Thread: Kids these days just don't understand Board: Heaven / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
The rapid changes in technology have widened the ever-present generation gap. I had plenty of 14-year-olds in my classes last year who couldn't read an analogue clock, for instance. Leaving aside books and movies and TV shows, which are ephemeral anyway, what are some things that kids these days just don't understand?

The one I thought of today: the aggravations of trying to make a folded map go back the way it started out.
 
Posted by RuthW (# 13) on :
 
My 10-year-old nephew can't seem to get it through his head that not all screens are touchscreens. He keeps poking at my laptop screen with his grimy fingers.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Having an F2F conversation, from what I've read/heard lately. So used to electronic devices that many/most don't know what to do, so they just stay home and text.

Hmmm...maybe cooking non-quick oatmeal from scratch? Mending things, rather than buying new ones? Using a print encyclopedia?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
They do not understand that once upon a time, cars did not have aircondtioning at all.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Or even heaters.
 
Posted by Schroedinger's cat (# 64) on :
 
And that a family would generally only have one car.

They were expensive luxuries, even without heaters.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Forget about folding a map, the necessity of using a map and/or compass when your phone can do it for you. And the city based kids I work with don't ever go places with no mobile coverage, so they see it as pointless.

Analogue clocks is an odd one as dyslexics really struggle (something to do with flipping directions, so find it difficult to know if the hands are pointing to the hour or after the hour) so it seems pointless to keep pushing that one when it isn't necessary to be able to read analogue dials to tell the time.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
Or even heaters.

Dad had a Renault 750 when I was a kid. It had one of the most successful car heaters I have seen. It had an outlet under back seat and we used to spread a ruv over our legs and toast. Occasionally we would take pity on our parents and and lift the rug to give them some heat.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Schroedinger's cat:
And that a family would generally only have one car.

They were expensive luxuries, even without heaters.

We have only one, and cars *are* expensive luxuries. Over my dead body we have more than one. There are too many cars already.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
pulling/pushing the little knob on the TV to turn it on/off
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
And 1 TV in the house, and you had to gather round it together and watch the one show you all agreed on, at a specified time, on a specified day, or you missed it.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I was greatly entertained when I played a vinyl record on the turntable for a 12-year-old once and then turned it over and played the other side.
Of course vinyls are back now so they'll be getting used to the idea.

GG
 
Posted by Anselmina (# 3032) on :
 
And of course. Telephones. I can just remember my family having a shared party line, with the neighbour. Having to wait for them to finish their call, so we could make ours.

When we got our very own phoneline, boy, where we posh!
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
pulling/pushing the little knob on the TV to turn it on/off

You've just reminded me of chokes in cars - which have certainly gone the way of chainmail and crinolines. Thinking about it, the one thing I can definitively say has changed between my childhood, and now, (my children's generation), is that mechanical - and electronic - things are just much more reliable. Despite being way more complex, cars rarely break down now. Our lawnmower starts reliably and keeps going until you're done with it, or it runs out of petrol, whereas an enduring memory of my childhood is my Dad, steaming with fury and full of creative euphemisms for swearwords, as he wrestled with the mower, yet again. And (fingers crossed) the era of computers just up and dying, as a regular happening, seems like it might also be on the way out. I did have a phone die comprehensively on me last year, but it was a Samsung, so...meh.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
The answer is to bring up your children with the values and skills of an earlier age: things like

Of course, the disappearance of things like small shops doesn't help but if you give pocket money, encourage thank-you letter writing, don't permit electronic games to be taken to family gatherings, you can produce children who are pleasant to have around.
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
And of course. Telephones. I can just remember my family having a shared party line, with the neighbour. Having to wait for them to finish their call, so we could make ours.

When we got our very own phoneline, boy, where we posh!

Heh. I turned 40 just a couple of months ago, and we were on a party line until I was, I think, thirteen. Must surely have been one of the last of them in the first world.
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
The answer is to bring up your children with the values and skills of an earlier age: things like


Some interesting things here. Cheques, for instance. You sort of think that no-one under 80 uses them anymore - but we're having a house built at the moment and keep on needing to pay simply massive bills - and actually, by far the best way to do it is by cheque. Our bank won't allow us to make really big payments by internet banking, and charge astronomical fees for teller transfers - so cheque it is. Easy as pie. The kids have seen me writing them. Whether they'll ever get to write one themselves is another matter.

Also, the meal plan. I do that, despite hating it, because I know it's sensible. I don't think my kids could exist without the list on the fridge saying what's coming up for dinner, it seems to be what life hinges around...

How to write a letter? Interestingly, my nine-year-old is being made to practice this, regularly, by her teacher. Everyone in her class has to write a letter to either Mum or Dad, each week, and have it signed off as having been read. It's maybe not coincidental that her teacher is pushing sixty...
 
Posted by Mili (# 3254) on :
 
Last week I accompanied a group of 10 and 11 year old children to a local nursing home. They are going to be visiting over a number of weeks to put together a history project with the residents.

This was the first week so the children just had getting to know you conversations with the residents. One lady had me explain to a child what a pea shooter was - something I had only seen in books, though boys at my school used to spit paper spitballs through plastic straws. Turns out this 91 year old lady's favourite childhood memory was hiding in a tree with her siblings or friends and using a pea shooter to shoot peppercorns at the heads of the men returning from work! Apparently they always got away with it too. The girl she was talking to was really shocked and it is funny to think that people always like to stereotype kids as less well behaved than previous generations. But very few Australian children would even be out unsupervised let alone think of playing that sort of trick on adults they didn't know or their neighbours today.

Another lady, when asked if she liked living in a nursing home, said of course as she had a roof over her head, food etc. She then went on to tell the story of two Nigerian children she had known or known of who only had a blanket each and burnt to death when their house caught on fire and they ran in to get the blankets [Ultra confused] In her childhood that was probably considered a totally ok story to tell children to teach them the moral of valuing their posessions!
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
And of course. Telephones. I can just remember my family having a shared party line, with the neighbour. Having to wait for them to finish their call, so we could make ours.

When we got our very own phoneline, boy, where we posh!

Heh. I turned 40 just a couple of months ago, and we were on a party line until I was, I think, thirteen. Must surely have been one of the last of them in the first world.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
How strange to think I could be asked at the age of 93 to demonstrate how we rewound cassette tapes in a canary-yellow Walkman with a pencil. So I could listen to Phil Collins sing Just Another Day in Paradise for the 400th time because I wasn't able to download a few thousand songs any time I wanted.

