurt. Sometimes, I'll replace the sandwich with a mini-cornish pasty (homemade by a friend and sold in local shops), or a wrap. I'll sometimes put in some flapjack (made by my wife) or cheese straws (also homemade). Infrequently, a pasta salad. Frankly, I'm bored with making packed lunches - the kids haven't complained yet. But I'd be grateful for any relatively healthy ideas.
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
Moo, you might try either rice or a panade of bread made with some non-dairy moistener - broth or soy milk if milk isn't allowed. Egg substitute if you can find it.

Spawn, those lunches sound non-boring, nutritious, and tasty - but here's a link to The Vegan Lunchbox blog for inspiration.

Charlotte
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Spawn, do your kids eat peanut butter? You can make "ants on a log" -- a length of celery filled with peanut butter and topped with raisins.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Henry Troup:
quote:
Originally posted by Lots of Yay:
In other news I made two most excellent cakes on the weekend - flourless chocolate (with 70% cocoa Lindt in it)

How did your flourless chocolate cake turn out? Mine had a tall and crispy edge, a lower and moister centre. But people ate it up and it certainly was chocolatey. I cut it in squares from a square pan.

Somebody makes a "maze" pan for people who like brownie edges; that would have been the ideal tool.

It makes me want to explore chocolate souffle; in spring when I can get goose eggs. (My wife has a sensitivity to chicken eggs, so major egg dishes have to be other kinds of eggs. I can often get quail eggs (tiny!) year-round; goose in spring and sometimes in summer; we just scored some pheasant eggs this week.)

On the subject of flourless chocolate cakes, I cooked this cake for a friend's birthday yesterday, and would definitely recommend it. I didn't choose it because it was flourless, but I heartily recommend it! Nigella's Chocolate Cloud Cake
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Lunch box? Hmmm. I suppose messy is out?

Nuts are good. Little bits of cheese. Hummus. Other various dips. Breadsticks. Toast "soldiers" (with or without Marmite, but with is more fun). Carrots, maybe cut into sticks. Samosas. Grapes. Cucumber. Why is cucumber the only green salady vegetable half the children in England will eat. Bits of pizza. Its full of lovely vitamins, honest. Not that they are likely to be short of vitamins anyway.
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
How old are these kids, Spawn? You may find the only person who wants variety and interest in the lunchbox is you. I've known kids who only wanted vegemite (change cultural reference) sandwiches every day for years.

You might also be surprised at how little is actually eaten - when I did tuck-shop (aussie schools don't generally supply meals en masse) there would be huge numbers of sandwiches and pieces of fruit thrown in bins so the kids didn't have to take them home to anxious parents. If you are able to volunteer at the school at lunchtime, take a look at your kids class eating area.

Whatever it is, don't make it tricky to open (lots of cling-film or stiff packets or vacuum boxes), don't make it too big (especially fruit). Kids want to eat fast and then go run for the lunch break, they don't want to sit and admire your fancy lunch. It may be a simple cheese sandwich and a few grapes and a drink is all that's needed.
 
Posted by Laura (# 10) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
Spawn, do your kids eat peanut butter? You can make "ants on a log" -- a length of celery filled with peanut butter and topped with raisins.

Like there isn't enough to do in a morning without trying to cram *&%$ peanut butter into a celery stick, painstakingly stick it with raisins and then figure out how to store it so it won't be a godwaful sticky mess when the kids get to school and then they tell your kids you can't bring anything with peanut butter. [Razz] [Razz]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Well, Lord knows *I* never bothered with such artistry, but I'm impressed with Spawn's dedication.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spawn:
Frankly, I'm bored with making packed lunches - the kids haven't complained yet. But I'd be grateful for any relatively healthy ideas.

Cold pizza is manna. Send your kids to school with a couple of slices of this in their lunchboxes and you'll cement your role as Coolest Parent in a World of Sucky Parents.

Soup or Stew in a Thermos. There a jillions of different variations on these two themes. Accompany them with some crusty artisan bread, slices of cheese, a Tupperware container of salad, and for dessert, fruit.

Cold sliced roast and veg. Pack in a zip-top bag, along with artisan bread and some good mustard.

Tacos and burritos Think of these as Hispanic versions of the sandwich. Stuff the tortillas with whatever you like.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
I have soaked, cooked, drained and cooled a stupidly large amount of soy beans.

I've made an African Spinach and Soy stew with them; I've added them to salads, I've tried blending them with oil,garlic and salt to make a bean dip.

What else can I do with the blasted things? I know they're fantastically healthy but I'm getting bored of them.
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
Originally posted by Mamacita:
quote:

Spawn, do your kids eat peanut butter? You can make "ants on a log" -- a length of celery filled with peanut butter and topped with raisins.

I used to do this with cream cheese - it doesnt take any longer than spreading it on bread once youve got the knack. I then used to put it in a small tupperwear tub on top of a slice of kitchen towel. hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. Might do this again!!! I think it was quite a normal thing when I was at school

[ 29. March 2007, 09:39: Message edited by: Emma. ]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
On the subject of feeding kids....

I have been wondering today about pasta salad. The kids and I all really like it and I know in my heart of hearts it would be far cheaper (and a far better example) to make it myself than to buy the little ready-made individual pots of it. But if I did make it, what would its "shelf life" be? How long would I be able to keep it in the fridge? (I assume it wouldn't freeze).

Yes, I know I'm hopeless, but after years of ready-meals because of pressure of time, I'm now hoping to get a little more domesticated and cook a little more often.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Smudgie:
Pasta salad ... if I did make it, what would its "shelf life" be? How long would I be able to keep it in the fridge?

Depends on the ingredients other than pasta. If the sauce is creamy/milky or of there is meat in it I'd say a day or two.

If just basic pasta in tomato sauce with maybe some onions or slices of mushroom or raw veg no reason it couldn't last a week if kept cool and voverd.


quote:

I assume it wouldn't freeze.

No real reason why not. Again, it depends on whats in it. Freezing & thawing will tend to soften the pasta a bit. Soft fruit is a no-no and crispy veg like lettuce or celery tends to be rather sad and soft after freezing. but most other thigns are OK. And how many kids will willingly eat lettuce anyway?
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
What else can I do with the blasted things? I know they're fantastically healthy but I'm getting bored of them.

Crush them and mash them up with garlic spicy stuff and some flour and maybe tomatoey stuff and roast it. Soya is pretty bland so you want to add as much flavour as possible.

Perhaps even big onion rings neatly arranged on top or bay leaves or the whole thing just one layer of a kind of layered thing with slices of potato or tomatoes or courgettes or maybe cheese.

They could be the basis of the filling for a veggy Shepherd's Pie.

Or mashed up into little patties you can make bean burgers out of them. Again you want something sticky and squidgy to hold it together and something spicy to give it taste.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
This week's veg box has just arrived and there's a bag of what looks like lamb's lettuce in it. There are no other salad ingredients so can I do anything else with it?
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Thanks for the ideas Ken. Some kind of layery, spicy, cheesy thing might be good.

Problem I find is that when crushed or blended they don't exactly go soft and fluffy a la chickpeas (or indeed pretty much any other kind of pulse) and just tend to stay in small hard bits. But that might add something to cottage pie.

Keren-H: how about including the lambs lettuce in a salad with grated (or julienned) carrot, sliced onion, mushrooms (if you had them in the box)...
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
This week's veg box has just arrived . . .

This may a pond thing, but just what does this mean? Is there someone who just randomly delivers vegetables? Do you not have any idea ahead of time what is coming?

Inquiring minds and all that.
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
This week's veg box has just arrived . . .

This may a pond thing, but just what does this mean? Is there someone who just randomly delivers vegetables? Do you not have any idea ahead of time what is coming?

Inquiring minds and all that.

We get an organic vegetable box delivered once a week with locally grown produce. There are lots of schemes like it in the UK - dunno about across the pond. We always get carrots and onions but the rest is a surprise each week, which livens up my cooking no end on the occasions when we get a mystery vegetable. [Smile]
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
So it's like an organic veggie co-op, then? I seem to remember seeing something similar here, but it's not all that common. We do have a local farmer's market, however. The one here in Lynchburg is one of the oldest in Virginia, dating back to the 1700's IIRC.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
I've offered to make quiche for Easter.

