Thread: Dirty little secrets Board: Heaven / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
No, no, not like that. I mean we don't want to know if you shagged the bishop or his/her wife. I admit I once confessed on these very boards to peeing on a church, but even that might push the envelope (and the church has been closed since: go figure). No, far more seemly things. Just the terribly unchic, if you get my meaning.

For example, I admit that I drink instant coffee. I even take some away with me when I stay with people. I mean I'm a coffee snob like the best of you, but you know, at three o'clock in the morning when you just want a figgin' hot caffeine fix who cares what it tastes like?

Well, I mean I wouldn't go for powdered caterers' blends, and in fact only allow myself the most expensive brand, which I won't name because it wouldn't do to advertise on the Ship ... but still, it's not the sort of think I'd confess in august circles ... [Disappointed]

Surely you have some dark secret? Your favourite food is roast guinea pig, or you subscribe to Breitbart or whatever ....

Keep it clean, of course. This is heaven. The angels and baby jesus weep in broiken harmony if they hear your sexual peccadiloes here. I don't even want to know if you go commando and all. No wobbly bits in here.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
I mix Marmite™ with margarine and a bit of cheese spread. Just the thing with morning tea!

I have been known to eat an entire bag of crunchy cheese sticks in one sitting.

[Hot and Hormonal] Peccavi. Mea culpa.

[spelin]

[ 05. September 2017, 08:06: Message edited by: Uncle Pete ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:


Surely you have some dark secret? Your favourite food is roast guinea pig, or you subscribe to Breitbart or whatever ....

IIRC guinea pig is a delicacy in one of the Andean countries. I've been tempted from time to time to make a sort of galantine from a boned and stuffed one, perhaps wrapped in vine leaves. Has anyone tried it?

I once boned and stuffed a rabbit, wrapped it in pancetta and then vine leaves and cooked it on the bbq. Delicious, but the boning was not a task I'd like to repeat, much more difficult than a chicken or duck as the bones were so small and went in contrary directions.
 
Posted by Doone (# 18470) on :
 
I am an avid reader and enjoy 'literary' books, both fiction and nonfiction. I also confess to reading a lot of the Cozy Mystery series of books as well, though [Hot and Hormonal] , especially those with quilting or knitting content.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
I mix Marmite™ with margarine and a bit of cheese spread. Just the thing with morning tea!

I have been known to eat an entire bag of crunchy cheese sticks in one sitting.

[Hot and Hormonal] Peccavi. Mea culpa.

[spelin]

Cheese and marmite improved cheese on toast but marmite, sliced tomato with cheese on top makes an epic toastie.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Marmite with margarine rather than butter? Is outrage!

[ 05. September 2017, 13:05: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
Peanut butter, spinach/lettuce, tomato, hot pepper sandwiches. When fridge is empty, peanut butter and pickle or relish or chutney.
 
Posted by LutheranChik (# 9826) on :
 
My dirty secret: I pretend to care about (American) college football as much as,my Dear Spouse does. I pay enough attention to the game to make appropriate noises of e,citement or dismay...7when DS says, " Did you see that play? Incredible!" I nod my head vigorously even though I've actually been Facebooking or menu planning orwatching birds outside the window. I also feign interest in the football fortunes of my own alma mater, when it's all I can do to remember the coach's name.
 
Posted by rolyn (# 16840) on :
 
I lick the butter of the the knife before dipping it in the marmalade jar. It's only me who likes marmalade.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I don't like children.

People think I'm joking when I say it, but it's true, I find them selfish, unpredictable and messy. I much prefer dogs.

Dogs want to please you, Children want to please themselves.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
I agree with you on all counts, Boogie. Even as a very young child I loved my stuffed toy dogs but had virtually no interest in dolls.

That's not a "dirty little secret" -- anyone who knows me realizes that's the way I am.
 
Posted by Kaplan Corday (# 16119) on :
 
I don't like children either, including adolescents.

Neither did C.S. Lewis, though he believed it was a fault in himself, not in the children, like someone who is tone deaf and can't appreciate music.

I once had a meal with Douglas Gresham (name dropping? you betcha!) who said it certainly wasn't obvious in his childhood relationship with his step-father.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Marmite is not a dirty little secret. Liking it is the sign of one's affiliation with all that is evil and rotten.
The creation, use and promotion of marmite is the unforgivable sin mentioned in the bible.

quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
I don't like children either, including adolescents.

