Thread: Extravagant Living Board: Heaven / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
Like many I try and live a simple life for the most part with few if any extravert purchases. There have been a time or two when I just went for it and am glad I did. First was way back in the 60's when I spent what seemed a great sum at the time on a black cocktail dress. $300.00 it was. I think it was a great investment because Mr Image was dating me at the time and he still remembers that dress.

The second is a $50 bottle of apricot flavored vinegar that I buy once a year and use throughout the year. Add a bit to ice water on a hot day, lovely added when cooking roast pork, makes a to die for salad dressing, and the list goes on. Thankfully just a small amount goes a long way.
Shipmates what is your idea of extravert living?

[ 04. August 2017, 23:14: Message edited by: jedijudy ]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Could someone kindly do something about this thread's title? I've no idea what 'extravent' means, but 'extravert' is AIUI a form of 'extrovert'. I suspect the latter spelling is more common on this side of the pond!

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
It seems to be a fusion of "extrovert" and "extravagant", probably about 35/65 in favour of the latter ...
 
Posted by Galilit (# 16470) on :
 
The trick is to have a "thing" that is inexpensive and readily available but precious to YOU that you can acquire and store.

Mine is face-cloths.
[For those in benighted cultures: a face-cloth is a 30X30 cm towel for washing one's face or one's whole body in shower or bath]

That way when a need "arises" (as we Buddhists say) to buy oneself something NEW ...I have an automatic go-to option that is easily obtainable, not expensive or luxury and will give me JOY to use.
It in no way compromises my "simple life" praxis

Perhaps I should confess at this point to a collection of 33 face-cloths in useable condition and 4 old ones that I keep for sentimental reasons.
I agree this is not minimalist but it is neither hoarding nor extravagent because I want to be able to choose colours and textures on-the-spot according to my mood and skin requirements.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galilit:
The trick is to have a "thing" that is inexpensive and readily available but precious to YOU that you can acquire and store.

There is a sandalwood scented bath soap that is imported from China by an outfit with the wonderful name of Prince of Peace Enterprises. It only costs 98¢ a bar and is carried by my local supermarket.

Every time I go shopping I pick up two bars whether I need more or not. Now I have a whole drawer full, which should last me a long time. Especially meaningful because I'll be moving to a new apartment in two weeks and the supermarket in question will no longer be convenient to me. I haven't seen this soap carried anywhere else.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
The thread title says 'extravent'. The OP refers to 'extravert'. Which is it, please?

[Help]

(Just asking. I do see the possible connection between 'extrovert' and 'extravagant' - but O, my poor language! What have they done to you?)

IJ
 
Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
It should read extravagant as in lacking restraint. Help Help I can not change it.

[Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
You can also use it to scent your drawers. Just open one end of the package and stick the bar in the drawer. It is still usable as soap afterwards.

Moo
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
@Graven Image - never mind!

I understand now, but my rigid Austerity Of Life precludes me from contributing...

(Perhaps a Kindly Host will come along soon to correct the title? Hint, hint...)

IJ
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
I bought a some "technical pants"** made of nylon, little bit of spandex with zippered "extravents" the knee going up about 5" and drawstrings at the ankles. They were $175 nearly 10 years ago. Still looking pretty good. They absolutely the best pants for outdoor activities where shorts (short pants) are too cool ~10°C


(**which means long pants, trousers is the 19th century word for this, slacks are probably something slackers wear; underwear are called underwear or gotch).
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
You can also use it to scent your drawers. Just open one end of the package and stick the bar in the drawer. It is still usable as soap afterwards.

Moo

In fact, take it right out of the packet and let the soap dry out and harden. Much better for use after it's done its job of scenting drawers.

[ 04. August 2017, 22:30: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
It should read extravagant as in lacking restraint. Help Help I can not change it.

[Hot and Hormonal]

Your friendly, neighborhood Heaven Host to the rescue! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Twilight (# 2832) on :
 
I just indulged in my main extravent today!

