Thread: Movie thread Board: Heaven / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
I decided not to put a year on this, since there's only a month left in 2016, but putting 2017 wouldn't have seemed proper.

Tonight I watched the original Total Recall for what I think was the first time beginning to end. It was entertaining enough, but I'd say "Give the people air" can be chalked up as another iconic line which, in addition to being misquoted(most water-cooler mimics add a definite article to "air"), seems not to have ever been intended as significant in the first place. Schwarzenegger delivers the line as part of a back and forth conversation, with no particular fanfare or urgency. The way people rendered it, I always thought it was delivered as a thundering ultimatum during a climactic scene.

"Consider that a divorce" seems to have been intended as comedically significant, though is different from how it usually gets quoted, which is "Consider it a divorce".
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Actually, looking at the clip again on You Tube, it's kinda hard to tell whether he says "it" or "that".
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
This evening I have watched The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel again - it really is a great movie: lighthearted, funny, poignant at times. Great entertainment.
 
Posted by Teekeey Misha (# 18604) on :
 
An hotel theme perhaps develops..?

Last night I re-watched The Grand Budapest Hotel. I watch it every few months, partly because I think it amusing - not fall-down-laughing-out-loud-hysterically-hilariously-rib-achingly funny, but amusing. I also find it a beautiful film (aesthetically rather than morally) - I find the whole style of the piece is appealing. Like the other hotel movie mentioned, it's lighthearted, funny, poignant at times. I'm not sure it would (or should) ever rank among the "greats", but I find it a lovely film and it cheers me up.

My next re-viewing will probably be Edward Scissorhands, which I also think is lovely for all the reasons attributed to GBH above.
 
Posted by Bene Gesserit (# 14718) on :
 
I've not seen SBEMH, but loved the first one - I'm always afraid that sequels just won't live up to the originals/firsts.

My Other Half and I were thrilled to discover today (oh, this is a fortuitous rebirth of a thread! [Overused] Stetson) that Studio Ghibli are working on a new full-length film, Kemushi no Boro (Boro the Caterpillar). [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Our local film club showed Pillow Talk last night. Interesting more for looking out for lines from/about "heart throb" Rock Hudson where the significance would not be understood until it came out at the end of his life that he was gay. Doris Day never married either, but I do not know about her orientation.

Actually, Pillow Talk was a replacement for The God's must be Crazy, which for some distribution reasons could not be shown. It was a cult classic in Brisbane and prevented the closure of (The Crystal) cinema for several years. I would have preferred that film.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bene Gesserit:
I've not seen SBEMH, but loved the first one - I'm always afraid that sequels just won't live up to the originals/firsts...

One of the those rare things - a sequel as good as the original.

Whereas Addams Family Values is a sequel that far surpasses the original.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Are current films allowed?

I recommend both Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Moana

Fantastic Beasts Struck me as the first of the Potter world films having been written for adults. Not that it is inappropriate for children, but the previous were written for children, but adults could enjoy, this one seems the opposite to me.

Moana is typical of PIXAR/Disney in all the good ways. Beautifully animated, well acted and solid story.

For Studio Ghibli fans
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
Doris Day's sexual orientation brings to mind the quote at the change in her reputation when she switched from being a band singer to a movie star.
'I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin." -- Oscar Levant.

I found the Hotel Budapest funny but very sad. It's an elegy for a way of life.

I'm fonder of "Moonrise Kingdom" but then the time and place matches my experience when I was the age of the character. I'm looking forward to seeing Manchester By The Sea to see the grown up Boy from MK.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:
Doris Day never married either, but I do not know about her orientation.

That would have come to a shock to her four husbands if any of them were still alive.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
The Purge: Election Year.

This series is my current guilty pleasure. I was glad to see that the writers have carried on, and in fact, expanded upon, the social commentary from the first film.

(SPOILERS)

The colour-coding of the electoral map at the end perhaps indicates that the writers' politics are left-wing, but not too much so. Bad guys, red; good guys, blue. (As opposed to some other colour indicating a more radical alternative).

The hero-senator seemed more like Elizabeth Warren than Hillary Clinton to me.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Saw Cafe Society a few hours back.

Pretty good, but as usual with Woody Allen's recent efforts, I found myself wondering if what seemed like swimming in cliches was an intentional effect(like he's doing it as a tribute or something), or if he's just at the stage of his career where he has difficulty coming up with original concepts.

The Hollywood scenes are a never-ending parade of "Let's do lunch!" conversations, with movie-bigshots name-dropping real life stars(it may be signficiant that the stars themselves are rarely, if ever, seen), and the New York scenes are pretty much just "ethnic New York" complete with cement-booting gangsters and kvetching old couples.

Still, kept me hooked for the duration.
 
Posted by Teekeey Misha (# 18604) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Whereas Addams Family Values is a sequel that far surpasses the original.

quote:
Originally posted by Stetson:
The Purge: Election Year

I'd put the Purge into Woderick's "surpass the original" bracket. I thought The Purge was ok - interesting concept but a bit *meh*, but I thought The Purge: Anarchy much better; far more easy to engage with and quite exciting. I look forward to seeing number 3.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Teekeey Misha:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Whereas Addams Family Values is a sequel that far surpasses the original.

quote:
Originally posted by Stetson:
The Purge: Election Year

I'd put the Purge into Woderick's "surpass the original" bracket. I thought The Purge was ok - interesting concept but a bit *meh*, but I thought The Purge: Anarchy much better; far more easy to engage with and quite exciting. I look forward to seeing number 3.

I think if you liked Purge Anarchy(aka Purge 2), you'd like Election Year. Like the second film, but unlike the first, it spends most of its time in multiple locations, thus avoiding a claustrophobic ambience. And like I say, the social-political satire is ramped up a bit.

One caveat is that in some places, it does seem to be leaning on the motifs of the second film a little heavily. But it's a pretty enjoyable ride, so you don't really care.
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
Sully was quite the tour-de-force: I found myself on the edge of tears ver non-existent love ones.
 
Posted by HCH (# 14313) on :
 
I recently saw and enjoyed "Minions".
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sir Kevin:
Sully was quite the tour-de-force: I found myself on the edge of tears ver non-existent love ones.

I haven't seen the movie, but the day this actually happened I heard the news while driving. I almost had to pull my car over because of my tears. I don't remember what else was going on in the world at the time, but it had been a couple of weeks of bad stuff. Hearing about the miraculous landing, and all the boats in the river (how none of them got hit was also a miracle) coming to rescue the plane passengers just about did me in emotionally.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
I'm Here

Spooky, atmospheric thriller about a woman(Kim Basinger) who attempts to deal with her infertility issues by stealing a baby.

Normally, I'm wary of under-the-radar films featuring retro actors playing roles about two decades too young for them(eg. anything starring Kevin Costner these days), but this bit of casting actually seemed to work. Possibly because using an actor in her sixties accentuates the character's age, which is relevant for the plot, even if the woman in the film isn't supposed to be as old as Basinger.

I do agree with the critics who said that, even allowing for the trauma of multiple miscarriages and a diagnosis of permanent infertility, the character's actions are still implausibly nutbar. Still, if you can suspend that little bit of disbelief for 90 minutes or so(as well as swallow a few heavy-handed dream sequences), it's a fairly compelling story, expertly filmed.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
We just came back from seeing Arrival. A truly intelligent science fiction film, excellently put together and magnificently acted. For once, the special effects take a back seat to intelligence, hard work and concept. It's been years since I've seen a movie so well put together.
 
Posted by bib (# 13074) on :
 
I tend to only watch films on tv because I can't stand the stink of the popcorn most people consume in vast quantities in the cinema.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by bib:
I tend to only watch films on tv because I can't stand the stink of the popcorn most people consume in vast quantities in the cinema.

I tend to only watch films on tv because I can't stand the talking, the cell phones, and the crunching (rather than the smell) of the popcorn.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
There are some films that really must be seen on a huge screen. I saw Interstellar on a six-story high Imax screen in 3-D, and also Dr. Strange. There is no way you can get the impact of films like that on a small screen.
The current trend in the US is high-end food in movie theaters -- beer, gourmet hot dogs and so on. There are even theaters with waiter service.
 
Posted by Athrawes (# 9594) on :
 
Not if you have vertigo! I saw about half of Dr Strange at our local cinema - the other half was spent with my eyes closed, trying to recover from the dizzy spells! Loved the movie, but it is definitely the small screen for me.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
I find my 2D glasses are a nice fix for when my husband and daughter really want to see a film in 3D and I want to go with them without being assaulted by things flying out of the screen towards me. Real life is already in 3d; isn't that bad enough?
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Daughter-Unit took me to see Dr. Strange yesterday. I really enjoyed it, but warned some of my friends who suffer from vertigo that it would not be a good movie for them to see.

Thursday, I will be going with D-U and her dear hubby to see Rogue One!!!!! Yay! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Twilight (# 2832) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:
Our local film club showed Pillow Talk last night. Interesting more for looking out for lines from/about "heart throb" Rock Hudson where the significance would not be understood until it came out at the end of his life that he was gay.

I love this movie and "Send Me No Flowers," (also with Doris and Rock) for the Tony Randall scenes.

Turner Classic Movies is really getting started on its Christmas films today with "Holiday Affair," at noon. Robert Mitchum in a romantic comedy is a rare treat.

Tonight, however, is "A Passage to India." No matter how many times I watch that, I am mesmerized from start to finish.

[ 11. December 2016, 13:20: Message edited by: Twilight ]
 
Posted by Dafyd (# 5549) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
We just came back from seeing Arrival. A truly intelligent science fiction film, excellently put together and magnificently acted. For once, the special effects take a back seat to intelligence, hard work and concept. It's been years since I've seen a movie so well put together.

Seconded.
Although as regards films well put together, I have a sneaking regard for this year's Captain America installment, which made spotlighting twelve plus characters while keeping a main dramatic and emotional throughline for the two central characters look easy, with action sequences.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Arrival is the film Interstellar should have been.

It showed a serious exploration of a scifi subject can be done without loads of FX and unrealistic story and tensions.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
It also magnificently passes the Bechdel test. And deeply romantic. The bravery of the heroine amazes me -- she is more courageous than the hunky Ian.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
Turner Classic Movies is really getting started on its Christmas films today with "Holiday Affair," at noon. Robert Mitchum in a romantic comedy is a rare treat.

I don't know this one and will look out for it.

Does anyone have recommendations for Christmas movies. I will probably take another look at A Christmas Without Snow and I still like the short A Charlie Brown Christmas for the kids. Our film club regularly precedes the December film with the Tom and Jerry Christmas short.
 
Posted by Teekeey Misha (# 18604) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I find my 2D glasses are a nice fix for when my husband and daughter really want to see a film in 3D.

I can't see 3D films at all*. If I wear 3D specs, I just see an uncomfortable double image (whether I have my normal specs on or not.) Don't know why.

*ETA I don't mean I can't see them at all - obviously I can see the film, hence why it's a double image. I just can't see the 3D effect!

[ 11. December 2016, 20:20: Message edited by: Teekeey Misha ]
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
It also magnificently passes the Bechdel test. And deeply romantic. The bravery of the heroine amazes me -- she is more courageous than the hunky Ian.

Amy Adams is a lot more of a badass than her big babydoll eyes would suggest. Love her.
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:
Does anyone have recommendations for Christmas movies. I will probably take another look at A Christmas Without Snow and I still like the short A Charlie Brown Christmas for the kids. Our film club regularly precedes the December film with the Tom and Jerry Christmas short.

I deeply love the original "Miracle on 34th Street" (1947). The casting is brilliant--even people who are just in one scene, like Lela Bliss as Mrs Shellhammer, are perfect for their roles. Even the child actors are wonderful. Natalie Wood is astounding, avoiding most "movie child" cliches. The orphan Dutch girl (Marlene Lyden), despite having no lines in English, gives a wonderful loving glance to her foster mother that absolutely makes the scene. Of the ENTIRE cast, only the little boy asking for a fire truck comes across as fake.

The story is great, too, but watch it for a bunch of character actors proving why character actors are so important to movies.
 
Posted by Gramps49 (# 16378) on :
 
Looking forward to seeing La La Land. It addresses two questions:

1) Is jazz and old music form encased in amber or a contemporary form constantly evolving?

2) Can old-fashioned, 1950's movie, be revived in modern day Los Angeles?
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Teekeey Misha:
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I find my 2D glasses are a nice fix for when my husband and daughter really want to see a film in 3D.

I can't see 3D films at all*. If I wear 3D specs, I just see an uncomfortable double image (whether I have my normal specs on or not.) Don't know why.