Neither did C.S. Lewis, though he believed it was a fault in himself, not in the children, like someone who is tone deaf and can't appreciate music.

He was spot on, the fault is in the adult.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
I have been known to eat icing out of a can. [Hot and Hormonal]

When I baked cakes long, long ago, I made homemade icing. If I buy a can of it, you can bet it's to be eaten with a spoon.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
At great personal risk, clearly, I'm going to have to confess I don't like dogs. I hate their wet noses, like they're running constantly. I hate not knowing if one is all bark or is actually a vicious bastard. I hate the way they jump at me when I'm on the bike. I cannot imagine taking a plastic bag of shit back with me from a walk, or having to de-turd the garden before using it for human activities. I hate the way it's acceptable to post 'if you don't love dogs I can't be your friend' memes on Facebook. But most of all I hate the way they want to lick your face, and the way their owners let them. [Projectile]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
Cats are my pet peeve (even though most are not really pets). If they're really pets, keep them in your house. If they need their "freedom," and you insist on letting them wander all over the neighborhood, then they're not pets.

They decimate the populations of native birds and small animals.

And they poop in my yard, especially around any flowers I try to plant! I have to keep my dog in my yard or on a leash (which I would do whether or not it was required). She has to wear a license for identification and to show she's been immunized for rabies (which I would do whether or not it was required). But cats can just wander wherever they want, kill whatever they wish (and often leave the remains for me to find in my yard), and leave me to "de-turd the garden before using it for human activities."

Sorry, this is getting pretty Hellish for Heaven.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Neither did C.S. Lewis, though he believed it was a fault in himself, not in the children, like someone who is tone deaf and can't appreciate music.

C.S. Lewis said that he didn't like very young children; he appeared to like them after the age of six or so. If he hadn't liked children, I don't think he could have written the Narnia books.

Moo
 
Posted by Anselmina (# 3032) on :
 
I like Pot Noodles, a nasty habit I developed as a teenager coming home from school.

I don't 'get' most modern art. A recent visit to the Tate Modern left me almost entirely cold, and wondering if the world had gone mad. The sandwich in the cafe was nice...

I occasionally binge on trash magazines: Heat, Reveal, etc. I'm so old now I hardly recognize half of the 'celebrities', and I hate the culture that generates the famous-for-being-famous non-entities that populate TV these days. But yet I remain fascinated by their failed plastic surgeries, weight-loss battles and breeding patterns.

Karl's post reminds me that while I'd probably give my life for my dog, I wouldn't let him lick my face. Not that he wants to, thank heaven. The only thing he puts near his mouth is what he thinks is food; and his eating technique involves snatching viciously and quickly in the hope that what ends up in there is actually edible. So long as he can either sick it up or poo it later, he doesn't care much if it isn't. Legacy of being a skin-and-bone rescue, I suppose.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
I don't 'get' most modern art. A recent visit to the Tate Modern left me almost entirely cold, and wondering if the world had gone mad. The sandwich in the cafe was nice...

Most of looks to me like the rag the painter used to clean his/her brushes. [Frown]

But the Tate Modern and other London art museums do have lovely cafes. [Smile]
 
Posted by Kitten (# 1179) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
At great personal risk, clearly, I'm going to have to confess I don't like dogs. I hate their wet noses, like they're running constantly. I hate not knowing if one is all bark or is actually a vicious bastard. I hate the way they jump at me when I'm on the bike. I cannot imagine taking a plastic bag of shit back with me from a walk, or having to de-turd the garden before using it for human activities. I hate the way it's acceptable to post 'if you don't love dogs I can't be your friend' memes on Facebook. But most of all I hate the way they want to lick your face, and the way their owners let them. [Projectile]

Me too
 
Posted by Kaplan Corday (# 16119) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
Neither did C.S. Lewis, though he believed it was a fault in himself, not in the children, like someone who is tone deaf and can't appreciate music.

C.S. Lewis said that he didn't like very young children; he appeared to like them after the age of six or so. If he hadn't liked children, I don't think he could have written the Narnia books.

Moo

Not sure whether that follows, but you could be right.

