Thread: Hope This Helps: General Enquiries 2017 Board: Heaven / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
If you have to ask a question and it doesn't fit neatly into any other category here, toss it onto this thread and see if anyone knows the answer.

Last year's General Enquiries thread has been locked.

[ 08. January 2017, 18:05: Message edited by: Trudy Scrumptious ]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Friend's AP is finding the cleared tile and lino floors slippery to walk on. Does anyone have an idea about stuff we could lay to provide an easily cleanable non-slip surface? I've looked at plastic carpet protection drugget from Argos, but it says it is slippery on hard surfaces, which would defeat the object. I have a plastic thingy for putting in the bath for a secure stand under the shower, but it wouldn't be flat, would be too small, and would be a trip hazard itself.
This would be for the kitchen and the hallway.
We don't want her putting newspaper down again.

[ 13. January 2017, 21:36: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have never tried this but have often seen the suggestion on US knitting sites. If she wears slippers inside it is often suggested to put puffy paint on the soles to stop slides. No idea how well that works.

I use a cane outside and walking to lift is along tiled walkway. I am careful to avoid any wet or even damp places. Even a bit of moisture on rubber at end of cane can cause it to slide on tile. I must have picked up a bit of grease the other day in car park and there was same result.

She needs to make sure there is absolutely nothing greasy or wet on floor.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Thanks for the suggestion. I'm not sure what she wears indoors - because of her leg problems she wears Crocs ouside. I have slippers which have rubberised bits on the soles, which work well, but we would need a large size.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Do not know how well it works but there is this spray on Amazon.

You might also look at the other things linked to on that page.

Jengie
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
I think she has to change what she is wearing on her feet. If you try to change the flooring somehow, anything you put down will also slip. A yoga mat on the floor works really well for being anti-slip but you couldn't do the whole floor.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Thank you - the floor surfaces are narrow, it's a galley kitchen, so mats would work. I'll have a look out for them.
I don't think the stone stuff would work on the lino, and it sounds a bit risky in confined places. The matting on the Amazon page is initially interesting, but the texture would not be easy to clean, which is the other thing to be taken into account.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
How about carpet tiles? They are not expensive and can easily be taken up to clean spillages etc. And they shouldn't slip if you get them laid properly in the first place.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Hmmm. We are nowhere near being able to lay them yet. Nice idea, though.
 
Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
My mother-in-law use to put large soft rubber bands around her soft slipper in the house. It seemed to work in making her feel less like she might slip.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
In addition to mats you can get rubberized tiles with round dots to prevent skids. Some are self adhesive peel and stick if you have a small area to do. The soft rubber is pretty cleanable and gentle on the feet.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Non-skid bathtub strips? There are also non-skid coatings that you can paint on. BUT I don't know how toxic they are. And some of them have grit in them, which could be a problem if she ever goes barefoot.

You might also check sites for/about seniors, like AARP.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Thanks for the suggestions. I am pointing her to the Red Cross who do work with helping people to stay in their homes independently. The hospital has already suggested them for other things, and she seems happy to consider help from that direction.
Feet have bandages on, so barefoot unlikely.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Interesting. AFAIK, the Red Cross doesn't do that kind of work in the US.
 
Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
Golden Key noted.
quote:
nteresting. AFAIK, the Red Cross doesn't do that kind of work in the US.

Perhaps they do not because visiting nurses do safety checks in home . At least that is true in California.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
It's time limited work, not long term.

Aldi are selling yoga mats for £4.99, information I shall pass on.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Are old DVDs recyclable? I have piles of old disks that I recorded myself off the TV and no longer want. I know the charity shops won't touch them, so is there any way of disposing of them without them going to landfill?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Do you have Freecycle in your area? You could offer them up and see if there are takers. Artists use them for projects.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Can they be used for making plant pots, as old 78 records could be?
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
Are old DVDs recyclable? I have piles of old disks that I recorded myself off the TV and no longer want. I know the charity shops won't touch them, so is there any way of disposing of them without them going to landfill?

The only places I've heard of that will take them want them in quantities of several tonnes. Literal, tonne, not figurative.

quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Can they be used for making plant pots, as old 78 records could be?

As I understand it, heating records releases unhealthy fumes. I can only imagine the potential for cds/dvds as the exact content of the plastic is an unknown.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
Are old DVDs recyclable? I have piles of old disks that I recorded myself off the TV and no longer want. I know the charity shops won't touch them, so is there any way of disposing of them without them going to landfill?

You might see if someone who works with kids wants them as craft supplies. They'll end up in landfill anyway, but at least they'll get another use on the way.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I have heard that if you want to frighten birds away from your fruit trees, you can hang a lot of disks from the branches.

Moo
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Yes, discs are useful for anti-bird purposes.

What one of the sons thought up was to attach to the top of canes for fruit/beans so not only scaring birds but also shielding the unwary from poking their eyes out if weeding, etc.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
When my nephew was young I had excess CDs (freebies I did not want) and made a mobile for a friends son. My mum promptly requested one for nephew. I made it, gave to her but he never got it, rather it hung in my parents' house for years.

It was nothing fancy, metal clothes hanger, fisherman's nylon and CDs stuck dull sides together.

Jengie
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
They would probably be good to attach to anything you want to catch the eye. I'm thinking of those long sticks they use in parking lots, so that when it snows the plows know where the edges are.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
See if a local preschool wants to make picture "frames" out of them. Or string them together (the blank ones) for rainbows.
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
Inspired by a current Radio 4 dramatisation (some will guess the book immediately):

Americans - were pickled limes ever really a schoolgirl favourite? They sound revolting.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Gill, I reread Little Women a few years ago and did some research -- pickled limes (not lime pickle) were a craze during the American Civil War, sold very cheaply from jars in sweet shops. The March family were very poor and this was why Amy's debt was so serious. They were imported to Boston from the West Indies, shipped in barrels preserved in seawater or brine.
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
Inspired by a current Radio 4 dramatisation (some will guess the book immediately):

Americans - were pickled limes ever really a schoolgirl favourite? They sound revolting.

Actually they're not bad. Limes usually cost about $1 each here, sometimes more, but occasionally there are some past prime, and are 3 or 4 for $1. They're nice as an ingredient, e.g., you've a slow cooker stew of some thing spicy. cooking on the theory that sweet balances the spicy hot. It's the peel which adds the flavour, but don't use too much, it's an intense flavour. Lemons are also okay.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Since Alcott was being semi-autobiographical, I think the period detail is accurate. More interesting is what she does not tell us. I could have done with far more description of the clothing, for instance. Does Meg wear a bustle? What were Amy's white boots made of? But we are not told these things, because she assumes her readers know.
 
Posted by Laud-able (# 9896) on :
 
The period is a bit early for the bustle. The crinoline was slowly giving way to the crinolette, which was in effect the back half of the crinoline (and thus the precursor of the bustle).

It is possible that Amy's white boots were cloth-topped, but I don't see how painting them blue would make them look as though they were made of satin.
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
Thank you all! The Radio 4 adaptation finished today - very truncated (five 15-minute episodes) but rather good. I can practically recite that book from memory so my standards are high!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Whilst sorting my bedroom today I found a lovely Lord of the Rings calendar for 1989 [Eek!] which I grabbed to hang in my back porch as the days and dates are the same as those for this year. I know there must be a word for this, but I don't know what it is. Can anyone help please?

Huia
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
For the calendar repeat? Or for such a delightful finding - which would be serendipity.
 