*ETA I don't mean I can't see them at all - obviously I can see the film, hence why it's a double image. I just can't see the 3D effect!

One explanation A quick and dirty test.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
I just saw Rogue One with Daughter-Unit and her Dear Hubby. [Yipee] [Big Grin] [Cool]

I don't think I'm giving away any spoilers here.

The story was good, but confusing sometimes. I guess I'll just have to go again to catch those details I missed tonight! There were some pretty funny lines (you must be kidding), and the obligatory "I've got a bad feeling about this", and some old (very old!) friends and enemies included.

We, of course, have space battles with X-wings and B-wings against TIE fighters and star destroyers. (I really liked the X-wing flying better in The Force Awakens, however!)

The very end of the film had a moment of cheers and clapping, along with loud comments of "How did they do that?" which was pretty fun.

It was quite a romp, and this Star Wars fan had a great time tonight!

Hmmm, I was in my early twenties when the very first film came out. It wasn't called A New Hope then, you know! I think it was Star Wars from the Adventures of Luke Skywalker, but then again, there's always the possibility that my memory isn't what it used to be! [Biased]

[Should have preview posted three times!]

[ 16. December 2016, 03:05: Message edited by: jedijudy ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I too saw it tonight, courtesy of a friend who had an extra pair of tickets! I am writing a review over on my blog, and if there is interest I can post a link.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
I'm hoping Rogue One will be on at our local cinema, though they tend to quite arty films with the occasional crowd pleaser (I saw The Hobbit and Ghostbusters there, and also a live streamed stage production of Jane Eyre, which was awesome, and much more the usual thing they put on there).
In the meantime, thanks to the local Co-op, I caught up with the Marvel Universe Age of Ultron and Captain America: Civil War.
I enjoyed both of them, but when the national governments of the world were talking about the need for oversight of the Avengers, I did wonder why nobody mentioned the fact that the Council that was in charge during the Chitauri invasion was prepared to nuke New York, which would have caused rather more damage than the Avengers did.
It was nice to see a glimpse of Wakanda and Black Panther, too. I even liked Scarlet Witch, and I didn't think I was going to (not sure why).
For the record, I'm definately Team Cap on this one, though I can see Tony Stark's point of view.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
FINALLY got around to watching Cruising(on YouTube), 36 years after it was released, and 30 after I became old enough to see it legally.

I guess I can kinda see why gay activists didn't like the film, since it was made at a time when anti-gay bigotry was still pretty widespread and acceptable(worse than now, trust me, kids), and it basically portrays every gay character as a popper-snorting, sexually promiscuous S/M leather dude, with of course a deranged serial killer thrown in.

Granted, the leather scene might have had its upsides as well but probably wasn't quite the image that the gay rights movement wanted to project to the viewing public in 1980.

Overall, a pretty servicabe thriller, exploring a side of society not usually given front-and-centre cinematic treatment, and even less so in the era when it was made.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Daughter-Unit and I went to see Collateral Beauty yesterday.

It started pretty slowly, and one of the dynamic points of the film was pretty well telegraphed from the beginning. There was a second huge point that I didn't catch on to until just before it appeared on the screen. Not giving any spoilers here!

All in all, it was a very good movie. I had tears rolling down my face several times because I was sucked into the story so strongly.

I recommend this for anyone needing a good cry.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
We went to see Arrival, which was excellent -- a true science fiction movie. Highly intelligent, and far better than Rogue One.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
I saw Manchester by the Sea this weekend. It is beautifully filmed, and dramatic without being melodramatic. The characters are sympathetic even if at times when you want to shake them and say, "Listen to each other, fell for each other fer gosh sake!" I think this movie will get a boatload of nominations.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:

Hmmm, I was in my early twenties when the very first film came out. It wasn't called A New Hope then, you know! I think it was Star Wars from the Adventures of Luke Skywalker, but then again, there's always the possibility that my memory isn't what it used to be! [Biased]

From wikipedia:
quote:
The film was titled Adventures of Luke Starkiller, as taken from the Journal of the Whills, Saga I: The Star Wars. During production, Lucas changed Luke's name to Skywalker and altered the title to simply The Star Wars and finally Star Wars
The title, like the script of the film, benefited from heavy editing.

quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
We went to see Arrival, which was excellent -- a true science fiction movie. Highly intelligent, and far better than Rogue One.

I find this an interesting comparison. Arrival is true Science Fiction. whilst Rogue One is a Wild West space fantasy mixed with samurai and nazis.
Arrival is a fantastic standalone work. I hope they never make a sequel.
Though it wouldn't exist well outside of the franchise, I think Rogue One is the best Star Wars film since the original.
 
Posted by georgiaboy (# 11294) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:
quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
Turner Classic Movies is really getting started on its Christmas films today with "Holiday Affair," at noon. Robert Mitchum in a romantic comedy is a rare treat.

I don't know this one and will look out for it.

Does anyone have recommendations for Christmas movies. I will probably take another look at A Christmas Without Snow and I still like the short A Charlie Brown Christmas for the kids. Our film club regularly precedes the December film with the Tom and Jerry Christmas short.

A Christmas film I always watch for (and usually fail to find
[Frown] ) is 'Come to the Stable'. Made I believe around 1948, it stars Loretta Young and Celeste Holm as French nuns who come to the US to re-found their monastery destroyed in WW2. It's a fairly complicated plot/sub-plot combo, but made with great charm (in B&W).
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
I have seen both Arrival and Sully in the last week and concur absolutely with the posts above.

Arrival was intelligent and thought provoking. It took a different angle on the multiple first contact question, no massive spaceships appearing simultaneously over our major cities provoking screaming crowds, panicking drivers and spectacular crashes. Also a much more believable take on first contact . . . . simply how do we communicate at all?

I saw Sully yesterday and came out smiling and uplifted. An optimistic and life affirming film. Sometimes we humans get it right .... and sometimes, as the Doctor once said ... "Everybody lives!"
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
IMO you need put no worry into it. There will never be a sequel to Arrival. Although you might enjoy seeking out the novella it was based on, by Ted Chiang. It was titled "The Story of My Life," which the movie people rightly rejected as a title unlikely to attract the right audience to the film.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Demolition.

You can pretty much guess what it's gonna be like via the plot synopses on IMDB. Sort of like if Fight Club were re-envisioned by Andrew Payne, with a Magic Pixie Dream Girl thrown in. Well, actually, a Magic Pixie mother-son tag-team.

I'd give it about a 6/10, and that's mostly because I generally like that sort of film, however predictable this one may be. If you're a fellow fan, you might wanna check it out, but don't expect to be blown by the originality.

[ 23. December 2016, 15:24: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by Pancho (# 13533) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
Turner Classic Movies is really getting started on its Christmas films today with "Holiday Affair," at noon. Robert Mitchum in a romantic comedy is a rare treat.

It's a good movie, worth watching. Robert Mitchum could do romantic comedy. He and Janet Leigh had good chemistry.
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
If you have 10 minutes, Dinner for One is what is watched at this time of year in Germany. Hilarious.
 
Posted by Twilight (# 2832) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pancho:
quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
Turner Classic Movies is really getting started on its Christmas films today with "Holiday Affair," at noon. Robert Mitchum in a romantic comedy is a rare treat.

It's a good movie, worth watching. Robert Mitchum could do romantic comedy. He and Janet Leigh had good chemistry.
You know, Pancho, I watched it again last night and decided that, for my taste, I would choose Carl (Wendell Corey.) His dry wit and good nature through the whole thing made me ready to volunteer to be his "frowzy blonde."
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Phil Spector.

Not so much about his trials(he had two, but the film only shows a tiny sliver of the first, and none of the second), but about his relationship with his high-powered defense lawyer. Al Pacino and Helen Mirren play the leads.

Basically, about as much insight and entertainment as you can milk from an inconsequential celebrity trial involving a figure whose profile is long past it's best-before date. The script actually seems to acknowedge the questionable relevance of Phil Spector, in one memorable scene involving Mirren and one of her flunkies, right near the beginning.

Pretty solid performances from Mirren and especially Pacino, though it could be said that they're both just giving the umpteenth renditions of their trademark personas(yes, Al has a yelling monologue). But this might just be one of the times when phoning it in really can work.

Since Phil Spector was never much of a public figure to begin with, it's hard to know what to make of Pacino's interpretation, save to say that he comes off as highly eccentric but rather likable. I kind of wanted him to be innocent, to be perfectly honest(though given his past history, I kind of doubt that he was).
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
And hey, if THIS doesn't whet your appetite...

[ 15. January 2017, 15:24: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Oh, and the other night, I watched We're The Millers, about a drug dealer who recruits three unrelated social-misfits to impersonate his wife and kids for a smuggling operation.

Somewhat disappointing, in that it started off looking like it might be sort of a slacker/stoner film, but ended up being more of a raucnhy bromance, minus the "bro" part. Nothing against bromances, but I'd rather watch a slacker flick, and that's where it seemed to be going in the first fifteen minutes or so, before all the cheap sex and ethnic jokes kicked in.

A few well-exectuted scenes and characterizations, nevertheless. If you liked the Hangover series, and you're in the mood, this might be worth a look.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
OMG, Stetson, have you seen "Maggie's Plan"?

Synopsis: Greta Gerwig gets involved with a married man (Ethan Hawke),then three years later falls out of love with him and tries to hand him back to his ex wife (Julianne Moore, rocking a painfully phony German accent. But hey, it's a comedy [Big Grin] )

I thought of this because of your just professed love of slacker films and this one is like Jim Jarmusch meets Woody Allen. And I love Greta Gerwig. She is such an adorable schlemiel.

Anyhow, it really has that old school golden era of indie film feel, complete with ska soundtrack.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Thanks for the recom. I'll keep a lookout.
 
Posted by Nicolemr (# 28) on :
 
Finally got a chance to see Rogue One yesterday. Excellent movie, I enjoyed it immensely. The CGI was amazing.
 
Posted by Mamacita (# 3659) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:

Moana is typical of PIXAR/Disney in all the good ways. Beautifully animated, well acted and solid story.

Yes, yes, and yes. Moana is terrific. Strong female hero and (ISTM) very careful and respectful attention to details of the culture they were depicting.

This weekend I saw "Hidden Figures" and I can't recommend it strongly enough. It is the story of the African-American women mathematicians who were instrumental in the success of the American space program in the early 1960s. These women were patriots and heroines and the recognition is long overdue. All the performances are superb. The depiction of life in the Jim Crow South -- and the hurdles these women had to overcome -- are depicted well, and heart-wrenchingly. (Can you tell I liked the film?) Also, take a young person to see it. It's appropriate even for elementary-aged kids.
(I didn't get the math, either.)
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
I went to the Palm Springs Film Festival and got an early look at "The Red Turtle", a beautifully conceived art animation. Gorgeous! It was practically a silent film. The plot is very much like a version of a traditional "selkie" tale, of a sea creature, in this case a turtle, that unites with a human. I highly recommend seeing it if it comes your way.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
This weekend I saw "Hidden Figures" and I can't recommend it strongly enough.

Daughter-Unit and I saw it Saturday and feel the same as Mamacita. Hidden Figures was one of the best movies I've ever seen.

It's shocking to be aware of how recently people were treated so unequally. Being forced to use the bathroom that's a half mile away because there were no "colored" bathrooms anywhere except that one building is enough to get my blood boiling!

See this movie. It is beyond good!
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
This weekend I saw "Hidden Figures" and I can't recommend it strongly enough.

Daughter-Unit and I saw it Saturday and feel the same as Mamacita. Hidden Figures was one of the best movies I've ever seen.

It's shocking to be aware of how recently people were treated so unequally. Being forced to use the bathroom that's a half mile away because there were no "colored" bathrooms anywhere except that one building is enough to get my blood boiling!

See this movie. It is beyond good!

Recommendation thirded by me and my 16-year-old daughter. I'm also reading the book on which the movie was based now, to get more of the story (I usually want to do that when I watch "based on a true story" movies).
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Force Majeure Pathetic failure pf a film to show male inadequacy in the face of an avalanche.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I saw La La Land and enjoyed it very much. A true original movie musical that isn't animated -- those are rare. Emma Stone is luminous, truly beautiful in it.