No Spotify, Soundcloud, alternative playlists, MP3, iPod Touch, CDs etc. And the batteries on my Sony Walkman had to be replaced every other week.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Re writing letters. My son had been taught to write formal letters at school, and had written thank you letters as a matter of course, but had never written a no-special-reason letter until he went to University and wrote to his sister.

He ended it with "I must close now, for I fear I may miss the post. I remain, my dear sister, your most affectionate brother, North East Loon"

His whole knowledge of letter writing, it turned out, was based on having read Jane Austen.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
That is so funny, NEQ! When my younger sister was nine years old she read Louisa May Alcott's Little Women and came into the kitchen to ask us:'Pray tell me, where are the cornflakes?' I seem to recall she also tried to use the word 'prithee'.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
I have a daughter with ADHD. Distractions, and electronic ones could be amongst them, are exactly what makes her pleasant to have around.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
CK:
quote:
Analogue clocks is an odd one as dyslexics really struggle (something to do with flipping directions, so find it difficult to know if the hands are pointing to the hour or after the hour) so it seems pointless to keep pushing that one when it isn't necessary to be able to read analogue dials to tell the time.
Not *necessary*, no... but if you can do it you have the following advantages over your digital-only friends:

1. You can read a clock-face from much further away (easier to see the position of the hands than to read numerals)

2. You can use pre-digital timepieces - such as Big Ben, or my mother-in-law's 200 year old grandfather clock.

3. Dunno whether this is backed up by data, but I find it's easier and quicker to read clockfaces than digital clocks. I suspect this is why digital clocks have not replaced traditional ones; for those of us who are not dyslexic, learning how to read a clockface is worthwhile because once you've done it your life becomes slightly easier.

4. Clockfaces look nicer. Some are works of art.

And like Karl, we have only one car.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I teach art one day a week to 11 year olds.

The teacher uses augmented reality to teach them, completely alien to me, but fascinating [Smile]

Kids expect all screens to be touch sensitive and are confused by 'old fashioned' laptops.
 
Posted by Bene Gesserit (# 14718) on :
 
A young friend, who I used to travel to work with on the bus, was absolutely fascinated when I demonstrated a slide rule to him (I wasn't carrying one randomly, I'd been telling him about them for some reason the previous day).
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I loved slide rules from an aesthetic and tactile point of view, but hated using them - I was always getting my decimal places wrong.

But (wait for it ...) I was a dab hand at using logarithms.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
And 1 TV in the house, and you had to gather round it together and watch the one show you all agreed on, at a specified time, on a specified day, or you missed it.

When the Muppet Show was on, the whole family sat in the family room and enjoyed it. There were a lot of subtle references my husband and I got, but our daughters missed. OTOH, they enjoyed the slapstick more than we did.

As far a analog clocks are concerned, when our children were very small I bought an analog clock with an owl on it, which I put in their bedroom. They enjoyed looking at it and gradually learned to tell time. When my grandsons were small, I gave them an analog clock with a monkey on it. They loved it and learned to tell time.

Moo
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
One thing kids don't understand is that there used to be far less variety in food. I didn't taste garlic until I was at University. I can remember when pizza started appearing, and there being a debate as to how it was pronounced. Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.

I think that is 'Scottish Sunday teatime salad', at least according to my wife who she out each summer at the Kilcraggan Conference Centre in the 1970s.

We in decadent London had beetroot, cucumber and even spring onion at times! But - as with you - mayonnaise had yet to be invented.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
The idea that teenagers today can't carry on face to face conversations is easily dispelled by actually spending time with them. The ones I know talk face to face, to adults and to each other, as much as I remember kids ever doing. But one thing that's different is how much devices like smartphones are integrated into their face to face interactions (not just "taking a selfie" to capture the moment, although that's one easy thing to recognize and identify -- but then Snapchatting the selfie to another friend who's not there, reading out and discussing her response with the friends who are there, etc etc). May seem alien to us old folks but from what I see of my kids, their friends, and my students, the kids are basically all right.

One thing kids today do not get, and even I am starting to find hard to believe, is how difficult and sketchy it was to make plans when we were young. You'd arrange to meet some friends at the mall after school. One friend didn't show up and ... that was it. Maybe they stopped by the house on the way and their mother made them stay home; maybe they were killed and eaten by wolves on the way to the mall. No such thing as texting to say "I'll be a bit late," or "I can't make it, meet up with you later." The whole business of arranging to go anywhere or do anything was so cumbersome in retrospect. Kids get it a little bit when they watch TV shows or read books set in an earlier era. My daughter watched all 10 seasons of Friends when it appeared on Netflix and said, "90% of the plot problems in these episodes could be resolved if they had smartphones."

[ 23. August 2017, 13:53: Message edited by: Trudy Scrumptious ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.

P.S. I remember going to the south of France in 1969 and first experiencing Salad Nicoise - my family ate well at home but this was nevertheless a revelation!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Oh, I wear an analogue watch and had one mobile phone saver screen set to be an analogue clock. My dyslexic daughter cannot read analogue however many ways we've tried. It doesn't matter; carrying a mobile phone means she always carries digital time, so clocks are irrelevant. The flipside is that she can see maps and drawings in 3D and if she concentrates see how engineering drawings move too.

Food depends, I grew up with mayonnaise and vinaigrette, not salad cream, but also knowing how to mix vinaigrette in a tablespoon at the table, because we made both. We used to stock up on pasta at Italian corner shops when we visited London, before spaghetti was available in every supermarket and bought cans of olive oil, which was otherwise only available at the chemist. I ate pâté (homemade) when my school friends ate meat paste. Came of having a mother who loved France and cooked.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
We had beetroot! It was pickled and served with stovies. Actually, that's another thing kids today don't understand; the progression from Sunday roast to Monday cold meat to Tuesday stovies. One day's chicken was the next day's chicken soup.

That was before the days you could get pea and ham from a chicken.
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
I recall my nephew staring at my rotary-dial phone in utter confusion as to how one was supposed to use it.

(I no longer have the phone--my cat took matters into her own paws one day and made sure it could never be used again.)

On the other hand, I am sure all my nieces and nephs know all about checks, as I send them one on their birthdays.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
At Daughter-Unit's workplace, the late teen and early twenty-something interns frequently ask her to translate documents that are handwritten in cursive!