I tend to suspect that he wrote them for himself, and for the select minority of untypical children who were like he was as a child, and that he was surprised by their popularity.
 
Posted by Kaplan Corday (# 16119) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
I'm going to have to confess I don't like dogs.

In which case you are going to be miserable in Heaven, which is going to be full of them (according to John Wesley) - apart from Hitler's dog (according to Homer Simpson).

Actually, your anti-dog invective suggests that you are not going to be in Heaven.

[ 05. September 2017, 22:40: Message edited by: Kaplan Corday ]
 
Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
I have been known to hide a candy bar from Mr Image so I do not have to share, and then eat it while he is out of the house.

I also often bring the car home without stopping at the gas station so Mr Image will fill it up.

PS I do love Mr Image but I really like certain candy bars, and I do not like filling the car for the simple reason the pump hurts my hand and the door to the station I find hard to open.
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
Funny that Marmite should keep showing up here. I have been publicly scolded by the estimable Piglet for saying that my ideal breakfast consists of Marmite on Aberdeen butteries (or rowies, if you prefer), so I suppose it isn't a dirty little secret any more. But I do recommend it.

Another one. I've been told that mental calculations are good for keeping the last few working brain cells alive. I have found ample time for this during the less inspiring sermons lately.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
... and how do I confess on so illustrious a website, surrounded by aficionadi of Taverner and I dunno, Tallis and whatever other dudes scrwled spiders' footprints on fence wire, that I love (much, not all) country music [Ultra confused]

I'm sorry. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Z--

Check out singer Rhiannon Giddens. I saw her on "Infinity Hall Live". Singing, banjo, violin. Much roots music. And she has quite a stage presence.
[Cool]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Rhiannon Giddens is curating Cambridge Folk Festival next year.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Thanks, CK. Interesting.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
At great personal risk, clearly, I'm going to have to confess I don't like dogs.

*shock*

Just shows, you never really know people in forums until you ask the really important questions about deepest secrets.

*strikes Karl off invitation list*
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kaplan Corday:
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
I'm going to have to confess I don't like dogs.

In which case you are going to be miserable in Heaven, which is going to be full of them (according to John Wesley) - apart from Hitler's dog (according to Homer Simpson).

Actually, your anti-dog invective suggests that you are not going to be in Heaven.

I'm already relying on Jesus' words that everything bar the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit will be forgiven a man, and trust that there will be a corner of heaven where dogs are friendly, have dry noses, not lick, will play fetch for a few minutes, then go away and be someone else's problem, just for kitten and me.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Kitten?? In heaven?? Don't you know that cats are Satan's own creatures and that Heaven will be mercifully free of them.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Surely in the many rooms in Heaven there will be space for different rooms for those who are exclusively dog lovers or cat lovers
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
To be a cat lover is akin to living the unforgivable sin. Dogs and their carers will be welcomed with open arms though - both dogs and their carers having already proven their fidelity.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
By kitten I meant the poster of the same name, but heaven will be full of cats anyway because they'll just whine until they're let in. It's interesting though isn't it how confessing to not liking children is fine but not liking dogs gets people responding...
 
Posted by Higgs Bosun (# 16582) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
By kitten I meant the poster of the same name, but heaven will be full of cats anyway because they'll just whine until they're let in. It's interesting though isn't it how confessing to not liking children is fine but not liking dogs gets people responding...

Once inside they will go to the pearly gates, wait for them to be opened, look outside for a couple of minutes, and decide to stay. St Pete sighs, and closes the gates again.

My dark secret is eating a whole packet of Jaffa Cakes in a few minutes.
 
Posted by Anselmina (# 3032) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
... and how do I confess on so illustrious a website, surrounded by aficionadi of Taverner and I dunno, Tallis and whatever other dudes scrwled spiders' footprints on fence wire, that I love (much, not all) country music [Ultra confused]

I'm sorry. [Hot and Hormonal]

Hey, me too!! I love much old and new polyphonic church music, and your basic classic choral repertoire. But I also love classic Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash et al. As well as a lot of the newer stuff, that is still recognizably of the genre.

Tex Ritter's 'Blood on the saddle' will always have a special place in my heart. [Big Grin]

[ 06. September 2017, 11:07: Message edited by: Anselmina ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Around here it is not a dirty little secret to admit loving mountain music, especially that of Ralph Stanley, who recently died.

