Thread: Look what I created! Crafting 2017 Board: Heaven / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
A shiny new thread for all your crafting questions and ideas! [Smile]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Knitting a long Harry Potter scarf for a niece. It'll take ages, it's supposed to be 14 ft long.

[ 07. January 2017, 14:43: Message edited by: Brenda Clough ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks Judy, I can see the shininess from down here.

My eldest son would adore a Dr Who scarf. Length and sameness of knitting even in stripes deters me.
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
Knitting a fox scarf - similar to the old fashioned fox furs - for kiddo who likes to dress up as a "grand lady".
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
We don't have foxes here. They were one of the few animals from Britain that some misguided settler didn't choose to introduce, but an elderly Englishwoman I met when I was about 3 or 4 had a real fox fur and it both fascinated and repelled me. After that I though all foxes must smell of mothballs.

I googled the knitted ones and they looked like a vast improvement.

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Making Christmas garlands for 8 large Christmas trees for the local nursing home. This is so much fun and you-tube has been amazingly helpful. They aged care facility where my 99 yr old mum lives has trouble finding enough volunteers to do the decorating each Christmas. So I suggested taking all the old decorations to my studio to remake them into fat garlands that will go on the trees quickly. "Oh yes please!" they said.

I have had a ball buying up sparkly decorations in the January sales. But the brief keeps expanding....table trees for the 12 dining room tables...Christmas door hangers for each room in the facility...wall decorations for the admin area.

I suspect I will be enjoying doing Christmas craft right up until its December again. Just glad I found out what a "work garland" is before my youngest daughter's wedding. By then I hope to be a boss at making beautiful garlands.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I am still knitting the same jumper I have been knitting since July. Stepdaughter was supposed to be getting it for Christmas, which morphed into supposed to be getting it for her birthday. Taken that her birthday is this week and it still has no sleeves, I think she’s getting an IOU [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I once picked up a fox fur at a jumble sale and slung it on top of the wardrobe while I thought what to do with it. I had to get up in the night and remove the identifiable parts, wrap and bin them, because it was looking at me!

I then made it into a bonnet, lined with some dress material and bound with orange piping cord. I wore it for several years, but when I wanted to stop, I couldn't get anyone to take it. Fur was a no-no, even old fur. (I had always thought it was respect for the animal to keep it going as long as possible.) And I can't remember what I did in the end.

Meanwhile, I have finished the cowl I was making - a tube about a foot across, and long enough to pull up from the neck over my head, as well as wearing it as a roll collar. I have crocheted an edging, but it isn't quite right.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm on the last square of 16 in a crocheted log cabin blanket. It is a pattern from a uk blogger called attic24. This week I hope to start piecing it together.
At Christmas I finished my first ever crocheted shawl, made from hand dyed mini skeins of variegated yarn opened each day throughout advent.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I'm still working on the Morrocan tiles blanket I started last January. I have one large motif to finish, 12 large triangles to finish, 4 small triangles, then the border. I shall be glad when it's done!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I'm still working on the Morrocan tiles blanket I started last January. I have one large motif to finish, 12 large triangles to finish, 4 small triangles, then the border. I shall be glad when it's done!
Other things have been done over the year, 4 baby blankets and 4 twiddle muffs, but I'm going to crack on with this now.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
I'm on the last square of 16 in a crocheted log cabin blanket. It is a pattern from a uk blogger called attic24. This week I hope to start piecing it together.
At Christmas I finished my first ever crocheted shawl, made from hand dyed mini skeins of variegated yarn opened each day throughout advent.

Yesterday I picked up an order of yarn from a Hobart yarnshop. I am in Sydney. I have done little knitting for some months as arthritis in my hands has been bad. I do knit for exercising the fingers, but at times things get too much. This is for a blanket of sixteen squares, each with a different pattern, like sampler of embroidery stitches from 150 or so years ago. Various shades of blues and greys. I hope the fingers can cope with a square at a time.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I can't work very much on my hat at a time. On New Year's Eve, possibly for psychological reasons, the joint at the base of my right thumb decided to get very painful. It stopped that fairly quickly, but a reminder is still there, and in exactly the place that is most worked by the hook for the knitting loom. Irritating.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I am diverted from my knitting to create a series of signs for the protest march next week. I took many a design and calligraphy class in college, and have produced the occasional book cover, but I haven't done serious graphic design in forty years. Nevertheless I just turn the tap on and it pours out. I am astonished at how easy this is and how good the signs look.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
I love knitting but haven't done any for a while, and I can do basic crochet. Some of the ideas mentioned above for crocheted or knitted blanket squares sound just the sort of thing to get me started again. Can any of you recommend somewhere - maybe on line - I can get patterns?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Sparrow, I am enjoying doing the first square. I bought both yarn and pattern from the Stash Cupboard, but that is in Hobart, Tasmania. Some of the patterns I recognise from a couple of books with a variety of stitches. If you have something like that, you may be able to use that.

I liked the yarn it came as a kit, and the hard work of getting tension right for each square so they would be same size after blocking had been already done. The pattern was not cheap, AUD $20 but is printed ion good paper, A4 size so nothing is cramped. Clear photos and a pleasant tone to the accompanying notes. It has been done by employees and friends of the store and was called Montage.

I could have done the extra leg work re tension and stitch numbers but it was good not to have to bother.
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
If you search for 'granny square crochet' on Amazon you will find lots of lovely books, including some that are free kindle downloads (if you don't have a kindle you can set up Kindle for PC - or various other formats - at no cost).
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
The squares I am doing are knitting, not crochet. I do crochet but not often. Stitch dictionaries and similar are useful books and I have several. I have often used them for patterns for decorative socks and scarves. However, I bought the pattern because the stitch numbers etc have been worked out so all squares will block to the same size fairly easily. That is, of course, providing my tension is right. [Biased]
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
Currently (slowly) working on a pair of socks with soles. Slowly because I'd never done socks or Fair Isle before (most of the leg is Fair Isle), and so I've been making 2 test ones using cheap yarn from the local shop (under £2 for a 100g ball of acrylic dk!). Nearly ready to start on the real pair...