That same D-U asked me if I had VCR recordings (she was young!) of the TV shows I enjoyed when I was a kid. When I told her there was nothing capable of recording shows at the time, she asked if we had mirrors then. [Paranoid]
 
Posted by Schroedinger's cat (# 64) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
pulling/pushing the little knob on the TV to turn it on/off

I remember a TV we had which neede to be switched between 405 and 625 lines (BBC1/BBC2). And tuned in with a proper tuning knob, like radios used to have.

And when it broke down, we got a man in to mend it.
 
Posted by LutheranChik (# 9826) on :
 
Recently I found myself having to explain the concepts of landline and party line phones to our 7- year-old granddaughter....that once upon a time phones were attached to the wall, families usually only had one, and the line had to be shared with neighbors. Our granddaughter looked at me as if I were insane.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Bus Timetables. User-friendly, simple, clear, and posted up at every Bus Stop in the town.

Yet I still see youngsters struggling to comprehend them, almost as if they can't actually cope with the printed word (or numbers).

IJ
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
(Forgot to add - nice to see you back on board, LutheranChik!)

IJ
 
Posted by Chelley (# 11322) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by RuthW:
My 10-year-old nephew can't seem to get it through his head that not all screens are touchscreens. He keeps poking at my laptop screen with his grimy fingers.

I've found myself doing that one sometimes if I switch from iPad to laptop or more basic mobile! (I try not to do it with grimy fingers though).
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
His whole knowledge of letter writing, it turned out, was based on having read Jane Austen.

One could do a lot worse!
 
Posted by basso (# 4228) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
They do not understand that once upon a time, cars did not have aircondtioning at all.

Cars? Where I grew up, houses didn't have air conditioning. (Not much need for it in the Bay Area...) So the first air conditioner I ever saw was in my grandfather's car when we visited Kansas.

I was about 8 years old.
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
Houses here didn't have air conditioners, until the last 20 or so years and the advent of heat pumps.
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
I'm not so old (53), but I'm met with incredulity when I explain that until the age of nine I had a choice of two TV channels: one English, one French, not the ca. 80 I receive, of which I regularly watch perhaps ten. The KFC French advert's tag line (Bon poulet!) became a running joke in family.

Incredulity that other than my swimming lessons, my summer days were innocent of structure: rock climbing, biking everywhere, hiking in the woods, swimming in the springs (Be home by 5!), playing after dinner (Come home when the street lights come on!). We were feral.

Making go carts. Playing street hockey. Picking blue berries (they weren't commercially available there). Most of our vegetables being tinned, even for major things like the Christmas dinner (poor transportation to a somewhat remote area, and frozen vegetables at the time were mostly corn, peas, or the medley of peas and carrots, and only then becoming available).

I am viewed as a strange mix of primitive and hokey.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I remember the joy of shelling peas grown in the garden for dinner. I was made to whistle as I shelled them. It is much more difficult to eat raw peas while whistling than while singing or talking.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
And of course. Telephones. I can just remember my family having a shared party line, with the neighbour. Having to wait for them to finish their call, so we could make ours.

When we got our very own phoneline, boy, where we posh!

Heh. I turned 40 just a couple of months ago, and we were on a party line until I was, I think, thirteen. Must surely have been one of the last of them in the first world.
Never mind party lines. I was watching an analysis of the musical "Company" and the speaker explained that kids don't know what a busy signal is any more. (It's blended into the opening music.) He also mentioned they wouldn't know what an answering "service" was.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Bus Timetables. User-friendly, simple, clear, and posted up at every Bus Stop in the town.

Yet I still see youngsters struggling to comprehend them, almost as if they can't actually cope with the printed word (or numbers).

IJ

And bus conductors who would collect cash and sell tickets and chuck kids off the bus if they were misbehaving
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Palimpsest:
He also mentioned they wouldn't know what an answering "service" was.

As soon as they try to call their doctor after hours, they'll learn about that.
 
Posted by Chelley (# 11322) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spike:
And bus conductors who would collect cash and sell tickets and chuck kids off the bus if they were misbehaving

This!
And teachers who threw the chalk (or wooden chalk rubber) at you in class if you were talking - not that it ever happened to me [Two face]

[ 24. August 2017, 06:40: Message edited by: Chelley ]
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
And kids who'd get off your lawn when you yelled.
 
Posted by Amorya (# 2652) on :
 
Chamber pots, because it was too cold to use the (outside) toilet on a winter night.

Laying the coal fire the night before, so come the morning you only had to shiver for the time it took to light it.

Waking up on a winter morning and finding the water in the glass on your bedside table was frozen.

Having to light the fire on a summer evening, because how else would you get hot bathwater?

Yes, I was born in the 80s, why do you ask? [Biased]

Amy
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
Hand washing, with Lux Flakes, endless rinsing and then putting through the Mangle - what luxury when Twin Tubs were invented!

And Freezers, who could live without them these days? Only people who remember only one channel on the TV, I guess.
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
Teachers used to smoke in elementary school (grades 1-8) in the staff room. They could smoke if they were at their desks in high school. In university, smoking in large lecture theatres was allowed if you were in the side sections, which was the same as in movie theatres.

They wouldn't understand air travel when you just walked out to the plan with no security, they always served meals and there was a 5 pack of cigarette included on the tray.

Thinking of smoking, my barber would always offer a cigarette while getting a trim, the magazines were mostly things like Popular Mechanics and Field and Stream, and in the bottom of the pile there always a copy or two of Playboy or Gallery. The kids these days would not understand that we didn't know women did have pubic hair.

[ 24. August 2017, 22:00: Message edited by: no prophet's flag is set so... ]
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
And kids who'd get off your lawn when you yelled.

Ha! Kids these days never get ON my lawn because they're inside playing with their electronics.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chorister:


And Freezers, who could live without them these days? Only people who remember only one channel on the TV, I guess.

Until I was seven (and lived in North Africa) we didn't have a fridge! It was two years later before we had one back home in Britain we didn't have a freezer until ten years after that (1977). We did have two TV channels, but mum regarded ITV as "common" although she allowed dad and I to watch the Big Match on Sunday afternoon.
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I remember the joy of shelling peas grown in the garden for dinner. I was made to whistle as I shelled them. It is much more difficult to eat raw peas while whistling than while singing or talking.