Posted by Ethne Alba (# 5804) on :
 
Oh crumbs...a comment like the above ( calendars ) is of NO help to a clutter-bug like myself!
[Biased]

[ 01. February 2017, 12:45: Message edited by: Ethne Alba ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
The word for a calendar repeat is the one I'm after. It's not really serendipity because I am following the custom of a friend who buys beautiful and expensive calendars and re-uses them when the appropriate year comes along. He , however is more organised than I am, and I usually find them too late [Waterworks]

Huia
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
The word for a calendar repeat is the one I'm after.

Recyclical? The cycle of the year being repeated?
 
Posted by Tobias (# 18613) on :
 
I would say, "The two years have the same Dominical letter". I don't know of a single word that describes the recurrence.

Just be aware, though - while the days of the week are coming around this year on the same dates as in 1989, the phases of the moon are not, so the date of Easter (and anything in the ecclesiastical year that depends on it) will be different.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
That's OK, it's one of those calendars that specialises in being stylish rather than useful so it doesn't have any of those details.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Thoughts after reading this , and discussions with science-sceptic friends...

When scientists say the blue whale is the largest animal to ever live, I implicitly place a "(that we know of") afterwards. Said friends not so.

When scientists say "90% of species were wiped out in X catastrophic event", my mind gets confused. How do they know? Is it, again, a case of, "on the available fossil evidence we have"? Such definitive statements get some friends riled up, but I have no real answers as to how they come to such a conclusion. Any thoughts?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Probably it's from the fossil record.

There is another way, to see when a great loss of genetic diversity has happened. The DNA of the cheetah is curiously consistent over individuals -- there is very little variation, the way there would be between you and me. In other words, all cheetah now alive are very closely related. This could only have happened if, at some point in the past, nearly every single cheetah died. Only a very few individuals were left to carry on the species, and every cheetah alive today is descended from them. In other words, there was a bottleneck at one point in the past, and only a very few cheetah got past it.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
Thoughts after reading this , and discussions with science-sceptic friends...

When scientists say the blue whale is the largest animal to ever live, I implicitly place a "(that we know of") afterwards. Said friends not so.

When scientists say "90% of species were wiped out in X catastrophic event", my mind gets confused. How do they know? Is it, again, a case of, "on the available fossil evidence we have"? Such definitive statements get some friends riled up, but I have no real answers as to how they come to such a conclusion. Any thoughts?

Largest known is what I most often hear/read and the estimate of droids is based on presence of fossils at different times. IIRC.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
What are droids, lilBuddha? The source of all knowledge was no help. Thanks.

Thank you also Brenda -- and interesting about the loss of genetic diversity event. Thanks.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
That's why zoos are very careful when they breed cheetah, so that the already sparse genetic diversity is maintained and increased. Because they are all already so very similar, the fear is that some disease will just wipe them all out.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
A question for somebody medical.
Saturday my husband’s friend was driving home when he experienced something (asthma attack? Heart problem?) which led to him going off the road into a woman’s driveway and some sort of arrest (cardiac? Respiratory? Both? It’s not clear, there’s a language problem). When the woman found him, he had been out for at least 45 minutes, according to the medical people. Paramedics came, apparently shocked his heart, and took him to hospital, where he is now in ICU on a ventilator and has been declared brain dead. They are proposing to keep him on life support until a child overseas can get to his bedside.
My question is this: Is it possible for someone to be in arrest for 45 minutes unobserved and unaided, and still be in a condition (that is, hanging on to life in some form) that someone thought it useful to shock his heart and put him in ICU? I would have expected them to declare him DOA at the hospital.
Asking for the family, and also for Mr. Lamb…
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
This is where you have to trust the medical people who were first on the scene. Nobody has a time line on this; you could imagine an attack (asthma, epileptic) in minute one, pull over car in minute two, and then after more than half an hour of increasing medical distress only a heart attack in minute forty-two. In which case the team arriving in minute forty-five probably could jolt him back to life and save him.
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
LC - what a story. Sad and poignant. Kind regards to all involved and the family.

To answer the question from experience: the heart can keep incompetently beating for quite a while, with erratic breathing also occurring, such that the body keeps running at low ebb for quite a while. I watched my father-in-law do this for about 3 hours. breaths were sometimes only once every 2 or 3 minutes and the heart was fluttering and sometimes beating (according to the monitor). We thought he was gone several times. In his case, he seemed to hang on until my mother-in-law came back (we'd been on death watch for many days). There's more going on at death than we imagine.
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
I would like to reconnect with a school friend who I have not seen for several decades. He became a CofE clergyman, and I know the area of England where he worked before retiring, but I can't find him in any on-line phone book (though that's not unusual these days) or even Auntie Google. I don't do Facebook, so perhaps I'm shutting myself out of modern life. Does anyone know of any publicly accessible directory where I might find him?
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Our first Ofsted omitted to give us the inspectors' CVs. The school caretaker ascertained that one was a priest in the CofE, and a visit to the library to consult Crockford's gave the background of the man. (Who could reduce staff to tears by the style of his questions, and had no teaching experience.) I don't know if Crockford's is still available in reference libraries, though. (Or indeed, if reference libraries are still available.)

[ 18. March 2017, 18:24: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by TonyK (# 35) on :
 
Crockfords is on line. Search by surname here.

It appears to include retired clergy, who have permission to officiate.

Hope this helps...
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
I just tried the link. You need to be subscribed to be able to see anything interesting.

ETA: Dammit, I hate it when a post appears at the top of the page. I was referring to TonyK's link to Crockfords.

[ 18. March 2017, 18:50: Message edited by: Spike ]
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
Thanks - found his name in a few seconds from the link, but the £35 subscription to get the details is a bit steep. I'll ask around my friends for a favour. Or possibly a library.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
Your local Anglican parish priest might have a copy, or know someone who does. There are no data protection issues in letting someone know what's in Crockford. If you don't already know what your Anglican parish is, and you are based in England, then A church near you will give you the information you want if you enter your post code.
 
Posted by Martin60 (# 368) on :
 
\0/
/0\

Has anyone ever encountered this symbol, more hexagrammatic than I can achieve here, as a precursor to the magen David, with alleged roots in Canaanite culture, symbolizing a sexual encounter?
 
Posted by Martin60 (# 368) on :
 
\./
/.\

The 'heads' are more dot-like.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Martin-

Not that specific one. *But*, AIUI, in Hindu yantras, downward triangle is feminine and upward is masculine (Wikipedia). Joining the two represents joining the two energies.

When I first came across that and considered the Star of David, I started wondering about connections. I don't know what it means, if it means anything.

You might also check out the Wikipedia articles on "Hexagrams", "Star of David", and "Sacred Geometry".

Good luck!
 
Posted by Shubenacadie (# 5796) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
Thanks - found his name in a few seconds from the link, but the £35 subscription to get the details is a bit steep. I'll ask around my friends for a favour. Or possibly a library.

It's possible that your public library authority may have an online subscription, in which case if you're a library member you may be able to get access using your membership. (A quick look indicates that my local library authority don't offer Crockford's, but there are quite a lot of reference works that I can log in to from home, plus some more accessible only in libraries).
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Shubenacadie:
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
Thanks - found his name in a few seconds from the link, but the £35 subscription to get the details is a bit steep. I'll ask around my friends for a favour. Or possibly a library.

It's possible that your public library authority may have an online subscription, in which case if you're a library member you may be able to get access using your membership. (A quick look indicates that my local library authority don't offer Crockford's, but there are quite a lot of reference works that I can log in to from home, plus some more accessible only in libraries).
All good advice - thank you. Luckily, I found one little google reference that let me make the connection via another person, and we are back in touch. A happy day.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
I’ve been wondering (for no particular reason) if there is a group name for the percussion instruments that are made up of a row of wooden or metal bars that are struck by a hammer -- other than referring to them as "xylophony-marimba-y, type thingies." Percussionists must have some name for them, I would think.
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
Perhaps Percussion Idiophone?
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hedgehog:
Perhaps Percussion Idiophone?