I also saw The Magnificent Seven, the remake starring Denzel Washington. Awful. That's ninety minutes of my life gone; thank goodness I had my knitting.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
Some time ago, someone told me I should look out for the TV series The Librarians, and I finally got round to getting the first season on DVD.
It was so much fun I immediately sent off for the three TV films, starring Noah Wyle, which had preceded the series.
The premise is that there is a magical Library, underneath the New York Metropolitan Library, which collects and makes safe magical artefacts. In the first film the Serpent Brotherhood are looking for the scattered pieces of the Spear of Longinus, in the usual quest for world domination, and only the new, clueless, Librarian and his Guardian can stop them. It's part Indiana Jones and part Doctor Who (without the time travel but with a main character who solves problems by cleverness rather than shooting at stuff). Great escapism, and the TV series is fun as well.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Found Streamers on You Tube. It's one of those movies I only really know about because I saw it reviewed on Sneak Previews back in the early 80s.

Robert Altman directs this screen version of a play about repressed homosexuality and violence at a US army camp during the Vietnam War. Pretty good, but doesn't do much to hide its ancestry as a stage play. Slightly claustrophobic, given that it all takes place in one room.

I'd speculate that this is what got Matthew Modine the role of Joker in Full Metal Jacket, though his character here is a little less cocksure and in command of things.
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eigon:
Some time ago, someone told me I should look out for the TV series The Librarians, and I finally got round to getting the first season on DVD.
It was so much fun I immediately sent off for the three TV films, starring Noah Wyle, which had preceded the series.
The premise is that there is a magical Library, underneath the New York Metropolitan Library, which collects and makes safe magical artefacts. In the first film the Serpent Brotherhood are looking for the scattered pieces of the Spear of Longinus, in the usual quest for world domination, and only the new, clueless, Librarian and his Guardian can stop them. It's part Indiana Jones and part Doctor Who (without the time travel but with a main character who solves problems by cleverness rather than shooting at stuff). Great escapism, and the TV series is fun as well.

Hi Eigon, would you recommend starting with the films or the series? I saw an episode of the series at my MIL's on SyFy and really enjoyed it.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
I started off with the first two episodes of the series, which set up the new Librarians, while the original Librarian Flynn Carson went off screen on his own quest - which meant that I got dropped in the middle of the action with no idea who this madman was!
Then I caught up with the three movies, which took Flynn from new Librarian through various adventures to become the experienced Librarian who appears in the series.
I think my favourite of the films was the third, featuring vampires in New Orleans.
I hope that helps you decide, Gill!
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
I saw La La Land and enjoyed it very much. A true original movie musical that isn't animated -- those are rare. Emma Stone is luminous, truly beautiful in it.

Very hot weather here in Australia this week (near to 40 degC!) so I decamped to air-conditioned cinema this afternoon. Wife was working in a cool library, to I went to a film that I knew she would not choose: La La Land, as she does not like musicals.
I found it likeable entertainment, but seriously doubt that it is worth all of the the 10 or so Oscars for which it has been nominated. The singing and dancing were both quite well done, but not up to the spectacular standards of Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers and Gene Kelly. But one highlight to me (as a Bollywood fan) was the dance at the Planetarium, where the lovers appear to dance among the stars to an appropriate song about "stars aligning".
I agree with Brenda Clough that Emma Stone gave a good impression of the tribulations and heartbreaks of a would-be film star, made more believable as she is not (to my eye) a classical beauty herself.
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
And on the next , equally hot day, we both went to the air-conditioned cinema to see United Kingdom, which is based on the true story of the marriage in about 1950 between a black African chieftain from Botswana and a white English woman, in the face of strong opposition from the British colonial office (prompted by neighbouring apartheid-era south Africa).
The first 10 minutes was a rather clumsy rush through their initial romance and rush to get married. (No , the rush was not for that reason, but because he was being called back to Africa to become the local king!) But the real meat of the film came when she moved with him to Africa, initially an outcast from both black tribe and from the local colonial society.
David Olewoyo and Rosamund Pike do a great job capturing the emotions of the couple , and showing how they stick together to win through in the end.
Although I can recommend this film to any one, we found it particularly pertinent as the Marama and I have lived through the decolonisation process elsewhere in the world. Indeed the Marama has even taught courses on the history of the British empire, and so knew quite a lot about the politics of this process in Africa and the role of the real Sir Seretse Khama, who became the first and still-revered president of his country, though she hadn't known before about his wife.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Deepwater Horizon.

Quasi-documentary style sprinkled with odds and ends from classic-era disaster movies. John Malkovich's villainous BP exec ordering the well to be opened was straight out of Irwin Allen.

Probably would have been better handled by Paul Greengrass(not that he was offered the job, as far as I know), but keeps you suitably occupied for a couple of hours. Some chatter on IMDB about BP getting all the blame for the spill, though I guess they were the ones held ultimately responsible in real life.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Arrival.

Engaging, but somewhat overly ponderous, sci-fi flick about UFOs appearing in Montana and the efforts of a professional linguist to understand and harness their language.

SPOILERS

The script seems to think it's presenting us with some profound insights, but the time-flattening premise is lifted from Slaughterhouse Five, and the ruminations on language and its relation to reality are along the lines of Eskimos Have Twenty Five Words For Snow.

[ 03. February 2017, 16:46: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by sharkshooter (# 1589) on :
 
Going out to see more movies in the cinemas these days, and a couple weeks ago chose Passengers because it was described as a Sci-Fi movie.

What I saw was a Harlequin Romance set in space.

As you can probably guess, the best part was the popcorn.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
The Grand Budapest Hotel a parable about the fading glories of Europe.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
A King In New York.

Late-period, non-tramp Chaplin film about an exiled monarch finding his way around NYC, eventually getting mixed up in celebrity culture and politics.

Usually billed as a satire of McCarthyism, that aspect actually seems tagged-on, essentially ensuing from a more-or-less chance encounter the King has with a boy whose parents are under investigation as Communists. More pertinent from a 21st Century persepective is the script's prediction of Reality TV. (I suppose Candid Camera might have been an inspiration in 1957, but the television program that entraps the king is a little more real-life than that.)

Also noteworthy is a series of movie previews the king watches on a visit to a theatre, presumably meant to showcase Chaplin's disdain for the cinema of the 1950s. Low-hanging-fruit attacks on violent westerns and gangster films, plus a rather distasteful(though fairly pedestrian) putdown of trans-gendered romance. Apparently, jokes about transgendered people going to Denmark date back at least to 1957.

[ 07. February 2017, 13:26: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
The Grand Budapest Hotel a parable about the fading glories of Europe.

And really rather a funny film with a great cast.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Boyhood about growing up and asking what's the point of life.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
I saw A Dog's Purpose today. It's not the best movie I've ever seen, by far. However, it was a very nice way to have an hour+ of entertainment.

The dog looking for his purpose (spoiler...in many different reincarnations) puts his memories to work in figuring out why he's here.

A group of adults from a local care facility for those with mental challenges were in the theater with me. It was so delightful hearing their exclamations of joy and excitement (and some sadness, too). They added to the emotions I felt watching and rooting for that dog.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
The Cider House Rules about how abortion can help people.
 
Posted by Pine Marten (# 11068) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
The Cider House Rules about how abortion can help people.

This is a good film. I run a semi-regular film club at church, and this is one of the films I'm showing in Lent, to illustrate choices between good & evil, not-so-good & not-so-evil, and shades in between. Not convinced by Michael Caine's American accent though [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Snowden.

Pretty much what I could have expected, having recently read the book. Fairly standard bio-pic, with only the occassional flash of the patented Oliver Stone style. More Wall Street than Natural Born Killers.

As someone who holds to the idea that Snowden acted out of moral impulse, my own views align with those taken by the film, so not much to take issue with there. Some of the technical stuff was a little above my head, as is usually the case with stuff like this.
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stetson:
Snowden.
...

As someone who holds to the idea that Snowden acted out of moral impulse, my own views align with those taken by the film, so not much to take issue with there.....

Have you seen his interview with John Oliver? He comes across as having tried to make a right moral choice.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Little Miss Sunshine A highly dysfunctional family travels to a beauty contest
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Clingford:
quote:
Originally posted by Stetson:
Snowden.
...

As someone who holds to the idea that Snowden acted out of moral impulse, my own views align with those taken by the film, so not much to take issue with there.....

Have you seen his interview with John Oliver? He comes across as having tried to make a right moral choice.
No, but thanks for the heads-up. I've actually seen very little footage of the guy. Something about the case, though, just leads me to believe that he was motivated by concern for the public good, not by self-serving financial interests or narrow ideological sympathies. I guess maybe because he revealed it all to the media, rather than channeling it secretly to a foreign government.

[ 13. February 2017, 18:50: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Clingford:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
The Grand Budapest Hotel a parable about the fading glories of Europe.

And really rather a funny film with a great cast.
Funny as in weird IMHO.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Escaped the 40C+ weather last week to see Lion in an air-conditioned cinema. An amazing true story. At least I think it is pretty faithful to the story.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Avatar About humankinds’ exploitation of the environment – uses stunning CGI
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
quote:
Originally posted by Mamacita:
This weekend I saw "Hidden Figures" and I can't recommend it strongly enough.

Daughter-Unit and I saw it Saturday and feel the same as Mamacita. Hidden Figures was one of the best movies I've ever seen.

It's shocking to be aware of how recently people were treated so unequally. Being forced to use the bathroom that's a half mile away because there were no "colored" bathrooms anywhere except that one building is enough to get my blood boiling!

See this movie. It is beyond good!

I agree. Highly recommended, not just for the subject matter but also for the way the story unfolds and for the way the women respond with humour to situations which could have made them cry.
Example:
Prissy male white engineer: "You can't come to the daily briefing with the Air Force because there is no protocol for a woman to go to such meetings."
Black female mathematician: "But I can't start the calculations you want until you tell me 3 hours later what came out of the briefing . And there's no protocol for putting a man into space either, but that's what we're doing, so I'm going in."

Mrs T had a more political response: If that's what white America was still like 100 years after slavery was nominally ended, then it's no wonder that the reaction to having a black President and women in positions of power was so severe that they elected Trump.
 
Posted by tessaB (# 8533) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:
Escaped the 40C+ weather last week to see Lion in an air-conditioned cinema. An amazing true story. At least I think it is pretty faithful to the story.

Saw Lion last night in a tiny cinema in Rye. Very weird seeing these huge vistas of land, sea and sky in a small room that held about maximum 50 people. Great film though. The little boy who acted Dev Patel as a child was amazing, just incredible acting. Loved it.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Notes on Blindness about my former colleague John Hull - very moving, as was the man himelf.
 
Posted by DonLogan2 (# 15608) on :
 
I rather enjoyed T2 a couple of weeks ago, different to trainspotting but as ever Spud is an absolute star.

On Thursday my lovely wife is off to a friends for the evening so it is a steak or possibly seafood and chips to settle down to watch a film I have not seen in ages by the Coen brothers called Blood Simple not a great film but very enjoyable noir-ish tale with M. Emmett Walsh as a disgusting private investigator.
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
"Toni Erdmann" a very funny (though sometimes bittersweet) German film about a 40 y.o. female management consultant, and her father who by pretending to be a life coach of her main client, makes a farce of her business meetings, while he tries to restore her humanity.

Apparently it's being remade by Hollywood for American audiences, who Hollywood believes can't cope with subtitles. I'll bet some of the best scenes are cut out in the American remake, especially (spoiler alert!) the hilariously misunderstood nude party. (Nudity is not much of an issue in Germany, home of the original "naturist" movement.)
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
[QUOTE].... I'm also reading the book on which the movie was based now, to get more of the story (I usually want to do that when I watch "based on a true story" movies).

Both "Hidden Figures" and "United Kingdom" are fine films, "based on" true stories told at greater length and in more detail in books. In both cases, the true story spreads over more years and lacks at least one key scene in the film. In both cases, the outcome of the key scene is true (the mathematician Katherine did play a serious role in working out astronaut Glenn's orbit; Botswana came to independence with control of its diamond resource) but the real life sequence of events to get to that outcome was more complicated than portrayed.

But such compression is in the nature of most (all?) film adaptations, so I don't think it matters - especially if in a "true" story the core truth comes through, which it did IMO in both these films.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
We went with a family with a 6-year-old to see Lego Batman. It was fun, especially if you know a great deal about the comic book character. But not a tour-de-force like the first Lego movie, which was spectacular.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
We went with a family with a 6-year-old to see Lego Batman. It was fun, especially if you know a great deal about the comic book character. But not a tour-de-force like the first Lego movie, which was spectacular.

We saw Lego Batman last night -- no 6-year-old to justify our existence, just me and my husband and our 17-year-old daughter. I loved it. It's the perfect antidote to the way the Batman movies have kept getting darker and darker and more intense and broody.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Yes, a solid case can be made that while the main line of comic books and (Lord knows) the movies have lost their way, the children's versions of the Dark Knight hold true. The Batman Animated series is very nearly perfect.
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
Are any Shippies attending any of the Borderlines Film Festival? It is about halfway done. There are a few films being shown that I wouldn't mind seeing if, you know, I wasn't an ocean or so away.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Defiance true story of Jewish resistance to the Nazis
 
Posted by Bene Gesserit (# 14718) on :
 
We watched Doctor Strange yesterday, and loved every moment. It's certainly different from other Marvel films.