I have just been giving in to temptation. The loveknitting site has its winter sale on till midnight tonight. So I downloaded 2 free blanket patterns and bought the yarn required. I hit the top level of discount they were offering. [Hot and Hormonal] Needles will be sorted out when the blankets are closer to the top of the project queue. [Smile]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I have finished my cowl and hat combo, with the hat done in double thickness, and wore them out to the dentist today, as they happened to go with the sweater I was wearing.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Time for politically active ironic knitwear: I have been commissioned to make a pussy hat. My sister-in-law, who is going proudly to sport the same in California, detests pink, so she wants a special black sparkly one. I am very excited about this project.
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
I've done several for friends and their baby girl in pink with rainbow flecks and am doing one in sparkly purple for kiddo. Did a half dozen in various pink or pink and other odd end mixes for co-workers/neighbours. Takes me longer than the "one hour" the website mentioned, but they do knit up pretty quickly/easily. Zero progress on the fox scarf though.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I was at the March on Washington and the sea of pussy hats was just amazing and delightful. Nearly all of them were hand-made, and many of them were given to marchers by enthusiastic crafters.
And can you top this? Here's my blog post: Go and slide down to the last photo. A friend took this photo for me on the Metro train. Those girls were a Scout troop or something. Some energetic mom made them all pink capes in shiny fabric, more than a dozen of them. (I trust she had a serger.) On the back of the capes is "NASTY GIRL".
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Love the look of those capes! I enjoyed seeing all the hand knitted hats at marches around the world. I'm sure I have never seen something quite so well organized. It was fun to see a meme which pointed out that the red ball caps seen at the inauguration were made far away - whereas the pink ones worn in Washington were all hand made in America.

Very little crafting happening here. My sewing machine was protesting last week but it seems to be back to work after a little dusting and the installation of a "jeans" needle. We have a big ice storm arriving tonight so, if there is power, tomorrow could be a day for sewing.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lily pad:
Love the look of those capes! I enjoyed seeing all the hand knitted hats at marches around the world. I'm sure I have never seen something quite so well organized. It was fun to see a meme which pointed out that the red ball caps seen at the inauguration were made far away - whereas the pink ones worn in Washington were all hand made in America.

A notably clueless conservative commentator asked, portentously, "Were all those pink hats made in the USA?" Which led to
this superb response, which I urge all crafters to read. Absolutely hits it, breaking down the multiple levels of cluelessness. Of course these people are not knittable. I wouldn't knit them a potholder.
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
I'm happy to knit him one - and/or send instructions, yarn, and needles so he could give it a go. Could be the making of him ...
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
He, not knowing the value of hand-knits, would certainly run it through the laundry and shrink it. Or he'd use it to wash the car. Not a knittable man.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Did you see the comments from the clueless non-knitworthy Joe Casey? All those hats funded by the only begetter of the idea, George Soros.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
The rumor I saw was that Hillary Clinton (source of all evil including the check-engine light on my car) paid the marchers to march. And, I presume, for their hats. Let's see, three million protestors worldwide and let's say they get a miserable dollar apiece. The hats, let us say another dollar for the yarn, we will assume the knitting was a donation and not a per-hour fee. That makes six million, merely to spite the Ogler in Chief...
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I need some advice with regard to the blind I need to install in my mini-spare room.

This room has a pre-existing astronomical theme, with wallpaper with gold stars on a sort of blue background, and a frieze of sun and moon along the unpapered, magnolia, exposed brick (architectural feature) other wall. It now has cupboards to hide stuff, which will be painted to match the paper it covers, possibly with gold stencilled sun and moon. It also has, hung on the wall, a couple of bamboo flat dishes which look vaguely like astronomical objects, and a number of glow stars in vaguely constellation patterns.

While surfing, a while back, I came across an image I wanted on the blind, fromm the work of Oronce Fine in Paris in the early 16th century.
Le Sphere du Monde The blue is exact for the wall. I investigated the possibility of having it printed on a custom blind, but found that M. Oronce Fine did not own the copyright, but Harvard did. They refused me permission to use it as it would "distort the image".

So I have painted my own, introducing some ideas from John Scotus Eriugena, who held in the 9th century after Martianus Capella of the 5th century that Mercury and Venus orbited the Sun. Also an idea from early users of telescopes that Venus had a moon.

This is not big enough for the blind, so idea number 1 is to photograph it, tidy it up, and send it off to blind printers. However, idea number 2 has surfaced - buy a plain blind and paint it directly. (I don't have a big compass, which would be necessary.)

What do you think?

[ 27. January 2017, 12:26: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Forgot to mention, in mine, the Earth and Water are a better representation of the planet, the Air has the clouds of the Intertropical Convergence Zone over the Equator, and the Fire is the Aurora.

I am toying with the Galilean moons. And more attempt at constellations in the firmament.

[ 27. January 2017, 12:51: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Do you need a compass? There are large round things you could trace. Wastepaper baskets. Platters from the kitchen. Hubcaps. It is also possible to do circles with a pin and a string. Fix the pin in the center, adjust length of string and then tie a pencil to the end.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
But I don't want a hole! And it would need to be about 30in in diameter at the outside. Bigger than a dustbin lid.