That's still rather broad, since it includes triangles, wood blocks, etc. Maybe no such term exists.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
How about Keyboard Percussion Instruments?
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
How about Keyboard Percussion Instruments?

I think you've got it! Thanks so much!
[Overused]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I think we used to call them pitched percussion when using them at school for Carl Orff method. That would include chime bars which are not arranged like a keyboard, but come separately, and the xylophones, glockenspiels and so one with a single range of notes, with different key signatures achieved by changing the bars, rather than having what would be the black notes as a separate range.
 
Posted by Martin60 (# 368) on :
 
Thanks Golden Key.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
What do you dial for an international call from the US to the UK? - The UK country code is 0044, but do Americans need to add anything in front?

Thanks! [Smile]
 
Posted by ThunderBunk (# 15579) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
What do you dial for an international call from the US to the UK? - The UK country code is 0044, but do Americans need to add anything in front?

Thanks! [Smile]

it's 011 44

44 is the country code; the 00 is the international access number in Europe; 011 is the NoAm version.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Excellent! Many thanks, ThunderBunk, this helps greatly!
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
Also, after dialing 011 44, be sure to drop the first 0 or 1 of the phone number.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Yep, got that. At least that! Ta. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Dear all,

I have been asked to help find a book about which I know almost nothing, so naturally my thoughts turned to Shipmates. My googling has certainly proved inadequate to the task.

All I know is that it is a children's book about a little girl who lived in a caravan and was converted. It was given as a prize at Covenanters perhaps 60 years ago. But I don't know whether it was written for them or just given as a prize by them.

The only other thing I know is that it made its owner cry! (In a good way).

Thanks for any help.

M.

[ 02. April 2017, 16:32: Message edited by: M. ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
The only children's book about a girl in a caravan I recall is The Diddakoi by Rumer Godden, but I think this is too recent for your parameters.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Thanks, but yes, I think that's late 1960s, as you say, too late, Brenda.

M.
 
Posted by Eutychus (# 3081) on :
 
My dad (a long-time lurker but not registered) suggests A peep behind the scenes which I think we actually have lying around here somewhere.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Ooh, worth a try, thank you, Eutychus' father!

M.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
In advance of a big family elebration I am trying to work out the various relationships to explain to our grandson.
This is not made any easier by the fact that there are big age gaps between the oldest generation of siblings and, consequently, in the the next two/three generations. It's now difficult to remember who belongs in which generation.
The latest complication is that my sister-in-law (or half-sister-in-law?) has discovered that she has a half sister, and they will be meeting for the first time at this celebration.
Now I'm trying to find an explanation for the relationship between my husband and the half sister of his half-sister. I'm guessing that there isn't an actual official relationship - but maybe there is a way of expressing the link?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
How old is the child? If he's big enough, a family tree would be useful.
If he's quite little, the all-encompassing word is 'cousin.' Or 'kin'.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
You can just say "she's a relative--it's complicated" if you like.

I seem to recall the old word for these kinds of relatives/not relatives is "connections".

[ 10. April 2017, 20:30: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
We just say family.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
How old is the child?

He's 15, but has what today they call "additional needs". He does like to have things nicely sorted into categories.
He know aunts, uncles & cousins OK, and has come across Great aunts & uncles, so it shouldn't really be a problem.
It's just that, having started thinking about this, I would quite like to know where everyone fits and to have it in my head, without having to consult the family tree every time we all meet up!
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
I'm trying to find an explanation for the relationship between my husband and the half sister of his half-sister.

I don't see anything wrong with calling her an aunt.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Of course, some of us are great uncles as well as great-uncles.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Of course, some of us are great uncles as well as great-uncles.

So my brother told us when we announced the arrival of our first child
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I have on occasion resorted to such statements as "She is the daughter of my father's mother's sister's daughter"! Rather than try to work out what sort of cousin she is to me.

Meanwhile, manuka honey. Having seen the wondrous results worked by it on D, I thought it might be a good addition to my medical supplies, along with the Friars' Balsam, and the little licorice pellets for catarrh, and other such remedies. So I sought it out in the supermarket. And read each jar of the stuff, with its mysterious code of 5%, 10%, 15%, and its extraordinary prices. And was astonished at the labels which read "Not for external use". Why would that be? What would happen if I did use it externally? Its a reversal of the usual prohibitions on things. (I didn't buy any.)
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:

The latest complication is that my sister-in-law (or half-sister-in-law?) has discovered that she has a half sister, and they will be meeting for the first time at this celebration.
Now I'm trying to find an explanation for the relationship between my husband and the half sister of his half-sister. I'm guessing that there isn't an actual official relationship - but maybe there is a way of expressing the link?

You're right - there is no relationship. If you wanted to call her a cousin or a step-sister, it wouldn't be horrible, if you wanted a sort-of-vaguely-right family word.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I have on occasion resorted to such statements as "She is the daughter of my father's mother's sister's daughter"! Rather than try to work out what sort of cousin she is to me.

Meanwhile, manuka honey. Having seen the wondrous results worked by it on D, I thought it might be a good addition to my medical supplies, along with the Friars' Balsam, and the little licorice pellets for catarrh, and other such remedies. So I sought it out in the supermarket. And read each jar of the stuff, with its mysterious code of 5%, 10%, 15%, and its extraordinary prices. And was astonished at the labels which read "Not for external use". Why would that be? What would happen if I did use it externally? Its a reversal of the usual prohibitions on things. (I didn't buy any.)

This is mostly guessing, but you've heard of honey having medical uses, and thought to go pick some up cheaper (not prescription like what I had), and how many other people are doing the same?

And parents are warned not to give babies honey during their first year for fear of botulism, I believe it was.

Putting those two together, I think the food manufacturers are avoiding liability from customers who try to use their not-medical-grade honey on open wounds.

[ 12. April 2017, 04:02: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Might also be the possibility of attracting bees and other insects to honey used externally.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Oooh ouch! [Snigger]
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
According to this site
quote:
Honey can become contaminated with germs from plants, bees, and dust during production, and also during collection and processing. Fortunately, the germ-fighting characteristics of honey ensure that most contaminating organisms cannot survive or reproduce. However, bacteria that reproduce using spores, including the bacterium that causes botulism, may remain. This explains why botulism has been reported in infants given honey by mouth. To solve this problem, medical-grade honey (Medihoney, for example) is irradiated to inactive the bacterial spores. Medical-grade honey is also standardized to have consistent germ-fighting activity. Some experts also suggest that medical-grade honey should be collected from hives that are free from germs and not treated with antibiotics, and that the nectar should be from plants that have not been treated with pesticides.

 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I would have thought that botulism was more of a problem when ingested!

I haven't found anything on-line warning about it, apart from not giving it to babies on every makers' jars.

But I'm not going to buy it unless I need it. And then I'll try the health food shops.

They've stopped the honey now on the legs.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
To be fair, I've never heard of anybody being seriously harmed from having food grade honey spread on them. You could google, I suppose. But it may be one of those "let's get a warning on here, better safe than sued" situations.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
1. A lot of honey badged "Manuka" in shops is nothing of the sort: you're paying for a name.

2. Pasteurised honey doesn't have the same health benefits as raw honey: a honey sold as "organic" may still have been pasteurised filtered.

3. If you want to get the most health benefit from honey buy direct from someone who has their own hives and who sells raw honey. In the UK there are local beekeeping clubs and societies who may be able to help.

An old lady in the village had a lengthy stay in hospital and was sent home with an ulcer on her leg that had proved resistant to all treatment. The District Nurse would visit and apply various pharmaceutical unguents and bind it up; as soon as she had gone Peggy would take off the bandages, wash off the gunk and apply honey, only bothering to cover if she was going out to work in the garden (they breed then tough around here). The ulcer she'd been told might never heal had vanished in 6 weeks.