Moo
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
This is a real Dirty Little Secret in Ship circles, but choral music leaves me cold. I have sat through many a choir concert either reading, or (in more recent years) playing games on my phone, if either of these activities can be done without annoying or distracting others. Or just dozing off, as once during a performance of the Messiah that all my musical friends were wildly excited about it college. I sat at the end of the pew where everyone had piled their coats, and only woke up whenever a particular high, shrill note was hit.

As for the not-liking-children thing -- I don't really get babies and toddlers. I liked my OWN kids when they were that age, and tolerated the children of my friends during the same period, but I do not get the oohing and aahing over babies. My classroom is near the front office at work and every so often I can hear someone come in and a bunch of high-pitched squealing erupt and people come from all over the corridor to ogle the thing that's just been brought in. When this happens I always say to my students, "Someone's just come in with either a baby or a puppy ... I hope it's a puppy."
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
I enjoy performing it, but I can't imagine sitting and listening to it. Twenty minutes of repetition of an obscure line from the Gloria just doesn't excite me.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
On the dogs thing, at the risk of digging a deeper hole, part of the problem for me is that I don't get this cute thing with dogs. I see so many pictures of "my beautiful boy" or "this gorgeous girl" and I just see a flat face and slobber. But I've always been badly grossed out by (even typing this I'm inwardly going "ick, ick, ick!") - urgh - [i]saliva[/]i - even human. Never mind canine.

They just aren't cute. No, not even puppies.

I'll happily play fetch with a dog for half an hour. But it's all that goes with them, as aforementioned, that I couldn't be doing with.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I don't really get babies and toddlers. I liked my OWN kids when they were that age, and tolerated the children of my friends during the same period, but I do not get the oohing and aahing over babies.

No, I agree, they're much more interesting when they're a wee bit older.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
I love (much, not all) country music [Ultra confused]

I'm sorry. [Hot and Hormonal]

And so you should be! I wonder what penance we could prescribe? Listening to Stockhausen or Boulez, perhaps. Or there's always aversion therapy ...
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
I love (much, not all) country music [Ultra confused]

I'm sorry. [Hot and Hormonal]

And so you should be! I wonder what penance we could prescribe? Listening to Stockhausen or Boulez, perhaps. Or there's always aversion therapy ...
Oh leave the lad alone. I'd be much more concerned about someone being into hip-hop.

Never understood how the otherwise musically wise John Peel found anything to like about that.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
I'd be much more concerned about someone being into hip-hop.

Be concerned, be very concerned. Liking hip-hop is not dirty.
In seriousness, I do think the average age is a factor in the Ship's General aversion. And proof that the Ship doesn't list to port in everything.
quote:

Never understood how the otherwise musically wise John Peel found anything to like about that.

Because hip-hop has every quality of any other pop music category. You. Yes, you, are likely not versed in the many variations.
I hate country music. However, having reluctantly heard quite a lot, there are artists who have tranceded that and I like. Well, at least a song or two. (my Dirty Little Secret)More importantly, even that which I still do not care for, I better understand why some might.
I still say most of it is dreadful, but acknowledge that it is possible for some of it to be listenable.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
No, but it's a bit like fish innit? I've tried quite a few and hated all of them, so knowing that I loathe 100% of the types I've ever tried, I'm not inclined to run around trying all the rest in the unlikely event that there's one that bucks the trend.

Ditto Rap and any other music likely to be played far too loud on a car stereo (Karl's First Law of Car Stereos - 'The volume of music on a car stereo is in inverse proportion to its quality')

Country? Take it or leave it, prefer to do the latter, prefer it to the chart shite they insist on playing loudly at places like bowling alleys.

/Grumpy old man
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
Oh leave the lad alone.

BT retreats, somewhat abashed, but resolute in his dislike of country music.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
No, but it's a bit like fish innit?

Actually, it isn't. I hate fish as well, but it is the basic quality, the underlying taste that I hate.
If you think this is why you hate hip-hop, the you do not know hip-hop. The varying styles do not have the same underlying quality, so much as a superficial relationship.
Just as there is a big difference between the Big Bopper and Nine Inch Nails, so to amongst hip-hop artists.