I've been thinking about string and pencil - there are gadgets with a sort of inverted dimple at the centre, and I could possibly tie string to one of the drawing holes in one. NIt sure if it would work, though.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I am pondering a needlework pussy hat, for those whose knitting and crochet skills are non-existent [Biased]

Penny, could you do it with a string and pin, then cover the hole by gluing on the innermost circle? Yu would probably need to start won the inside by tracing around something, then base your subsequent pin and string circles on that size getting larger as you go.

It's an awesome project.

Huia
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
But I don't want a hole! And it would need to be about 30in in diameter at the outside. Bigger than a dustbin lid.

I've been thinking about string and pencil - there are gadgets with a sort of inverted dimple at the centre, and I could possibly tie string to one of the drawing holes in one. NIt sure if it would work, though.

Even scotch-taping the end of the string down would do you. Do it on a large piece of paper or card, and then use that as a pattern.

As to pussy hats, the key thing if you try needlework (do you mean needlepoint? On canvas?) is to be sure you can wear it. In other words, it has to have some stretch to stick onto your head. You might consider buying or making a pink cap (there were plenty on Saturday made of pink fleece) and embroidering it.

However, you should just let your creativity flag fly. At the march I saw some men with ordinary dark watchcaps on their heads. They had turned them into pussyhats by attaching pink paper triangles to the tops, with strips of duct tape.

[ 27. January 2017, 18:49: Message edited by: Brenda Clough ]
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
I don't mean to carry on this tangent, but I am intrigued by how widely the idea of knitting/crafting a hat spread. Thanks so much for the link to the Pussyhat Project. I may knit one just for the fun of it and to feel like I have something tangible to say, "I protest!"
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Knitting a long Harry Potter scarf for a niece. It'll take ages, it's supposed to be 14 ft long.

Isn't that Doctor Who rather than Harry Potter?
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Depends on whether it is multicoloured (Dr Who) or pied (Harry Potter).

Jengie
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
I love knitting but haven't done any for a while, and I can do basic crochet. Some of the ideas mentioned above for crocheted or knitted blanket squares sound just the sort of thing to get me started again. Can any of you recommend somewhere - maybe on line - I can get patterns?

I dug out a very old pattern from the bottom of my craft file which is a patchwork sweater made up of knitted diamond shapes that you sew together afterwards. It looks interesting and hopefully I can use up most of my odds and ends on it!
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I ran out of yarn and became bored, so the scarf is only about 10 feet long. Since my niece is only about 5 ft 2 this should be plenty.
For more about the how and why of pussyhats, here is a video report. I am steadily knitting more, for people of my acquaintance who want them. My local store is about sold out of pink yarn.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks for the video link Brenda - I watched it twice. I guess that one of the advantages of having a homemade symbol is that those who couldn't march for whatever reason could still participate.

Huia
 
Posted by Surfing Madness (# 11087) on :
 
This feels like a question I should know the answer to....anyway I don't so thought I would ask here.
I have a sewing machine, 15 years old, fairly basic, but not to basic (ie about 15 stich options). It works fine when making clothes, but if I try making anything thicker the needle and the bit of metal attaching it to the machine falls out. I can screw it back in. My question is, if I get it serviced is this likely to be fixed, or is it the wrong machine for quilting.
Thanks everyone.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I am definitely not a quilter so cannot answer your question re suitability of your machine for that.

Have you had a good look at the relevant bits? I say this because I had major problems with tension on my Husqvarna which I had not used for several years. Friends advised me to replace the needle which I did. The next step was to check needle was in the right way around. Just replacing it fixed my troubles. It may just be something simple which has been forgotten.

Hope you get some answers soon. I found busted tension was really frustrating.
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Surfing Madness, any sewing machine should be fine with machine quilting. I regularly sew through several layers of fleece with my basic one. There are various types of needles for heavier jobs and you may need to adjust the tension a bit but I doubt if that is the trouble.

I'd get a nice bright light and try to see if anything is preventing that piece of the machine from gripping strongly. The screw that you use to tighten the needle holder onto the part that goes up and down may be hindered by some dust or thread. Maybe check it each time you begin to sew to be sure it is tight. I would think that a technician would be able to repair it if something has become bent or stripped. Hope it works out!
 
Posted by Pyx_e (# 57) on :
 
made de boots
 
Posted by Pyx_e (# 57) on :
 
made de bags

endless bags ..............
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
[Overused] Pyxe

Special limited edition shiny black pussy hat is ready. It will be in an envelope and winging its way across the Atlantic shortly.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Pyx_e and la vie en rouge, I am impressed!!!

My mom gave me her sewing machine when she and Dad downsized recently. I used to sew quite a bit, but gave my machine to my son-in-law who was constructing costumes and such for his role-playing games. Now, all I have to do is clean off the sewing table and see if I remember how to read a pattern! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Remembering may not help. They have taken to doing all the sizes on one sheet of paper.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Very impressive, Pyx_e. I really like the bags.

LVER. I see your photo box pic has an ending to URL for France. I have tried several times and obviously others can see it but I can't. Sorry.

Is this for a friend or are you sending it to tomcat-in-chief? [Big Grin]

[ 07. February 2017, 00:58: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
Our new grandbaby was born a bit over a week ago. While awaiting his arrival I knitted him 15 cardigans, some hats & booties, and a cot toy.
I think I should stop now
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
{With one hand, holds up shiny keys to distract Granny Roseofsharon, and sweeps away all the yarn goodies and supplies with the other hand.}
[Biased]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
That’s funny – it sounds like Judy could see my picture outside of France?

It’s a classic pussy hat shape, but knitted with black sequinned yarn, with a black and silver bow sewn on. It’s going to be worn by my sister-in-law who is currently protesting her little heart out in California. It is a limited edition because she detests pink.