We also re-watched Thor: The Dark World, and are looking forward to Ragnarok.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Wasn't Strange fun? Fully capturing the trippy drug-like imagery of the 1960s, when he first appeared on the scene.

I do not see every Marvel movie (they are too action-heavy, there's a limit to how much superheroic combat I can tolerate) but I have heard good reports of Logan, the new Wolverine film.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
I saw Logan last night. It really is very good; it's unlike any of the other Marvel films and, I suspect, what DC would like their films to look like.

Be warned, it's extremely violent, though in a believable way. I find violence with real consequences infinitely preferable to the many films where the characters are beating the crap out of each other without leaving bruises or taking out unwitting police officers.

The actor playing the girl, Laura, stands up against Stewart and Jackman and there's an unexpected and non-comedic turn by Stephen Merchant.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
I saw Logan last night. It really is very good; it's unlike any of the other Marvel films and, I suspect, what DC would like their films to look like.

They need to hire, and listen to, writers more than they need fancy directors. Seriously. This is why PIXAR was kicking Disney's arse until they merged. Story is king.

quote:

Be warned, it's extremely violent, though in a believable way. I find violence with real consequences infinitely preferable to the many films where the characters are beating the crap out of each other without leaving bruises or taking out unwitting police officers.

The actor playing the girl, Laura, stands up against Stewart and Jackman and there's an unexpected and non-comedic turn by Stephen Merchant.

Other than the whole mutant thing, I do think it was the most realistic of the recent superhero films.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
I saw Logan last night. It really is very good; it's unlike any of the other Marvel films and, I suspect, what DC would like their films to look like.

They need to hire, and listen to, writers more than they need fancy directors. Seriously. This is why PIXAR was kicking Disney's arse until they merged. Story is king.
You're not wrong. That would explain why the most logical and consistent superhero film is The Incredibles.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Indignation.

Based on a Philip Roth novel about a young, New York-area Jewish man attending college in smalltown Ohio in the early 1950s.

If it's not too much of a SPOILER...

One thing I liked about the film is that after the first ten minutes, you pretty much know how it's all gonna end up, and so you can have fun ticking off the list of things that the main character does to make that eventuality come true.

[ 18. March 2017, 14:39: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
Get Out.

A young white woman takes her black boyfriend to meet her family for the first time, and they don't know he's black.

Best seen knowing as little as possible.

It was great. Thrilling, scary, funny. Well performed. Both my wife and I enjoyed it.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
I went to see "A United Kingdom" where a black man brings his white wife home to Africa and his relatives and the highest level of the British government tells them to "Get out!"
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Al Eluia (# 864) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bene Gesserit:
We watched Doctor Strange yesterday, and loved every moment. It's certainly different from other Marvel films.

Yes, Dr. Strange was a lot of fun.

My other two recent movies were:

The Lego Batman Movie. It plays with the tradition and has a number of references to the old 60s TV series with Adam West, which I appreciated.

Masterminds, a comedy from 2016 that didn't have much impact at the theaters but has a great cast including Kristen Wiig and Zach Galifiniakis. It's about a huge armored-car heist that actually happened in 1997 and let's say the title is highly ironic.

[ 28. March 2017, 15:05: Message edited by: Al Eluia ]
 
Posted by Mere Nick (# 11827) on :
 
My wife and I were invited by a group to see The Shack. We have heard from some folks that the book was good and that's about all we knew about it. We found it far more intense than we expected.
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mere Nick:
My wife and I were invited by a group to see The Shack. We have heard from some folks that the book was good and that's about all we knew about it. We found it far more intense than we expected.

Was the film good/ bad? How?
 
Posted by Mere Nick (# 11827) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Clingford:
quote:
Originally posted by Mere Nick:
My wife and I were invited by a group to see The Shack. We have heard from some folks that the book was good and that's about all we knew about it. We found it far more intense than we expected.

Was the film good/ bad? How?
We seem to think it was good. I suppose we thought going in it would be something light and entertaining to watch while we spent a pleasant evening with some of the members of a nearby congregation who had invited us. I was probably thinking it would be something along the line of a spiritual Hallmark type of movie, or maybe something like Touched by An Angel, Highway to Heaven, something like that. It was actually much more intense and dealt with the types of things we think about between the time our head hits the pillow and we fall asleep.

A family's youngest daughter is abducted and killed while the family is on a camping trip. Blood stains and the dress she was wearing are located in a shack. The father, especially, is in severe mental and emotional agony because he blames himself and blames God for not protecting her. He later goes back to the shack and has an encounter with personifications of the trinity. They show and teach him how they look at things that happen and the people involved.
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
Thank you.

It sounds as though you haven't read the book - I read about half before getting annoyed by it and abandoning it. So I wondered how the film version might compare.
 
Posted by Mere Nick (# 11827) on :
 
No, I haven't read the book. I looked up the book in wikipedia and the plot of the book, as described in wikipedia, appears to be very close to the movie.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
I just got to see Hidden Figures, about the black women mathematicians at NASA in the 1960s - wonderful film! I highly recommend it.
I'd love to see more films with mainly black casts, too.
There are some very good actors in this one - plus the chap who plays Sheldon Cooper in The Big Bang Theory, as an engineer being generally unpleasant to Katherine, the main character, and Kevin Costner leading the project (I haven't watched any of his films since the terrible Robin Hood one, but he was really good here).
I loved the way Dorothy Vaughan got "her girls" into the IBM computing section so they didn't lose their jobs as "computers" too.
And the romance subplot between Katherine and Jim was really sweet.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
OMG, Stetson, have you seen "Maggie's Plan"?

Synopsis: Greta Gerwig gets involved with a married man (Ethan Hawke),then three years later falls out of love with him and tries to hand him back to his ex wife (Julianne Moore, rocking a painfully phony German accent. But hey, it's a comedy [Big Grin] )

I thought of this because of your just professed love of slacker films and this one is like Jim Jarmusch meets Woody Allen. And I love Greta Gerwig. She is such an adorable schlemiel.

Anyhow, it really has that old school golden era of indie film feel, complete with ska soundtrack.

Watched it a couple of weeks back. Yeah, it was good, I'll give it 7.5 out of 10.

I liked the motif of slackers and their preoccupations having progressed into academia, though I did find myself wondering how much of that was exaggeration, and how much of it was possibly an accurate reflection of current intellectual concerns. Is the professor's field of "ficto-critical anthropology[or whatever it was]" a real thing, for example? I liked the Greta Gerwig character having some job that involved the commercialization of rarefied academic pursuits.

And yeah, Gerwig is pretty adorable. Even before recognizing her, the film was reminding me of Frances Ha, in a good way, and I think that was largely due to her performance.

And the sperm-donor character was classic slacker- film.

[ 09. April 2017, 19:22: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
A friend twisted my arm into seeing The Shack. I refused to read the book when it was being used for discussion in my (and many others) church.

The beginning was a bit confusing. (Is that the grown boy, or is it that other person?) However, I did catch up eventually to who and what was going on.

I had been warned to have a hanky and I'm glad I took that advice to heart. Surprise! I did really like the movie! God being played by a black woman totally warmed my heart!

The big lessons I learned were:

Not a bad takeaway from a movie, I would say.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
The Founder. Michael Keaton as Ray Kroc, long-time CEO of McDonalds.

Manages to transcend the usual parameters of the quickie biopic, ending up as a lightly cynical takedown of the rags-to-riches mythos. You can think of it as another entrant into the Dark Side Of The American Dream genre, but not caustic enough to deeply offend any true believers who happen to have wandered into the theatre.

Interesting that in the "Where They All Ended Up" section at the end, it it stated that Kroc's last wife donated a lot of money to National Public Radio. NPR being the sort of thing generally beloved by people who would agree with the script's negative assessment of dog-eat-dog capitalism.

[ 23. April 2017, 09:31: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
The Imitation Game about how Alan Turing saved us from an extra 2 years of war.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Jersey Boys.

Clint Eastwood-directed biopic about the Four Seasons. Made me remember that I never really liked most of their songs. That lead singer's falsetto kinda grates on my nerves.

But interesting as kind of a light-gangster flick. Those guys were apparently mixed up with the mob, largely via the legal and financial problems of one of their members. That aspect kept the story going at a tolerable pace.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Nocturnal Animals.

Story-within-a-story plot about a woman reading her ex-husband's violent-crime manuscript, and her reaction to it.

As is often the case with dual-narratives or stories-within-stories, you get the impression that neither plot line would be interesting on its own(even though one of them is supposed to be a stand-alone novel), but the writers figured that putting them together would somehow redeem the banality of both.

As well, the overall effect works by that annoying trick(which Hitchcock once publicaly criticized) of with-holding information from the viewer that is available to the characters. We KNOW there must be a reason why the woman seems so disturbed by her husband's otherwise generic crime writing, something related to her past, but since she is never shown talking about it, we have to spend the whole film wondering what it might be. Until the script makes the arbitrary decision to show it to us in a flashback near the end.

Those complaints aside, if you are willing to accept the manipulative nature of the set-up, it's a fairly entertaining, and at times rather eerie, ride. Probably most effective when it veers into horror territory a few times.

[ 15. May 2017, 16:10: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Get Out.

I'd say it's the best horror-film I've seen in years, but that would be from the perspective of someone who more-or-less gave up on the genre a long time ago. But even with that caveat, I'd still rate it pretty high.

Quick synopsis: Black guy goes to visit the family of his white liberal girlfriend, only to find that they are not quite as welcoming and tolerant as they might appear(to put it mildly). The acerbic social satire deftly manages to avoid blunting the pleasingly eerie atmosphere.

One issue I have with the execution of the story...

In a horror film where unreal things are happening, the explanation is inevitably going to involve either a) science-fiction, or b) the supernatural. Without giving away which route this particular films takes, I will say that I think they'd have done better to go with the other one. YMMV.

[ 22. May 2017, 15:50: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by louis crandall (# 18781) on :
 
watched The red turtle on dvd over the weekend excellent film. Highly recommended. French/dutch/japanese but as it is a silent film no worry about subtitles.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Welcome to the Ship of Fools, louis crandall! Heaven is a great place for a first post and I hope you'll check out all the other boards!

Be sure to check out The Ten Commandments and if you'd like to introduce yourself we have a dedicated Welcome thread here.

I hope you enjoy your voyage with us.
[Smile]

jedijudy
One of the helpful Heaven Hosts

 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
The Book Thief about a girl who steals books to read to a Jew she is hiding in Nazi Germany.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
Be sure to check out The Ten Commandments

Very appropriate for a film thread [Biased]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
[Big Grin]
So true!
 
Posted by louis crandall (# 18781) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
I saw La La Land and enjoyed it very much. A true original movie musical that isn't animated -- those are rare. Emma Stone is luminous, truly beautiful in it.

I also saw The Magnificent Seven, the remake starring Denzel Washington. Awful. That's ninety minutes of my life gone; thank goodness I had my knitting.

sadly the fact that this was a remake of a classic movie should warn folks off. that being said I also own the film it was a remake of - the seven samurai
 
Posted by Dal Segno (# 14673) on :
 
Moana

A Disney princess movie with no love interest. Finally!

Good songs. Good humour. Fantastic introduction to the fact that Pacific islanders explored an enormous ocean and settled almost every island in that ocean using fleets of large catamarans*. Rather knocks on the head any idea of them being primitive savages. Sadly, the movie also panders to stereotypes but I think that the positives outweigh the negatives.

* AIUI the largest Pacific catamarans were longer than the European exploration ships. And they sailed in fleets. New Zealand is believed to have been settled in seven waves of colonisation around about 1100 AD, and you only need to look at a map of the Pacific to see how many thousands of miles the settlers had to sail to get to New Zealand from the nearest island groups.

[ 27. May 2017, 12:45: Message edited by: Dal Segno ]
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
Moana got mixed reaction from the Pacific Island communities, of which I am part. Many were pleased to see some characters who were like them or their relatives; every islander has a feisty grandmother or aunt like Moana's in the film. The village scenes and sounds had a strong feel of Samoa. And it was, as you say,good to see the skills of Pacific navigators (some of whom were indeed women) recognised. The biggest concerns were about the rather cartoonish demi-god and how he was portrayed.