It's "back-to-school" sale at Walmart, so I bought 8, yes eight, spiral notebooks. Wide ruled in four different colors. I do this every year because I seem to have a sort of phobia about running out of writing material and my son shares this. What if we have a list to make or a poem to write or something to say that's too inane even for the ship?!!

Sale cost was 25cents so all eight totaled $2.00. Even so I had to sneak and buy it when my husband wasn't with me because -- such is the irony of marriage -- he has sort of a thing about wasting paper and would actually think I could put all that priceless information on the back of old envelopes. [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
As regular visitors to the British thread in AS will know, Retail Therapy is something I enjoy probably rather more than I should, although I do try to be a bargain-hunter.

However, there are one or two things I will splash out on: Lancôme self-tanning cream for my legs - I hate pasty-white legs with dresses or cropped trousers - and it dries quickly and lasts several days; and decent-quality nail-varnish, because I like it and it goes on more easily and lasts a little longer than cheap-and-nasty stuff.

[ 05. August 2017, 00:51: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
So many brilliant ceramicists in South Africa. I save up to buy bowls by Katherine Glenday.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
I have realized that my extravagance is tools. Not a particular kind of tool, just tools.

I don't buy expensive tools, but I do seem to spend some considerable time convincing myself that I need this particular tool for a particular project I have in mind.

My list of pending projects is quite long. It got reset when I moved to the US, but has been merrily growing since. (The oldest job on the list is a pair of powered speakers that have been waiting to have some dead capacitors changed for the last decade.

The newest project is a set of shelves that'll be finished tomorrow - things do drop off the list, but not as fast as they get put on.
 
Posted by Kaplan Corday (# 16119) on :
 
Pocket knives, most of them Swiss Army.

One in every jacket I own.

Just in case!

One day a lot of people are going to look pretty foolish when someone's horse has a stone stuck in its shoe, and I'm the only one with the pocket-knife attachment to remove it.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
So many brilliant ceramicists in South Africa. I save up to buy bowls by Katherine Glenday.

Lovely. Thank you.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Wow. Drop-dead gorgeous or what (the ceramics, I mean).

Having sourly remarked earlier about my Austere Life, I have to confess that I am somewhat extravagant (thank you for the correction, O Kindly Host!) when it comes to buying books...

[Help]

IJ
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
Books are not an extravagance -- they're a necessity.
 
Posted by mark_in_manchester (# 15978) on :
 
quote:
I have realized that my extravagance is tools....My list of pending projects is quite long. It got reset when I moved to the US...
Ow, that must have hurt. I last moved house 23 years ago, and even then the shed situation was out of control. I don't know what I'd do now - weigh it all in? Give it all to a dealer for £2.50? Spend the rest of my life listing dial gauges(*), obsolete BSW fasteners and obscure bike parts (the bits that don't go wrong) on ebay one-by-one?

* Don't need a dial gauge or ten, do you? My place of work don't use them any more, and when saner minds than mine spew them into the skip as a few more are discovered quaking in a dark forgotten corner, somehow they end up coming home with me. Some are even metric...
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mark_in_manchester:
quote:
I have realized that my extravagance is tools....My list of pending projects is quite long. It got reset when I moved to the US...
Ow, that must have hurt. I last moved house 23 years ago, and even then the shed situation was out of control. I don't know what I'd do now - weigh it all in? Give it all to a dealer for £2.50? Spend the rest of my life listing dial gauges(*), obsolete BSW fasteners and obscure bike parts (the bits that don't go wrong) on ebay one-by-one?

* Don't need a dial gauge or ten, do you? My place of work don't use them any more, and when saner minds than mine spew them into the skip as a few more are discovered quaking in a dark forgotten corner, somehow they end up coming home with me. Some are even metric...

Dial gauges? Don't ever throw them out. My third digital vernier has just lost its little electronic mind, so its old mechanical grandfather saved me again. Next time I am in your area I may give you a call.
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
Perfume was very much frowned upon as an extravagance when I was growing up. I love the stuff, but treat myself to 2 bottles a year so I can have a winter perfume, and a summer one.