I'm not saying that is conclusive but it should be persuasive.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and, as an added benefit, raw honey tastes so much nicer!
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
1. A lot of honey badged "Manuka" in shops is nothing of the sort: you're paying for a name.

2. Pasteurised honey doesn't have the same health benefits as raw honey: a honey sold as "organic" may still have been pasteurised filtered.

3. If you want to get the most health benefit from honey buy direct from someone who has their own hives and who sells raw honey. In the UK there are local beekeeping clubs and societies who may be able to help.

An old lady in the village had a lengthy stay in hospital and was sent home with an ulcer on her leg that had proved resistant to all treatment. The District Nurse would visit and apply various pharmaceutical unguents and bind it up; as soon as she had gone Peggy would take off the bandages, wash off the gunk and apply honey, only bothering to cover if she was going out to work in the garden (they breed then tough around here). The ulcer she'd been told might never heal had vanished in 6 weeks.

I'm not saying that is conclusive but it should be persuasive.

And that wasn't even manuka, presumably. There was a piece in the paper about the legal identification and classification of manuka being intruduced by the NZ government. Also the criminal behaviour of people aiming to make gains from other people's work with their bees.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Stealing honey, or even complete sets of beehives is becoming more common as prices for manuka honey rise.

As I said elsewhere, some farmers are even planting manuka, which in the past has been eradicated from farm land.

After having seen the result of manuka honey on a badly ulcerated leg I would use it (this was bought from the supermarket before medical honey was developed).

Huia
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
When do British panel shows come back on air?

'Have I Got News For You' is back [thank you YouTube people] but others seem to still be on hiatus. I was hoping for them to keep me entertained on these dark, long [relatively] wintry nights.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I don't know if anyone here is in the area, but Foots Cray in Kent is now the home of a giant metal cube which looks like a Borg ship built of scaffolding tubes, hollow, but with some sort f screening on one side. It towers over the surrounding area, worse even than the giant heap of rubbish which was disfiguring the other side of the A20. I can't find out from the internet or the planning lists what on earth it is. Anyone know?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
One of my brothers has sent me a supermarket voucher for my birthday. I want to buy some shower gel, but I am concerned that some gels have small plastic beads in it that pollute the ocean. Does anyone know how they are described on the contents labels so I can avoid buying them please.

Huia
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
They are called microbeads or appear on the labels under a range of names - more information from the Marine Conservation site (pdf) the most common of which are listed as:

 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks CK. I once, unknowingly bought a product containing them which languishes three-quarters full in a bathroom cupboard and I don't want to repeat the exercise.

Huia
 
Posted by Qoheleth. (# 9265) on :
 
We are planning for the celebration of our Church centenary in September, and would like to try to contact some previous clergy [CofE context]. Crockfords on-line wants £50 for a subscription [Eek!] . I wonder whether any CofE shipmates already have a subscription for their own purposes, and would be happy to help with a little research, please? Best to PM me, rather than clog up the thread.

Thanks
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I'm wondering whether microbeads can be mixed into soil. The nearest suggestion I can find to that is to put the products into landfill.
One idea is to continue using the product, but rinse into a bowl or similar, from where the water can be filtered before getting rid of the left overs safely.
 
Posted by Sarah G (# 11669) on :
 
Can anyone identify the piece of piano music Tokio Myers opened with at the BGT final :

Here, hopefully (at 1:31)


I know it, but just can't remember it!

Thanks.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Has anyone come across the following scam and can explain it to me?

A couple of weeks ago my parents received a piece of mail addressed to a name they didn't recognise. They popped it back in the post marked "Return to Sender - Not known at this address" A week later they received another piece of mail addressed to the same person, and they returned it likewise.

Last week their postman knocked on their door with a third letter to this person. He told them that he recognised it as part of a scam which is happening a lot in their area.

Apparently some people in London are taking out e.g. car insurance, but are getting cheaper premiums by claiming to live in a low crime area, such as my parents' home town. They can identify an address which has a garage and off street parking through google maps.

I understand that motor insurance is a legal obligation, and cheaper premiums must be attractive, but surely if someone had to put in a claim, it would immediately be obvious that the address was false, and their insurance invalid? At which point surely they would be charged with driving without insurance? Presumably these people are still paying out a three figure sum to acquire worthless insurance?

What is the point? And is this actually widespread?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I know someone who committed this scam (admittedly, using a relative's address) and the point of it is in the lower premiums BEFORE you get caught. Getting caught is not on their radar. She DID get into an accident, and was doing her damndest to settle with the other insurance company without having to report it to her own, for obvious reasons. Don't know how that turned out, hope she learnt something though.

If you wanted to put a stop to it, though, you could simply open the mail, find the insured's name and company, and call the company to let them know what's going on.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I would think that when the letter goes back to the insurance company with the message, "Return to sender--not known at this address', the company would start asking questions.

Moo

[ 03. July 2017, 00:16: Message edited by: Moo ]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
That, I'm afraid, is assuming the company cares about returned mail--that somebody has actually made examining such stuff a mailroom priority rather than saying "what's the point, I don't want to spend X to hire someone to do that work, it's not worth it"--which I fear many do.
 
Posted by mark_in_manchester (# 15978) on :
 
NEQ - the point is that your number plate comes up as 'insured' on the ANPR (automatic number plate recognition) cameras used by police in their vehicles and at roadside installations. If you come up 'un-insured' a police car will stop you, and a roadside installation will send you a summons. That is, if your V5 is registered to you at an address you live at - with online vehicle taxation I don't know if anyone is comparing the addresses on your V5 and insurance any more.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
NEQ, your parents may be caught up on the periphery of a "ghost broker" scam. Coincidentally I heard something on Radio 4's "You and yours" programme today about this. People receiving mail addressed to unknown people at their address was a feature of it.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Thank you, everyone. I had assumed that anyone who wanted car insurance would want to have the documentation, but mark is right - if the insurance is just to avoid a car being picked up as uninsured, the documentation might as well end up in the Scottish Highlands.

The ghost broker scenario does sound likely, and fits with the postman saying that it is happening a lot in their area; I'll talk to my parents about it on my next visit.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
My partner and me will be coming to the States later this year (we are eclipse chasers coming for the Big One in August) and planning to extend our trip afterward to take in several cities in the SW and California.

My question is: on internal flights in the US, how long before take off time do we need to be at the airport? We are used to leaving 3 hours for international flights from the UK, but what is the situation for internal USA flights?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Re: potential "ghost broker" scam.

For some time now the Royal Mail has not bothered with most mail marked "returned to sender" because it costs them time and money, so the company sending out the letters will be unaware that their missives are being sent to a bogus address.

NEQ The advice from police in my area is this: open the mail and note what it relates to. If it is anything to do with motor insurance, sent the mail back to the insurance company with a covering letter stating that you live at the address and that the addressee is unknown to you.

Send a second letter to DVLA, enclosing a copy of your letter to the insurance company, and head it up "Possible motor insurance fraud" and they can take it from there,
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
On the subject of motor insurance please remember that about one-third of vehicles are uninsured or incorrectly/illegally insured (so they may as well not be insured. South Wales is a particularly bad area for this.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
on internal flights in the US, how long before take off time do we need to be at the airport?

The general rule is two hours.

But it depends on the airport, the time of day, and the day of the week. In major airports in major cities, you can luck out and arrive at the gate when there is little or no line, and breeze right through. On the other hand, I've stood in lines that snake out the entrance door and down the sidewalk.