I remember it too. Though not as a joy. Usually about four ten-litre pails of pods would come in, and once podded, that would give you maybe 8 litres of peas. Pea pods, when mature, are usually developing some sort of mildew - it stinks, the smell sinks into your skin, and doesn't come out with washing. Topping and tailing several buckets of gooseberries and/or blackcurrants, I didn't mind so much. They smell ok. (Yes, blackcurrants have a scent vaguely reminiscent of cat pee, but I guess I was just already gearing up for a lifetime fandom of sauvignon blanc).
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amorya:
Chamber pots, because it was too cold to use the (outside) toilet on a winter night.

Laying the coal fire the night before, so come the morning you only had to shiver for the time it took to light it.

Waking up on a winter morning and finding the water in the glass on your bedside table was frozen.

Having to light the fire on a summer evening, because how else would you get hot bathwater?

Yes, I was born in the 80s, why do you ask? [Biased]

Amy

Jeepers Creepers. And I thought I (born in the 70s) had it primitive. All our hot water did come from a wetback, so yes, the stove had to be lit every day, but we DID have a shower. A very dribbly one, due to the low-pressure hot water - but I guess you're going to tell me that you're talking about heating water in a pail, on top of the stove, and pouring it into a tin bath. On Sundays. No?

And why couldn't the fire be on overnight? Coal too expensive?
 
Posted by Amorya (# 2652) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
but I guess you're going to tell me that you're talking about heating water in a pail, on top of the stove, and pouring it into a tin bath. On Sundays. No?

And why couldn't the fire be on overnight? Coal too expensive?

It wasn't quite that bad, there was a back boiler as part of the fireplace, which fed into a water tank. So we did have hot water on tap, assuming the fire was lit! One bath a week was still the norm though [Smile]

I guess cost of coal was an issue. We were pretty poor. I was only a kid at this time, so didn't notice all the nuance. When I was eight we moved to a modernised house with central heating, and it was like moving to the future!
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
'God save the king' was played in the picture theatre before the programme started, and everyone stood for it.
(Was there an equivalent in the US?)
There would be a newsreel and a cartoon before the main film, and a trailer for a forthcoming programme.
The films were on huge reels. Now that they're on DVDs a movie can open all over the country/world on the same day, but these bulky reels travelled round the country and it might be some time before they reached your small town.

GG
 
Posted by Schroedinger's cat (# 64) on :
 
Saturday Morning Pictures?

The cinema would show a film and cartoons, I think, to fill an hour or so. It was so the parents could go and shop.

Shopping for stuff. Having to go around the actual shops and look at stuff and decide and buy. Rather than just check up in the net and buy online.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I remember the joy of shelling peas grown in the garden for dinner. I was made to whistle as I shelled them. It is much more difficult to eat raw peas while whistling than while singing or talking.

I remember it too. Though not as a joy. Usually about four ten-litre pails of pods would come in, and once podded, that would give you maybe 8 litres of peas. Pea pods, when mature, are usually developing some sort of mildew - it stinks, the smell sinks into your skin, and doesn't come out with washing. Topping and tailing several buckets of gooseberries and/or blackcurrants, I didn't mind so much. They smell ok. (Yes, blackcurrants have a scent vaguely reminiscent of cat pee, but I guess I was just already gearing up for a lifetime fandom of sauvignon blanc).
I know some pods had mildew but nothing as you describe. Certainly no smell on my hands etc. I used to have a limit set. Do twenty pods and you can eat the contens of one.
Along similar lines. I was not allowed to cream butter and brown sugar with a wooden spoon for cakes. I ate a large proportion of it and Mum's famous date loaf would be half the size she wanted.
 
Posted by betjemaniac (# 17618) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amorya:
Chamber pots, because it was too cold to use the (outside) toilet on a winter night.

Laying the coal fire the night before, so come the morning you only had to shiver for the time it took to light it.

Waking up on a winter morning and finding the water in the glass on your bedside table was frozen.

Having to light the fire on a summer evening, because how else would you get hot bathwater?

Yes, I was born in the 80s, why do you ask? [Biased]

Amy

Not only was I also born in the 1980s, right at the start actually, but minus the chamberpot and the hot bathwater all those are still things that I do...
 
Posted by betjemaniac (# 17618) on :
 
Thanks to "life in the eighties" (TM) I could still probably change a gas mantle, and I do have vivid memories of my father putting more coal on the range while the Sunday roast was cooking...

I've long held a suspicion that the childhood of a provincial English child of the 1980s was closer to that of those who'd been children in the 40s and 50s than it is to those who were children in the 1990s and 2000s.

Let me take you to 1980s Kidderminster....
- factory hooters measuring our the day for the whole town at the various carpet mills
- brown smog hanging low over the rooftops from thousands of coal fires
- the coal man coming round every Thursday and dropping off sacks of coal on doorsteps - to be squirreled away in concrete bunkers in the back garden
- the "pop van" coming round selling cream soda
- a rag and bone man plying the streets with horse and cart
- TVs with coin slots in them so you paid as you went (5p a throw from memory)
- those red and white stripy shelters they used to put over holes in the street
- BBC playing the national anthem on TV every night before closedown
- BBC having a closedown
- rest days in the middle of test matches
- "Sunday League" one day matches in the middle of county matches
- *some* cars and lorries still on the roads from the 50s and no one batting an eyelid (a friend at first school was shamefacedly dropped off every day in an ancient Humber (to much jeering). I'd love that car now.
- some houses (ours) still cooking on coal fired ranges

Here ends my contention that the 1940s and 1980s were sisters under the skin. It's just that the latter also had new romantics.
 
Posted by Twilight (# 2832) on :
 
My landline phone once rang five times before going to voice mail, it had gradually gone down to three rings and there was no longer any hope at all that I, and my cane, would be able to answer in time. A bit of online research said the company was probably doing this to double the charges. Ex; Jane calls me and gets a charge, I have to call her back and there's a second charge.

I called the phone company and after about five minutes of pushing buttons and holding I reached a tech who was happy to give me six rings.(32 whole seconds!)

A day later I realized I hadn't had any incoming calls since then, a friend reported that my number was all busy signals. I called the phone company to get it fixed. It took five days and six techs to correct the mistake they had made.

Through it all I had to keep convincing the techs that I honestly, truly, definitely did not have a mobile phone and that, yes, it really should be possible to fix my landline even though I didn't have a mobile to talk on at the same time.