Anybody got a good, easy, non-F***-up able recipie?
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
I've offered to make quiche for Easter.

Anybody got a good, easy, non-F***-up able recipie?

For the pastry or the filling?

I'd buy ready-made pastry at the supermarket. Hows that for cheating? Life's too short, etc, etc.


Filling? Onions and cream. All you need.

Or taking it in parts, the liquid that surrounds the solid filling is basically cream. And egg stiffens it if you like that sort of thing. So does cheese but its not authentic. And we aren't making a pizza! Just stir it together with herbs of choice (thyme, marjoram is good, basil for a slightly mediterranean feel, maybe some precooked spinach or other leaves, more salt than you prohbably think you need.

Then there is the solid filling, which is basically onion, but I'd not throw up the chance of putting in little bits of ham to make it tastier if you like that sort of thing. Sliced olives, capers, plenty of black pepper, if you like that sort of thing. No need for tomatoes, we really aren't making a pizza! Sliced mushrooms and chopped spinach both good.

Then you make a tart case oput of the pastry in a dish, put the filling in, pour the gloop over it till it is all but full and bake it till it smells good.

Easy [Biased]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Just to point out if you are being properly French quiche has eggs and cream in the filling. Cheese is forbidden. Everything else, even the onions, is optional. Its just that I like onions.

I like cheese too but that's not quiche - well its not quiche Lorraine. So it would be unfair to mention that chunks of feta cheese (or Halloumi for more stiffness) with mushrooms chopped to about the same size, and spinach, make a good tart. If not a real quiche.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
Pre-made cruts-- oh, goes without saying.

but, but, but... as to the insides-- preportions? baking time? texture of filling? etc.
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
So it's like an organic veggie co-op, then? I seem to remember seeing something similar here, but it's not all that common. We do have a local farmer's market, however. The one here in Lynchburg is one of the oldest in Virginia, dating back to the 1700's IIRC.

If you googled up CSA (community supported agriculture), you might find if someone in your area was doing it.

The farmers appreciate the year-round cash flow and the consumers get a price break on fab organic produce, as long as they're willing to deal with possibly unfamiliar fruit and veg.

Charlotte
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
(Aims puppy-dog eyes at Charlotte)
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
Miss Kelly, I am not a quiche maker. I would check a cookbook I trust and then tweak the innards. I am actually looking for an eggy breakfast casserole thing that I can take for Easter Vigil and might need to just wing it.

However, if you have a mini-muffin pan (available at Targay) and are willing to do minis, I have a kick-ass recipe for mini-quiches using Pepperidge Farm puff pastry for the crusts. In fact, I'm making some to freeze and bake up for Easter coffee hour, with asparagus and goat cheese (a very tasty and spring like combo).

Generic version of the recipe (from the Dec 2006 Fine Cooking, where they used bacon, leeks, and Cheddar):

Makes 48

2 large eggs
2 egg yolks
1 1/4 cup half and half
1 cup (about 4 oz) cheese
3 cups veggies and/or meat (cooking first recommended)
Salt, pepper, seasoning to taste
1 package pepperidge farm puff pastry (2 sheets)
Oil spray

Prep mini-muffin pan by spraying with PAM or similar product (I'm thinking of using the flour-and-oil spray this time).

Thaw puff pastry (keep it in fridge when not working on it). Roll sheet out to at least 10 by 18 inches (flour the board). Cut out in 3" circles and fit circles in cups. One sheet should make 24 "crusts" or close to it.

Combine other ingredients. Fill up to the top of the crusts.

Repeat for other sheet of puff pastry. Refrigerate the scraps and use elsewhere.

Bake at 400 for about 15 minutes or freeze, uncooked. You can store them in a bag or container after they've solidified - recommend wax paper layers. They're supposed to take longer to cook from frozen, but I was told it took 15 in our church's somewhat crappy oven. They also recommended popping the tarts back in the muffin pan, but I'm going to try on the baking sheet. You could also bake them earlier, and heat them up on a baking sheet.

I went to three different stores to find asparagus that wasn't huge ... these things are not big [Biased] .

Charlotte

[ 04. April 2007, 05:36: Message edited by: Amazing Grace ]
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
Can somebody who knows these things confirm my thinking (or tell me I'm wildly off base), please?

As I understand it, American "all purpose flour" is what we in the UK call "plain flour" i.e. flour with no added raising agents.

Is this correct?
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rosamundi:
As I understand it, American "all purpose flour" is what we in the UK call "plain flour" i.e. flour with no added raising agents.

An Irish friend of mine who lived in the US for awhile describes all-purpose flour as no-purpose flour. It is a mixture of hard and soft flour; it is not hard enough to make excellent bread, and it's too hard to make good pastry.

It's fine for cookies, but that's all. American cookbooks call for all-purpose flour because the authors don't know any better.

Moo
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
AGs recipe looks fine, but its a sort of cheese omlette in pastry, not actually a quiche!

I don't think you can really specify baking times as ovens all differ - you just have to do it till it smells right. Maybe that's why I can bake bread but I'm not so good at pastry and totally crap at cakes!
 
Posted by Martha (# 185) on :
 
Whether this counts as a quiche or not according to ken, I wouldn't like to say, but its the recipe I use and hasn't gone wrong yet. Its all very negotiable - substitute normal onion for spring onion, cheddar for feta, add fried bacon etc to give you roughly the right amount of stuff.

9" pastry shell

4 spring onions, chopped
1 red pepper, deseeded and chopped
100g feta cheese
15g butter
100g courgette / zucchini, cubed
2 tsp dried mixed herbs
2 eggs
100 ml / 1/2 cup milk
50 ml / 1/4 cup single cream / half and half

Put spring onions and pepper in a bowl. Crumble in feta and mix. Fry courgette in butter for 2-3 min until slightly softened. Add to bowl with herbs and mix. Tip into pastry case. Whisk together eggs, milk and cream and pour over. Bake 35-40 min at 180C / 350F/ Gas 4 until set.

If you're feeling sophisticated you can bake the pastry case for 10-15 min before putting the filling in, which is meant to stop it from going soggy. I don't usually bother, and no one complains.
 
Posted by Martha (# 185) on :
 
Lots of Yay , I usually find that very wet recipes work best for gluten-free, so I've never tried gingerbread. I always use the Doves Farm g-f flour and do a fairly straight substitution, although they do suggest adding more liquid. Perhaps an extra egg would help? Pastry seems to work best with egg instead of water, so gingerbread might follow the same principles. I can give you my standard gingerbread recipe if you like, but as I say, I've never tried it g-f, so don't know how it would work.

And the orange poppy seed cake sounds good - any chance of the recipe? I've got some poppy seeds that need using!
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by rosamundi:
As I understand it, American "all purpose flour" is what we in the UK call "plain flour" i.e. flour with no added raising agents.

An Irish friend of mine who lived in the US for awhile describes all-purpose flour as no-purpose flour. It is a mixture of hard and soft flour; it is not hard enough to make excellent bread, and it's too hard to make good pastry.

It's fine for cookies, but that's all. American cookbooks call for all-purpose flour because the authors don't know any better.

Moo

Rosamundi -- right -- no raising agent. There is no usual North American equivalent of the Uk "self-raising flour" we see in some UK recipes. Using them, we have to figure out just how much baking powder to add.

APF is, as Moo says, a mixture of hard and soft. English "plain" flour is likely to be all hard. But the difference is small.

And I'm not sure it's the cookbooks' fault, Moo. It used to be impossible to buy hard or soft flour, rather than all purpose, except in health food stores or specialty shops. It's onl in the last 10-15 years I've been seeing them in regular supermarkets. You can't blame cookbooks for targeting to what people are likely to be able to buy. (on the other hand, I remember when every "Gourmet" recipe called for pureed kiwi fruit and/or unsalted butter+sea salt, at a time when none of them were easily obtainable around here)

John
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
Well, actually, you can buy "self-raising flour" in many groceries that I've seen, just not all of them.

Protein content varies wildly between UK and US flour (and within US flour ranges). We have more hard (protein/gluten-rich) Canadian and midwestern wheat in our blends, so it behaves differently. It's ok for most breads (no need for what Brits call "strong flour"), but tender pastries such as pie crusts and cakes need help. The gluten that makes bread so delightfully chewy is not a desirable quality in cake.