I think it might be quite fun to start sending them to Trump though. Reminds me of one of my favourite ever protest movements, the awesome Panties for Peace. Apparently Than Shwe’s Burmese junta were a superstitious lot, and one of their many phobias had to do with women’s underwear. Consequently the idea behind PFP was to put a pair of knickers in an envelope and mail it to your local Burmese embassy [Big Grin] .

<muses about entertaining items to send his orangeness>
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
{With one hand, holds up shiny keys to distract Granny Roseofsharon, and sweeps away all the yarn goodies and supplies with the other hand.}
[Biased]

You'd need both hands, extended arms and at least two sweeps to remove my yarn supplies [Big Grin]
Fortunately I have been offered a distraction from oversupplying Grandbaby. A church member has asked, on behalf of a local charity, if our knitters would make teddies to add to Moses baskets filled baby needs being given to refugees.
Just one more pair of booties, and some mittens, then I'll move on to teddies
 
Posted by Doone (# 18470) on :
 
I can knit and sew, but not crochet. I had my first 'lesson' this morning for a granny square. [Eek!] [Ultra confused] [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
That’s funny – it sounds like Judy could see my picture outside of France?

Yes indeedy! Florida, France, all the same!
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I plan to select the least successful of the pussyhats I'm knitting (because I doubt if he'll actually wear it) and drop it off at the White House gate next time I go downtown. To save on postage. I will pack it in a clear ziploc bag (so that it is clearly innocuous) with a kind and simple note, in words of one syllable to increase the odds of it being read. No irony! I am the master of my words, and can make them stay one one surface level.
It will probably be carefully archived as a historical artifact. Most Presidential museums and libraries are well-stocked with this kind of folk-art thing -- portraits of the president rendered in glued-on macaroni, hand-painted porcelains depicting the White House dog, etc.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
La Vie - I had no problems viewing your hat either, although my school girl French was challenged a bit. [Hot and Hormonal]

I might see if someone in my craft group would teach me to knit a pussy hat. The woman in Brenda's video had huge needles so doing one like that might be in the realms of possibility.

Huia
 
Posted by neandergirl (# 8916) on :
 
I used this pattern for pussyhats. I've made 17 now but still takes me longer than the 1 hour estimated. http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/pussyhat-project
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
It's not difficult, Huia. The pattern is designed to be very simple. And it's a small, easily portable project.
 
Posted by Anna B (# 1439) on :
 
Weaving weaving!

I've got 426 linen ends wound onto the back beam and ready for threading. This is for table runners in monk's belt.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Weaving fascinates me but it is not my thing. Besides, I have no place for a loom. Do you have pictures of your work anywhere?

[ 08. February 2017, 21:21: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Anna B (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I have no place for a loom.

"Do I have a place for this loom?" is never the first question.

"Do I have a place for this loom?" is never, ever, ever the first question.

The first question is always, "Does my bed need to be this large?"

Just sayin'.
[Big Grin]

(Unfortunately no pictures of my work anywhere---but here is where I learned to weave: Vavstuga)
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Lothlorien--

There are lap and table looms, FWIW.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I did once have a small inkle loom which was fun to use. However, I do sew but not often now. Knitting is what most of my time goes on now. I give a lot away and spend quite a bit of time on chemo hats for children at children's hospital where Miss M, my granddaughter was treated. One way of expressing my gratitude and they always need hats.

I have made dozens and dozens of pairs of socks over the years and love making lace shawls too.

Enough on my plate.
 
Posted by Doone (# 18470) on :
 
I am just beginning to sew again. I've had a very painful upper back since November and haven't been able to cut out or use my sewing machine or sit comfortably enough to hand sew [Waterworks] I am just making a peg bag that I promised a friend before Christmas, I'm slow but getting there [Yipee]
 
Posted by Surfing Madness (# 11087) on :
 
Wish me luck, this weekend I'm teaching two friends to knit!!
 
Posted by Doone (# 18470) on :
 
SM [Eek!] [Votive] [Smile]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
In these days of YouTube videos it's not too difficult to teach knitting. You show people how to do it and then tell them that if they forget they should find the appropriate video on line and keep on playing it over and over. There are people who can teach themselves from a page (I can do this), and people who can do fine seeing it on YouTube. (My son-in-law does this, with quite complex things -- he taught himself how to kill a live lobster with a cleaver, by watching YouTube. And then he stuffed and grilled it. It tasted great, but could never bear to do this!)

But there are always those people who must be physically shown how to start. And those are the people who sign up for lessons, or ask friends to show them. After that, they're fine.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Loved seeing a clip of someone learning to knit by replacing the right hand needle with the same sized crochet hook....wish someone had taught me that way. Less dropped stitches and much better and more uniform tension!

Never good at knitting, I always preferred crochet because there was less slippage. Youngest daughter had a boring January at work and one of her workmates taught her to crochet cute Japanese animals during their breaks. She has made some beauts, but bemoaned the lack of patterns for them on the internet. You will be pleased to know I directed her to ravelry.com immediately!

Thank you SoF. In exchange B4 taught said workmate how to make origami poo.
[Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Oh yes, I must make a confession.

Last night, I took the scissors to a 97 year old piece of sheet music. I am sure this would horrify some - but Ten Preludes for Piano by Mr.Laine was rather tatty and delightfully aged enough to make great Valentine's day hearts for a sales table I am running this weekend.

The bonus bit at the end was a song by Ada Leonora Harris called "In an Old-fashioned town', music by W.H.Squire.

Inscribed by the owner, I.Micholm 21.10.20. Price 2/-
Boosey & Co. 295 Regent St London.

A delightful cover sheet - I may have to frame that one.
 