That said, like what you like. My point is that dislike is often more from ignorance than familiarity.

Enough of this tangent, though.I am contemplating a hip-hop thread, but I fear it will just be me and, perhaps Og, King of Bashan.
 
Posted by churchgeek (# 5557) on :
 
I reply to trolls on facebook threads. Although I like to reply to them not in kind, but rather with respect and reason. They never reply back, though.

I know it's a waste of time, but it does feel like it injects some dignity into a thread that's just full of people tossing insults at each other. I suppose I could claim it as holy folly?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Dirty secrets--I DO like hip hop. But then, there isn't much I don't like musically.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I am hooked on J.D Robb's In Death series. They are junk reading, the writing is slick, the sex scenes repetitive (besides I don't think sex is a spectator sport), and the characters are predictable, but everytime a new one comes into the library I borrow it.

I am not so far gone as to pay good money for them though.

Huia
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Smoked mussels: hot toast, buttered and the mussels mashed onto it, black pepper - bliss [Yipee]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I don't really get babies and toddlers. I liked my OWN kids when they were that age, and tolerated the children of my friends during the same period, but I do not get the oohing and aahing over babies.

No, I agree, they're much more interesting when they're a wee bit older.
I think babies are very interesting. I like watching them figure things out.

Moo
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
... and how do I confess on so illustrious a website, surrounded by aficionadi of Taverner and I dunno, Tallis and whatever other dudes scrwled spiders' footprints on fence wire, that I love (much, not all) country music [Ultra confused]

I'm sorry. [Hot and Hormonal]

Hah! - I read your opening post, was right with you on the coffee thing, decided to play along, and thought, what am I going to confess to? ...oh, wait - country music... -but no, too late to the party!

So, I guess I'm left with sweetened condensed milk, eaten on buttered toast.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
What? on toast? not straight from the tin? [Razz]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:


So, I guess I'm left with sweetened condensed milk, eaten on buttered toast.

Close! My preference is blackcurrent jam on toast with Philadelphia cheese on top. Sort of instant cheesecake.
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by anoesis:


So, I guess I'm left with sweetened condensed milk, eaten on buttered toast.

Close! My preference is blackcurrent jam on toast with Philadelphia cheese on top. Sort of instant cheesecake.
I do exactly that with Scandinavian crepes! Well, cheese first, then the jam. I use either black currant or sour cherry jam. Roll the crepe, sprinkle with a pinch of cinnamon and sugar.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I don't really get babies and toddlers. I liked my OWN kids when they were that age, and tolerated the children of my friends during the same period, but I do not get the oohing and aahing over babies.

No, I agree, they're much more interesting when they're a wee bit older.
I think babies are very interesting. I like watching them figure things out.

Moo

From a distance, until they start crying.

When my niece's twins were babies and visiting our house she asked if I'd like to change a nappy. She looked a bit surprised when I said 'no thank you'! Her Mum and sister happily did so. I have a very high ick threshold and happily clear up after pups. But - other people's babies nappies? - NO thank you!
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I listen almost entirely to classical music – I confused a fellow doing a survey the other day "What station do you listen to from 9-12?" "The Concert Programme""What do you listen to between 12 and 3?" "The Concert Programme" "what do you listen to between 3 and 6?" "The concert programme"etc.
But I don't like most choral music – especially I can't listen to The Messiah, only occasionally to one piece of it.
I don't like female choirs.
I've enjoyed singing alto (="a soprano who can read music")in church choirs and in congregational singing and when almost any traditional hymn is sung I sing the alto part automatically.
I love male voice choirs, especially Welsh ones...

GG
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
I love male voice choirs, especially Welsh ones...

You would have enjoyed our Golden Jubilee Concert last Saturday, then. (A bit loud in our small church, though - not the one on the poster!)
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
I am surrounded by friends and neighbours who love rugby and I pretend to understand what is going on. (The technicalities and rules of the game have been explained to me many times, in vain.)

I like singing 'Don't Cry for Me Argentina' in the bath.

I don't consume very much Marmite on toast (always with butter) unless I'm travelling in places where it is not readily available. Then it becomes a Primal Need and I will do anything to get hold of a small pot-bellied yellow-labelled jar of it.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
I am surrounded by friends and neighbours who love rugby and I pretend to understand what is going on.