I presume that Moo can find a low-protein blend such as White Lily in her market. I'd be surprised to see it around here.

The Regular Grocery and the Hippie Grocery have both stopped selling cake flour in the pink box, which annoys me, as this makes the Posh Grocery the single source and I go through supplies for my brownies. Maybe I should write the manager a letter and ask them to restock it.

Charlotte
 
Posted by Ferdzy (# 8702) on :
 
Moo, coming a little late to this request, but for future reference, a good non-egg binder for meatloafs is made with ground flax seed and water.

Use one tablespoon ground flaxseed, and three tablespoons water. Whisk together, and cook in the microwave until thickened. Give it a stir, it should be roughly as thick as a beaten-egg or a little thicker. This replaces 1 egg, and can be used in the more whole-grain type cakes or cookies as well.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Thanks, Ferdzy.

Moo
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
Thanks y'all. I got

A prepared crust

Cream
Eggs
Broccoli
(coughcough lookaway, ken cough)
and I have an onion, but I also got a shallot, as I like shallots better than onions. Does it make a big difference what bulb I use?
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Kelly, if you wish to make it a pie you can use...

4 eggs
1cp cream
salt and pepper to taste
green onions
other ingredients
bacon and guyere
sausage and cheddar
turkey/chicken and swiss

I don't remember what temp you cook at but you can use the toothpick test to check for doneness.

No I do not care if you think that quiche does not have cheese. [Razz] In my defense most americans will expect quiche to have cheese and be made in mini-cupcake form. I assume Kelly is interested in making the quiche in a pie tin. Either way you can get back up .

[ 05. April 2007, 02:15: Message edited by: rugasaw ]
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
Bite your tongue! That's what Mom suggested! [Smile]

Thanks, y'all. for the variety of baking/ preperation/ filling suggestions. I think I have enough to get started now. Will let you know about the responses.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
quote:
Kelly said:
Does it make a big difference what bulb I use?

I'm sure Al Gore would appreciate it if you use a compact fluorescent bulb... or perhaps one of these [Votive] Enjoy! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Papio (# 4201) on :
 
I am, for literally the first time ever, and slightly against my conscience, roasting a chicken.

I have washed it, dried it, stuffed some quarted lemon up it's arse, coated it with olive oil and sprinkled a chicken OXO cube on to it and stuck it on gas mark 5 into the oven for an hour and a half (I am due to retrieve it at 6:30pm UK time).

I hope this is right as I doing this for a guest, and the entire process is, in my view, mildly disgusting. I'm still not sure why I had to stuff lemon up it's arse.

So, have I got it more-or-less right? [Help]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Yes you have got it more or less right.

The only essential you need to know is how to check if it is cooked. instruction 3 on this page tells you how to do that and the note at the end tells you what to do if it isn't. You can use a sharp knife if you don't have a skewer.

Jengie

[ 05. April 2007, 16:36: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
I've never stuck a lemon up the arse of anything, chicken or not. Not that I plan to either.

On the other hand a bit of fresh lemon (or lime) juice in the poaching water adds a nice flavour to fish, so maybe that's the reasoning behind the chicken getting stuffed.
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteCanada:
I've never stuck a lemon up the arse of anything, chicken or not. Not that I plan to either.

As far as the chicken is concerned, don't knock it till you've tried it! The whole lemon gives you zest as well as juice and is an easy-peasy way to make extra-tasty roast chook. (Organic lemons if possible for this ... I have a tree so it's no prob for me.)

I usually cut the back out (it goes in the freezer for making stock later), whomp the chook flat, and put lemon slices under the skin, but the quarters or whole in the cavity is an easier way to do it.

Charlotte
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
Thanks y'all. I got

A prepared crust

Cream
Eggs
Broccoli
(coughcough lookaway, ken cough)
and I have an onion, but I also got a shallot, as I like shallots better than onions. Does it make a big difference what bulb I use?

No.

I often sub shallots for onions.

Charlotte
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amazing Grace:
[QUOTE] <snip> Organic lemons if possible for this ... I have a tree so it's no prob for me. <snip>

I love the concept of having ones own lemon tree. It sounds impossibly exotic to me. I appreciate that things grow differently in different climates but am finding it very hard to get my head round the idea of having a lemon tree in one's back garden in the same way we might have an apple or plum tree.

And how wonderful just to be able to go down and pluck one when you need some lemon juice rather than having to go to the market.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Lemon juice brings a wonderful tartness and acidity to foods, it really wakes up flavors.

To increase the flavor when roasting a chicken, toss a few sprigs of rosemary in the bird's cavity and then slide some pats of butter under the bird's skin, above the meat. These will melt and baste the meat.

If you really want to kick the flavor up, dust the exterior of the bird in kosher salt and wrap it in plastic wrap and let sit for 3-4 hours. Unwrap, add the butter and rosemary, and cook as usual.
 
Posted by Emma. (# 3571) on :
 
My scales (round things with slidey dial to set to 0 once a pot is on it) seem to vary each time I use them which really isnt helpful. Ive also (by accident) discovered that if, after piling in the flour, or wahtever, I press gently on the scales it gives me a completely different reading, but is consitant.

Are my scales particularly dodgy or is this a common problem? Is there a "right" way to weigh things? If I buy new scales will I get the same problem, or do I need to buy ones with weights... and do electric scales have the same problem?!

[Confused]
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
get an electronic balance. I love mine. It measures in grams, up to 5kg, or whatever the imperial equivalent it. You can press a button to change between metric and imperial.

It's great since I only have one set of measuring cups and spoons and it means I don't have to keep washing them out. Eg. I can measure out a table spoon of yeast, which is 12g.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
Lemon juice brings a wonderful tartness and acidity to foods, it really wakes up flavors... If you really want to kick the flavor up, dust the exterior of the bird in kosher salt and wrap it in plastic wrap and let sit for 3-4 hours. Unwrap, add the butter and rosemary, and cook as usual.

oooh, KenW, I love it when you talk dirty to me! [Big Grin]

Actually, it's true - rosemary (the part I snipped) is truly wonderful as an herb to punctuate meat. As it were.
 
Posted by Kepler's Puppet (# 4011) on :
 
Could any of the southern US shipmates give me some basic principles for making gumbo? I'm sure there are a variety of kinds of gumbo, but I'd like to hear what you like to make.
 
Posted by DaisyM (# 9098) on :
 
I am a Southerner, but I don't make or eat gumbo. Has that nasty okra in it. Sorry! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I've never made gumbo *but* I have consumed some lovely gumbo w/o okra, so I know it can be done... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amazing Grace:
I am actually looking for an eggy breakfast casserole thing that I can take for Easter Vigil and might need to just wing it.

Breakfast Casserole

4 slices bread
1 lb pork sausage, cooked and drained
8 oz cheddar cheese, grated
6 or 8 eggs, beaten
2 cups milk
1 tsp dry mustard*

Grease the bottom of a 9 x 13 inch pan.

Cut or tear the bread into bite-sized pieces and strew it across the bottom of the pan. Put the crumbled sausage over the bread. Mix the eggs, milk, and mustard, and pour over all.

Refrigerate overnight.

Bake the next morning at 350 degrees for about an hour.

* If you prefer, you can use salt and pepper, or Tabasco, instead of the dry mustard.
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
Too late to edit.

You put the grated cheese in after the sausage and before the egg-and-cheese mixture.
 
Posted by Kepler's Puppet (# 4011) on :
 
I'm a Yankee who actually likes okra, strangely enough [Big Grin] . My wife's family is from down south and they hate the stuff.

My main problem is that I've never really had gumbo, but I like a lot of other southern and cajun cuisine so I'd like to try making it sometime.
 
Posted by welsh dragon (# 3249) on :
 
re scales,we have had a similar problem with scales-to-weigh-yourself-on...
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
To increase the flavor when roasting a chicken, toss a few sprigs of rosemary in the bird's cavity and then slide some pats of butter under the bird's skin, above the meat. These will melt and baste the meat.

Instead of placing pats of butter under the skin, I dip several thicknesses of all-cotton cheesecloth in melted butter and place that on top.