Posted by Anna B (# 1439) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
origami poo

I thought you were kidding.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
You will be pleased to know that I have utilised her creative paper crafting into Valentine's Day cards. Yes, really.

She made some out of happy floral paper (red roses, yellow sunflowers etc) and I put googly eyes and chocolate lips on them, then glued them to the front of cards with the message "Oh Poo...You know I love You!"

I figure if we are going to go kitsch then lets go completely overboard....I'll let you know how they sell.

For some people love is definitely not all hearts and flowers.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I can see that appealing to some people who are sick of the overly sweet messages.

Once, with his permission I used a quote from Zappa on my Easter card. It said Shit happens, so does Resurrection but in a fancy font so that it wasn't immediately obvious.

I only sent the card to selected recipients.

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Maybe a step too far - didn't sell a single poo card! The 6 I did will be recycled. Meanwhile I had a new craft experience today - dumpster diving.

I spent the day at my mother's nursing home, and the activities officer asked to see me, saying she had some craft oddments for me if I wanted them. She gave me a bag of Christmas materials, then mentioned she'd just thrown three more large boxes full in the dumpster unopened, as she couldn't be bothered going through them.

Definitely not too proud to look in a skip and take away what I can use. I think I came away with several hundred dollars worth of stuff - unopened bags of silk thread and ribbon, lace, new tubes of paint, real pearl buttons etc etc - a cornucopia of fun to be had.

TP looked on amused until he spotted a cache of terracotta pots that had been chucked. We took those home too, as he often pots plants for charities to sell.

Not telling the children about this one, I think. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Am not having a good time at the moment. I found some wool that I bought years ago for a project that never happened, and decided to use it up by knitting little girls' jumpers for the charity shop. Did one but underestimated how much wool I would need for the second one. In fact, right up until halfway through the second sleeve, I thought I would have enough wool. Well, I haven't. I can't think of a way of introducing another colour that would look anything other than dreadful, so I think I'm going to have to undo it all and knit a smaller size.

Then, I was about to put an old pair of trousers out to grass and suddenly saw I could make them into a little girl's skirt. I cut it out, inventing the pattern (which I've never done before), thinking there was nothing lost if it all went wrong, when my old sewing machine died. I bought a new one, a simple one (I only want to do seams and button holes, nothing fancy) - one suitable for children over the age of 8 and persons of restricted understanding - and after 3 days, the instructions, the dvd and several tutorials on YouTube (by 8 year old girls), Macarius and I have been unable to thread the bobbin properly/get the right tension, and all I get is bird's nests.

It's gone from being a fun little project to a bit of a nightmare! Oh well, onwards and upwards. Sorry for the moan.

M.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Oh dear, M, how frustrating. My mother's machine, used only by my dad, threaded backwards to anything else anyof us had ever see, much frustration.

BL, my sister on NSW north coast has been making watering stations for birds in these dreadfult temperatures. A terracotta pot, inverted and placed in a shady spot withthe saucer on top filled with water was in use by multiple birds within 30 minutes of placement under a grevillea.

[ 13. February 2017, 06:37: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yes, the birds are suffering in the heat - our in-laws had three chooks die from heat stress over the weekend. Inverting the pots and putting saucers of water on top is a great idea. We keep our two bird baths (one out front and one in back) properly filled and the wildlife queue to use them!

M, nothing more frustrating than a machine that simply will not co-operate, and not being able to work out why. I have one with an automatic threader that will work on some days and not on others. I've never been able to figure out why as I do exactly the same thing each time I want to thread it.

As for the sleeves on the jumper, can only suggest turning it into a sleeveless vest and using the wool you have for working around the armholes or maybe using woollen material to make the sleeves. Hybrid garments are very trendy.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Or knit down the sleeves simultaneously (wind the unravelled wool into two balls) until the yarn runs out, resulting in matching short sleeves.
 
Posted by Anna B (# 1439) on :
 
Now threading the warp onto heddles. I sit inside the loom to do this.

Here is a picture of the same model I've got
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Are you able to take the machine back to the shop? Someone should be able to show you how to do it, and there is always the possibility that something is broken/defective.

As to the sweater. Are you knitting the sleeves from the top down, or from the cuff up? In either case, Penny has the right of it. Take apart the single sleeve, and find some other yarn of a similar weight and fiber, in a tolerable color contrast. Reroll both these yarns into two separate and identical balls, so that you know you will have enough for each sleeve.

Then make two identical sleeves in the two colors. There are a lot of ways to do this -- stripe it with color A and color B, or use color A for the cuff and a stripe or two, leaving most of the sleeve in color B, or even mainly color B with a pattern in color A. It all depends on which color you have the most of. It'll look best if the ribbings (cuff, collar, hem) are the same.

[ 13. February 2017, 13:55: Message edited by: Brenda Clough ]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Thanks for all the suggestions. There is a helpline for the machine that I will try - I tried over the weekend but it's only open weekdays..

But I don't think the jumper would look right with different colours or with short sleeves or as a tank top; I've thought of all those things but just can't see it.

M.
 
Posted by Doone (# 18470) on :
 
Have now made two pegbags; very pleased with them. Have also mastered treble, double treble and triple treble crochet stitches - I 'm clearly more cut out for straight(ish) lines rather than squares. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Doone--

Congrats on the peg bags! And there's nothing wrong with specializing in straight(ish)-edged projects. All sorts of things you can make.

Some ceramicists specialize in slab work and other things, rather than throwing pots on a wheel--and vice-versa.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
If anyone's interested in the saga of the new sewing machine, I eventually got hold of the manufacturer's helpline, and we went through all the possibilities, all of which I'd already checked. Finally, he said that as the machine was brand new, I should just take it back to the shop.

So I took it back to Argos and got a different sort of machine. Which worked perfectly first time.