In what are euphemistically called regional airports (smaller airports catering to smaller aircraft), I've hardly ever experienced a long line.

If you're lucky enough to be traveling first class, or if your boarding pass is marked "TSA Precheck", you generally get the privilege of standing in a much shorter line.

Regardless, I like to arrive at the airport at least two hours beforehand. The more time you give yourself, the less likely you will be to miss your flight.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Thanks, that is helpful. One or two of the airports are what I would guess are small (Flagstaff and Phoenix) but we will also be going through Las Vegas, LA and San Francisco.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
There are apps, or web sites, that you can go to to see how your airport is doing on any particular day. Another annoying factor is the ones you cannot control. If there is a major disruption in air traffic, demonstrations about immigration at the airport, a terrorist incident anywhere -- all this gums up the works.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
Thanks, that is helpful. One or two of the airports are what I would guess are small (Flagstaff and Phoenix) but we will also be going through Las Vegas, LA and San Francisco.

Actually, the Phoenix airport is large and has had horrendous crowds (and waiting times), especially if something major (e.g., a football championship) is happening here. Do allow at least two hours.

When will you be in Phoenix? There are several Shipmates here who would love a Meet if the timing is right.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
Thanks, that is helpful. One or two of the airports are what I would guess are small (Flagstaff and Phoenix) but we will also be going through Las Vegas, LA and San Francisco.

Actually, the Phoenix airport is large and has had horrendous crowds (and waiting times), especially if something major (e.g., a football championship) is happening here. Do allow at least two hours.

When will you be in Phoenix? There are several Shipmates here who would love a Meet if the timing is right.

We are actually only changing planes in Phoenix, en route from Salt Lake City (where our eclipse tour finishes) to Flagstaff where we are going to see the Meteor crater and the Lowell Observatory.
This is definitely an astronomy themed trip!
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
We are actually only changing planes in Phoenix, en route from Salt Lake City (where our eclipse tour finishes) to Flagstaff where we are going to see the Meteor crater and the Lowell Observatory.
This is definitely an astronomy themed trip!

I just looked up the date of the eclipse, and it seems like I'll be passing through Sky Harbor (the Phoenix airport) during it. I'll be headed for Chicago, leaving Phoenix around noon, so it looks as if I'll be flying through the path of it. Should be interesting. (And no, I do know better than to watch it from the plane window.)
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Has anyone come across the following scam and can explain it to me?

A couple of weeks ago my parents received a piece of mail addressed to a name they didn't recognise. They popped it back in the post marked "Return to Sender - Not known at this address" A week later they received another piece of mail addressed to the same person, and they returned it likewise.

Last week their postman knocked on their door with a third letter to this person. He told them that he recognised it as part of a scam which is happening a lot in their area.

Apparently some people in London are taking out e.g. car insurance, but are getting cheaper premiums by claiming to live in a low crime area, such as my parents' home town. They can identify an address which has a garage and off street parking through google maps.

I understand that motor insurance is a legal obligation, and cheaper premiums must be attractive, but surely if someone had to put in a claim, it would immediately be obvious that the address was false, and their insurance invalid? At which point surely they would be charged with driving without insurance? Presumably these people are still paying out a three figure sum to acquire worthless insurance?

What is the point? And is this actually widespread?

They are people who see insurance as an unfortunate legal requirement, rather than as something that will pay out in the event of a claim. They assume they will not have an accident, or don't consider the possibility. All they are bothered about is getting their reg no. on the PNC for the lowest possible outlay.

[ 05. July 2017, 07:16: Message edited by: Karl: Liberal Backslider ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I've not heard of this, although one understands that the cost of insurance is so high in many areas that people will do anything to bring it down, especially as the fines for being found out are far too low (less than the cost of "proper" insurance).

What puzzles me is that the address of the Insured and the address of the Registered Keeper would be very different. One presumes that the DVLA would pick that up - but perhaps they don't, as I suppose lots of cars are owned by leasing companies etc. whose addresses are legitimately quite different from the addresses of the people who drive them.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
A non-Christian friend in Glastonbury reports that today (Saturday) the streets are full of clergymen. Is there a vicar convention or something taking place there?
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
No, just a pilgrimage due to this legend

Jengie
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Shame it's just Forward in Faith. In former days it was for all Anglicans.

[ 09. July 2017, 16:51: Message edited by: leo ]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Wasn't there a cycling thread somewhere on the Ship? Is there one now? Haven't been able to find it yet if it's there! - Thanks for your hints and links. [Smile]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
A culinary request this, but not a recipe. Having for the second time this week had to prepare a seedless fruit puree for icecream (goosegogs and elderflower this time) by rubbing through a sieve with a spoon, I have started to think about getting a mouli food mill.

Would this be quicker and/or less effort than the sieving, and produce a comparable result or better? £25 is quite a lot for something that might get to the back of the cupboard when I don't have to bother about seeds.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Would you use it for other things? I have one I would give you, but the postage across the Pond would be destructive. Before you go buy a new one, poke around on line. Can you buy a used one on Ebay? Post a Wanted on your local Freecycle group? Is there a Yard Sale group on Facebook in your town? Take a tour of all the local charity shops?
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
Wasn't there a cycling thread somewhere on the Ship? Is there one now? Haven't been able to find it yet if it's there! - Thanks for your hints and links. [Smile]

I seem to remember a cycling thread...somewhere! After a quick look, I don't see it, either. Might be time to start one up, Wesley J!
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Would you use it for other things? I have one I would give you, but the postage across the Pond would be destructive. Before you go buy a new one, poke around on line. Can you buy a used one on Ebay? Post a Wanted on your local Freecycle group? Is there a Yard Sale group on Facebook in your town? Take a tour of all the local charity shops?

There's a lot in there that suggests I'm better off with the sieve!
Haven't seen one in the charity shops of late. And I wouldn't want one which did not come with a box and indications of not having been used - too many nooks and crannies which I would not know the contents of!
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Hmm. How urgent is your need? I may be coming to the UK again.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
V urgent, I'm afraid. I have realised it would be better than my stick blender for the veg which I have to reduce to mush. That requires more to mush than is wanted. I went to get one yesterday and found, after I had used the new improved ordering process in the shop that it wouldn't arrive for several days. There is another possible source.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Urgent help needed please. Me and my partner are here in the US to see the eclipse and now about to leave our tour and head out on our own. I was planning to rely heavily on my mobile phone for calling for taxis etc, but I have been having problems trying to use it ever since we arrived.

Specifically my main problem is knowing exactly what numbers to input when calling a number here such as a taxi firm. Do I need to dial the full 001 first as if calling from the UK? And do I need do drop any of the digits of the US number?

Any help very much appreciated please.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
If you're in the US you need to dial 1, then the 3-digit area code, and then the seven digits of the actual phone number. If you're having real difficulty, see if you can find a phone store -- Verizon or T-Mobile or whoever your provider is --for technical assistance. The cheapest solution may be to buy a very cheap phone just for use within the US.
If you're near Washington DC and need crash space, pm me.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
So I drop the 00? I was told before leaving the UK that I needed to dial the full number including 00 as if I was calling from the UK.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
So I drop the 00? I was told before leaving the UK that I needed to dial the full number including 00 as if I was calling from the UK.

Nope -- no "00", just a "1". Good luck!
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
No, you should not need to dial 00. 1 is sufficient, and sometimes you don't even need the 1.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Thanks for this, we managed to get our phones working ok for calling taxis etc.

Currently in Flagstaff about to set off for the airport, Las Vegas via Phoenix.

We can neither of us get over how polite, helpful and just downright kind Americans are! We are loving it.
 