I had to tell AT&T how to fix my phone.
 
Posted by Amorya (# 2652) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by betjemaniac:
I've long held a suspicion that the childhood of a provincial English child of the 1980s was closer to that of those who'd been children in the 40s and 50s than it is to those who were children in the 1990s and 2000s.

I don't remember all the things you mentioned, mainly because I grew up in the middle of nowhere. Eleven houses, farming community, there was a bus to town once a week on market day. But a lot of them are familiar.

I did enjoy being there for a lot of new developments. We had a colour TV, but had friends who had black and white. We owned a typewriter, then I saw in computers, first with greenscreen monitors, then colour ones you hooked up to the telly, then something with a mouse. I dialled up bulletin boards before we got the internet. I went from a landline rotary phone with a three digit number (347, since you asked) to touch tone phones, plug-in answering machines, then finally when I was about fifteen then some kids started having mobile phones.

My maths textbooks still taught how to add up in pounds, shillings and pence. My school desk still had a pot for the inkwell. (Which I didn't use back then, we used pencils; but in secondary school I started writing with a dip pen and ink bottle just to be hipster.)

I keep finding surprising ones too. Like people not knowing what fuse wire is for. And while I never knew a house that had no electric lights, the power was unreliable enough that I knew how to use paraffin lamps as well. Seeing people freak out about an unexpected power cut is rather amusing.
 
Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
I have a two wooden potato mashers, One was carved by my grand father prior to 1910, and the other carved by my husband's grandfather. My grandchildren brought up with electric mixers think they are a hoot and always want to mash the potatoes at my house.

I think electric mixers make potatoes the texture of glue by the way.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
'God save the king' was played in the picture theatre before the programme started, and everyone stood for it.
(Was there an equivalent in the US?)
There would be a newsreel and a cartoon before the main film, and a trailer for a forthcoming programme.
The films were on huge reels. Now that they're on DVDs a movie can open all over the country/world on the same day, but these bulky reels travelled round the country and it might be some time before they reached your small town.

GG

I don't remember "The Star Spangled Banner" being played before movies, but it was played at the end of the TV viewing day in the 60s (when the programming day began at 6 AM and ended at 1 AM). But even today the national anthem is played before most team sporting events and many community concerts.
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I remember the joy of shelling peas grown in the garden for dinner. I was made to whistle as I shelled them. It is much more difficult to eat raw peas while whistling than while singing or talking.

I remember it too. Though not as a joy. Usually about four ten-litre pails of pods would come in, and once podded, that would give you maybe 8 litres of peas. Pea pods, when mature, are usually developing some sort of mildew - it stinks, the smell sinks into your skin, and doesn't come out with washing. Topping and tailing several buckets of gooseberries and/or blackcurrants, I didn't mind so much. They smell ok. (Yes, blackcurrants have a scent vaguely reminiscent of cat pee, but I guess I was just already gearing up for a lifetime fandom of sauvignon blanc).
I know some pods had mildew but nothing as you describe. Certainly no smell on my hands etc.
I don't know where you are/were from in Aus., and I know it's not bone dry all over [Biased] , but it's pretty seriously damp in most places here. We can grow mildew anywhere. Fences, shoes, carpet, walls, plastic, windowpanes...
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Graven Image:
I have a two wooden potato mashers, One was carved by my grand father prior to 1910, and the other carved by my husband's grandfather. My grandchildren brought up with electric mixers think they are a hoot and always want to mash the potatoes at my house.

I think electric mixers make potatoes the texture of glue by the way.

I was not aware that electric potato mashers were a thing. Don't have one, never seen one...
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I remember earning pocket money for top and tailing gooseberries, and for cleaning the big sash windows. Threepences or sixpences.(c1942)

Our closing down tune for TV was 'Goodnight Kiwi', actually a lullaby usually sung in Maori, though it wasn't traditional. A cartoon kiwi clambered up a pylon, lay down in a 'dish' and pulled up a blanket – there was a cat, I think, that joined him.

In 1964, in a remote Scottish Youth Hostel, being a lark by nature I'd be up early and get the coal range going, all ready for the city types who didn't know how to handle the thing.

GG
 
Posted by Joan Rasch (# 49) on :
 
Good Night Kiwi video
I knew I'd seen this somewhere...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I phoned someone yesterday to say I'd send some photos of the pup (they'd been looking after him) and asked if they had whatsapp - she replied "there are no computers in this house".

That's pretty unusual these days isn't it?

I'll have to print and snail mail the photos.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.

Our salads used to be lettuce, tomato and cucumber with grated cheese and salad cream; sometimes hard boiled egg. And there was none of this side salad stuff - that was the meal.

I was well into adulthood before I realised that I don't actually like lettuce and that salad can be made without it, and include other things.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Yes, my childhood salad memories are similar...but we also had SPAM!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_eYSuPKP3Y

Kids these days wouldn't understand, indeed.

[Disappointed]

[Projectile]

IJ
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
Do people still make sandwiches with sliced tongue?
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
Tongue sandwich? Of course. Well, I don't make them, but I order them at deli.

Another thing kids don't know: municipally mandated curfew. It was 9pm, IIRC, but disappeared, or ceased to be enforced meaningfully, when I was a child.
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
One I heard today in the mousehold: "Sorry I missed your call. I couldn't find my phone in time."
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
One I heard today in the mousehold: "Sorry I missed your call. I couldn't find my phone in time."

Hell's bells! I use that!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Salad comprised lettuce, tomato and sliced hard boiled egg, with salad cream.

Our salads used to be lettuce, tomato and cucumber with grated cheese and salad cream; sometimes hard boiled egg. And there was none of this side salad stuff - that was the meal.

I was well into adulthood before I realised that I don't actually like lettuce and that salad can be made without it, and include other things.

Our salad was like that until well into the 1970's, with the addition of spring onions and grated carrot. Someone around the family must have read Elisabeth David because by c1982 there were different kinds of salad.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by betjemaniac:
Those red and white stripy shelters they used to put over holes in the street

With a brazier outside.

Has anyone said policemen (and they were men!) on point duty?
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Or police wearing white gloves (and no hazard vests) directing traffic at busy intersections? And the traffic lights didn't have to be out: they were non-existant.
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
That predates me, Pete.