It's fun again now.

M.
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
Brilliant! It's no good if it's not fun.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yay!
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
It seems no-one wants old silver and tinware any more. Lots of battered bits donated to recent charity sales tables have been given to me to "do something creative with."

And so I have been enjoying siliconing bits together to make centrepieces for a Mother's Day high tea during the coming autumn. Silver trays of different sizes with goblets and candlesticks or stemmed glasses in between to make them into attractive towers for fruit or flowers or cakes. The ones that are not the best will end life as craft storage for my bits of lace and jewellery recycling.

My respect for the building guns who silicone around doors and windows has risen. I suspect they would make excellent sugar artists if they turned their hand to cake decorating!
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I saw a great photograph of glass mushrooms, created by some creative person from glass bowls and vases glued together. They make great garden ornaments, in groups.

Due to various requests I have been knitting pussyhats continuously, using the opportunity to experiment with different stitch patterns. They all have to be fairly small, and suitable for knitting in the round. The best one is a simple right-twist cable. I am doing a more elaborate one now that has holes in a lattice, but I don't like the waffle-hole effect so well. Alas, I don't dislike it -quite- enough to pull it all out and start over with something different.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Doone:
Have now made two pegbags; very pleased with them. Have also mastered treble, double treble and triple treble crochet stitches - I 'm clearly more cut out for straight(ish) lines rather than squares. [Yipee]

Yes but straight lines and squared are not the only thing you can do with crochet. I am in the process of making three elephants. First one of two for me niece is here. Second pink one is in progress and then a grey one for my sister to s slightly different pattern. My sister's one needs to match the pale pink elephant I made some years ago for her and my niece has nabbed.

Jengie
 
Posted by Kitten (# 1179) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
I saw a great photograph of glass mushrooms, created by some creative person from glass bowls and vases glued together. They make great garden ornaments, in groups.

Due to various requests I have been knitting pussyhats continuously, using the opportunity to experiment with different stitch patterns. They all have to be fairly small, and suitable for knitting in the round. The best one is a simple right-twist cable. I am doing a more elaborate one now that has holes in a lattice, but I don't like the waffle-hole effect so well. Alas, I don't dislike it -quite- enough to pull it all out and start over with something different.

There's a lovely pattern on Ravelry for one with a double helix cable design. I'm adapting it to knit flat as I dislike knitting in the round
 
Posted by Doone (# 18470) on :
 
JJ they're lovely! Your elephant is very cute [Axe murder] I will definitely have a go.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kitten:
There's a lovely pattern on Ravelry for one with a double helix cable design. I'm adapting it to knit flat as I dislike knitting in the round

I am always disappointed when I look at the Ship's Ravelry group - no posts for eight years!
 
Posted by kingsfold (# 1726) on :
 
There's a ship's ravelry group???
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I was going to knit a vest with that double helix cable pattern. Or possibly a cardigan, but the idea would be to have the helix cable going up both fronts and over the shoulders. (This would obviously have to be knitted flat but with no shoulder seams, up and over the top.) The cables would go up and over and then recombine at the center back into a central double helix going down the spine to the hem. The background would be a pattern of recombinant proteins, which are luckily T-shaped and would be relatively easy to work. A biology lesson in one knit project! Alas I have never done it, but some day.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by kingsfold:
There's a ship's ravelry group???

It was started in 2007 and has 19 members, but not many whose names I recognise.
As I said, no posts for the last eight years and only RevKate and I have added project pictures in the last six.
Really, it's more or less moribund - even the member who set it up is conspicuous by her absence.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I've done stuff that's posted on Ravelry more recently than that but I'm not a member of the Ship group
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
Heh - I just went and found the group, intending to join it, and found that I am already a member.
quote:
Originally posted by Me, almost 9 years ago on Ravelry ...:
At the moment I’m trying to finish off all sorts of things that have been hanging around for ages before allowing myself to start on the aran weight cotton-mix that is going to turn into something jacketty once I’ve found a pattern that I like.

I’m also finishing a quilt that I started 23 years ago (every stitch done by hand, and some very long breaks while I made other quilts by machine), and a tapestry that has only been around for months rather than years.

The aran weight cotton is still waiting for an appropriate pattern. I almost gave it away when we moved, but rescued it at the last moment. The hand-stitched quilt is nearing completion (every stitch, both the piecing and the almost-complete quilting, still done by hand). It is, in fact, sitting on the settee on the other side of the room as I type. The tapestry, however, is long finished and framed.

In my defence, I have done an awful lot of other things in the meantime, including a part time Masters' degree!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I am seriously considering This beautiful shawl as a winter project. It is modular so not too much strain on my hands. I am well on the way to finishing a throw rug made of different individual squares, so am happy with the modular concept. The designer has another half dozen or so patterns, all lovely but not all appealing to me.

A minute after finding the pattern, message popped up on FB from a yarn shop in Tasmania asking if anyone was interested in adding to their Malabrigo order. Obviously, I was meant to do this. [Biased]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
That looks amazing Lothlorien!

I have taken up loom knitting - it's easier on the hands than normal knitting. I've done a scarf and a multicoloured hat, I'm now doing a denim coloured hat. I may knit some Christmas presents.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks Boogie. I am telling myself that knitting involves plain and purl stitches and manipulating them in various ways. That shawl has slipped stitches. Have done plenty of that before, similarly with cables.

I can count too andI think that is important to working properly. I am used to "reading" my knitting to keep on track and to troubleshoot. That comes from intricate lace work.

I live by myself, so have no one to distract me.

I know it is a challenge, but consider it worthwhile for my brain nd for the product. I am often a product knitter but have decided I will enjoy the process.