Posted by LutheranChik (# 9826) on :
 
One of my goals this year has been to learn more about African history, specifically pre- colonial history.But I find a dearth of literature on that subject. Can anyone steer me toward some good reading material?
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:
One of my goals this year has been to learn more about African history, specifically pre- colonial history.But I find a dearth of literature on that subject. Can anyone steer me toward some good reading material?

This is one of my areas of interest because I live in South Africa but it is a complex subject with many different and differing approaches. I have done studies in prehistoric rock art of the San hunters and gatherers. I used the research of David Lewis-Williams and Harriet & Jeanette Deacon.

[Deacon, H.J. & Deacon, J. 1999. Human beginnings in South Africa]
[Lewis-Williams, J.D. and D. Pierce 2004. San Spirituality: Roots, Expression and Social Consequences]

Shula Marks and Terence Ranger have done research into the pastoral communities or pre-colonial southern Africa and Zimbabwe. Earlier work was done by Monica Wilson and Leonard Thompson on prehistory of African rural communities.

I've also looked at histories of African art -- the making of masks, drums, textiles, sculptures etc. I used Fall, N’goné and Jean Loup Pivin (eds). 2002. An anthology of African art in the twentieth century.

One of the most influential books (not a light read) is THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF SOUTH AFRICA: Volume 1 edited by Robert Ross, ­Carolyn Hamilton and Benard K Mbenga; Volume 2 edited by Robert Ross, Anne Kelk Mager and Bill Nasson (Cambridge University Press).

A vast and complex field -- is there a particular angle you'd like to follow up?

In terms of Protestant missionary work and the development of the church in South Africa, there is John de Gruchy's The Church Struggle in South Africa, updated I believe in 2005.

[ 28. August 2017, 07:38: Message edited by: MaryLouise ]
 
Posted by Amorya (# 2652) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
No, you should not need to dial 00. 1 is sufficient, and sometimes you don't even need the 1.

I've always dialled "+1". (You can dial the plus symbol, usually you get it by holding down one of the other keys. On an iPhone you hold 0 for a few seconds and it gives you a plus.)

That works no matter what country you're in at the time.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Another question ... we are now in LA and want to see the Queen Mary. We don't drive, but we thought it looked possible to get to Long Beach by metro. But I can't see where we go from there. Is there a bus, or do we need to get a taxi?
 
Posted by LutheranChik (# 9826) on :
 
MaryLouise: Thank you. My interest is general...it was originally piqued while reading about some of the civilizations in northern Africa -- kingdoms like Adsum -- but I'm interested in it all, really.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I was reading a news article in a local paper that stated that more soldiers died in the American Civil War than have died in all subsequent wars in which American soldiers have fought including both WWI and II, Korea and Vietnam.

Does anyone know if this is accurate please?

Huia
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I suspect it is. The figure I recall for Civil War dead is 750,000 from both sides. Most of the deaths were from contagious diseases, such as measles. Many soldiers came from isolated communities where they had never been exposed to what are frequently called 'childhood diseases'. If better care had been available, the death rate would have been much lower.

Moo
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
This was before antibiotics, before immunization (except for smallpox) and before decent field medicine existed. Germ theory was unknown, sanitary practices vestigial. So mortality was very high. A huge leap in emergency medicine took place during the first World War.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks Moo and Brenda.

I didn't think about the contagious diseases and soldiers who came from isolated places, Moo. I once taught New Entrants in a country school and there were more children absent in my class than any of the other 3 for the same reason. I even caught measles which I had avoided until then.

Huia
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Complete change of subject. In among all the heap of books were the scattered sections of a 1904 "An Introduction to Folk-Lore" by Marian Roalfe Cox, published by David Nutt (President of the Folk-Lore Society) and dedicated to Edward Clodd.

I found all but the pages 177 to 192 which covered the veneration of serpents, and the abode of spirits associated with burial, mountain-burial and sacred mountain-tops - Soul must climb steep hill = Glass-mountains - "Terrible crystal" and other solid firmaments... and other otherworldly stuff. (Wonderful Victorian contents list at the front.)

Naturally, I have found this section more interesting than any of the rest - I've read so many stories in which the heroines climb glassy mountains, but I thought I could track down the ideas on the web.

But they aren't there.

Does anyone have any sources I could access on the connection between folk tales and beliefs about the fate of the dead?

[ 31. August 2017, 13:53: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
My first thought would be to go straight back to the Folklore Society, if it still exists.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I have discovered that the author mentions the glass mountains earlier as well, and it seems that they may be part of the journey to the abode of the dead, which makes all the stories of heroines (usually) and the odd hero climbing them versions of Ishtar going to rescue her lover, and Orpheus trying to rescue Eurydice.
Which means that my interpretation of many of those stories having to do with the male character being imprisoned by his mother (there is always a wicked woman, of unidentified relationship to the man) in the manner of Cupid being released from Venus by the actions of Psyche, may be wrong.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
There is an entry in our church records in 1720 which reads "Payment to smith for mending the bell rackle" (or it might be raickle).

What is a bell rackle / raickle?

We don't know exactly when our bell was made, but other bells by the same maker are dated between 1713 and 1717. There is an entry in the records in 1713 recording a payment to the smith for mending the bell tow, which I assume was the bell rope.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
There is an entry in our church records in 1720 which reads "Payment to smith for mending the bell rackle" (or it might be raickle).

What is a bell rackle / raickle?

We don't know exactly when our bell was made, but other bells by the same maker are dated between 1713 and 1717. There is an entry in the records in 1713 recording a payment to the smith for mending the bell tow, which I assume was the bell rope.

Collins English Dictionary describes 'rackle' as an archaic Scottish term for a chain, and the Dictionary of the Scots Language confirms your thought about the bell tow.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Thank you!

I wonder if the bell chain was being mended in order to hang the new bell? The surviving accounts are for small items, large expenses such as the bell itself must have been recorded separately, through a different account.

The bell still exists, but is no longer rung.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
St. Ninian's Priory still ring theirs on a Sunday morning, though I suspect it is newer than yours.

I think one of the example texts in the second dictionary I looked up talked about the bell being overused and the tackle and tow needing to be fixed.

[ 07. September 2017, 13:14: Message edited by: BroJames ]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
We broadcast a recording of a bell ringing, which can be heard for several hundred yards. I think most people assume the bell itself is ringing.

We also have a second, much smaller bell, more of a large handbell size, which is known as "the funeral bell" although I've no idea when it was last rung at a funeral, or indeed when it was last rung at all. I also have no idea how old it is, whether it predates the main bell, etc.

Perhaps as I trawl through the records I'll find out more.
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
I hope I haven't asked this before. If so, apologies etc.

When we were leaving the hospital in Fife with our newborn daughter, many years ago, the nurse asked us which door we had entered by when my wife was in labour, and made sure we left by a different one. I've asked many people if they had heard of this superstition, and no-one ever has. Anyone here know the reason for it? Was it just a local custom?
 
Posted by RuthW (# 13) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
Another question ... we are now in LA and want to see the Queen Mary. We don't drive, but we thought it looked possible to get to Long Beach by metro. But I can't see where we go from there. Is there a bus, or do we need to get a taxi?

Well, rats! I wish I'd seen this. I live in Long Beach and work downtown, and I could have helped with this. Did you get down here to see the QM?
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
I hope I haven't asked this before. If so, apologies etc.

When we were leaving the hospital in Fife with our newborn daughter, many years ago, the nurse asked us which door we had entered by when my wife was in labour, and made sure we left by a different one. I've asked many people if they had heard of this superstition, and no-one ever has. Anyone here know the reason for it? Was it just a local custom?

A distant bell is ringing at the back of my mind but details aren't clear.
It was something about it was okay to go out by a different/same door if you had sat down in the house.
I hope someone can supply the correct details!