The Marama and I went to a very different film last week, namely The Viceroy's House, about the partition of India in 1947, into the two new independent countries of India and Pakistan. As well as showing some of the politicians and civil servants in discussions and riots on the streets, the film-maker, Gurinder Chadhna (some of whose family died in the chaos of those events) brought the tensions to a human scale by portraying a [fictitious] doomed love affair "below stairs" between a Moslem woman and a Hindu man, who were both among the thousands of servants in the Viceroy's House.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Before I Fall.

Groundhog Day, minus the comedy, combined with the setting, mood, and characters of Twilight. Probably rates about a 7/10 if you are in the target demographic(see the above Twilight reference.)
 
Posted by aizen (# 18794) on :
 
The Lego Batman Movie

Love the Lego Movie and there was nothing that indicated that I would not enjoy the Lego Batman Movie. It was pretty entertaining. There was nothing wrong with them doing every superhero cliche since they basically making fun of themselves throughout the movie. Oh, and there are a few jabs against Marvel here and there.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Welcome to the Ship, aizen! I'm glad you stuck your toe in here! Heaven's a great place to get your feet wet!

You may wish to go to the Welcome Aboard thread in All Saints to let other Shipmates know that you are aboard.

I hope you enjoy the voyage with us!

jedijudy
One of the helpful Heaven Hosts


[ 05. June 2017, 11:58: Message edited by: jedijudy ]
 
Posted by aizen (# 18794) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:
Welcome to the Ship, aizen! I'm glad you stuck your toe in here! Heaven's a great place to get your feet wet!

You may wish to go to the Welcome Aboard thread in All Saints to let other Shipmates know that you are aboard.

I hope you enjoy the voyage with us!

jedijudy
One of the helpful Heaven Hosts

Thank you for the welcome message sir. Will do sir. Again thank you for the warm welcome.
 
Posted by Nicolemr (# 28) on :
 
Guardians of the Galaxy 2. A lot of fun, non-stop excitement, not much in the way of anything deeper (though it does sort of delve into the meaning of family), but a lot of fun.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicolemr:
Guardians of the Galaxy 2. A lot of fun, non-stop excitement, not much in the way of anything deeper (though it does sort of delve into the meaning of family), but a lot of fun.

I would add the caveat that one thing that made the original such a delight was the surprise of how it worked. This is not such a novelty in the sequel. Still well worth the watch.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A bit out of date here as I don't really go to the cinema and generally only watch DVDs - this week I splurged on the DVD of the Ab-Fab movie which really is pretty terrible but there were some fun moments - and June Whitfield is still the best of the bunch!
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
Who has seen Wonder Woman? Thoughts?

I saw it with my daughter and some friends last night and really enjoyed it although, as always with superhero movies, the action scenes bored me (not the filmmakers' fault; it's just how my brain is wired). It's a very well-done version of the superhero movie genre that really does right by its main character -- making her as fully rounded and complex as a demigod/superhero can be, keeping the focus on her own character development rather than on her male love interest. Quite enjoyable.
 
Posted by Pine Marten (# 11068) on :
 
Yes, we saw Wonder Woman yesterday. I liked the action scenes (must be how *my* brain is wired [Razz] ) and I thought that Gal Gadot did an extremely good job - as well as being hugely beautiful she made the character very believable and rounded. I stayed interested in the character, and I could also understand every word she said, which I certainly can't do with some other actor superheroes - Iron Man, for example.

I believe there is a sequel planned. I look forward to it [Yipee]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
I saw Wonder Woman, too. It was very enjoyable! The fight scenes were amazing, and WW's development as a very innocent person outside of her native environment was believable and entertaining. ("Oh! A baby!!") The moment she realized she couldn't be a bully was very satisfying.

Looking forward to the next movie!
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
I saw Wonder Woman as well. I very much enjoyed the film, so take the comments below with this in mind.
For the most part, I liked most of the action scenes. The exception being the climactic battle. Way OTT. But, considering superhero films lately, the action was understated.
Some of the physics were just plain wrong. Not the worst I have ever seen, but noticeably not correct.
There were a few pieces of the story that didn't fit.
I have one stronger criticism that I will not detail, because spoilers are evil.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
lilBuddha:
quote:
Some of the physics were just plain wrong. Not the worst I have ever seen, but noticeably not correct.
Only some? The woman leaps hundreds of feet in a single bound! This is a scifi-fantasy after all. I don't know if I could enjoy any comic book movie without turning off my believeability meter. If I can believe the physics of the universe of the story, I'm a happy camper.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
lilBuddha:
quote:
Some of the physics were just plain wrong. Not the worst I have ever seen, but noticeably not correct.
Only some? The woman leaps hundreds of feet in a single bound! This is a scifi-fantasy after all. I don't know if I could enjoy any comic book movie without turning off my believeability meter. If I can believe the physics of the universe of the story, I'm a happy camper.
That isn't what I meant. I meant that if a person was capable of jumping great distances, that is not how it would look. If something is launched with power that ends at the launch site, such as jumping, it will immediately begin to decelerate and fall. The arc of travel is dependent on the initial angle, but the downward force is constant despite the velocity at which the object travels. Something we know from experience, even if we don't understand the physics.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
The moment you start applying simple laws of physics to movies you become unhappy. (Why can you hear the explosions of space weaponry in STAR WARS? Sound waves do not carry in vacuum...) It is continual and there is no escape. (Why, when Superman or Iron Man picks up a car, does the metal not rip off in his hands?) Better to utterly suspend disbelief and just go with the flow.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
The moment you start applying simple laws of physics to movies you become unhappy. (Why can you hear the explosions of space weaponry in STAR WARS? Sound waves do not carry in vacuum...) It is continual and there is no escape. (Why, when Superman or Iron Man picks up a car, does the metal not rip off in his hands?) Better to utterly suspend disbelief and just go with the flow.

This is not how it works for me, nor for most people, I expect. We suspend until something jars us. This will be different for everyone and likely not consistent for anyone.
Star Wars represents an anomaly. If the movement of space vehicles were anywhere near realistic, it would ruin the film.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
You and the Night - poorly made film about dead people who hang on to life by having lots of sex - at its first screening, 90% of the audience walked out iothin thr first half hour.
 
Posted by Nicolemr (# 28) on :
 
Just saw Wonder Woman! Loved it, it was exciting,and captivating, and although I'd be hard put to say just how, it was different than a movie directed by a man. Much less jiggle for one thing.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
My Beloved Goddaughter persuaded me to take her to see A Dog's Purpose. It wasn't a film I'd have chosen to see myself, but I took her out of a sense of godmotherly duty.

What can I say? A Dog's Purpose is cliched, schmaltzy, cheesy and has a ridiculous plot. It was so bad that it was actually good. I cried. I laughed. I cried some more. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
The Last Match about macho Cuban footballers and stray affections.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicolemr:
Just saw Wonder Woman! Loved it, it was exciting,and captivating, and although I'd be hard put to say just how, it was different than a movie directed by a man. Much less jiggle for one thing.

For me the biggest difference (and of course it's not to say that a male director couldn't do the same, just that they less often do) is how completely rounded and developed a character Diana, as the main character in her own show, was. She faced the kind of challenges and character growth that we expect of male superheroes in their movies. And Steve, while also a fully-fleshed-out character in his own right, is clearly there to further HER development as a character, which is the role that women normally play in movies about male heroes. It sounds so obvious that in a movie called Wonder Woman, Wonder Woman would actually BE the main character, but it's rare enough to see a female hero portrayed with full complexity and agency that it does stand out within the genre.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
I went and saw "Meghan Leavy" yesterday. It is very inspiring and well done. It is a true story about a young woman who found a new way of connecting with life by becoming a Marine who handled a special bomb-sniffer combat dog. If you aren't crazy about war films, it's maybe not for you. But the Iraq war is just the setting. It is more about Meghan's progress in finding her way into life.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Daughter-Unit hadn't seen Wonder Woman yet, so we went together yesterday. She's a Marvel comics fan, and really hasn't liked any of the DC movies. Until this one. She loved it, and I really enjoyed seeing it again!
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
The Circle. Techno-thriller about an evil Silicon Valley corporation bent on world domination.

Pretty much just a re-make of the 2001 internet-thriller Antitrust, updated for the social media era. Same general plot, setting, characters etc. As such, not particularly cutting edge, making the same basic point as the earlier film.

Fairly standard portrayal of tech-firm culture(officially non-hierarchical, but lots of idolization of the boss), which might have seemed like a novelty in 2001 but not so much now. If you're someone who explicitly thought it would be a good idea for one large corporation to control the whole world including governments, this might serve as a wake-up call.

Tom Hanks seemed to be slumming it a bit in this film. It's the sort of thing I'd more expect to see Nicholas Cage doing.

I'm still gonna give it 7/10, because it works okay within the standards of the middle-brow sociopolitical thriller, and if you don't go in expecting much, you'll probably find yourself suitable entertained for a couple of hours.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
We went to see Wonder Woman yesterday. Well worth while if you enjoy superhero movies at all. Good casting is essential for this kind of thing, and they did it perfectly this time.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Emmanuelle

The original, 1974.

Yeah, yeah, I know. But I can honestly say I watched it out of historical interest, since it's apparently considered a milestone for its genre, and there are many other films of the same type I could have watched for less money here, if that's what I was after.

Basically, a combination of softcore porn flick, cheap travel documentary, and laughably self-important meditation on lust and love. The ostensible premise is that the French diplomatic corp in Bangkok are so bored by their idle rich lifestyle that they have nothing to do but lounge around all day having sex with each other. That's pretty much the whole background, with a focus on the title character's rather cliched erotic awakening.

The scenes of everyday life in Thailand seemed rather authentic, for whatever that's worth.
 
Posted by aizen (# 18794) on :
 
Nobody judge me but I just watched the Power Rangers movie. Good movie. Although the soundtrack reminds me of the Stranger Things one. Anybody else feel the same way?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Just took in The Exception, a movie about the last year of Kaiser Wilhelm's life. Excellent! I will write a review. Christopher Plummer (last seen by me singing 'Edelweiss' in The Sound of Music opposite Julie Andrews) is dynamite in the title role.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
My Beautiful Laundrette by Hanif Kureishi In Thatcher's racist England, Asians get on by being capitalists.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Hidden Figures.

I actually didn't think it was all that great. Yeah, the history(which I had never known before) was interesting, and it's a very good thing that the women's story has finally been brought to the screen.

But there was nothing particularly noteworthy about the film-making. I didn't even think it did a good job of capturing a period feel. (Not least because, as far as I could tell, some of the musical choices weren't even from that era).

All in all, sort of what I'd expect from a made-for-TV movie.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Interesting. I loved Hidden Figures, but must admit a bias towards the subject so I would need to rewatch it to assess your comments. And I sort of don't want to. The impression I have now is more meaningful to me than a sober appraisal.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
I enjoyed Hidden Figures - but I think that what I enjoy is a compelling story rather than "noteworthy film-making". (And now I want to read the book, so I can get all the details right.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Beautiful Thing - refreshingly celebratory rather than guilt-ridden adolescent sexuality.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
I enjoyed Hidden Figures - but I think that what I enjoy is a compelling story rather than "noteworthy film-making". (And now I want to read the book, so I can get all the details right.

For the record, I wasn't trying to come off like a film snob when I wrote that. I guess I was hoping for something a little more off-the-beaten-path, but I recognize that when telling that kind of story, a straightforward narrative is probably to be expected.

A few nights back I watched Miss Potter, and ironically(given what I wrote above) I quite liked it, even though the story is told in a pretty cut-and-dry fashion. In fact, it was actually the most "innovative" parts that I liked the least, ie. I really didn't buy the need to include animated sequences in with the live-action, since the story does not otherwise dwell on skirting the boundaries between fantasy and reality. We know that Potter writes fairy tales, and that she sometimes talks about her creations as if they were real, but she's not really shown as delusional.

I'm not quite sure why I liked it, since I don't usually care for period pieces set more than about a century ago. I guess something about it put me in the mood for its Edwardian narrative and trappings.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stetson:
The Circle. Techno-thriller about an evil Silicon Valley corporation bent on world domination.

Pretty much just a re-make of the 2001 internet-thriller Antitrust, updated for the social media era. Same general plot, setting, characters etc. As such, not particularly cutting edge, making the same basic point as the earlier film.

Fairly standard portrayal of tech-firm culture(officially non-hierarchical, but lots of idolization of the boss), which might have seemed like a novelty in 2001 but not so much now. If you're someone who explicitly thought it would be a good idea for one large corporation to control the whole world including governments, this might serve as a wake-up call.

Tom Hanks seemed to be slumming it a bit in this film. It's the sort of thing I'd more expect to see Nicholas Cage doing.