I too knit for hand exercise but have had to cut down on the amount done at any onetime. It is exercise for my bumpy, swollen, misshapen fingers. That shawl is modular.

Have you considered cowls on your loom? I am convert to them. Warm and cosy and they stay in place, unlike many scarves.
 
Posted by SusanDoris (# 12618) on :
 
It must be so difficult knitting with stiff and swollen fingers. I am lucky that I do not have that problem.
I am continuing with my knitting activity. My daughter-in-law visited the other day and I showed her my latest effort and she said I should call it 'abstract knitting', which I shall do from now on!! If I find I've added a few stitches, I just drop a few to even it up a bit. [Smile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by SusanDoris:
It must be so difficult knitting with stiff and swollen fingers. I am lucky that I do not have that problem.
I am continuing with my knitting activity. My daughter-in-law visited the other day and I showed her my latest effort and she said I should call it 'abstract knitting', which I shall do from now on!! If I find I've added a few stitches, I just drop a few to even it up a bit. [Smile]

A great attitude to have instead of getting all hot and bothered.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
This weekend I am seeing my youngest grandchildren. The last picture of Miss four that I received by phone was of her with a curly red palm tree of hair on top of her head., She had demanded that her daddy give her "Hair like Poppy" (The Trolls Movie). And he nailed it. But I saw an online video of how to make troll hair very simply by tying strips of tulle to a headband and then holding it vertically with an elastic band. So I tried it last night.

Brilliant. A great dress up. So I have had fun making hair like Poppy, Branch and Bridget. One for her, and her grandad and I will arrive wearing the other two.

Heh. Back in the early seventies I detested the troll dolls. When they returned in the late eighties I refused to buy them for my own kids. But my daughter asked us to watch the movie with her children last week, and hats off to the story writers. I really liked its message, which is largely anti-racial.
The last laugh is on me. I have finally made my peace with trolls!
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
The fairly traded fabric I ordered online is great, but I've done something weird to the pattern I've made about eight times before and the sleeves are too tight. I might need to make this tunic dress sleeveless.

Cattyish, solving problems of my own creation.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
If you have any leftover fabric, you can probably fix it by inserting a gusset. A strip of fabric, up the sleeve seam? A diamond-shaped insert, taking in the sleeve seam and the side seam of the garment? You could use a substitute fabric and experiment with shapes until you get the exact right one, and then cut the actual dress scraps and seam them in. Even if you cannot match the pattern precisely, it'll pass in a crowd with a push. The number of people who will get in there and closely examine your underarm is surely not large.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
A few minutes ago I put the final stitch in my Persian Tiles blanket. It's taken me over a year to make - though I have done 3 baby blankets and a couple of fiddle muffs in between, and I still have lots of ends to weave in, but it is COMPLETED!
 
Posted by Doone (# 18470) on :
 
[Yipee]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
A few minutes ago I put the final stitch in my Persian Tiles blanket. It's taken me over a year to make - though I have done 3 baby blankets and a couple of fiddle muffs in between, and I still have lots of ends to weave in, but it is COMPLETED!

Great feeling, isn't it? Well done.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Last night, I put the final stitch in my Persian Tiles blanket. It's taken me over a year to make - though I have done 3 baby blankets and a couple of fiddle muffs in between, and I still have lots of ends to weave in, but it is COMPLETED!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Oops, didn't think it had sent - but still very pleased. Now it's weaving in all the ends.
Note to self: If you ever do something like this again, deal with the ends as you go along.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
St. Gwladys, that sounds amazing! Can you share a picture with us?
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I'm not sure how to do that, but if you google "Persian Tiles blanket", you should find a picture.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
I've just sewn in the last square on the big patchwork blanket I've been knitting for over a year. I still have the edging to finishing knitting and sew on and the whole thing needs ends trimming off etc, but it is good enough to snuggle under while watching TV if we have any more cold evenings this spring.
 
Posted by Ethne Alba (# 5804) on :
 
Isn't it so satisfying to get that last big square in and be able to start snuggling with them?

My purse developed a massive hole last month, so a 50p ball of multi coloured, spring time green wool at our local charity shop has saved the day. I really like knocking up a nice solid purse.

Then totally forgot about Mothering Sunday ....until yesterday. Big panic solved by going creative. I should do it more often.

Maybe it's spring time, inspiring us......

[ 25. March 2017, 11:31: Message edited by: Ethne Alba ]
 
Posted by Surfing Madness (# 11087) on :
 
I'm getting more into craft, and have started not just following patterns but experimenting as well. Would quite like to start blogging about it, mainly so I can see what I've done, but maybe to be in contact with other crafty people. Any recommendations of where to blog etc?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Have you been over to Ravelry.com? The premiere place for this sort of thing.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
And todays activity....ironing autumn leaves.
I want to punch/cut shapes out of them for cards, but first they need to be flattened, dried and the colour fixed so they don't go brown. I have googled this, and am not confident what will work best. So if anyone has any helpful hints, I would love to hear them!
 
Posted by The5thMary (# 12953) on :
 
I have discovered "acrylic pours", a type of painting with acrylics that involves paint, some water, pouring medium such as Liquitex Pouring Medium which is VERY expensive (alternatives do exist, thankfully), and usually silicone oil or silicone spray, stretched canvas or old record albums, and sometimes a butane torch. I am deathly afraid of fire, so I have not used the torch but I will be using silicone oil when it arrives from amazon.com this week.