Anybody else remember lights built into curbs (kerbs) in the street at Y intersections? They had yellow lights that flashed, and were inside a heavy steel cage. They're all gone now and for the life of me I don't remember the last time I saw one in operation.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Joan, thanks for the link to the "Goodnight Kiwi". Our family used to have an ongoing discussion on how the cat managed to get up to the dish, and decided that it was a bit of everyday cat cunning.

Huia
 
Posted by RuthW (# 13) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
Anybody else remember lights built into curbs (kerbs) in the street at Y intersections? They had yellow lights that flashed, and were inside a heavy steel cage. They're all gone now and for the life of me I don't remember the last time I saw one in operation.

We've got one in my town.

My first "oh crap, I'm getting old" experience was some years ago when I was helping lead the youth group at my church. Someone gave the group an old console stereo, a huge piece of furniture with a turntable built in and some polka records in the cabinet. One of the kids put a record on the turntable, lifted the arm, and then stopped before putting down the needle and asked, "Do you start on the inside of the record or the outside?"
 
Posted by Rossweisse (# 2349) on :
 
What we used to call "no-speed" bicycles, sans gears. Those don't seem to be made nowadays once you get past itty-bitty beginner bikes.
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rossweisse:
What we used to call "no-speed" bicycles, sans gears. Those don't seem to be made nowadays once you get past itty-bitty beginner bikes.

"Fixies", singular "fixy" is what they call them today. All the rage with the vegan tiny house moss wearing tree huggers. Not sure why.
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
We used to have what was essentially very expensive white paint that came in a nail polish bottle, and if you were typing and you typed a wrong letter or number, you'd paint over the wrong one with this white paint, then back up the typewriter one letter and type the letter or number you should have typed. When this was first invented it was a godsend and it made document creation tons easier for secretaries, students, etc.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pangolin Guerre:
Tongue sandwich? Of course. Well, I don't make them, but I order them at deli.
.

I like tongue. I once found a butcher who had, or could get, tongue, and I cooked one and pressed it in a basin in the fridge. It was actually not difficult. I remember peeling it, which was easy if you'd cooked it long enough. I suppose we had it sliced with salad (salad again!)

GG
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
MT - Trivia for you: a patent for a correction fluid was held by Bette Nesmith Graham, mother of Michael Nesmith, of The Monkees. She left him a ton of dough.

GG - A friend of mine had me over for dinner, and served me a delicious calf's tongue in an almond and red wine sauce. (She and her partner joke that when I'm invited, they feed me "guts".) If I get the recipe I'll post it in Heaven's recipe thread, and pm you.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
Or police wearing white gloves (and no hazard vests) directing traffic at busy intersections?

That is point duty! (British terminology).
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
If you were typing and you typed a wrong letter or number, you'd paint over the wrong one with this white paint ...

There is of course the apocryphal person who was new to computers and wrote their first document. After finishing the job they said, "That was great, now how do I get the white blobs off my screen?"
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
A slightly different take, not mine sadly, but seen in the Times a few days ago. Someone showing their old typewriter to a grandchild and getting the response, 'wow! It's got an integral printer!'

M.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
quote:
Originally posted by Rossweisse:
What we used to call "no-speed" bicycles, sans gears. Those don't seem to be made nowadays once you get past itty-bitty beginner bikes.

"Fixies", singular "fixy" is what they call them today. All the rage with the vegan tiny house moss wearing tree huggers. Not sure why.
Not the same thing. A single speed gearless bike still has a freewheel - you can stop pedalling and it keeps going. A fixed gear, or fixie, has no freewheel so while it's moving you have to pedal. The appeal is maintenance - less of it - and apparently greater sense of control.

[ 27. August 2017, 07:38: Message edited by: Karl: Liberal Backslider ]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
I'm trying to remember the last time I saw a Toledo Torch as a cautionary warning where road construction was happening. When I was young, I thought they looked like little bombs!
 
Posted by Twilight (# 2832) on :
 
I still get on a bike and think I should pedal backwards to stop. It's the only kind I ever had. It had a nice comfy wide seat and you sat up straight so you didn't fear going over the handlebars onto your teeth if you hit a bump.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Twilight:
I still get on a bike and think I should pedal backwards to stop. It's the only kind I ever had. It had a nice comfy wide seat and you sat up straight so you didn't fear going over the handlebars onto your teeth if you hit a bump.

That's what I still have! Foot brakes, comfy seat, handlebars that allow you to sit upright -- but I do have three forward gears.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
Speaking of gears, I drive a car with a manual transmission -- they're few and far between in the U.S. I've had young men at car washes baffled by mine.
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
About fifteen years ago friends were getting married, and we had a stag and doe for them where we had a silent auction to raise money for their honeymoon. I picked up an orangey-gold one-speed coaster break Columbia bike (ca. 1958-1964) with white wall tires and canvass paniers with a cowboy on a bucking bronco stencilled (gold on silver!) on each panier flap. I don't use it - it's more an objet d'art in my diningroom, When I took it home, I felt like I was 10!

Reactions have ranged from "You use that?!?" to "That is so cool!"

[ 27. August 2017, 13:34: Message edited by: Pangolin Guerre ]
 
Posted by sharkshooter (# 1589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:
quote:
Originally posted by Rossweisse:
What we used to call "no-speed" bicycles, sans gears. Those don't seem to be made nowadays once you get past itty-bitty beginner bikes.

"Fixies", singular "fixy" is what they call them today. All the rage with the vegan tiny house moss wearing tree huggers. Not sure why.
Not the same thing. A single speed gearless bike still has a freewheel - you can stop pedalling and it keeps going. ...
We called them coasters because when you weren't pedaling, you were coasting.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
Speaking of gears, I drive a car with a manual transmission -- they're few and far between in the U.S.

I have one too. It's a '98 Saturn wagon, and it's body is not metal but some sort of synthetic which doesn't dent or rust. They don't make those any more.

Moo
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
Speaking of gears, I drive a car with a manual transmission -- they're few and far between in the U.S. I've had young men at car washes baffled by mine.

Me three!
It always tickles me when I take my car to the dealership for regular service, the young men get into my car to take it to the service bay, then get right back out again looking for someone who can drive a stick! I haven't had an automatic since I was in my late twenties! (A very long time ago.)
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
I've heard a manual transmission described as a theft deterrent for that very reason!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
We also have a stickshift, on our tiny Jeep. Come to think of it, that probably explains why it hasn't been stolen yet, though anybody over the age of three could break into it.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
quote:
Originally posted by Pangolin Guerre:
Tongue sandwich? Of course. Well, I don't make them, but I order them at deli.