Moo
 
Posted by Papio (# 4201) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by KenWritez:
To increase the flavor when roasting a chicken, toss a few sprigs of rosemary in the bird's cavity and then slide some pats of butter under the bird's skin, above the meat. These will melt and baste the meat.

If you really want to kick the flavor up, dust the exterior of the bird in kosher salt and wrap it in plastic wrap and let sit for 3-4 hours. Unwrap, add the butter and rosemary, and cook as usual.

I shall try and remember to try that next time. Thank you.
 
Posted by Otter (# 12020) on :
 
Emma, it sounds like your scale. A couple years ago I bit the bullet and bought an electronic scale ($50-100 US, IIRC), and have been very happy. It's very consistent, goes English-Metric at the push of one of the two buttons, and you can tare (zero) it with the push of the other button, which is also the "on" button. Very nice feature when you want to weigh something that won't stay nicely on the platform, and don't feel like doing math in your head. [Big Grin]

If you decide to buy a new scale, go to a store that has display models, and play with them. Weigh other things out for display individually, in groups, adding and subtracting things to see if it's giving consistent results. Play with things at both the top and bottom ends of its range, too. That's what Mr. Otter and I did when we bought the current scale.

My previous scale was mechanical, with a rotating dial indicator. It was reasonably consistent, but it didn't have the sensitivity or range I wanted. Nothing wrong with mechanical scales, but there are limitations - those that work on the principal of a springy bar somehow moving the indicator can get wonky as the springiness of the bar degrades as it ages. I think the better electronic scales avoid this issue because they use interior strain/pressure gauges.

If you prefer mechanical, I'd look for the kind where the counterweight(s) slide on a bar. (my mother is still using one of this style that came from my grandparent's drug store or Grandpa's medical office.) Keeping track of the weights for a balance pan style would drive me up a tree.
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
I still use an old fashioned balance type scale. I have a set of metric weights, and a set of imperial, so am well prepared for any recipe. There is nothing as accurate as 'seeing' it balance against an actual weight! Very satisfying!!
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I have a recipe that I'll be baking for the first time which calls for cake flour to be sifted 3x... what purpose does sifting serve? I realize I always think of it as clearing away lumps but what's it really doing?

In other words, do I need to go out and buy a decent sifter? [Confused]
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
It's probably an old recipe. You really don't need to, though I sift for sponges, once only, just because I do. It used to get out lumps and insects, but modern flour should be a whole heap better than that. You also have to watch that if you're measuring in cups rather than by weight of the flour that you're sure you measure at the right time - I cup of sifted flour isn't the same as a sifted cup of flour. If you go by weight, though, should be no problem.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Ah, see, that's a second point to clarify w/my mom, who has often baked this cake. Being an America recipe, there's no weights involved. This is the cake she bakes for MY birthday, and my son has requested it for his 37th, coming right up. At least he has good taste [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Josephine:
quote:
Originally posted by Amazing Grace:
I am actually looking for an eggy breakfast casserole thing that I can take for Easter Vigil and might need to just wing it.

Breakfast Casserole

4 slices bread
1 lb pork sausage, cooked and drained
8 oz cheddar cheese, grated
6 or 8 eggs, beaten
2 cups milk
1 tsp dry mustard*

Grease the bottom of a 9 x 13 inch pan.

Cut or tear the bread into bite-sized pieces and strew it across the bottom of the pan. Put the crumbled sausage over the bread. Mix the eggs, milk, and mustard, and pour over all.

Refrigerate overnight.

Bake the next morning at 350 degrees for about an hour.

* If you prefer, you can use salt and pepper, or Tabasco, instead of the dry mustard.

This is my Christmas Morning recipe! Here's a little trick from my mom: before adding the dry mustard to the casserole, put it in a custard cup and pour in a couple of tablespoons of the egg-milk mixture, and stir that up (I use a little bitty whisk). Keeps the mustard from getting all clumpy.
I also add a jar of sliced mushrooms, but not everybody's a friend of the fungi.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
I have a recipe that I'll be baking for the first time which calls for cake flour to be sifted 3x... what purpose does sifting serve?

I was always told it added air and made the cake lighter - which is why you can't use cups/volume to measure the results. If you are making a sponge it's probably worth doing.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
If you are using a measuring cup instead of weighing the flour, you should sift it before measuring. The flour may have settled in the package, and occupy less space than it will after sifting.

Moo
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Always sift for choux pastry as well!
 
Posted by Josephine (# 3899) on :
 
If they thaw in time, we'll have two legs from a spring lamb (one front leg and one back) and the ribs to cook for Sunday's pot luck after Agape Vespers.

I've never cooked lamb before. I need something as fuss-free as possible.

Help!
 
Posted by Otter (# 12020) on :
 
For the lamb, trim as much of the fat off as possible (it's the fat that makes lamb taste musky). If you're up to it, pulling off silverskin is useful, too.

Smear with whatever herbs, spices, and seasonings, appeal to you. Good ones for lamb include:
Garlic
Rosemary
Salt
Pepper
Olive Oil
Lemon

Roast at The Universal Temperature (350 F) until it reaches whatever temperature your favorite cookbook says.

Or, I like to slice lamb thinnish, marinate with oil and whatever sounds good (often including curry powder) for a while (a half-hour to a day), then grill or broil, and serve with pita.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Thanks for all the sifting feedback; this cake is anything but *light* (a dozen eggs and nothing to make it rise!) so perhaps I *don't* have to sift it... Hmmm, I may try that rather than buying a pricey new sifter which I've managed to live without these last 30+ years... I know the cake well, so this can be a comparison [Snigger]
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
I just took my first homemade quiche out of the oven. [Cool]

Will not be able to report on the results of the collaberation until tomorrow though. But it looks good, and the filling is solid...

Thanks, y'all!
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
I'll bet it's yummy-- congrats!
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
I'm just about to take my first ever not-shop-bought quiche out of the oven. This thread inspired me. And today I get to eat cream and eggs for the first time for a few weeks!

I did put two little pieces of tomato on it, just to be perverse.

And the left-over mix (I made a little too much for the pastry casing) got put in a little pot with cheese to see how that goes.


Can I bear waiting for it to cool?
 
Posted by My Duck (# 11924) on :
 
No!! Don't wait - quiche is delicious hot too, and it certainly sounds too good to wait.

And congratulations - many many returns of the quiche [Yipee]

*My Duck's stomach rumbles*
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Your wish is my command. Its been out 8 minutes now, mut be cool enough to cut without burning my hand...
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
"Mine is currently getting raves," she said modestly.

"Tomato perversity", ken.Yeesh. [Snigger] Bet it's yummy.
 
Posted by Earwig (# 12057) on :
 
Help! I need advice from the SOF cooking gurus, please.

I'm making teeny tiny Yorkshire puds with roast beef and creme fraiche horseradish sauce (Delia Smith recipe here) as canapes for a party in a fortnight.

I practiced the making the puds today. I was surprised that the characteristic dent, where one puts the filling, came from the bottom, not the top of the pudding! Ie, the tops rose uniformly, and slightly rounded, but there was a little dent in the base by the tin.

But this only happened on 50% of the puds - what did I do wrong? Was the fat not hot enough? Do little tiny puds just not make dents? Any advice?
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
And very nice quiche it is too. Asparagus and mushroom in it [Smile]

Memo to self - one egg is enough for 140ml tub of double cream. I used two eggs and it was almost souflle-like - it rose a little. And veryy yellowish. Nice though.

As usual I made enough for four and ate half of it. Burp.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
A plague on your fancy foreign 'quiche'! [Snigger]

For a family lunch yesterday I made two savoury flans!

A green lentil and tomato one for the vegetarian half of the family, and a chicken and leek one for the omnivores.
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by John Holding:
Rosamundi -- right -- no raising agent. There is no usual North American equivalent of the Uk "self-raising flour" we see in some UK recipes. Using them, we have to figure out just how much baking powder to add.

Thanks all for advice - I have a number of cupcake recipes I wanted to try, and wanted to be sure about raising agents. Cakes with too much bicarb in are vile things indeed.
 
Posted by Papio (# 4201) on :
 
Does anyone know of any half-fat or low-fat cheddar cheese that doesn't actually taste totally, revoltingly, inedibly, disgusting?
 