I'm still gonna give it 7/10, because it works okay within the standards of the middle-brow sociopolitical thriller, and if you don't go in expecting much, you'll probably find yourself suitable entertained for a couple of hours.

I watched it againg last night, and came away slightly more impressed than I was the first time. Specifically, I liked the way it grappled with the dilemna of Transperancy Versus Privacy(ie. the pros and cons of social media making so much information available to the world). As opposed to typical pop liberalism, which tends to treat both things as unquestioned benefits, without considering that they do in fact clash at times.

Also, it was interesting to see Tom Hanks as a villain, albeit one subtly drawn. I don't think I can think of another instance of him playing the bad guy.

[ 17. July 2017, 06:11: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by gustava (# 15593) on :
 
Originally posted by Stetson: The Circle. Techno-thriller about an evil Silicon Valley corporation bent on world domination.

Read the book fairly recently and found it chilling, didn't know there was going to be a film. Looking forward to it in a grim sort of way
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
I don't know if I would call the film outright chilling, though Tom Hanks as the bad guy has a rather insidious creepiness about him. The script does a good job of capturing the deceptive friendliness and self-deprecation of the character.

I'm guessing Hanks was chosen for the role because audiences haven't been accustomed to having negative thoughts about him since he socked Alex Keaton in the jaw three decades ago.

[ 17. July 2017, 10:59: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
I had a highly-successful horror dvd double bill at the weekend: Zombieland and It Follows.

Zombieland was a re-watch, but it bears repeat viewing. Silly and gory by turn, it has one of the best celeb cameos in film. Also a search for twinkies makes me wonder what I'd do for a Jaffa Cake in post-apocalyptic Britain.

It Follows was a whole other matter. There is a little on-screen violence, but it mostly relies on building tension and clever camera angles. It would have been better on a cinema screen as you want to keep an eye on the edges of the picture, but held up on dvd.

It was nice to see a bunch of young adults portrayed as able to cope with a rapidly changing situation without hysterical screaming, disbelief and general uselessness.

The Babadook is still waiting for me to crack the cellophane. Fingers crossed.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Aban and Khorshid based on a true story of two gay men senteneced to death in Iran.
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
Wonder Woman, based on a woman and wonder.
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by RooK:
Wonder Woman, based on a woman and wonder.

I tend not to like documentaries.
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
I had a highly-successful horror dvd double bill at the weekend: Zombieland and It Follows.

Zombieland was a re-watch, but it bears repeat viewing. Silly and gory by turn, it has one of the best celeb cameos in film. Also a search for twinkies makes me wonder what I'd do for a Jaffa Cake in post-apocalyptic Britain.

It Follows was a whole other matter. There is a little on-screen violence, but it mostly relies on building tension and clever camera angles. It would have been better on a cinema screen as you want to keep an eye on the edges of the picture, but held up on dvd.

It was nice to see a bunch of young adults portrayed as able to cope with a rapidly changing situation without hysterical screaming, disbelief and general uselessness.

The Babadook is still waiting for me to crack the cellophane. Fingers crossed.

I have seen all 3 films and would recommend all of them. I think that The Babadook is the best of them.
I agree with your assessment of It Follows as it has a good atmosphere which it what I like in horror.
Zombieland is a fun romp which I look forward to seeing again as we have got hold of the DVD.
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
I enjoyed Baby Driver last week. I am a fan of Edgar Wright and the film didn't let me down. It was a ride. I happened to see it in a subtitled screening which wasn't a distraction and was a plus in telling you the name of the songs that were playing. The film was stylish, well written and performed.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Clingford:
Zombieland is a fun romp which I look forward to seeing again as we have got hold of the DVD.

I suspect the commentary will be a corker too, which is why I bought the DVD.

It Follows has a commentary, not by the director or actors, but by a critic and an academic, which is highly unusual. Not listened to it yet, but I'm looking forward to hearing their analysis.
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
Recently re-watched Dirty Dancing, a movie about dancing that some consider unclean.
 
Posted by Prester John (# 5502) on :
 
Tom Hanks also plays the villan role in Lady Killers which was directed by the Coen brothers. I loved it.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Prester John:
Tom Hanks also plays the villan role in Lady Killers which was directed by the Coen brothers. I loved it.

Thanks for the reminder. Yes, from what I recall of the previews, he was supposed to be a bad guy, albeit in a farcical sort of a way.

I'll likely never know for sure, though, since I really dislike the Coen brothers, and manage to force myself through one of their films about once every five years. And Lady Killers, despite being readily available at my local dvd place, is not one of the films I'm likely to sit through.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
The original Ealing The Ladykillers was so good, I'm not sure why anyone wanted to remake it.

M.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Recently saw 'Arrival'. Yes, it was different. Yes, it was more realistic than your average First Contact film... to the point of being slightly dull and also annoying in places. Am I the only woman on the planet who wanted to slap the main male character for informing the (female) linguist that "You think about language like a mathematician"? Patronising swine. Ignorant, too; you'd expect a research mathematician to know about mathematical linguistics.

SPOILERISH STUFF


quote:
...and the ruminations on language and its relation to reality are along the lines of Eskimos Have Twenty Five Words For Snow.
I know too much about linguistics to really enjoy this film properly. The strong version of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis (or, more accurately, linguistic determinism ) is now considered to be false, although linguistic relativity, the weaker version of the theory (=language influences thought and perception) is still under investigation.

And the McGuffin seems to be that the American linguist with experience of translating Farsi decodes the alien writing system before anyone else, even the Chinese - who have a logographic writing system and many distinguished linguists of their own. You'd think that would have given them a head start.

[ 24. July 2017, 16:06: Message edited by: Jane R ]
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
I know too much about linguistics to really enjoy this film properly. The strong version of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis (or, more accurately, linguistic determinism ) is now considered to be false, although linguistic relativity, the weaker version of the theory (=language influences thought and perception) is still under investigation.
I barely passed my linguistics class at university. But I still think I'm on pretty solid ground in doubting that simply adopting a different language, even one with groovy circular characters, could make you lose all sense of time.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
It is a trope in science fiction dating back to the 1950s. I draw your attention to The Languages of Pao by Jack Vance, in which the choice of language drives the political system and culture. (What is impressive about this novel is that it's written, as you would expect, in English. Vance was a great enough prose stylist that he could convey half a dozen alien languages with cadence, word choice, and tone alone.)
Another example would be Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein. In which if you could only learn to speak Martian you would have enormous psychic and sexual powers.
Yes, we know it's not entirely accurate scientifically. But it was just too cool not to play with.

[ 24. July 2017, 17:19: Message edited by: Brenda Clough ]
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
I Love Hooligans about why football hooligans gain status as part of a group.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Brenda:
quote:
Yes, we know it's not entirely accurate scientifically. But it was just too cool not to play with.
[Big Grin]

It's not even in the top seven deadly sins of SF (FTL travel, exoplanets with a survivable biosphere, noise in space, human-shaped aliens, monocultural aliens who always speak English...) And I did like the aliens.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
[NOT-SPOILER]
I was convinced the two hand-shaped aliens, always framed by the viewing window and surrounded by mist, were going to turn out to be limbs of a single creature.

I really enjoyed Arrival for many reasons, but clearly my brain just wanted to make up it's own twist (not the first time that's happened).
[/NOT SPOILER]
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
Just re-watched Raiders Of The Lost Ark with my 8-year-old, in which an ark is found and raided.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
Whoda thunk? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
Did he enjoy it? And did you enjoy that he enjoyed it? I love it when children enjoy films I have loved.

I wanted to show our youth group an old low-budget Scottish film called 'Restless Natives' which I am certain they'd love, but unfortunately when I had a quick review of the DVD to make sure it was suitable I realised how much swearing there is in it.

Cattyish, sticking with the conventional options for now.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Cattyish, A friend and I once showed the Aussie film The Castle at a residential conference for high school students. We remembered the typical humour. Neither of us remembered the copious swearing. No one said anything to us and there were no complaints later from aggrieved parents. We held our breath for a while though.

The organisation which held the conference was and still is, heavily supported by two very conservative groups in Sydney.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
Whoda thunk? [Big Grin]

One of the ESL tectbooks I teach from has a chapter on movies, and the accompanying word list includes the words "raider" and "ark", in preparation for the film being mentioned later on.

But of course, neither of those words is in particularly common use, with "ark" being almost entirely confined to the Bible, where it describes two different objects that don't have all that much in common. And the one referenced in the film is actually the lesser known one.

Suffice to say, not my favorite lesson.

[ 25. July 2017, 08:02: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cattyish:

I wanted to show our youth group an old low-budget Scottish film called 'Restless Natives' which I am certain they'd love, but unfortunately when I had a quick review of the DVD to make sure it was suitable I realised how much swearing there is in it.

I have always been amazed, both with my own kids when they were younger and with church youth groups, how many movies that I enjoyed turn out to be FULL of inappropriate language and content once I preview them for showing to the young folks. The brain is a wonderful editor.
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
Just watched Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, the unlikely tale of a municipality connected to a large number of celestial bodies.

[ 26. July 2017, 14:10: Message edited by: RooK ]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stetson:
But of course, neither of those words is in particularly common use, with "ark" being almost entirely confined to the Bible, where it describes two different objects that don't have all that much in common.

Lots in common. Both were boxes.
 
Posted by Bene Gesserit (# 14718) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by RooK:
Just watched Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, the unlikely tale of a municipality connected to a large number of celestial bodies.

We're still hmm-ing and ha-ing about how much or whether we want to see that one. What did you think of it?
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
My posting on this thread is meant to be performance art. If you want actual discussion about movies... I should probably do that¹, too.

The basic truth is the Luc Besson makes Luc Besson movies. If you have enjoyed Luc Besson movies, you will probably enjoy this Luc Besson movie. It is beautiful visually, and benefits from being seen on a big screen. Thematically it is simple, which might come across as clumsy but is just how Luc Besson focusses attention. I personally enjoyed it rather a lot, because it basically kitchen-sinked a bunch of my favourite science fiction tropes as background details while maintaining the kind of center-stage spectacle that lights up my spatial cognition.

¹ I had a lovely bit of snark I would have normally said there, but the Heaven Hosts are scary in the employee lounge. Don't want to piss them off.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
[Snigger]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
An admittedly demanding friend of mine assessed the film as 'a hot mess.' I do like reviews in one-syllable words.
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Cattyish, A friend and I once showed the Aussie film The Castle at a residential conference for high school students. We remembered the typical humour. Neither of us remembered the copious swearing. No one said anything to us and there were no complaints later from aggrieved parents. We held our breath for a while though.

The organisation which held the conference was and still is, heavily supported by two very conservative groups in Sydney.

I presume that if anyone did complain you remembered to "tell 'em they're dreamin' ".*

[* for those who haven't seen The Castle, this one the often quoted catch-line of the main character, spoken in relation to people who want to sell him goods of dubious quality but inflated price. ]
 
Posted by Twilight (# 2832) on :
 
[Rook's daughter is now 8 years old. Where has my life gone?]

Old Crabapple Review of Arrival:

I spent the first ten minutes cleaning my glasses, actually got up and washed them thinking they must be encrusted with oil steam from cooking. The foggy look did appropriately combine with the frequent blast of a very loud fog horn. It was particularly unpleasant since I had the TV at full volume trying to make out the dialogue.

Amy Adams whispered almost every line in the movie. Even when communicating her first words to the aliens through a big shield and during intense, hurried meetings when everyone else was shouting. And the dim scribbling on whiteboards? Has technology gone backwards since "Close Encounters?"

I can't believe Adams was nominated for best actress for this performance which consisted of two and a half hour of mouth breathing.

Trite is always irritating but even more so in sci-fi movies which are supposed to stretch our minds. Yet, in "Arrival," all military people are still as stupid and trigger happy as they were in the 1950's films. Love is still demonstrated by, "He wouldn't leave your bedside till he knew you were okay," and suspense is created by illogical, arbitrary time constraints -- even when dealing with aliens whose whole thing is "We don't do time."

I want my $1.99 from Redbox back.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
and suspense is created by illogical, arbitrary time constraints -- even when dealing with aliens whose whole thing is "We don't do time."
It was especially awkward the way the subtitled dialogue struggled to convey the idea that the aliens have no concept of time.

"Abbot wellness body not." (Or something)

Whereas, if you're aware that someone who knows Abbot has to be informed that he's sick, it's because you know that there was a time in the past when he was healthy.