Oh, and books, as previously mentioned. But they're second hand, so that doesn't count, right? [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Er...well... some of them are, but I have bought a couple of rather expensive new ones recently...

[Ultra confused]

IJ
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I have a weakness for dried apricots. They come from California, and I discovered that those wicked and selfish Golden Staters keep all the good ones out there for themselves. The ones you see in supermarkets are third-rate rejects. So when I go out I try to hit a farm market and buy six packets, to take back and eat on the east coast.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
I love the L'Occitane Verveine range of bath and body products ... really out of range of my pocket for every day, but I occasionally treat myself to a bottle of the shower gel (the cheapest!) and use it very sparingly when I feel I deserve it.
 
Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
Jedi Judy fixed it.
quote:
Your friendly, neighborhood Heaven Host to the rescue!
Thank you. [Axe murder]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Good quality clothing is a must for me. I'd rather have one Lacoste shirt that lasts 25+ years than 5 cheaper versions that become manky within a short period of time.

There is an advantage to this: weight gain isn't an option unless I want to buy an entire new wardrobe.
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
I buy luxurious undershirts, and very many of them at a time, so that even if the laundry doesn't get done over the weekend, I will still have some clean undershirts to start the next week with*. (At which point I run down and start a load of "whites.")


_________________
*I was raised to always wear an undershirt under my shirt. To the extent that, in very hot weather, I still have a hard time convincing myself that it's okay -- I can go out without my white tee under my polo.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
I was raised to always wear an undershirt under my shirt.

[TANGENT]

As a member of the membership committee of our choral group, I have a hard time convincing the singers that an undershirt should be worn under their dress shirt. They complain that it's too hot on stage and so the fewer clothes the better.

The argument that an undershirt wicks away moisture and prevents the dress shirt from sticking to the chest falls on deaf ears. They appear not to care that the audience can see their chest hairs and nipples through the wet dress shirt.

Only a bumpkin would not wear an undershirt under a dress shirt.

[/TANGENT]
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
So many brilliant ceramicists in South Africa. I save up to buy bowls by Katherine Glenday.

I buy ceramics, as well. You display some very good taste. Glenday's work is lovely.
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
Books. I patronise a local independent book dealer. He and the staff now know me by sight if not by name. Never a good sign. And now I'm in the throes of moving.

Suits. I don't own many, but they are very good, and I love the rituals associated with buying one. A well tailored suit just feels right.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
I bought a some "technical pants"** made of nylon, little bit of spandex with zippered "extravents" the knee going up about 5" and drawstrings at the ankles. They were $175 nearly 10 years ago. Still looking pretty good. They absolutely the best pants for outdoor activities where shorts (short pants) are too cool ~10°C


(**which means long pants, trousers is the 19th century word for this, slacks are probably something slackers wear; underwear are called underwear or gotch).

I cannot get used to the way you guys the wrong side of the pond call trousers "pants". It creates hilarious mental images. Sometimes. Other times horrible ones.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
It pleases me no end to know that you get such fun out of it. Almost like when you folks speak of "fannies" and I have to pull my mind back from thinking of backsides.
 
Posted by Kaplan Corday (# 16119) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
I cannot get used to the way you guys the wrong side of the pond call trousers "pants".

In India you would have to cope with half-pant and full-pant.

Here in Australia pants and trousers are simply synonyms.
 
Posted by churchgeek (# 5557) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Pocket knives, most of them Swiss Army.

One in every jacket I own.

Just in case!

I try to do that with asthma inhalers! Well, one by my bed, one to put in my pocket (kept next to my wallet when I'm home), and one or more in various bags I take (as I keep my different activities - work, choir, shopping, misc - in different bags so I don't have to keep unloading and reloading things).

I guess my extravagance might be in my canvas tote bags, then.