GG
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Hmmm, my mother still reminds us to go back out the same door we entered in. I'm not sure where that superstition comes from, but I'll ask tomorrow. There seem to be different versions of the same idea.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
I found info about door folklore/superstitions at "The Psychic Well". Maybe 20-25 items.

Some of the in/out stuff evidently has to do with which door is reserved for taking out the dead.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
I've heard of old Dutch/Afrikaner settler homesteads where two doors were created at the front of the house, one for the exclusive use of those taking out the coffin of any householder who died.

It sounds extremely impractical.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Re doors:

There was a TV series called "The Incredible Journey Of Dr. Meg Laurel", starring Lindsey Wagner as an Appalachian woman who went back home to bring them modern medicine.

At one point, the local healer (?) said "Birth and death should never be in the same house". So deceased person had to be removed before a baby could come in. IMHO, that could have a medical basis, if the person died of anything infectious.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by RuthW:
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
Another question ... we are now in LA and want to see the Queen Mary. We don't drive, but we thought it looked possible to get to Long Beach by metro. But I can't see where we go from there. Is there a bus, or do we need to get a taxi?

Well, rats! I wish I'd seen this. I live in Long Beach and work downtown, and I could have helped with this. Did you get down here to see the QM?
Yes we did thanks. We got the Metro to Long Beach and then the free Passport bus to the QM. She was gorgeous!
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
I found info about door folklore/superstitions at "The Psychic Well". Maybe 20-25 items.

Some of the in/out stuff evidently has to do with which door is reserved for taking out the dead.

Some good stories on that website - thank you. I am wondering if the young nurse in Dunfermline was confusing her superstitions, though. The idea of not leaving by the same door as a corpse is understandable, but surely not in a hospital where these things are done a bit more discreetly.

Sort of on the topic, we had a talk at the church by an undertaker who explained that many older houses have double front doors so a coffin can be carried out in a dignified manner. For a while it was the fashion in some bigger new houses, but the owners probably had no idea of the origin.
 
Posted by Robert Armin (# 182) on :
 
Does anyone know why different parts of the world have different electric plugs? As a Brit I'm used to 3 square pins, and have to take an adaptor with me when I travel abroad (as I'm about to). Many countries have only two round pins, which looks unsafe to me, yet presumably work well. Why is there this variety?
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
While I'm unable to provide an explanation of the variation of plugs and sockets right now, while-u-wait, here's an overview of all the types there are. Interesting that some combine, and some combine unsafely! [Eek!]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Armin:
Does anyone know why different parts of the world have different electric plugs? As a Brit I'm used to 3 square pins, and have to take an adaptor with me when I travel abroad (as I'm about to). Many countries have only two round pins, which looks unsafe to me, yet presumably work well. Why is there this variety?

I suspect it's simply due to the electrical systems of the world developing separately and many countries following the lead of their colonial masters. To take an analogous parallel, the railway gauges of Britain, Ireland, Spain and Russia (to mention only Europe) are different although the British lead in construction meant that "standard" gauge became widely used. (And don't even mention Australia!)

The British system was a deliberate attempt in the 1940s to create a new, safe and universal system. In particular it included shuttered sockets (so you couldn't electrocute yourself by poking anything into the holes) and fused plugs. An omission was shielded pins which meant that something dropped behind a half-inserted plug could become live - this has now been rectified. A major drawback is the large size of the plugs.

The "Continental" system provides fewer safety features although earthed sockets are available for larger appliances. Of course many appliances today are double-insulated and don't need earthing although that was less common 50 years ago. In this case the British earthing pin is a dummy, serving merely to open the shutter mechanism for the other two pins.

[ 18. September 2017, 10:16: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
I found info about door folklore/superstitions at "The Psychic Well". Maybe 20-25 items.

Some of the in/out stuff evidently has to do with which door is reserved for taking out the dead.

Some good stories on that website - thank you. I am wondering if the young nurse in Dunfermline was confusing her superstitions, though. The idea of not leaving by the same door as a corpse is understandable, but surely not in a hospital where these things are done a bit more discreetly.

Sort of on the topic, we had a talk at the church by an undertaker who explained that many older houses have double front doors so a coffin can be carried out in a dignified manner. For a while it was the fashion in some bigger new houses, but the owners probably had no idea of the origin.

Looking through that and other sites, the folklore varied. (By location or culture, I presume.) But I wonder if "take a newborn in one door and out the other" is a symbolic way of not reversing what happened--i.e. the baby's birth?
 
Posted by Robert Armin (# 182) on :
 
Thanks for the info, Wesley and BT. Funnily enough, Wesley's webpage says three round pins are universal in India, where previous searching had told me 2! Ah well, they must be on sale in the airport, surely?
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Can anyone recommend a decent mp3 player that isn't an iPod, please? I'd be using it mainly to listen to podcasts/spoken word rather than music. I currently have a Creative Zen, which is fine for what I need, but it is getting a bit old and creaky now (I got it 10 years ago, and I've not paid any attention to what else is out there since getting it). Many thanks.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
I collect ephemera connected to my village - postcards, maps, communion tokens, anything really. I have a search set up on Ebay which notifies me if anything relating to (village name) comes up.

About 6 weeks ago, my notifications started to include everything being sold by a second-hand bookseller in Germany. Most days, this seller is listing 5-10 items, but more go on at weekends. Today, this bookseller posted 59 books for sale; I have to scroll through the list of notifications to see if all 59 are second-hand German books, or if there are some e.g. relevent postcards amongst them.

I can't figure out a way of filtering out the irrelevent items.

Any suggestions?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Is there a way to figure out why it's tripping your search parameters? I'm thinking the German guy has a single mis-spelled word.
The other idea is to see if you can filter the search by country, or postage, or something. If you could limit it only to your country, that would fix the German vendor.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
Can anyone recommend a decent mp3 player that isn't an iPod, please? I'd be using it mainly to listen to podcasts/spoken word rather than music. I currently have a Creative Zen, which is fine for what I need, but it is getting a bit old and creaky now (I got it 10 years ago, and I've not paid any attention to what else is out there since getting it). Many thanks.

Wow, so many people use their mobiles as their players these days, I wasn't sure there was much else out there other than audiophile brands.
A quick search finds these companies with good reviews.
AGPtek
SanDisk
Sony
FiiO
Sony and FiiO have reasonably prices units and some less so.
FiiO is one of the players in the audiophile portable music market. Their earlier earlier versions, still on the market, are decent for a reasonable cost.
There is also Pono Player in that market, minus the reasonable cost.
The expensive units are not worth the cost unless one has something better than an MP3 and high end headphones with which to listen and listens to types of music where it matters. And probably not even then.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
NEQ--

Maybe do a page search (ctrl z) for "buch"? That's German for "book". Might also be "buecher" (or u with the two "umlaut" dots above it, rather than ue). IIRC, that's "books".

Good luck! [Smile]

ETA: Reading through your original post, I may have misunderstood it. I thought you were having to work with listings in German.

[ 22. October 2017, 00:30: Message edited by: Golden Key ]
 
Posted by Robert Armin (# 182) on :
 
A few days ago I finally succumbed and let my desktop upgrade itself. The result wasn't as bad as I feared, in that almost nothing has changed. The only thing I can notice is very minor, but it is annoying me. My screensaver used to be a phrase of my choosing in an attractive font; now it says "Windows 10" in something dull and san serif, and I can't see any way of changing it. Can any of you wizards out there advise me?
 
