Thread: A little piece of me Board: Heaven / Ship of Fools.


To visit this thread, use this URL:
http://forum.ship-of-fools.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=012905

Posted by The Scrumpmeister (# 5638) on :
 
I've recently started taking to adding a little ground clove into my macaroni pie. I did it once because I had no paprika and I thought I'd try a New Thing, but it turns out it really makes it, and I would never go back to paprika.

What variation have you made on an established recipe that was either handed down to you or got from a book, that you think is a vast improvement on what you received?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I double or triple the bananas in the family banana bread recipe, and cinnamon ditto. The church eagerly scarfs it up.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Scrumpmeister:
I've recently started taking to adding a little ground clove into my macaroni pie.

I add nutmeg, which is also very good.

Moo
 
Posted by Doublethink. (# 1984) on :
 
Cinnamon in mince lamb or beef is awesomely moreish in almost any dish.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
A friend of mine has shared the wonder of squeezing a little lemon juice into chicken noodle soup.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Rum. A little rum into whipped cream (at the end, just before serving) is a wonderful thing.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Ground harissa powder and a good shake of chilli flakes on fried eggs. Sesame seeds as well are good too. All these I put on just after egg is broken into pan.
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by The Scrumpmeister:
I've recently started taking to adding a little ground clove into my macaroni pie.

I add nutmeg, which is also very good.

Moo

Um, what else is in a macaroni pie? Because in my part of the world macaroni is really only combined with cheese, or maybe cheese and bacon, and the mind kind of boggles/barfs at the idea of mixing either of these flavours with cloves...
 
Posted by georgiaboy (# 11294) on :
 
As I don't care much for cinnamon, I will usually omit it and substitute nutmeg, which I very much like. If the recipe already calls for nutmeg I will double the amount.

A tip from a friend when making pecan pie: use twice the amount of pecans as specified in the recipe. (Plus a good slug of bourbon whiskey!)
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:

A tip from a friend when making pecan pie: use twice the amount of pecans as specified in the recipe. (Plus a good slug of bourbon whiskey!)

In the pie -- or in the cook?

[Biased]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Both, obviously. No point in being shy.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
Um, what else is in a macaroni pie? Because in my part of the world macaroni is really only combined with cheese, or maybe cheese and bacon, and the mind kind of boggles/barfs at the idea of mixing either of these flavours with cloves...

Do you eat rice pudding? Probably with nutmeg, or possibly cloves? Somewhere, I have a 1970s recipe for chocolate macaroni.

Mind you, I've never been tempted to try it, because 1970s food was pretty much entirely horrible.
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
Um, what else is in a macaroni pie? Because in my part of the world macaroni is really only combined with cheese, or maybe cheese and bacon, and the mind kind of boggles/barfs at the idea of mixing either of these flavours with cloves...

Do you eat rice pudding? Probably with nutmeg, or possibly cloves? Somewhere, I have a 1970s recipe for chocolate macaroni.

Mind you, I've never been tempted to try it, because 1970s food was pretty much entirely horrible.

Oh, right... Yeah, my mum used to make rice pudding, with loads of milk, and not much rice, and nutmeg sprinkled over. A nasty wrinkled nutmeg-flavoured skin would form on top during cooking, under which was a thin milky soup with some swollen rice grains and a few ghastly bloated sultanas. Eeeeurgh. Can't see that it would be hugely improved by using pasta instead, to be honest...
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Very wise not trying the chocolate macaroni. I was fed that particular delight by friends, in the 1980s, and have not wanted to repeat the experience. I have also made and tried chocolate pasta, which is not worth the effort.
 
Posted by sabine (# 3861) on :
 
I googled "macaroni pie," and it made me so very, very sorry that I am allergic to the milk protein (no cheese for me [Frown] ).

Enjoy, with whatever spices you choose.

sabine
 
Posted by Sipech (# 16870) on :
 
Yesterday, I was making some eggy bread for breakfast. I added a few splashes of Henderson's relish and a sprinkling of laver seaweed to it. It turned out really rather well.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
When I was (much) younger, and working at a restaurant, we made twice baked potatoes for a festival and the chef added a nice sprinkling of nutmeg to the potato mix. It was perfect! Since then, whenever I have baked potatoes, I add nutmeg to the toppings of butter and salt and pepper. (And cheese and sour cream...)
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
I like my oatmeal made with half-and-half, not water, and flavored with a bit of real maple syrup.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
Horseradish in cole slaw which is a New York thing.