My favorite is a black bag with the Great Lakes on it in white - but it glows in the dark! Not to imply the Great Lakes are radioactive or anything...
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
I bought a some "technical pants"** made of nylon, little bit of spandex with zippered "extravents" the knee going up about 5" and drawstrings at the ankles. They were $175 nearly 10 years ago. Still looking pretty good. They absolutely the best pants for outdoor activities where shorts (short pants) are too cool ~10°C


(**which means long pants, trousers is the 19th century word for this, slacks are probably something slackers wear; underwear are called underwear or gotch).

I cannot get used to the way you guys the wrong side of the pond call trousers "pants". It creates hilarious mental images. Sometimes. Other times horrible ones.
1. I've not heard underpants referred to (only ever by young teenage boys in my experience) as "gotch" for 50 years or more. (term arises from a game of trying to depants other teeanage boys, calling "gotcha")

2. WHen I was growing up in the dark ages in Manitoba, "trousers" and "pants" were used interchangeably. (Underwear was called underpants). Trousers has just fallen out of use over the decades, though still understood everywhere.

"liar, liar, pants on fire" has rather a different and more immediate impact if pants are understood in the UK way.

John
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
It pleases me no end to know that you get such fun out of it. Almost like when you folks speak of "fannies" and I have to pull my mind back from thinking of backsides.

Believe you me, that one can be pretty funny the other way around. Back when bum-bags were still a thing we used to snort into our cellar temperature hand pulled cask ale/tea* at mention of fanny packs...

*delete as appropriate
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I am savouring my extravagant purchase of American cherries. In NZ cherries come into season around Christmas, and in the depths of winter it seems that summer will never arrive, so every winter I buy aboot 20 cherries (the last of the big spenders [Big Grin] ) eat the flesh and suck the pits. Today they were $18/kilo, but one year theyy crept up to $26 [Eek!] .

I thought about food miles, then I reasoned that I always walk or use public transport, and when I fly domestically ( maybe 2 -3 times a year, the flights only last an hour at most) while currently the bus takes 9* hours and the ferry over 3. So I trade off my light use of fossil fuels and splurge on a few cherries - seems fair to me!

* Highway one - the main route, was damaged by a huge quake in November - hence the extended time. Scheduled date for completion is before Christmas - fingers crossed.

Huia [Angel]
 
Posted by wild haggis (# 15555) on :
 
Ooooohhh! Where do I start!

L'Occitane skincare - can't normally afford it!Got some of the Divine range for my birthday, or was it Christmas? But for this Christmas........hint, hint.

Zsolnay Hungarian antique ceramics!Love them but the real ones cost the earth. Have a few pieces but would like more.............

Perfume, I too have a summer and winter one. Mind you the winter one is an M&S one, so probably doesn't count!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Cheese.

Good cheese, tasty cheese, sod-the-cost cheese.

Cheap cheese is a waste of money but good cheese is a pure delight.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Owtch, Huia. That is expensive. Cherries in the grocery store here in the mid-Atlantic are now going at $3 a pound, quite reasonable. What are they doing, buying those fruits a first-class airplane seat?
 
Posted by cliffdweller (# 13338) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:

* Highway one - the main route, was damaged by a huge quake in November - hence the extended time. Scheduled date for completion is before Christmas - fingers crossed.

Huia [Angel]

*tangent* I had to reread this a few times to make sense of it since our (US)
Hwy 1 is also closed and will be for at least a year, leaving a small but lovely community (Big Sur) cut off from the rest of the world (there is a small trail of a couple of miles they can hike out). Ironically, our closure was not caused by one of the earthquakes so iconic to Calif., but by mudslides caused by the uncharacteristic rains we had last year.

*end tangent*
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Funny you should say that Cliffdweller as our Highway ! now also has mudslides after heavy rain. I do hope it gets fixed soon as I feel cut off from family at the moment. There are flights, but I like that road having walked portions of in in protest at the growing gap between the rich and poor here in 1998 ( which has grown even bigger since then).

Huia
 
Posted by Ethne Alba (# 5804) on :
 
Well i was going to say nothing...that i had no extravagances.