Posted by rosamundi (# 2495) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Papio:
Does anyone know of any half-fat or low-fat cheddar cheese that doesn't actually taste totally, revoltingly, inedibly, disgusting?

Afraid not. My advice would be to buy the proper stuff and eat less of it.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I agree with rosamundi - buy the strongest best Cheddar you can find and you'll find a small amount works.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Rather late, I know, but this caramelised onion and mustard tart ticks many of the eggy-quichey boxes and is rather yummy.
 
Posted by Lots of Yay (# 2790) on :
 
So flourless chocolate cake - this gets lots of stars from my *cough* experienced reviewers.

1/2 cup (35g) cocoa powder
1/3 cup (80ml) water
150g dark chocolate, melted - I used Lindt 70% - recommended
150g melted butter
275g brown sugar
125g hazelnut meal
4 eggs, separated

Blend cocoa and water in mixing bowl; add chocolate, butter, sugar, hazelnut meal and egg yolks. Taste the mixture. Mmmmmmmmmm.

Beat egg whites to "soft peaks" stage and fold in to other bit in a couple of batches.

I used a 20cm square tin (greased and lined) and baked for about an hour at 180/350.

The recipe I have reckons it serves 8. This quantity easily satisfied 16 people as it is extremely rich and goes very nicely with vanilla ice cream. I also prefer it to serve 16 because I like squares. I suppose you *could* cut it into 9 squares or use the method I developed to cut it into 15 squares...
 
Posted by Lots of Yay (# 2790) on :
 
Orange Poppy* Seed Syrup Cake

1/2 cup (50g) poppy seeds
60ml milk
185g softened butter
1-3 oranges - you need a tablespoon of rind and 285ml juice
1 cup (220g) caster sugar
3 eggs
1.5 cups (225g) self-raising flour
1/2 cup (75g) plain flour
1/2 cup (60g) almond meal

Another cup caster sugar
80mL water

Place seeds in milk and put aside.
Beat butter, rind and first cup sugar until light and fluffy, add eggs (one at a time if you are that way inclined). Stir in flours, almond meal, 125mL juice and milk/poppy seeds. Spread into greased/lined 23cm/9" round tin. Bake at 180/350 for about an hour.

Meanwhile, combine 160mL orange juice with other cup of caster sugar and water in saucepan, stir over heat til sugar dissolved, then bring to boil and reduce heat. Simmer for a few minutes.

When the cake comes out of the oven, wait five minutes, then turn it out of the tin and manoevure it til you have the cake sitting right way up on a wire rack, with the wire rack resting on a tray of some sort. Jab some holes in cake with a skewer, then gently pour syrup over. Repeat with whatever ends up on the tray until most of the syrup is in the cake.

For transferring the cake from the wire rack, I think the best way to maintain the appearance of the top would be to slide something under the cake rather than doing an upsy downsy transfer - the syrup tends to make the top a bit fragile and er sticky.

*If publishing a recipe for anything containing poppy seeds, be very sure that you double the p and not the o
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lots of Yay:
I also prefer it to serve 16 because I like squares. I suppose you *could* cut it into 9 squares or use the method I developed to cut it into 15 squares...

I am guessing that the green one in the diagram is yours? [Razz]

I would be wary of tasting the raw batter with eggs in it. They can be carriers of salmonella, I've been told.
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
Thanks for all the sifting feedback; this cake is anything but *light* (a dozen eggs and nothing to make it rise!) so perhaps I *don't* have to sift it... Hmmm, I may try that rather than buying a pricey new sifter which I've managed to live without these last 30+ years... I know the cake well, so this can be a comparison [Snigger]

Lynn, do you have a fairly fine strainer? that works as a sifter. Just make sure you sift into a big enough bowl.

I have a sifter (vintage - was my great-grandmother's) but rarely use it. I do a lot of stirring the dry ingredients pretty vigorously with a fork, though.

(The eggs are the leavening agent, btw.)

Charlotte
 
Posted by Amazing Grace (# 95) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
"Mine is currently getting raves," she said modestly.

"Tomato perversity", ken.Yeesh. [Snigger] Bet it's yummy.

I don't much like tomato for this kind of thing except as garnish, mainly because they're watery when cooked. (hmmm, now I'm thinking of roasting them first ... will try that out soonish, maybe with peppers, olives, and feta).

Yays Kelly!

I will report that my breakfast casserole improv went over well on Easter morning. The basics were:

1 lb small Yukon Gold potatoes
1 lb asparagus (pre-prepped weight)

I scrubbed the taters (no peeling) and cut them in dice. (As a guide, I had baby taters - "creamer" size - and cut them in half, then the halves in six.) I sauteed them in olive oil for a few minutes (till some were starting to brown), then stuck them in the micro for 3 more minutes. The prepped asparagus also got cut in usefully small bits and given a couple of minutes' saute.

Greased a 9 by 13 pyrex dish and spread the par-cooked veg on the bottom and salted and peppered them.

Mixed up (well):

10 eggs
4 egg whites (I had them around - if I hadn't, it probably would have been 2 more eggs)
a little milk/half and half
salt and pepper
about 1/2 cup parmesan cheese (good handful)

and poured it over the veg.

It was in a 350 oven for about 20 minutes before I had to take it out - it wasn't quite done, but was almost. It held well, covered with foil, in a low oven for two hours before breakfast.

I think it would be pretty amenable to having more veg in it, but it was four in the morning, so I was pleased I could do as much as I did [Biased] .

Charlotte
 
Posted by Henry Troup (# 3722) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amazing Grace:
... I do a lot of stirring the dry ingredients pretty vigorously with a fork, though.


Stirring the dry ingredients with a wire "balloon" whisk works very well, too.
 
Posted by Henry Troup (# 3722) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
I would be wary of tasting the raw batter with eggs in it. They can be carriers of salmonella, I've been told.

I've seen it claimed that one egg in ten thousand is infected in modern production. Usually in articles that are screaming about the care needed with raw eggs. I've eaten raw egg; I've tasted a lot of batter. I'm still here.

If 1/10,000 is a serious risk, I better stop doing a lot of things, like traveling by any means at all.
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
You are probably right Henry. In the not-so-good old days, the risk was likely much greater.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
If you buy eggs from free-range hens the salmonella risk is much smaller. I like my breakfast eggs with runny yolks, so I buy free-range. I buy ordinary eggs for baking.

Moo
 
Posted by Lots of Yay (# 2790) on :
 
Yes, avoid tasting batter if you are pregnant or immunosuppressed etc. I am happy with the tiny odds of a particular egg being infected (and also the likely tiny load of bacteria on a finger full of batter) and my cast iron constitution [Big Grin]
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Henry Troup:
quote:
Originally posted by Campbellite:
I would be wary of tasting the raw batter with eggs in it. They can be carriers of salmonella, I've been told.

I've seen it claimed that one egg in ten thousand is infected in modern production. Usually in articles that are screaming about the care needed with raw eggs. I've eaten raw egg; I've tasted a lot of batter. I'm still here.

If 1/10,000 is a serious risk, I better stop doing a lot of things, like traveling by any means at all.

Some years ago there was a major salmonella scare in the US. We in Canada were told at that point (how accurately I do not know) that the different inspection systems in place in Canada meant the risk of salmonella in Canadian raw eggs was significantly less than in US raw eggs.

Mind you, I continue to eat the stuffing cooked in a chicken or a turkey, and even leave it in the (refrigerated) bird for a day or two while nibbling on it. I'm not dead of salmonella yet.

John
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Reporting back on the four-layer cake w/o sifting of flour: [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin] Very yummy and I didn't notice any difference (and I know this cake well), so there you go.

If there's an interest in a seriously rich, dense, chocolate cake (more on the milk than dark side), I can post the recipe.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Probably about 1 in 5 or 1 in 4 human beings are infected with Salmonella in Britain anyway. I'd be astonished if they got eggs down to 1 in 10,000 without irradiating them.

If you aren't immunocompromised or very old, very young, pregnant, or already ill, the danger is small.
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
If you aren't immunocompromised or very old, very young, pregnant, or already ill, the danger is small.

That would be me, then. (immunosuppresed, that is.)
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
Well, I knew you weren't very young nor a geezer, so I was going with "pregnant." Glad to see I was wrong!
 