I like tongue.
So do I - had some this afternoon.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
We used to have what was essentially very expensive white paint that came in a nail polish bottle, and if you were typing and you typed a wrong letter or number, you'd paint over the wrong one with this white paint, then back up the typewriter one letter and type the letter or number you should have typed. When this was first invented it was a godsend and it made document creation tons easier for secretaries, students, etc.

Then they made little strips to insert between the typeface and the paper so as to tye over the offending letter.
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
Add me to the list of those who drive a stickshift. (Hmmmm.....why is there such a high percentage of us on the Ship? [Paranoid] ) I feel it keeps me closer to the car and aware of when she is feeling ill. I find driving automatic transmissions....unsettling.

I don't think I am cut out for a self-driving car.
 
Posted by RuthW (# 13) on :
 
Stickshift forever, baby! I've also had the young guys at the service place jump in my car and then jump right out again to go find someone who can drive stick. Always amusing - they look so embarrassed.
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
Then they made little strips to insert between the typeface and the paper so as to tye over the offending letter.

Then they made the strips into a long ribbon, put it on a spool, and built it right into the typewriter.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
We resisted getting an automatic; it seemed like wasting your years of accumulated skill having the car make decisions about which gear to use. Then the pressure got to us as we hit our seventies and we relaxed and learned to enjoy our automatics.
There came the day when we were having something done to the car and needed a rental. The Grandad decided he'd drive so in we got and after two attempts he muttered that he couldn't get it into gear – and I had to remind him there was a thing called a clutch.
Ah, the days when I could impress a student passenger in my Mini by doing a rapid double de-clutch as we headed up a steep hill.
GG
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I'm teaching my kid to drive, and stickshift is definitely on the menu. Poor child. I vividly recall my days as a student driver, particularly the time I was at an intersection with a cop car on one side and the gear shift knob came off in my hand and rolled under my mother's seat. She just laughed and laughed while I panicked and the cop rolled his eyes...
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
My mom couldn't drive a stick, and had a terrible time when we had to drop my dad off at the fire station (a fire had started downtown while we were coming back from the beach, we went to investigate, and they asked him to suit up and help). We lived on the top of a pretty sizeable hill, and she had a hell of a time getting up it. Dad told her to just put it in second gear and drive all the way in that. It worked but we went slow, got honked at, etc.

I determined then and there to learn to drive a stick when it came time for me to drive. During driver's ed, on the "range" we had a number of older cars, all automatic, plus two new stick cars donated by the local Chevy dealer (it said so on the sides in large letters). My buddy and I always ran to get those cars so we could learn the stick. Never regretted it.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Re correcting typos:

--An uncoated aspirin, rubbed over the error, worked in a pinch.

--There were also typing erasers, with an ink eraser at one end and a brush at the other. You'd use the eraser very carefully, so as not to wear a hole in the paper, then brush away the eraser debris.

Re liquid paper:

--College students used it to cover improvised repairs of nail holes in dorm room walls. Lots of colors available, so it could often be matched to the paint.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Gestetner duplicating stencils (with the "o"s and other letters that dropped out) and it's bright pink correcting fluid.

Banda duplicating skins, the copies from which always smelled wonderfully of alcohol.
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
In the days when we hired boats on holiday, we found Tippex very handy for covering up the occasional scratch on the hull.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
My poor kid didn't understand automatic transmissions. (Back to stick shift!) She had only driven my car, and if I would have been smart, I would have let her drive my parents' car before she took driver's ed in high school.

Poor thing pushed in the clutch, but it was the brake. The instructor was not amused. While she sobbed in my arms, I told her that the instructor probably had no idea how to drive a stick, but she did. Made her laugh! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Zacchaeus (# 14454) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Forget about folding a map, the necessity of using a map and/or compass when your phone can do it for you. And the city based kids I work with don't ever go places with no mobile coverage, so they see it as pointless.

Analogue clocks is an odd one as dyslexics really struggle (something to do with flipping directions, so find it difficult to know if the hands are pointing to the hour or after the hour) so it seems pointless to keep pushing that one when it isn't necessary to be able to read analogue dials to tell the time.

Interestingly, my dyslexic daughter finds just the opposite. As because of problems with orientation, she can’t tell the difference on a digital timepiece, between 2 and 5 or 6 and 9.
 
Posted by Zacchaeus (# 14454) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Schroedinger's cat:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
pulling/pushing the little knob on the TV to turn it on/off

I remember a TV we had which neede to be switched between 405 and 625 lines (BBC1/BBC2). And tuned in with a proper tuning knob, like radios used to have.

And when it broke down, we got a man in to mend it.

And havign to get u from your seat to change the one of only 4 chanels avaialable
 
Posted by Zacchaeus (# 14454) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chorister:
Hand washing, with Lux Flakes, endless rinsing and then putting through the Mangle - what luxury when Twin Tubs were invented!

And Freezers, who could live without them these days? Only people who remember only one channel on the TV, I guess.

Freezers!! we had no fridge. The milk was kept in buckets of water, or with earthenware covers over them
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
I love reading history threads!

Shame on you Trudy, for interjecting perspective.
 
Posted by Baker (# 18458) on :
 
Popcorn doesn't always come in paper bags that you put in a microwave.

I amazed the kids of a friend who was working on my computer. I took a pan, put some oil in it, added popcorn kernels, heated it, and voila!, there was popcorn. Their eyes got round and they asked "How did you DO that?"
 
Posted by Amorya (# 2652) on :
 
I've got some irrational prejudice against microwave popcorn. I've known of its existence for ages, but I still make popcorn in a pan, and that just seems right.

When we first got a microwave (when I moved to the future, see my post above!), it lived in the garage, a separate building across the garden from the house. So it didn't really save much effort, especially if the weather was bad! Meanwhile the stove was convenient and easy.

It also helped that my parents, when I was young, ran a business selling health foods on the markets. They sold dried popcorn kernels, amongst dried beans, nuts, spices, glacé cherries and so forth. So we had access to as much popcorn as we wanted, but it wasn't pre-packed, it came in 10kg sacks.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I'm the same with all microwave cooking!

I only ever use it for defrosting- newfangled contraption!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
Gestetner duplicating stencils (with the "o"s and other letters that dropped out) and it's bright pink correcting fluid.