[ 29. July 2017, 16:54: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Orthodox about a haredi Jewish butcher turned boxer- it's really about seaching for a father-figure.
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
Godzilla about a radioactive-fire-breathing dinosaur-like monster - it's really about the horror felt about others missing the point of things.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
I Spit On Your Grave, 1978

For anyone who thought that 1970s vigilante films couldn't sink any lower than Death Wish.

Actually, the politics of it aren't that bad, since we are meant to understand that the rationalizations that the rapists offer for their crimes(eg. she was asking for it because of how she dressed), are to be rejected, and we are clearly on the side of the female protagonist taking her revenge.

But, implausible scenarios(eg. castration by motorboat propeller), threadbare script, and bad acting(one guy supposed to be playing a mentally challenged character looks like he's doing "Retard" at a high school skit night) leave no question as to why most of the people associated with this have little in the way of linkage on IMDB.
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
"Salt Bridge", a new film about a [fictional] Indian migrant to Australia, who gets friendly with a local white woman -rather too much so for some of the local Indian community - and who is forced to move interstate. Since the writer/ director lives here in Canberra and loves the place, most of the film was shot here; indeed we saw one scene being shot in a local park about a year ago. So the wife and I enjoyed identifying many familiar locations, supposedly in the fictional town of Salt Bridge, but all obviously somewhere in Australia.

Aimed mainly at the world-wide Indian diaspora, the film is mainly in Hindi with English subtitles, but there is also some English dialogue. It also includes many songs,some of which have lyrics significant for the plot, but (surprisingly) almost no dance. The three leads are professional actors, but some of the minor characters are much less so and it shows.

Nevertheless the film is worth a look, as it has some nice comic lines and the story has enough dramatic drive and home truths about people's behaviour to carry the film along.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Atomic Blonde
I like the hell out of this film. Not an award winner, save for visuals perhaps, but definitely a fun and well made film.
I do have a few criticisms and do agree with the Rotten Tomatoes 75% rating from the critics.
It is a stylish, action-thriller with a terrific cast. Good fun action film with a tiny bit of mind candy. It gives you more than the trailer would imply, but if you do not like the trailers, don't go. Charlize Theron is badass and droolworthy, of course. But Sofia Boutella's performance is probably the best of the film.
The actions scenes are well done and a bit brutal.

Also, nudity and sex. It that offends, do not attend.

SPOILERS!


SPOILERS!


SPOILERS!


Well, mild spoilers.
I think Atomic Blonde succeeds where No Way Out failed. That is really saying too much, but I did warn.

On the nudity, I had mixed feelings. It wasn't completely gratuitous, but not completely essential either. And the sex scene. Well...Erm...I... [Hot and Hormonal] ...hmmm. I liked it, yes, but mixed feelings as well. I think I would approve more if this genre was not so much a boys-club. What could be liberating also panders to that demographic.
Some critics, and viewers, complained the plot was too hard to follow or wasn't coherent. I don't agree. There were plenty of clues and it all made sense in the end. Not claiming it was perfect, but I though a decent job was done fitting things together. However, I can see how others might not agree.
 
Posted by Nicolemr (# 28) on :
 
Just saw Spiderman: Homecoming. The best word I can think of to describe it is "cute". I liked it, it wasn't great, but it was fun and cute.
 
Posted by Kaplan Corday (# 16119) on :
 
Saw The Big Sick yesterday, and if you are happy to make the effort to stay inside the imaginative world of romcom conventions, it is fantastic.

Dunkirk strives to be realistic, but nerds such as me will pick holes in it.

For example, everyone's hair is too long for 1940, when short back'n sides were de rigueur; there is hardly anyone smoking, despite its being in those days the universal panacea in highly stressful situations; people wander around the town and beach unquestioned and unsupervised by beach assembly officers or military field police; and all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.
 
Posted by simontoad (# 18096) on :
 
Dunkirk was the first film I have seen at the Cinema since running screaming from the theatre after the recent Star Wars reboot. I felt it was an excellent film, giving great encouragement to men with bald spots. Mark Rylance FTUW
 
Posted by churchgeek (# 5557) on :
 
Has anyone seen "Detroit"? I'm planning to go tomorrow night. I'm curious what anyone not from Detroit might think of it.

(I do wish they'd given it a better title, though.)
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
I happened to hear one of the Proms season, which started with Korngold's wonderful score for The Sea Hawk, so I curled up for a nostalgic re-watch. I was pleasantly surprised to see it pass the Bechdel Test (Queen Elizabeth talks to Donna Maria, and Donna Maria talks to her maid Miss Latham, and not always about Captain Thorpe), and Donna Maria (Brenda Marshall doing her best Olivia de Havilland impression) actively trying to warn Captain Thorpe that his secret plan has been discovered, and helping him get the secret dispatches to the Queen at the climax.
I also enjoyed the way that the climactic sword fight was cut so that it looked as if Henry Daniell had a clue about what he was doing!
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Saw The Big Sick yesterday, and if you are happy to make the effort to stay inside the imaginative world of romcom conventions, it is fantastic.

Dunkirk strives to be realistic, but nerds such as me will pick holes in it.

For example, everyone's hair is too long for 1940, when short back'n sides were de rigueur; there is hardly anyone smoking, despite its being in those days the universal panacea in highly stressful situations; people wander around the town and beach unquestioned and unsupervised by beach assembly officers or military field police; and all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.

No brown people...
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
I didn't see Dunkirk yesterday. After half an hour of increasingly loud and violent commercials and trailers, plus choking on the dreadful popcorn fog, I left. My dear wife said it was good, but I thoroughly enjoyed the time outside on a beautifully cool summer evening, reading an excellent book.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
That's why, when we lived elsewhere, we tended to wait for films to come to the local Film Theatre rather than going to see them at the Multiplex. It was a far more agreeable experience (and, if you think I'm saying that "a better class of viewer went to the film theatre", you're probably right!)
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Over the last few days I have re-watched The Lord of the Rings for about the 173rd time - I must confess that my comments get a tad more unrepeatable every time but I still enjoy it.
 
Posted by Kaplan Corday (# 16119) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Saw The Big Sick yesterday, and if you are happy to make the effort to stay inside the imaginative world of romcom conventions, it is fantastic.

Dunkirk strives to be realistic, but nerds such as me will pick holes in it.

For example, everyone's hair is too long for 1940, when short back'n sides were de rigueur; there is hardly anyone smoking, despite its being in those days the universal panacea in highly stressful situations; people wander around the town and beach unquestioned and unsupervised by beach assembly officers or military field police; and all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.

No brown people...
Yes, they were certainly part of the British component, though a very small proportion.

https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-08-02/there-were-indian-troops-dunkirk-too
 
Posted by Twilight (# 2832) on :
 
quote:
all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.


Now I'm thinking I may be able to go see it after all.
 
Posted by RuthW (# 13) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
quote:
all deaths from bomb blasts are immediate and silent, with no-one lingering for hours screaming and writhing with limbs missing, bowels hanging out and brains showing.
Now I'm thinking I may be able to go see it after all.
If you're like me in this regard, and I suspect you are, you can see this movie. I pass by pretty much any film with an R for violence, but this is PG-rated. The deaths aren't depicted realistically.
 
Posted by Cathscats (# 17827) on :
 
I saw Dunkirk last week with my teenage son. I expected to have to shut my eyes a lot, but didn't. I didn't find it totally gripping, but it was certainly watchable. Actually, I think the teenage son was the best audience for it. He was entirely enthralled and full of reflective questions later.

I did fear that the end was going to be a bit too much "Land of Hope and Glory" -ish but they reigned it in just in time.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Christopher Nolan stripped most of the carnage of the real Dunkirk in order to tell stories. The result is a war film for a broader audience.
Like most films of this nature, don't look to it as an history, but history adjacent.
A major negative for me was the score. Whilst Hans Zimmer didn't drive the viewers into shrieking madness as he did in Intersteller, the Sheppard tone is overused. Though this might be under Nolan's direction.
 
Posted by Ariston (# 10894) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bene Gesserit:
quote:
Originally posted by RooK:
Just watched Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, the unlikely tale of a municipality connected to a large number of celestial bodies.

We're still hmm-ing and ha-ing about how much or whether we want to see that one. What did you think of it?
Because it's still in theaters . . .
It's not just another Besson film. It's also another French 1970's sci-fi comic book. Which, granted, have influenced . . . well, lots of people . . . but keep in mind: this is a genre where Barbarella was a genuine epoch-making work.

High points of French 1970's Sci-Fi-Comic Books: gorgeous scenery. Sometimes strange, mind-bending themes. Great influence on everything from Star Wars to Nausicaa. Did we mention the scenery? It's gorgeous.

Low points: anything resembling a coherent plot. Depth of characters.

The best F70SFCB's, like Mobeus, don't even try to bother with dialogue or coherent plots. Sometimes, they just embrace the surrealism and run with it. They don't have plot holes or lazy, pastiche charactarizations; no, they're absurdist, trope-subverting fantasies!

If you go in with that mindset—ignore the plot, embrace the absurdity and imagination—it's great. There are a few shots that are lifted straight from Mobeus and his contemporaries (like the helmets in the desert scenes—could swear I've seen those in Airtight Garage), a few others that look like they were meant for dual-page spreads in a full-color album. Gorgeous, imaginative, and sometimes absurd.

If you actually want something that looks like someone thought about the screenplay beyond setting up a world to explore . . . sorry. Not in this genre.

As for Detroit . . . it strikes me as a Socially Conscious Movie. Like, not one with a social conscience. More one that lets you feel Outraged about what Other People Have Done while watching Other People get beat up, shot, and stripped naked. A bit of an overt awards bid cloaked in shock and violence. Which is not to say shocking and violent events don't or didn't happen—but that they can be handled in a way that doesn't exploit them for our lurid viewing pleasure. I don't know which side of the line Detroit winds up on, but it's pretty close either way.

[ 10. August 2017, 22:36: Message edited by: Ariston ]
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
Snuck out to see Atomic Blonde, the retro tale of an intensely powerful female with light-coloured hair.
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:
If you go in with that mindset—ignore the plot, embrace the absurdity and imagination—it's great.

Your description encapsulates the mind space well. If you love looking for visual detail and are amused by metaphorical puns, this movie delivers the genre goods. Otherwise, VATCOATP is going to seem like a mishmash with no compelling point.

On the topic of Atomic Blonde - holy shit the soundtrack. People who remember the 80's will either love it, or die miserable and lonely for lack of having a soul. And the fight scenes are considerably more effective than most action movies; a testament to Theron's raw talent and Leitch's compelling inclusion of entropy.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by RooK:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariston:
If you go in with that mindset—ignore the plot, embrace the absurdity and imagination—it's great.

Your description encapsulates the mind space well. If you love looking for visual detail and are amused by metaphorical puns, this movie delivers the genre goods. Otherwise, VATCOATP is going to seem like a mishmash with no compelling point.

On the topic of Atomic Blonde - holy shit the soundtrack. People who remember the 80's will either love it, or die miserable and lonely for lack of having a soul. And the fight scenes are considerably more effective than most action movies; a testament to Theron's raw talent and Leitch's compelling inclusion of entropy.

For shame. Andy Kaufman is going to haunt you.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
In a fit of [more than usual] insanity I decided to watch the first of the Harry Potter movies last night - I remembered it was bad but had forgotten how bad it was! The disc had a fault so I only saw up to the end of the troll scene and then gave up. John Hurt, Alan Rickman and Maggie Smith were the only redeeming features.

Quoth the raven "Nevermore!"
 
Posted by mark_in_manchester (# 15978) on :
 
My kids (esp the younger, just 10) love them. I've seen some much, much, much poorer kids' films. (Worst so far? Probably an excrescence called 'Home'). I'm going to miss kids films as they both get older.

We just watched the Lego Batman Movie. Which is OK, but I don't think it would stand 2 viewings as the Lego Movie did.
 
Posted by mark_in_manchester (# 15978) on :
 
quote:
Alan Rickman
(Oh - and the films have been useful in that when the neighbours' kids throw shit into my garden - mostly broken toys and dismembered remains of their grandmother's plastic bushes (don't ask) - and I ask them to desist, my kids say that 'Dad has his Snape-voice on again'...)
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
I have returned from the annual Capitolfest movie festival, this year honoring Fay Wray. This year, the feature films were made between 1918 (Little Orphant Annie) and 1934 (The Countess of Monte Cristo and White Lies). There may have been shorts from later years.

As a surprise this year, it was attended by Fay Wray’s daughter, Victoria Riskin. Probably not a coincidence, but she has a memoir about her mother scheduled to be published later this year. Still, her presence highlights just how hard the festival works to find rare movies to show: Ms. Riskin admitted that a couple of the films starring her mother she had never seen (including the previously mentioned The Countess of Monte Cristo)!