Posted by Campbellite (# 1202) on :
 
[tangent]
Always check the itemized bill after hospitalization. I found a charge one one bill for a pregnancy test. I assured them that had I been pregnant, there would be a LOT of explaining to do. [Paranoid]
[/tangent]
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Why am I hearing Ricky Ricardo say, "Lusy! You got some 'splainin' to do!" [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
I bought raspberry vinegar. And now I'm wondering why (because it looked cool, I was in France for the day, and wanted to buy something different).

SO what would you use it for?
 
Posted by Otter (# 12020) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
I bought raspberry vinegar. ...snip...SO what would you use it for?

In a vinegar and oil salad dressing, a sauce for chicken or fish, or straight-up green beans or maybe broccoli.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I'm looking for some inexpensive starters ideas, which are either cold, or easily heated up. More summery than wintery.

I have smoked mackerel paté ( sm mack fillets & cream cheese, with parsley) and rillettes etc. Does anyone have other suggestions?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
I'm looking for some inexpensive starters ideas,

Things on bread - eg bruschetta. Interesting, crusty bread (ciabatta for pref) sliced, topped with tomato, or tomato/olives, drizzle of olive oil, bake in the oven.

Dips. Hoummous (lemon, chickpeas & tahini) with pitta breads halved and cut into smaller pieces, then baked/toasted to dip.

Or fruit; melon and 'parma' ham (ie, any very thin-cut proscuitto-like ham). Even - if you happen to have quality ingredients - a fan of thin ly sliced avocado dressed with lime juice and halved cherry tomatoes in a light vinagriette, with freshly torn basil leaves tossed over. Maybe an onion ring or two.

Or baked egg - individual ramekins with one egg, slurp of cream, sprinkle with cheese and bake. Serve with toast.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
Interesting, Firenze - a baked egg? How long and for what temperature? What does one want to end up with? Something kind of poached or completely hard or ??? trying to imagine it...
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
Baked eggs:

See here
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I think they're also known as shirred eggs. My grandmother used to make them.

Moo
 
Posted by Pearl B4 Swine (# 11451) on :
 
Dormouse ~ this might be too un-sophisticated, but people seem to love them: (my son showed me how to make them)
You need pickles(we like dill); cream cheese, room temp to spread; deli ham, or hard salami.
Spread some cr. cheese on a slice of ham, put a pickle on one end & roll it all up. Stick toothpicks in to make secure & slice into rounds.
You can upscale it some my using pepper/herb cream cheese, & peppered ham, or something similar. THey look pretty arranged on a platter & kids & grown ups like them. For cheap food treats, like for 4-H, use baloney, lol.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
Just thought y'all foodies would like this...
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
I'm looking for some inexpensive starters ideas, which are either cold, or easily heated up. More summery than wintery.

Goat cheese and crusty bread and/or crackers.

Crudites and ranch dressing

Pecan halves coated with honey and roasted

Melon balls skewered with chunks of manchego cheese and good ham

Braunschweiger on crackers garnished with a dollop of horseradish or mustard, and then a chive spear

Cold, cooked asparagus tips and mayonnaise
 
Posted by Tiredwalker (# 12202) on :
 
Dormouse,
My aunt used to make a fruit dip for all of our parties. It's not very sophisticated, but there was never a drop left.
Simply whip equal parts of real whipped cream (already whipped with sugar) and cream cheese. Then provide an assortment of fruit to dip in it. Strawberries, apples, kiwis, and grapes go really well. When presented well, it is appropriate at any affair.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Nice ideas so far, thanks folks.
These are good, but I will happily accept any others.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
Interesting, Firenze - a baked egg? How long and for what temperature? What does one want to end up with? Something kind of poached or completely hard or ??? trying to imagine it...

It comes out fairly hard - a bit like a hard boiled egg. Nice if you put a bit of ham in the bottom of the dish first.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Cream cheese and rasberry chipolte jelly (any hot jelly will do)

Tortilla roll-ups - spread cream cheese on tortilla add strip a of roasted pepper, ham and chopped kalmata olives roll them up and slice them into rounds.

Anti-pasta - sit out a mix of good olives, deli sliced meat, cheese, and crackers or crusty bread slices.

In a frying pan cook pecans, sugar, cinnamon, and a couple of tablespoons of water. Cook until water is evaporated.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
[QUOTE]Originally posted by rugasaw:
[QB]
Anti-pasta - sit out a mix of good olives, deli sliced meat, cheese, and crackers or crusty bread slices.QUOTE]

ante-pasta, surely?

(Have I ever told my maternity-unit funny story on SoF?)
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
I've heard that you can freeze ginger and grate it frozen, and also that you can grate it and then freeze it. Has anybody tried either way and does it work?
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Dormouse, not sure if you want pre dinner nibbles ideas or first course ideas, but for the pre dinner nibbles some nice toasted pitas or interesting crackers with artichoke dip (from Delicious magazine last year - 280g jar of marinated artichoke hearts, drained, pureed with can of cannellini beans, drained, 1/2 cup grated parmesan, tablespoon of flat leaf parsley and some olive oil to make the right consistency). The other artichoke heart trick is to wrap a piece of proscuitto around an artichoke heart - yummy.

If you want something a little more substantial, mango, shelled and deveined prawns tossed together in a mayonnaise with some sweet chilli sauce is rather fine too.
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by rugasaw:
[QB]
Anti-pasta - sit out a mix of good olives, deli sliced meat, cheese, and crackers or crusty bread slices.QUOTE]

ante-pasta, surely?

(Have I ever told my maternity-unit funny story on SoF?)

If you eat enough ante-pasta at one setting you will be anti-pasta [Biased]
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
What non-alcoholic substitute can be used for sherry in making trifle? Preferably something cheap...
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
Orange juice is good.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Mayday, mayday.

I bought two farmed barramundi in the supermarket today. I intend to have them for dinner tomorrow. But my fish cookbooks are TOTALLY SILENT on the subject of b'munni.

Oz shippies, rally! (But not anything that involves flinging them on the barbie. Not in Scotland in April.)
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ricardus:
What non-alcoholic substitute can be used for sherry in making trifle? Preferably something cheap...

Traditionally it was jelly

Jengie
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ricardus:
What non-alcoholic substitute can be used for sherry in making trifle? Preferably something cheap...

This is to soak the spongecake, beneath the fruit and jelly?
I would have thought a fruit juice to complement or match the fruit you are using, or maybe even a smoothie?
 
Posted by PeteCanada (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Mayday, mayday.

I bought two farmed barramundi in the supermarket today. I intend to have them for dinner tomorrow. But my fish cookbooks are TOTALLY SILENT on the subject of b'munni.

Oz shippies, rally! (But not anything that involves flinging them on the barbie. Not in Scotland in April.)

This site seems not to require flinging on the Barbie.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Barramundi...I'd be sticking to herbs, lemon juice and olive oil for a short marinade before frying or grilling with maybe a sprinkle of toasted flaked almonds to serve.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
Barramundi...I'd be sticking to herbs, lemon juice and olive oil for a short marinade before frying or grilling with maybe a sprinkle of toasted flaked almonds to serve.

And don't overcook them! [Frown] Dried out fillets are disgusting.

Frying/grilling would allow you to see how they are cooking. You could also make parcels of aluminum foil and put herbs, lemon slices etc and bake them. Again they won't take long. Probably no more than 20 minutes if they are quite thick, less for thinner pieces.

Looking at your site, I think most of the recipes seem fine. I'd avoid the barrumundi taco. It's a waste of sweet, tasty fish.

[ 22. April 2007, 07:10: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Ok, amalgamating several recipes, I think the whole fish, marinaded in lemon juice & oil, baked in foil and served with smothered leeks and potatoes, the whole sprinkled with crisped panacetta.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ricardus:
What non-alcoholic substitute can be used for sherry in making trifle? Preferably something cheap...

I agree about the orange juice but try to avoid using jelly, it really is not necessary. And anyway it's yukky!

Sponge then fruit then possibly another thin layer of sponge and more fruit, a little orange juice or whaever poured over to moisten and then the custard which should be stirred constantly in a jug until cool before pouring.