But there appears to be more bags than i thought in our home......and now i think about it, yes...it's bags. Felt bags, raffia bags, leather bags, cotton bags, string bags, carpet bags, old bags, new bags, zipped bags, tied bags, open bags, poppered bags.....

In fact, in old age all the extended family would need to do is surround me with bags + things to put in and take out of them. There. Sorted.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
A bit of a tangent to save going over to the 'kids these days' thread, and in response to the above posts about pants;
Kiwi schoolgirl about 1956, looks up from the book she's reading and asks teacher, 'Miss G, what are knickers?'

GG
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I feel you all aren’t trying hard enough here. How’s about some really obscenely expensive indulgence?

Is this the moment to admit a have a little, ahem… weakness for Michelin-starred restaurants?
 
Posted by LutheranChik (# 9826) on :
 
We subscribe to a monthly coffee delivery from s small- batch coffee roaster " up north." The coffee isn't any kind of varietal, just one of their smoother blends, but it's so food that to us it's worth the expense.

We also save up for quarterly mimi-,vacations...three days, usually...my Dear Spouse ruthless researches the discount lodging websites for rock- bottom roomd eals, and we plan our meals so that we can afford one spendy dinner. We've enjoyed a few of these adventures that were extravagant experiences but not pricewise..but to me all of them are a gift.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I consider myself an expensive girl. (Although I am not as expensive as my sister, who is the most costly woman you shall ever meet unless you are brought alive before the throne of Ivanka Trump.) But it is the expensiveness of desire, not dollars. If it is what I want, I don't care if it costs a dime or a century note. A cheap phone does me perfectly well and I would not get the full value out of an $800 Iphone.
Which is working around to the costly indulgence of next week. My husband has never been to France. So we're going to go. Paris, to see museums and tour the catacombs and Pere Lachaise (because I love cemeteries). And then south. A bucket-list trip, before age sucks away mobility and we can't do this any more.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
I like to fly first class whenever I can, especially if I have enough points to do it for free or for a small surcharge.

Unfortunately, the service you get in first class these days is what you used to get in economy class.
 
Posted by Leaf (# 14169) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
I feel you all aren’t trying hard enough here. How’s about some really obscenely expensive indulgence?

Is this the moment to admit a have a little, ahem… weakness for Michelin-starred restaurants?

Darling, the Guide doesn't even send inspectors to Canada.


[Waterworks]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
King Island camembert cheese. Lindt dark chocolate covered almonds or hazelnuts. Frangelico liquer. Sigh. All lovely, but I try to limit the intake now to special occasions.

Fortunately in a large family it is not too long between special occasions!

BL. Not destined to be a skinny old lady any time soon.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
I feel you all aren’t trying hard enough here. How’s about some really obscenely expensive indulgence?

Is this the moment to admit a have a little, ahem… weakness for Michelin-starred restaurants?

It may horrify you to learn that in nearly 50 years on the planet the poshest place I've ever eaten is here: http://www.scotsmanspackcountryinn.co.uk/menus
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
Actually, Karl, it looks quite nice. I would rather have an outstanding beef pie and mash than an indifferent bit of wankery garnished with seared foie gras. I still remember a particular venison pie I had in Moulin, Scotland about ten years ago. Perfection. Your post has given me an idea for my next hike in the UK - I must do some research.
 
Posted by chris stiles (# 12641) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:

Is this the moment to admit a have a little, ahem… weakness for Michelin-starred restaurants?

I could cop to that - and while I don't eat out much any more, I like good ingredients and sometimes spend what must seem like an inordinate amount of time on preparation.

I also like smelling nice - though the expense of a decent cologne can be spread out over quite a long time
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Human indicators are rather extravagant.

Japanese PM.

[ 28. October 2017, 21:52: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by TurquoiseTastic (# 8978) on :
 
Ginger Spice flavour Jude's ice cream...yes...

with Maple Syrup...yesyes

and....

half a capful of brandy

YES
 


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