I made some chicken soup for a friend with a horrible cold and loaded it with small chunks of fresh ginger. He found it delicious.
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
Is eggy bread the same as French toast? Eggs, milk (I use almond milk) mixed up and bread dipped into it, and fried.

We add a touch of vanilla and bit of cinnamon and sometimes nutmeg to the egg mixture. Lovely. Rum or whisky may be added in place of vanilla. Learned this on a ski trip about 40 years ago. Maple syrup on top is the usual, berries too.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I like French toast baked in an oven. It has a nice crunchy texture. I frequently top it with heated pie filling from a can.

Moo
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Had to look up what you meant by twice baked potatoes: looks like an enormous amount of effort for something very ordinary.
 
Posted by Sipech (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
Is eggy bread the same as French toast? Eggs, milk (I use almond milk) mixed up and bread dipped into it, and fried.

Given you have just described eggy bread, it sounds like French toast is an alternative name. Though it's really a bit inelegant, so describing at French seems a little out of place.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
Yes, that's pretty much what we call French toast over here. It's usually served with confectioners (powdered) sugar, although I prefer maple syrup and a bit of nutmeg. Butter (real), too, of course.

There's one local restaurant chain that serves all-you-can-eat French toast at breakfast. Unfortunately they only let the bread wave to the egg in passing, and the result is dry and tasteless. The bread has to be super-saturated in egg for the dish to work.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Which is why the French all it "pain perdu" -- "lost bread" -- brad lost in the custard so you hardly know it's there.

JOhn
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Or rather, bread in the custard. I don't know who Brad is, or how he got into the dish.

John
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Had to look up what you meant by twice baked potatoes: looks like an enormous amount of effort for something very ordinary.

[tangent]It is more effort, but the results are pretty tasty. I tend to bake my potatoes once in my gas grill. That way, the heat stays out of the house, and the potatoes are nice and fluffy![/tangent]

[wrong word]

[ 15. August 2017, 15:42: Message edited by: jedijudy ]
 
Posted by Og, King of Bashan (# 9562) on :
 
The Queen of Bashan loves her hot wings on Football Sundays. Her standard preparation involved marinating the wings for a few hours in Frank's Red Hot sauce and onion slices, then grilling over low heat, and basting in more red hot, butter, and onions.

I had some leftover coffee one morning, so I tossed that in the marinade. And it's been a vital part of the preparation ever since. That little bitterness cuts through the heat and fat, and makes for a real wonderful wing.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Add tarragon to most chicken casserole recipes.
 
Posted by wild haggis (# 15555) on :
 
Try these:
Macaronni: add sweet Hungarian paprika(not the hot stuff)and it becomes a different dish.Serve with salad.

Rice pudding: get a good Portuguese recipe (on line) for Aros Doce - yummy. Rice pudding (thick)cooked on the hob, with lemon added and cinnamon. You will change your mind about rice pudding after tasting this. (I had an aunt who did English oven rice pudding and just broke an egg on top! It was horrible - thin stuff with this baked egg. Put me off rice pudding until I lived in Portugal.)

To make an ordinary stew taste great add the chopped up skin of a preserved lemon (can be bought in the supermarket in jars) and 2 tea spoons of Ras El Hanout with a handful of chopped dates, a handful of fresh chopped coriander and parsley to make an easy Moroccan dish.

Same stew (well a new batch!!!) add roasted peppers (can be bought in a jar in the supermarket) and a large dessert spoonful of sweet Hungarian paprika with a tiny bit of dried caraway and a good dollop of tomato paste. When cooked serve with roast potatoes and soured cream and very thinly sliced raw red and green pepper on top. Then you have Hungarian porkolt (what most non- Hungarians call goulash!) Yummy.

To make dough ball or cobbler cooked on top of mince or stew different good, add some mixed herbs or you can spice it up with paprika (hot or medium).

I wouldn't be without my herbs and spices. You can transform dishes. I'm feeling hungry!!!!!!
 