Banda duplicating skins, the copies from which always smelled wonderfully of alcohol.

The days before either of these (at work) when absolutely everything had to be handwritten.

Hand written school reports.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Hand written school reports? Yes, mine from pupil days are all here and thankfully those I had to write along with the attendance rolls which were also handwritten are now a thing of the past.
 
Posted by Eirenist (# 13343) on :
 
That there was a time before computers? and television?
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
School reports, yes. During the brief period when I was teaching they were the bane of our lives. The Head wanted each girl's name included in the comments, and everything absolutely perfect (no Tippex allowed), so if any teacher made a mistake everyone had to write their comments again. There was one girl called Rosemarie, whose class teacher had a terrible time with unobservant staff: she'd get the report nearly completed , and then one teacher would write "Rosemary" and we'd all have to start again.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I spelt the word beginning* wrongly one year, and had to re-write a lot of reports.

* I almost misspelt it here too, some people are slow learners [Hot and Hormonal]

Huia
 
Posted by wild haggis (# 15555) on :
 
School Reports: Yes, I remember.
When I started teaching, for each subject it was a tick for well above average, above average etc and also a tick for effort. Then a space if you wanted to make a short comment. You didn't always. They were in books that had excellent carbon so you didn't need to lean heavily.

Then we went to written reports for each primary subject with a sheet a carbon. Being dyslexic I sat with a dictionary! I hated doing 30+ of these because you also had to lean quite heavily as they changed the publisher of the report pads.

These were in Scotland. I moved to England and what a carry on.

We had a silly directive from a county council that we should not put negative comments. So we sat in the staff room and compiled "positive negative comments" If I remember rightly there was a publishing company who caught on and had a booklet of the same. It became tedious as you couldn't put that Johnny was mucking around in class and not doing his homework. Parents didn't really understand the possetive/negative comments anyway,

Then we had the dreaded Attainment Targets - over 100 for each child in Key Stage 1 to be be written out (not just ticked). I know what I want to do with various Ministers of Education from that time - get them to do that for 30+ children twice a year and see how they feel and then..........don't go there haggis!!! The parents hadn't a clue what the targets were about anyway. All they wanted was to know if their kid was working well and were below average, average, etc and if there were any problems, behavioural or educational.

My last school - an independent one - we did our reports on computer so could cut and paste. What joy. No political correctness either.

But how I long for the Scottish Primary Reports of the 1970's with ticks and space if you to write a comment should you wish. Easy and informative.
 
Posted by JeffTL (# 16722) on :
 
I not infrequently hear "Is that a real fountain pen?" -- usually from people older than myself (I was born at the tail end of the Reagan administration). Many who are confident in identifying them, however, don't know how to use one, and fewer yet know what to make of a Parker 51 or similar with the hooded nib. For those not in the know, that's a fountain pen where only the very end of the point is visible, so unless you look very carefully you may think it's a ballpoint, and unless you know the model you may not realize which way is up.
 
Posted by Kaplan Corday (# 16119) on :
 
There is currently a SSM postal survey being carried out here in Australia, amidst a great deal of concern that younger members of the electorate will be incapable of participating because they won't know how to post a letter, despite the form and a postpaid and addressed envelope's being provided.
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
I'm the same with all microwave cooking!

I only ever use it for defrosting- newfangled contraption!

Defrosting is the thing I'm worst at. Setting the heat level and all that -- I'm far more comfortable using it for cooking.

We got our first one when I was in high school. It had a knob you turned, with a red line pointing to the number of minutes you wanted to nuke for. If you wanted it to nuke for 15 seconds, it was me reliable to just set it in the middle and count it out, than to try to hit it just right with the knob.
 
Posted by Galilit (# 16470) on :
 
Indeed!
I was just Friday night telling Number Two Son and his GF about that one.
The trick where I went to school (in the Antipodes) was that they "threw to miss" so you had to stay completely still or you risked actually getting hit!
 
Posted by mark_in_manchester (# 15978) on :
 
quote:
I'm trying to remember the last time I saw a Toledo Torch as a cautionary warning where road construction was happening. When I was young, I thought they looked like little bombs!
These are still a thing in Ukraine (just back from touring hols) - though the roads are generally so bad, it's funny to see someone making an effort to light up a particular patch. Somewhere nearby there will be rocks the size of bricks lying around in the middle of a road with no remaining surface, and foot-deep longitudinal ruts in the tarmac on a fast dual-carriageway.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Hand written school reports.

For which you did research at the library, in books. No Google or Wikipedia back then.

As a language teacher, I was always rummaging through magazines for pictures I could cut out to illustrate various vocabulary words or phrases. Now it's all Google Image.
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Hand written school reports.

For which you did research at the library, in books. No Google or Wikipedia back then.
And the Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mousethief:
It had a knob you turned, with a red line pointing to the number of minutes you wanted to nuke for. If you wanted it to nuke for 15 seconds, it was me reliable to just set it in the middle and count it out, than to try to hit it just right with the knob.

Some of us still have microwaves like that - ultra-reliable and simple. Ours (Samsung) dates from about 1991 and we have had it in four different houses.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Hand written school reports.
I think Boogie means the reports made by every teacher on a pupil at the end of the school year (in some schools every term).

Yes, these are something that my children didn't have: in fact their secondary school didn't issue reports at all, relying rather on pupils reporting what progress they thought they'd made over the course of the year and the subject teacher either agreeing or noting areas for improvement.

Not a satisfactory thing IMV.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
I think Boogie means the reports made by every teacher on a pupil at the end of the school year (in some schools every term).

Oh, I see. We called them evaluations over here. Reports were a homework assignment on steroids.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
"The Bumps" (as done to a child on its birthday).

A couple of weeks ago my birthday coincided with one of the children at church, and as is our custom we had Happy Birthday sung at us after the service. I said to her jokingly "at least they didn't give me the bumps!" (I am somewhat aged). She looked at me blankly.

I guess the dreaded 'elf 'n safety strikes again ...
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
"The Bumps" (as done to a child on its birthday).

[Confused]
This is another one that may take some explanation for those of us who live elsewhere.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
"The Bumps" (as done to a child on its birthday).

[Confused]
This is another one that may take some explanation for those of us who live elsewhere.

Child lies down, friends pick them up by arms and legs, and "bump" their torso into the air once for each year of life, plus usually one more for luck.
De rigueur when I was a child.
 


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