If making a raspberry trifle, unlikely at this time of year, then cooking a few raspberries with a little water and a little sugar then pureeing to make a juice is fab too - you can add orange juice to this as well, if you want. Remember the sponge should be moist but not soggy.

Now I'm hungry!

I don't know the fish in question but Firenze's idea sounds fab - with the trifle afterwards!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
What are

quote:
...smothered leeks and potatoes...
??


[Aargh, need to remember that Preview Post is my friend]

[ 22. April 2007, 16:26: Message edited by: Yangtze ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Final version of the barramundi: I decided the whole fish were a bit scaly and bony to make convenient eating so -

I did the leek and potato ('smothered' just means sliced, layered and cooked in a closed pan with a very little liquid) and at the same time baked the fish in foil, in the oven. Then I stripped off the skin and bones and laid the bits of fish on top of the vegetables, poured a little cream round, and put the lid on again for a few minutes until everything was heated through. Meanwhile frying the pancetta until crisp.

Serve soft mound of creamy leek, potato and fish, sprinkled with crispy, salty bacon.
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
('smothered' just means sliced, layered and cooked in a closed pan with a very little liquid)

Ah, I think what you cooked was braised leeks and potato. "Smothered" means 'covered with other food,' a la "steak smothered in onions." At least, that's the only definition I've ever seen and used in the west and south US.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I did the leek and potato ('smothered' just means sliced, layered and cooked in a closed pan with a very little liquid) and at the same time baked the fish in foil, in the oven. Then I stripped off the skin and bones and laid the bits of fish on top of the vegetables, poured a little cream round, and put the lid on again for a few minutes until everything was heated through. Meanwhile frying the pancetta until crisp.

Gosh, that sounds yum.

Do you think 'smothered' is a particularly Scottish expression for a dish cooked as you describe?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I have a notion I picked up the usage from a Sophie Grigson recipe.

I tend to think of it as applying particularly to vegetables cooked in their own juices - for which you need a low heat and a tightly lidded pan.

'Braise' is broader - I would use it for slow cooking meat.

But I suspect it is all chefSpeak a la Melange of Truffled Sea Urchin Nestling on a Mille-Feuilles of Arugula and Dawn-gathered Petit Pois Drizzled with a Balsamic Reduction and Dusted with Fennel Pollen.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
and Dusted with Fennel Pollen.

Oh, I must remember to try that , when my fennel is in flower! [Big Grin] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
and Dusted with Fennel Pollen.

Oh, I must remember to try that , when my fennel is in flower! [Big Grin] [Big Grin]
Apparently it is a Real Ingredient - see here
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Apparently it is a Real Ingredient - see here

I don't doubt it...but it's a bit poncy, doncha think? An ingredient for impressing Michelin judges?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Firenze

You are aware that further south (I hope England but it might be South Africa) if you say "smothered" you mean liberally covered.

Jengie
 
Posted by KenWritez (# 3238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
but it's a bit poncy, doncha think? An ingredient for impressing Michelin judges?

Nope, it's a legit ingredient. I have recipe for the best roasted tomatoes I've ever eaten that uses it.

There are no poncy ingredients, only poncy people.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Firenze

You are aware that further south (I hope England but it might be South Africa) if you say "smothered" you mean liberally covered.

You see, to me, that usage of 'smothered' is no less chefSpeak than 'nestling'. You could say 'covered with' and 'on' with no loss of meaning and some gain of clarity.

Whereas a cooking method which is involves covering tightly, excluding air and trapping heat, is something like the idea of smothering.

And with that I'm off to whip the cream, beat the eggs and bully the beef (no recipe, just fun...)
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
When I saw this tidbit in Sunday's paper, I just knew that it had to go on the recipe thread. See, here in the upper midwest, we are about to be hit with one of the plagues: the 17-year cicada (locust) infestation. So here is a recipe I will not be trying:

Soft-Shelled Cicadas

1 C Worcestershire sauce
60 freshly-emerged 17-year cicadas
4 eggs, beaten
3 C flour
Salt and pepper to season flour
1 C corn oil or slightly salted butter

Marinate cicadas, alive in a sealed container, in Worcestershire sauce for several hours. [This step may be skipped and you may go directly to the egg step.]
Dip them, in beaten egg, roll them in the seasoned flour and then gently saute them until they are golden brown.
Yield: 4 main dish servings.

Other recipes can be found here, along with a disclaimer. Apparently you're supposed to check with your doctor before actually eating cicadas. Right.

[ 24. April 2007, 02:03: Message edited by: Mamacita ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I wonder whether these are the kinds of locusts John the Baptist ate in the wilderness. Without the Worcestershire sauce, of course.

Moo
 
Posted by DaisyM (# 9098) on :
 
Oh, dear, I read the recipe and literally shuddered. Reminds me of an organization (club, society?) I read about that meets very occasionally to eat all manner of strange and weird, to put the matter as positively as possible, "food." This would be their kind of yummy. [Confused]

[ 24. April 2007, 22:04: Message edited by: DaisyM ]
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
Only distant relatives, if that. The 17-year critters are genus Magicicada and aren't "real" locusts, so I'm sorry if my attempt at scientific shorthand was, well, unscientific. There are different species of locust on the Arabian peninsula and they are, I've just discovered, allowed under the food rules in Leviticus.
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
well, sure - you don't expect that John the Baptist wasn't keeping kosher, do you?! [Biased]

Last year in Oklahoma and Iowa the cicadas were amazing - sometimes literally producing a roar... [Eek!]

We don't have cicadas *or* fireflies/lightning bugs... [Frown]
 
Posted by Talmudnik (# 9339) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege:
well, sure - you don't expect that John the Baptist wasn't keeping kosher, do you?! [Biased]

He problably was since there are 4 types of kosher locusts...
Insects
With three exceptions, all bugs and insects are forbidden as treif (un-kosher). The exception is a type of locust from the Arabian peninsula; this type of locust encompasses four distinct species of locust. The tradition for identifying which species of locust were and were not kosher has been lost among all Jews except the Jews of Yemen. The Grasshopper and beetle are also kosher.

 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
.....

Marinate cicadas, alive in a sealed container, in Worcestershire sauce for several hours. [This step may be skipped and you may go directly to the egg step.]
Dip them, in beaten egg, roll them in the seasoned flour and then gently saute them until they are golden brown.
...

Isn't there a step missing before dipping them in the beaten egg? [Ultra confused] I can just imagine the cicadas beating the eggs even more. Or are they cooked like lobsters, except with a coating [Confused]
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
.....

Marinate cicadas, alive in a sealed container, in Worcestershire sauce for several hours. [This step may be skipped and you may go directly to the egg step.]
Dip them, in beaten egg, roll them in the seasoned flour and then gently saute them until they are golden brown.
...

Isn't there a step missing before dipping them in the beaten egg? [Ultra confused] I can just imagine the cicadas beating the eggs even more. Or are they cooked like lobsters, except with a coating [Confused]
I'd suspect that the recommending marinading in Worcestershire sauce in a sealed container would likely do them in. It would me.

But even if you omit the marinading process, I somehow doubt that those people who would eat the cicadas would get overly fussed about whether the insects were being cooked alive (while smothering in the coating) or not.

John
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
well, if you think about it, cooking a live cicada is kind of like cooking a live lobster, but on a much smaller scale... [Eek!]

Talmudnik, that's a great link - thank you! Funny, the debate about whether honey is kosher; the Hebrew scriptures being full of references to the goodness of honey (but not in excess, Prov.25:16) - it intrigues me that such a debate would even happen.

And Beatles are kosher! who knew?! [Biased]
 
Posted by Talmudnik (# 9339) on :
 
You're welcome, Lynn. If you thought that honey was bad, I contemplated stopping Talmudic study over the discussion on capers!

The Jerusalem Post did a review a couple of years ago on a restaurant in the Golan that serves locusts. The Insectarium here actually serves a variety of bugs. Shudder.
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
I need to buy a new rolling pin. But there are so many types to choose from now! The traditional type, the type where the middle bit spins freely from the handles, pins which are just a rod of wood with no handle at all and I saw one recently which was "tapered".

Plus you can buy them in wood, marble, plastic or stainless steel.