Posted by Cathscats (# 17827) on :
 
To go back to the French Toast, we eat it savoury In these parts, maybe with ketchup or sausages. When my mother ran a Bed and Breakfast she was startled by her first American guests looking for syrup to eat with it, and they were startled when she responded to the request with golden, not maple. [Smile]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Making your own preserved lemon is so easy it's a sin. Get lemons, any number you like. Cut in halves or quarters, pack into a jar. Pour coarse salt over, put the lid on. Three days later it's ready, and will keep for months.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
Oh, right... Yeah, my mum used to make rice pudding, with loads of milk, and not much rice, and nutmeg sprinkled over. A nasty wrinkled nutmeg-flavoured skin would form on top during cooking, under which was a thin milky soup with some swollen rice grains and a few ghastly bloated sultanas. Eeeeurgh. Can't see that it would be hugely improved by using pasta instead, to be honest...

I never add sultanas and use only full milk (blue topped)and some sugar. I once made it with skim milk and it was horrible. I use the Edmonds recipe as a guideline, with it's long, slow baking and ditch the skin that forms at the top, although my brother used to like it.

And Palimpsest - thanks for the suggestion of ginger in chicken soup, I'm going to try it.

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
For an eastern Mediterranean twist, I use a little saffron, cumin, sumac (very lemony) and za'atar in chicken and lamb dishes. Recipes found in Claudia Roden, Ottolenghi and Diana Henry's Crazy Water, Pickled Lemons cookbook.
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
When I was in a terrible hurry, I had only very good ginger dark chocolate in the house and Mary Berry's chocolate brownies to make. Oh yes. Yes.

Also, the orange sauce is just as good on chocolate ice cream as it is on the duck; salting it a little helps.

Perhaps it's all because of the chocolate.

Cattyish, random user of sweet and salt things.
 
Posted by Sarah G (# 11669) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Doublethink.:
Cinnamon in mince lamb or beef is awesomely moreish in almost any dish.

I get that.

I often use a variation on that which is to add five spice powder, which contains cinnamon, and other things as well.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
A pinch of dried chili flakes in pretty much anything. Not enough to identify, enough to give flavour.
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
Rice pudding: I follow a Finnish recipe (baked), but replace one quarter of the whole milk with marsala (or madeira - I suppose that one could use an Oloroso sherry in a pinch), and some finely minced almonds. A more 'adult' version.

Eggs: (a) Poached eggs on top of smoked fish and English muffin, dash of hot sauce. Strong black tea. Ready for battle. (b) Rice mixed with soya and sambol oelek, topped by a couple of eggs sunny side up. Ditto re: battle.
 
Posted by Aravis (# 13824) on :
 
My perfect apple crumble recipe:
Peel two Bramley apples and cut into small chunks, but don't precook it. Place in baking dish. Add a little soft dark brown sugar (1tsp is probably enough) and a little water. Sprinkle sultanas or raisins over the apple.
For the topping: approx 4oz plain flour, 2.5 - 3oz butter, 2 oz Demerara sugar, 1oz jumbo oats (if you can't get these, dry porridge oats will do), pinch of cinnamon. Spread evenly over the apples, bake for 30 mins at 190 degrees C.

This works better than standard recipes because:
- the apple isn't too sweet but has a toffee flavour. The more solid apple and the sultanas mean it's fruit, not just mush.
- the oats and Demerara make the topping crunchy and chewy
 
Posted by Amorya (# 2652) on :
 
Pomegranate powder, in anything savoury that you'd usually add a dash of lemon juice. I use it in curries all the time.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Aravis, your apple crumble recipe looks delicious, so I am reposting it to "On the Back Burner"!

jedijudy
Hopefully Helpful Heaven Host!

 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
The little bit of me (or more correctly of my family) is in the name of the dish rather than the recipe. My late grandmother was the most gifted maker of Yorkshire pudding I have ever known. It would rise up so much you needed to push it down with a knife to get it out the oven. She never referred to “Toad in the Hole” but always “Mole in the Hole” (presumably after the song). In my house it shall ever be known as Mole.

[French Toast Tangent: I think the “perdu” in “pain perdu” refers to the fact that the bread would otherwise be wasted (because it’s gone dry). In France these days it’s usually made with brioche.]
 
Posted by sabine (# 3861) on :
 
Because I am allergic to the milk protein (casein) I cannot use milk in cooking or baking. I have tried the varieties of nut milks as well as coconut milk and have found that cashew milk is the creamiest and best suited as a substitute for the things I make.