Most ly, the point of acrylic poured paintings is to get "cells" to develop by using silicone and making those cells more robust by heating the paint on the canvas with the butane torch or a hair dryer. I have no examples of my own to show off this fantastic art form but anyone can do a search on Google or, better yet, check out the hundreds of poured painting videos on YouTube. It can get rather expensive because a lot of acrylic paint ends up getting dumped off the canvas...I'm working on ways to use the big puddles of swirled paint...this technique can produce amazingly beautiful art. Unfortunately, I have only been able to bring forth one small beauty but I will persevere. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Gosh, that looks fantabulous (in Google images). I immediately think book covers, which I am currently working on. Some of those would make wonderful images for SF novels.

I began to knit a sweater for my grandson, because he is outgrowing the previous one (which had his name on it). This one has a sailboat, front and back, executed in intarsia. Unfortunately in the excitement of getting to the end of the image I forgot to allow for the armholes, and now will have to steek the knitted fabric if the kid is to wear it.

[ 15. May 2017, 13:50: Message edited by: Brenda Clough ]
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
I've finished the cross stitch badger I started last year, and I've started surrounding him with blackwork patterns in dark green, getting lighter as they get further away, to give the impression of him standing in a tunnel of leaves.
The black work is going much faster than the cross stitch did!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
And todays activity....ironing autumn leaves.
I want to punch/cut shapes out of them for cards, but first they need to be flattened, dried and the colour fixed so they don't go brown. I have googled this, and am not confident what will work best. So if anyone has any helpful hints, I would love to hear them!

When I was teaching we used to iron autumn leaves between two layers of waxed paper - the kind that used to be used for wrapping school. I have no idea if it still exists or if the leaves kept their colour, but it did make them easier to handle. I did wonder about laminating them, but the laminator I use says only paper products should be used,

Huia
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
At work, we laminated leaves for a window display and it worked quite well.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
A few years ago, I saw a beautiful mobile made of autumn leaves. They had been laminated, and the laminated leaves had been cut so as to leave a border all around. Holes had been punched in the clear borders so that the leaves could be strung together.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
(whoops, cross-posted.)

St. Gwladys--

When I was a kid, we did crafts like that, but using wax paper. Two pieces the same size, or one folded over, wax to the inside. Put in leaves, etc., and maybe some crayon shavings. Close it over, then *carefully* iron it, preferably using a pressing cloth or hanky. Give the creation plenty of time to cool--especially if you use crayon shavings, because they will melt.

IIRC, this was a nice way to make bookmarks.

[ 17. August 2017, 10:49: Message edited by: Golden Key ]
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
I surfed into the site Make And Do Crew, and found something offbeat and intriguing:

"How to Crochet Boots With Flip Flops – Free Pattern + Video"

These were evidently designed by the site owner, and she has several kinds. Basically, you take te straps off a pair of flip-flops; poke holes along the edges; and crochet sort of a tube (for the leg of the boot) right onto the sole!

If making a pair to wear outside, I think I might use the really thick kind of flip-flop--both for stability, and to keep the leg of the boot a little further from puddles, snow, and dirt.

Have any of you made something like this? How did it go?

Thx.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I'm embarking on a soap making spree - for fundraising [Smile]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
There is an entire line of clear-plastic boots (think rain boots) so that your hand-knit socks can be properly but safely displayed. I'm told they're rather hot to wear, however.

Someone gave me a massive cone of cotton denim yarn, and I'm knitting a simple cable cardigan. There's tons of this yarn; I could go on for a long time but the fiber itself is rather heavy. Do I really need a calf-length coat that weighs as much as a large child? Perhaps I should have selected a lace pattern instead?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
I'm embarking on a soap making spree - for fundraising [Smile]

For Guide Dogs?

The local supermarket has a plastic guide dog shaped collection statue. I always slip a few coins in when I walk past, I think of it as "Boogie's long-distance fundraising."

I've adopted an idea that Brenda mentioned (either on this thread or elsewhere) for cardmaking. I send my brother with Parkinson's, G a card every week, and have run out of the small calendar picture I was using. When I was home last weekend my youngest brother K, took me to a second hand bookshop. When I picked up a book about cars for G, K commented that it was heavy and that G would have difficulty turning the pages. I was about to put it down when I thought about its potential for card making - over 300 pictures for $12! Also the print is arranged so that I can add small, descriptive paragraphs about the photos.

I hope whoever invented photocopiers made a mint.

Copyright? Sshhh [Angel]

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have been busy. Some small projects like several Odessa hats. After the success of my 16 large differently patterned for squares, I rather unwisely decided to make a rug for new DIL. The arthritis in my hands has been bad, lots of new little bony bumps on previously free fingers. I am using the pattern, such as it is, for ten stitch blanket.. It is repetitive, just round and around the circumference with a narrow strip joined to previous work by knitting two stitches together. I am using Cleckheaton California which is 8 ply and more like roving than yarn. It will be warm but will be a very belated birthday present when finally finished. I am refusing to allow myself to start anything else.

My original rug of different squares has been very good to use. Worsted weight, so thick and cosy. I don't often make stuff for myself, but am glad I kept this and did not give it away.

[ 18. August 2017, 22:21: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Some years ago I stitched a large needle point of Tutankhamum for my middle brother. It was meant for his 20th birthday, but he received it on his 25th [Hot and Hormonal] he said it was worth waiting for, I'm sure you daughter in law will feel the same way about her rug.

Huia

[ 19. August 2017, 06:13: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks Huia for the encouragement. Fingers were baqd last nigh and woke me. I could pick out the pin in various separate joints. I forgot to rub anti-inflammatory cream in before getting into bed. Won't make that mistake again I hope.

My mother, not a handcraft type person at all, started a jumper for me of many very narrow stripes. My birthday came and went and no jumper. One grandmother finally finished it for my sister's sixth birthday. She is second child behind me. I think it was something like ten or twelve years in the making.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Soap made (lemon) - it looks and smells good enough to eat!

See my ‘Room’ blog.

[Smile]
 


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