Posted by Albert Ross (# 3241) on :
 
You can add a negative term to an Ebay search using "-" eg "-fool". Items with "fool" in their description will not be included in the search results. You could try this using the bookseller's name.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
I wonder if as part of his output he may have the words “buch” and “an” either with a space missing, or with some other separator which the search algorithm ignores. Assuming your village is in Buchan that could throw up the error. If “Buchan” is what is triggering the notifications, and you can find it in his listings (it sounds as if it might be a text common to many of his listings), and it is in fact an error, then an email to him might get it changed. If it’s not an error or you can’t get it changed, I’m not sure what the next step might be.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Bishop's Finger - try the instructions here for setting a screen saver.

(And having found this and checked it I now need to work out how to reset the settings I've unset)
 
Posted by Robert Armin (# 182) on :
 
Many thanks CK - that did the trick!
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
If someone was sentenced to seven years penal servitude in 1908, would they have served the full seven years, or was there a "time off for good behaviour" scheme, or parole?
 
Posted by Peter Owen (# 134) on :
 
Did you find a solution? If not you need to use eBay's advanced search. One option allows you to exclude specified sellers. That should do the trick.

quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
...

I can't figure out a way of filtering out the irrelevent items.

Any suggestions?


 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
If someone was sentenced to seven years penal servitude in 1908, would they have served the full seven years, or was there a "time off for good behaviour" scheme, or parole?

Where are you talking about?
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
My 9 yo niece wants a book on horses.

Pictures AND words apparently. She does ask for a lot. [Biased]

Can anyone recommend a good horse book for a 9 year old? Of course Uncle Ian may get in trouble from the parents for feeding this obsession!

edit: Thanks!

[ 16. November 2017, 04:59: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Ian--

Fiction? Non-fiction?

If fiction, maybe "Black Beauty". I think the author is Anna Sewell. A classic horse book.

[ 16. November 2017, 05:08: Message edited by: Golden Key ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Misty of Chincoteague, by Marguerite Henry. Famously illustrated by Wesley Davis. There are many other similar books by the same team, Born to Run, King of the Wind, etc.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
As a horse crazy girl, I was given Album of Horses when I was nine or ten years old. Another winner by Marguerite Henry (Author) and ‎ Wesley Dennis (Illustrator).

I still have and treasure that book! [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Given where in the world you are and if you want fiction then Silver Brumby. I am not sure whether they have pictures.

Jengie
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Thank you all; they are great suggestions!

GK: sorry for not specifying; I think she'd be happy with both.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
Given where in the world you are and if you want fiction then Silver Brumby. I am not sure whether they have pictures.

Jengie

Silver Brumby: Yes and yes and yes! My favourite for years and years.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Thank you too, Sparrow. Despite as Jengie Jon writing on my location, I must say I had never heard of it...

Looks like I can choose from a wide selection.

[ 17. November 2017, 07:09: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Ian, How about Good Luck to the Rider by Joan Phipson. It is quite old and I can reme ber hearing it on ABC years ago. Will send you PM with names of places I have found old books.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
If someone was sentenced to seven years penal servitude in 1908, would they have served the full seven years, or was there a "time off for good behaviour" scheme, or parole?

I'm assuming you're thinking about Scotland.

A bit of Googling is somewhat inconclusive since all the terms hit on modern issues as well. AFAICT time off for good behaviour was possible at that time, though I haven't identified whether the sentence finished early, or whether there was a scheme of release on licence.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Not sure this will help, wrong end of the country for starters but Old Bailey Online does follow sentence people for quite some time.

Jengie
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
A query, just out of intrigue.

The other day, I got addressed by a tram collector as 'Sah' which I assume is a pronunciation of 'Sir'. It intrigued me enough to listen as he went further down the tram. He was addressing everyone as 'Sah' regardless of gender. I wonder if this is because he feels uncomfortable using 'ma'am' and therefore developed a gender-neutral form.

Has anyone else noticed this phenomenon? Let me be clear tram conductors are not usually the most socially progressive of people and 'duck', 'hen' and 'sugar' are far more usual forms of address by them.

Jengie
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
Thank you too, Sparrow. Despite as Jengie Jon writing on my location, I must say I had never heard of it...

Looks like I can choose from a wide selection.

I should perhaps add that it might be a bit too much for a nine year old. It is a story about wild horses, and though the horses talk to each other it is fairly realistically grim in some parts. Horses die, fight and kill each other. My Little Pony it is not!

There was a TV series a few years ago that really messed it up, Disnified it and made it really (small) child friendly. But nothing at all like the book!
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Thanks Sparrow & Lothlorien for the follow-ups. I'm know I'm her uncle, but she is reasonably mature (for 9) - I think the only time I've seen her run is the rat scene in The Princess Bride! [Smile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I cannot remember when I read Black Beauty but know I was in primary school. It has some cruelty to horses depicted and some sad passages. It was very old when I read it first and spoke of a time years gone by. Hard to imagine in these days of fast cars. I am not complaining of that . Books are a great way to learn of the past.

[ 18. November 2017, 03:48: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Ohher (# 18607) on :
 
I read Black Beauty as a third-grader, about age 8. I remember sobbing my heart out at some of the scenes, to the point where my family was somewhat concerned at the intensity of my response. But this was at a time when television was a recent addition to the home scene, and I (and children in general) were exposed to far less violence, etc.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
My 9 yo niece wants a book on horses.

Pictures AND words apparently. She does ask for a lot. [Biased]

Well, there's this one.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
[Killing me]

I'm very tempted. Just to see her face...

Ohher: I reread the plot and wondered at some scenes. Hard for me to tell how she would react.

[ 18. November 2017, 05:37: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
IIRC Black Beauty was written in the 1880s. I loved it as a child, but as an adult I came to realize that there is far more sympathy for animals than for human beings.

The boy who throws stones at the horses is slapped and called wicked, although many children unthinkingly throw stones at animals. They need to be stopped, but they also need to be told why this is wrong. There is understanding for a horse that misbehaves, but not a child.

Moo
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
The boy . . . is slapped and called wicked.

A method of discipline that has, alas, fallen into disrepute.

[Miss Amanda shields herself in her wrap and slinks off.]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
When I was about eight, my mother brought home a used typewriter, much like this one, and I thought it was the greatest thing ever. I started to write the great American novel, "The Silver Horse."

Despite the fact that I was eight years old and knew nothing about horses I'm sure it would have been wonderful if it had ever been completed (I think I may have finished a page or two). There probably would have been bidding wars for the movie rights. I'm sure your niece would have loved it.

My apologies for depriving the world (and your niece) of this masterpiece.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
No plans to pick it up again? The world is waiting...

[Smile]

---

Anotther question. I read this in an article, on politics:
quote:
Despite our politics running like the inner workings of a Danish castle, the commentary on it runs like the council notices of The Wooropna Advertiser – a dutiful, deathful, exhausting documentation of tactics, manoeuvres, spin and public relations.
I take it the bolded phrase means "well"? Or not? Where does it come from?
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
Does anyone here play recreational football/soccer? Or knows someone who does? I'd like to get a pretty good quality ball for my niece and her husband for Christmas but don't know anything about equipment except that a ball for adults is size 5. I read that there are pro types, training types, turf types plus some others. I believe they play on public park grounds.

Much obliged for recommendations. [Smile]
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
No plans to pick it up again? The world is waiting...

[Smile]

---

Anotther question. I read this in an article, on politics:
quote:
Despite our politics running like the inner workings of a Danish castle, the commentary on it runs like the council notices of The Wooropna Advertiser – a dutiful, deathful, exhausting documentation of tactics, manoeuvres, spin and public relations.
I take it the bolded phrase means "well"? Or not? Where does it come from?
My guess would be Hamlet- and thus not so well.
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
In the context of the rest of that article, Ian, I wonder if it's a Hamlet reference?
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
How embarrassing. Hamlet never crossed my mind, uncultured uncouth person I am. Makes perfect sense. Thank you both.
 


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