Normally I note what films from the festival I’d like to have on DVD. Unfortunately, this year the only one that would go on the list happens to be one that I already own: The Four Feathers (1929). But that doesn’t mean that there was nothing of interest.

For example, there was one called Cheer Up and Smile (1930), which was almost instantly forgettable...except for the fact that it had John Wayne in an uncredited bit part. I found it a bit shocking to realize that John Wayne started appearing in films (in bit parts) in 1927, but did not get to be a big star until his role in Stagecoach (1939).

Little Orphant Annie (1918) (and, yes, it is “Orphant” not “Orphan”) has been available for some time but (as the program points out) never in a GOOD copy. This restoration was eminently viewable, although for me the best part of the movie was an impressively trained cat who seemed able to tolerate everything. As you cat owners know, “toleration” isn’t usually high on a cat’s list of attributes. This one would happily be carried in a scarf (with tail calmly waving) and happily walk up to the reclined star (Colleen Moore) and curl up beside her.

The Sea God (1930) is a typical “tough Americans put one over on primitive islanders” saga and, again, eminently forgettable (despite Fay Wray’s best efforts), but it did have Eugene Pallette in a supporting part. No movie is a complete loss if it has Eugene Pallette in the cast. Once again, he walks away with the best lines in the movie, all delivered with his usual gravel-voiced tones.

The Countess of Monte Cristo (1934) is an amusing comedy with quite a couple chuckles and some bizarre dialogue (“I’m not dangerous, I’m debonair!”). It almost made my list of movies I want on DVD--but I’d rather have the original, which is a 1932 German film called Die Gräfin von Monte-Christo starring Brigitte Helm (probably best known as Maria & the Robot in Metropolis).

And then there were the morally questionable “pre-Code” films: Disorderly Conduct (1932), starring Spencer Tracy as an honest cop who crosses a racketeer who (rather than using violence) uses influence to bust him down a rank. Tracy decides to go crooked and accepts bribes from a more violently inclined racketeer. Tracy’s captain learns Tracy is crooked, and tells him he will be thrown off the force...after he leads a raid against the violent racketeer. Later, thinking himself betrayed, the violent racketeer tries to gun down Tracy and accidentally kills Tracy’s nephew. Tracy, seeking revenge, goes and guns down the violent racketeer and two of his henchmen. Wounded in the battle, he gets back to the police station and returns a bribe he got from the non-violent racketeer. Result? His captain is impressed by his honesty in returning the bribe and reinstates Tracy back to the rank he had at the start of the film. And the three guys he murdered? Ehhhhh, why let that get in the way of a happy ending? What is the moral there? Kill people to get your job back?

Then there was White Lies (1934). A newspaper publisher finds a man who embezzled $30,000, but had returned $20,000 of it and was working on the rest. He publishes the story, the guy gets arrested, convicted and then escapes (after wounding a police man). The embezzler then finds the publisher’s daughter, knocks her unconscious and then murders the guy she is with and places the gun in her hand. She goes to trial, where the publisher sobs that it is all his fault because none of this would have happened if he had not published the first story despite the fact that the embezzler was trying to make good the loss. An honest police detective (in love with publisher’s daughter, natch) captures the embezzler and brings him to the trial while the judge is summing up the case for the jury. Happy ending, including...the publisher swearing that he will hire lawyers to defend the embezzler and “when he gets out of prison” giving him a job. Ummmmmmmmm, he did murder an unarmed guy in cold blood. What makes anybody think he will ever get out of prison????

Anyway, a good time was had. Next year’s featured star will be Ronald Colman! I’m already looking forward to it!

There were also dealers in hard-to-find movies on DVD, and I probably bought too many. But, really, where else am I likely to find Myrna Loy in a 1959 Kinescope of a TV production of Meet Me in St. Louis?
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
Just watched Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom with my 8-year-old. The swashbuckling adventurer with a knack for getting into trouble enjoyed the second Indiana Jones movie.
 
Posted by Twilight (# 2832) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cathscats:
I saw Dunkirk last week with my teenage son. I expected to have to shut my eyes a lot, but didn't. I didn't find it totally gripping, but it was certainly watchable. Actually, I think the teenage son was the best audience for it. He was entirely enthralled and full of reflective questions later.


We saw Dunkirk, today based on what everyone here has said. It was a good pick for the three of us. As with Cathscat, our son liked it best giving it a 10, husband a 9, and me an 8 which is high for me for anything not Howards End-ish.

I long to see Maudie, but it's not showing in a theatre near me; it not being animated, nor having any guns.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Wadd: The Life And Times Of John C. Holmes

1998 documentary about the rather squalid life of the American adult-film actor. I had read, years ago, Mike Sager's landmark article about Holmes in Rolling Stone, so knew the basic outline of his story, and thus the film didn't contain many fresh revelations, but I'm a sucker for 1970s nostalgia, so this worked for me.

One interesting thing about it, cinematically, is the way it uses footage from Holmes' movies to represent the actual events of his life, eg. when the real John Holmes is driving through the American southwest on the run from the law, film footage is shown of his character driving through what looks like a desert area.

No hardcore footage, but enough nudity to render it NSFW. Available on You Tube(as of two days ago, anyway).
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
I just watched Batman vs. Superman-Dawn of Justice for the second time today. I first watched it Saturday (the PG shortened version), and I had no clue what they were going on about. It seemed disjointed and didn't make a lot of sense. So, today, I watched the R rated version. That's the one with all the violence.

It did make more sense to me the second time through. Some of the scenes that were cut in the milder version really had explanations of some of the more confusing parts of the story.

Anyway, once I kind of followed what was going on, it was a mostly good story. There was one part where it seemed Batman had gone home and changed, because his mask was busted up during one scene, then was all nice and new looking in the next. I guess he had to go home to get the Bat Plane. Oh. The Bat Plane and Batmobile both sound like pod racers.

I like Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill playing our heroes, even though I'm not normally an Affleck fan. However, my favorite is Gal Godot! She is Wonder Woman, for real!

I'm glad I watched the movie a second time, and will probably watch a third time with the subtitles turned on. These youngsters mumble too much! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
I long to see Maudie, but it's not showing in a theatre near me; it not being animated, nor having any guns.

Oh, Maudie is lovely, I hope you do get to see it somehow. I know what you mean about the lack of animation or guns ... we also live in the sort of place where smaller, artier movies either don't come at all, or are here so briefly that by the time you've made plans to get out of the house, the movie is gone. But Maudie had a good long run here because it was filmed here and lots of local people were involved (even though it's set in Nova Scotia, it was filmed in Newfoundland because [obscure thing about the Nova Scotia film industry that I don't understand but that lots of NS arts people are mad about but worked out to our benefit here in Nfld in this case]).
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
I saw Logan the other night - in which elderly Professor X and Wolverine go on a road trip with a young girl mutant. As soon as it finished, I spent the rest of the evening trying to re-write it in my head to give a lower body count! There were some characters who you just knew were doomed as soon as they met Logan.

And now I've been told that Peter Capaldi appeared in The Lair of the White Worm, which I remember only for Stratford Johns chewing the scenery and some young chap dashing around the ruins attempting to play bagpipes to calm the monster (I think). The young chap may have been Hugh Grant. So I've sent off for a DVD, which has arrived labelled in German - so this evening's viewing should be hilarious!
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
My Daddy-O and I went to an actual theater to watch a movie! Dad hadn't been to a theater since 2012, so this was a rare event for him.

We saw Spider-Man: Homecoming, which was a real romp! This is my favorite Spiderman. Tom Holland is a cutie patootie and was believable as a teen and all that entails, plus having super powers and trying to prove himself.

The special effects were so much fun! My dad was amazed at the realism.

The story is about a good kid trying to do the right things with varying successes.

**spoiler!**

What will he do when he finds out the father of the girl he has a huge crush on is a Very Bad Guy???

When we left the theater, my dad laughed and said, "Well, it's no Gone with the Wind is it?" But it was fun!

[ETA " ]

[ 31. August 2017, 12:22: Message edited by: jedijudy ]
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eigon:

And now I've been told that Peter Capaldi appeared in The Lair of the White Worm, which I remember only for Stratford Johns chewing the scenery and some young chap dashing around the ruins attempting to play bagpipes to calm the monster (I think). The young chap may have been Hugh Grant. So I've sent off for a DVD, which has arrived labelled in German - so this evening's viewing should be hilarious!

Yes, it was Hugh Grant.

Though what I remember best about the movie is the patented Ken Russell hallucination sequences, like eg. a nun suddenly appearing on the screen and spitting blood.

Seriously, no one did religious horror like Ken Russell. Made The Exorcist look like Uncle Arthur's Bedtime Stories.

Possibly NSFW
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Holding the Man - true love story from Australia about the devastating impact of AIDS.
 
Posted by RooK (# 1852) on :
 
Seven Samurai - a not-true story from classical Nippon about a specific number of a warrior class.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
Stetson - the character in Lair of the White Worm (or Der Biss Der Schlange Frau*, in this case) dashing around in a kilt with bagpipes was indeed Peter Capaldi! He looked so cute with his curls and round glasses! I do have questions, though - this may have been covered in the script, if I'd been watching in English, but where on earth did he get that mongoose from? And was it really up his kilt all that time?
Hugh Grant was the aristocratic RAF officer - Stratford Johns was his butler.

*The Kiss of the Snake Woman
 
Posted by georgiaboy (# 11294) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jedijudy:

"Well, it's no Gone with the Wind is it?"

[ETA " ]

Deserves a place in Quotes File!
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eigon:
Stetson - the character in Lair of the White Worm (or Der Biss Der Schlange Frau*, in this case) dashing around in a kilt with bagpipes was indeed Peter Capaldi! He looked so cute with his curls and round glasses! I do have questions, though - this may have been covered in the script, if I'd been watching in English, but where on earth did he get that mongoose from? And was it really up his kilt all that time?
Hugh Grant was the aristocratic RAF officer - Stratford Johns was his butler.

*The Kiss of the Snake Woman

Sorry, Eigon, I was right about Grant's presence in the cast, but wrong about which character he played. Actually, I can't remember much about who did what in that film, it's probably been about twenty years since I saw it.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Saw The Beguiled, set in a Virginia girls school during the Civil War. You could probably say it qualifies as a Female Lord Of The Flies.

I was a little disappointed to find out it was a remake of an earlier film, since I usually don't see the necessity of doing that, unless it's really different from the original. This one may be, for all I know, though I'd doubt it, since there's really only so many ways a story like that can be told.

Taken on its own terms, it's entertaining enough, with a slightly leering focus on feminine miscreancy. Probably not as profound as some might want to make it out to be.

[ 09. September 2017, 18:19: Message edited by: Stetson ]
 
Posted by louis crandall (# 18781) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stetson:
Saw The Beguiled, set in a Virginia girls school during the Civil War. You could probably say it qualifies as a Female Lord Of The Flies.

I was a little disappointed to find out it was a remake of an earlier film, since I usually don't see the necessity of doing that, unless it's really different from the original. This one may be, for all I know, though I'd doubt it, since there's really only so many ways a story like that can be told.

Taken on its own terms, it's entertaining enough, with a slightly leering focus on feminine miscreancy. Probably not as profound as some might want to make it out to be.

The original version of The Beguiled came out in 1971 and starred a certain Clint Eastwood and was directed by his friend Don Siegel.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
Yep, Don Siegel of Body Snatchers and Dirty Harry fame. The latter being one of the more subtle and understated of the vigilante genre.
 
Posted by Stetson (# 9597) on :
 
WEEKEND ROUNDUP...

Saw American Made on Saturday. Sort of a political-procedural thriller, along the lines of Charlie Wllson's War or American Hustle(ie. political procedural), but with more action, violence and suspense. Entertaining enough, and heavy on the 80s trappings for all you nostalgia buffs. I actually remember watching Ronald Reagan's anti-Sandinista speech where he talks about the photograph that plays such a major role in the plot.

Directed by Doug Liman, son of Arthur Liman, who Iran-Contra buffs will recall as the Senate's chief counsel during the hearings. (This somewhat coincides with the plot.)

And on Sunday, I watched Wind River, about a white wildlife-control officer and a white FBI agent investigating a mysterious death on an Indian Reservation in Wyoming. It starts off promising enough, with expertly crafted atmosphere and cultural tension, but the resolution to the mystery seemed like kind of a letdown. Granted, I'm pretty tired off the too-clever-by-half plot twists that blight so many modern thrillers, but this one erred in the other direction: You can kind of guess, if not outright predict, that the crime in question was something like what it turns out to be.
 


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