What should I get?? I do mainly biscuits and pastry, and I have some as-yet-unrealised grand plans for gingerbread.
 
Posted by Otter (# 12020) on :
 
I have a marble rolling pin, but I only use it if I'm rolling out one or two of something, and I don't mind the something being mashed pretty hard by the weight. I find the marble pin too heavy for extended use.

For pasties (never made less than a dozen) or pastry that I want to be somewhat flaky, I use a cylindrical wooden rolling pin with the "axle" and handles removed. A while back I was drooling over some nice tapered hardwood pins, I expect I'll get one sooner or later.

I expect all the different styles and materials work well, and that a lot of it is simply personal preference.

[added lost word back in]

[ 26. April 2007, 14:52: Message edited by: Otter ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I used to use a stonewear Oude Geneve bottle - you know the type, I'm sure. Bols do one. Of course I had to drink the GIN first! [Big Grin]

For pastry I'd keep it in the fridge for a few hours first, or fill it will chilled water.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I used to use a stonewear Oude Geneve bottle - you know the type, I'm sure. Bols do one. Of course I had to drink the GIN first! [Big Grin]

For pastry I'd keep it in the fridge for a few hours first, or fill it will chilled water.

My mother always used a milk bottle...but a tall, sterilized-milk bottle, there's not room to put both hands on the squat modern ones.
I have a solid wooden rolling pins, no handles.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
I wonder whether these are the kinds of locusts John the Baptist ate in the wilderness.

Not locust beans then?
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I used to use a stonewear Oude Geneve bottle - you know the type, I'm sure. Bols do one. Of course I had to drink the GIN first! [Big Grin]

Alas, my gin of choice is Bombay Sapphire which has lovely blue square bottles.

Thanks for the replies - I do like the look of marble, but the handleless ones look cool too. Maybe I'll just go by whatever one I like the appearance of. Or whatever one is on sale.

Today I bought an apple peeling/coring machine for only $22! [Yipee]
 
Posted by MouseThief (# 953) on :
 
Beef & Barley Soup

A recent invention at the Mousehold.

dribble oil
1 large carrot, chopped small
2 medium onions, chopped medium
1 lb ground beef
1.5 cup cooked barley
2 cans beef broth
2-3 tbsp beef granules
1 bottle (11 oz) beer
salt

In the oil saute the carrot until nearly soft. Add onions, saute until just transparent. Add ground beef; cook until done through. Drain fat.

Add everything else. Bring to a boil. Turn down heat and simmer for say 5 minutes. Serve.

We had this with some chewy bread dipped in olive oil and balsamic. Enjoy!
 
Posted by Spiffy da WonderSheep (# 5267) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ecumaniac:
I need to buy a new rolling pin. But there are so many types to choose from now!

Go to the hardware store.

Buy about 70cm of wooden curtain rod.

It'll be cheaper than those foofy French ones, and as long as you don't put it in the dishwasher or let it soak in water, it'll last you for years.

Three generations of women in my family have rolled out tortillas using this type of rolling pin.
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
Curry pastes.
I like making curry's but unless I use a commercial paste they never seem to work. What I would like is some recipies for pastes that I can make in bulk, maybe over the weekend, and freeze, and then use instead of the commercial ones, saving me money, sugar and salt content, and cupboard space. I need to be able to cook weekday dinner fast (get home after 5 and have 2 toddlers to feed!) but could possbly spend some time on them initialy before freezing. A range of different types would be nice (we have a big freezer) Thai, Indian, various regions etc, need to be vaguely toddler friendly but they are fairly good at spices. Any ideas folks? (I just know someone will...)
 
Posted by Spawn (# 4867) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nats:
Curry pastes.....
...A range of different types would be nice (we have a big freezer) Thai, Indian, various regions etc, need to be vaguely toddler friendly but they are fairly good at spices. Any ideas folks? (I just know someone will...)

Okay, here's a vindaloo curry paste (not authentic but my own version) which I made an excess of last night and will keep in the fridge for a couple of weeks.

Dry-fry (roast) two or three teaspoons each of cumin seeds, coriander seeds, mustard seeds, in a hot griddle or frying pan. When they've started to pop and colour (after about a minute) grind them in a pestle and mortar or spice grinder.

Add 5 finely chopped garlic cloves, a grated thumb-sized piece of ginger root, tablespoon of tamarind paste (or to taste), two teaspoons of tumeric. Continue grinding all these ingredients together. Finally add cider vinegar to get your desired consistency (as much or little as you want).

This makes a pretty good paste. To make the vindaloo, fry a finely sliced large onion until coloured caramel brown, add a teaspoon more of mustard seeds until they pop, add the curry paste and fry until the oil separates, then brown the meat in the oil and paste. Cover with water and simmer until the meat is tender and cooked. garnish with loads of fresh coriander. Add as much chilli as you want during the cooking process.
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
Ooooo Spawn that sounds lurverly! Will try that at the weekend. Would it freeze? or is fridge better??
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ecumaniac:
Plus you can buy them in wood, marble, plastic or stainless steel.

I had my mum's glass rolling pin - it was hollow with a cork bung at each end. The idea was to fill it with ice to make perfect pastry (apparently it's best if kept cold). I can't remember it ever being filled with ice, but my pastry has received compliments (maybe because I have such cold hands?)
 
Posted by Lynn MagdalenCollege (# 10651) on :
 
you know what they say: warm [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
I've got a lovely marble rolling pin. I got it at a Church sale paid next to nothing for it and it's smashing. My Gran used to have a marble slab in her kitchen for pastry!

In the mean time, any more curry pastes out there??
 
Posted by rugasaw (# 7315) on :
 
Mousethief, I believe you had a typo in your recipe. That should read:

2 bottles beer.

You also missed the step telling you what to do with the second beer. [Biased]
 
Posted by MouseThief (# 953) on :
 
Except ... I don't like beer.
 
Posted by Doulos (# 12388) on :
 
Nats I had a marble rolling pin and I smashed it! [Eek!] It rolled off the work surface on to our stone floor...eeekkkk.....
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
Ouch - I didn't think it would be possible to smash! Note to self - take care of marble rolling pin....
 
Posted by The Revd H P Stinker Pinker (# 10704) on :
 
Hollandaise sauce: I never seem to get it right. Last night being the height of the English asparagus season I steamed some to go with the lamb steaks and jersey royals and was of course tempted yet again to do a hollandaise to go with it (after doing this each year I should know better, but it is almost the perfect spring meal to my mind).

It was fine - keeping warm in a bowl over a pan of gently simmering hot water, and tasting absolutely wonderful - and I turned my back for a few seconds to reprimand a cat that had climbed on the counter - and it went all lumpy (the sauce not the cat), separated is perhaps the technical term.

How do I avoid this - and when it happens is it salvageable? I've tipped it down the sink before (same with a bearnaise a few years ago). It was still tasty but looked like a sauce boat full of something from a petrie dish.

Stinker
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
Sauce rescues
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
Delia's foaming hollandaise might help you out...

Delia on line foaming hollandaise sauce
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
I need to bake cake/biscuits - and lots of it (100/150+ portions? - difficult to know)- for after the funeral of a young child, sometime in the next week.

Any tips for good, tasty, tray-bake type cakes, nice sponges, or other things to make in large quantities would be very much welcomed. They need to keep in a car for five/six hours as I live quite some way away from the location of the funeral (so fresh cream is probably best left out).

Your suggestions will be much welcomed. I feel like its the only thing I can do to help the family, so I want to make it as special as I can.
 
Posted by Nats (# 2211) on :
 
If there are going to be very small children then do fairy cakes in mini muffin /petit four cases - makes them bite size and go further. Looks good to. Mix in some dried fruit or even some chocolate drops and go without icing if you like.

Someone on this thread pages and pages ago posted a lovely oatmeal and rasins cookie recipie which is lovely and really easy as well. You can also make lots of mix and freeze in balls and cook from frozen which might help. I haven't got time to scroll through the thread right now - I'll have a look later if you can't find it. Or re-post it!
 
Posted by The Revd H P Stinker Pinker (# 10704) on :
 
thanks for the hollandaise advice:
rescue site very helpful.
I have made foaming hollandaise a la Delia, but I didn't like the texture at all - too fluffy for my taste.

Stinker