ETA: I'm also allergic to soy, so soy milk is not something I can use. I have tasted it, and it seems very bland compared to the nut milks and coconut milk.

sabine

[ 28. August 2017, 15:39: Message edited by: sabine ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Have you ever worked with aquafaba? It is the juice from cooking chickpeas, or alternatively the juice from a can of chickpeas. You can whip it like cream and get a very similar effect.
 
Posted by sabine (# 3861) on :
 
I've heard of it, Brenda, but I haven't tried it yet. Do you need to buy canned garbanzos or do they sell it alone?

sabine
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I have never seen it sold alone. But the next time you soak and boil chickpeas, or the next time you open a can of them, save the juice and tinker with it. Otherwise you'd just throw it away, right? Lots of recipes and YouTube videos kick up on Google.
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
What purpose would it serve? Condiment of some sort?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
A vegan whipped-cream substitute fulfills a long-felt need. I've never tried it, but apparently it is indistinguishable from the real thing.
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
The liquid from the tinned chickpeas is more reliable than that you boil yourself, which I believe is because of the amount of heat, and possibly because they are cooked and then heated again within the tins, and then the chickpeas soak for a long while in the liquid. .

You can beat them as long as you want, unlike whipped cream, and when they settle out, beat them again. But they do not do well in the 'fridge, saved for tomorrow. Very filling to eat.

They are definitely distinguishable from whipped cream. Anyone can tell. They have a beany thing, just a hint. Vanilla helps, and a bit of sugar. We've also tried kidney beans and lentils. Kidney bean water whips up more easier and is even beanier. kidneyfaba? Lentil water less well, and is more like chickpea water but not as easily made into peaks.

Important: If you cook beans yourself and then use the water (not from a tin can) generally do NOT use a slow cooker. There is a toxin which requires high heat for some beans to destroy it (phytohaemagglutinin), and cooking at low heat increases it. You can boil then before adding to a slow cooker. And never, ever eat dried beans raw.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by sabine:
Because I am allergic to the milk protein (casein) I cannot use milk in cooking or baking. I have tried the varieties of nut milks as well as coconut milk and have found that cashew milk is the creamiest and best suited as a substitute for the things I make.

ETA: I'm also allergic to soy, so soy milk is not something I can use. I have tasted it, and it seems very bland compared to the nut milks and coconut milk.

sabine

This won't whip but it does produce a thick pouring cream. Also, you can get commercial almond cream and if you want it thicker just mix in ground almond or almond flour (other nut flours will do).

Jengie
 
Posted by sabine (# 3861) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pangolin Guerre:
What purpose would it serve? Condiment of some sort?

Since I'm allergic to milk, any substitute to use in baking (and some cooking) is needed if I wish to bake. The chickpea liquid could well be a good substitute. I plan to try it.

sabine
 
Posted by sabine (# 3861) on :
 
A big thanks to all of you for your suggestion about the chickpea water and vegan cream. Much appreciated.

sabine
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Google around -- there are masses of sites and recipes. No point in reinventing the wheel, right? Also, pictures!
 
Posted by sabine (# 3861) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Google around -- there are masses of sites and recipes. No point in reinventing the wheel, right? Also, pictures!

For the chickpea thing?

I've spent years finding non-chickpea-water recipes for my milk and soy allergies and also $$$ buying cookbooks for same (I could probably start a blog if I had time. [Smile] ) I'm sorry if I gave the impression that I was just starting out with this. I've known about my allergies for 40 years.

But I'm fascinated with the chickpeas. I eat them quite a bit; now I know I have been tossing perfectly good water.

sabine
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Here, for instance, are 20 thrilling vegan things to do with aquafaba. Hazelnut almond dacquoise, who would have thought?!?
 
Posted by sabine (# 3861) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Here, for instance, are 20 thrilling vegan things to do with aquafaba. Hazelnut almond dacquoise, who would have thought?!?

I'm drooling!! Thank you. [Smile]

sabine
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
I don't do dairy either. I think the trick to things like this is to not expect non-dairy things to resemble dairy. Appreciate them in their own way.

I have made slightly sweetened mildly curried aquafaba, with chopped dried cranberries with a sprinkling of coconut on top. One of those weirdly mindbending flavour things which we'll repeat.
 


© Ship of Fools 2016

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0