Be comforted: so do they. The only people who understand are referees - and even they're not too sure at times.
 
Posted by betjemaniac (# 17618) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
I am surrounded by friends and neighbours who love rugby and I pretend to understand what is going on. (The technicalities and rules of the game have been explained to me many times, in vain.)


you've got one of the best museums of the game in the world in Cape Town - go and drink deeply at the well and all shall be revealed...
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
The only people who understand are referees - and even they're not too sure at times.

There are plenty of referees who are completely sure that they understand the rules, and are wrong...
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
I am surrounded by friends and neighbours who love rugby and I pretend to understand what is going on. (The technicalities and rules of the game have been explained to me many times, in vain.)

I like singing 'Don't Cry for Me Argentina' in the bath.

I don't consume very much Marmite on toast (always with butter) unless I'm travelling in places where it is not readily available. Then it becomes a Primal Need and I will do anything to get hold of a small pot-bellied yellow-labelled jar of it.

Tangent with a South African flavour... After a Marmiteless year or so I happened to be visiting your lovely country with friends. We stopped at a grocery shop in Aliwal North for supplies, where I spied that very jar and grabbed one from the shelf. My sanity was questioned and I was not asked to share it. We spent the evening watching rugby, recalling that back in grammar school, I had been a hooker.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
My dirty little secret sounds dirtier and dirtier.

It is a big thing out here in a sports-mad country. I once confessed my ignorance about/disinterest in rugby to a black academic colleague who promptly assumed this meant that I was a dedicated soccer lover (South Africa's other great passion) and he talked to me conspiratorially about Bafana Bafana and Kaiser Chiefs soccer teams each time we met. I know nothing about soccer.

betjemaniac, I have heard about that magnificent rugby museum at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town. A much-loved older neighbour who once played forward (back? goalkeeper? scrum-half? clueless) told me all about it with tears in his eyes and I assured him I would love to spend time there. *ashamed hypocrite*

Baptist Trainfan, Lorning Cniht, whenever I listen to a supporter of the Stormers (Western Province) and supporter of the Blue Bulls (Gauteng) discuss a game they have watched together where the Stormers inevitably beat the Blue Bulls, it is evident they have watched two different games and the referees presided over a third unrelated game.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
I feel for you. I have no interest in sports of any kind; I used to follow Test Cricket but realised it was just the numbers and wondering about the rain; I got bored watching it and was very vague on who the players were.

Some people really cannot cope with it; had plenty of blokes especially give me the cold shoulder after the answer to "my team" being "haven't got one, I have no interest in football." Fortunately I work in IT so it doesn't affect work relations but I've heard horror stories.
 
Posted by Prester John (# 5502) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
We spent the evening watching rugby, recalling that back in grammar school, I had been a hooker.

Umm... this comes across as something completely different to an American.
[Ultra confused]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
It has that ambiguity in English-English too, I think. Blame the Marmite.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
It has that ambiguity in English-English too, I think. Blame the Marmite.

Source of endless single-gag fourth-form humour.
 
Posted by Anselmina (# 3032) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Prester John:
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
We spent the evening watching rugby, recalling that back in grammar school, I had been a hooker.

Umm... this comes across as something completely different to an American.
[Ultra confused]

You mean not all American hookers look like this?
 
Posted by LutheranChik (# 9826) on :
 
I lied to my Fitbit albout what I ate today.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
You mean not all American hookers look like this?

I think that one would have to work a pretty dark street corner.
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
You mean not all American hookers look like this?

I think that one would have to work a pretty dark street corner.
Could be quite successful in a niche market.
 
Posted by Prester John (# 5502) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Anselmina:
quote:
Originally posted by Prester John:
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
We spent the evening watching rugby, recalling that back in grammar school, I had been a hooker.

Umm... this comes across as something completely different to an American.
[Ultra confused]

You mean not all American hookers look like this?
Not that I'm speaking from experience of course but he doesn't look like any that I see on the TV show Cops. Which exposes my dirty little secret. I watch a show that could very fairly be described as panem et circenses for the masses.

<slightly off coding>

[ 08. September 2017, 23:49: Message edited by: Prester John ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I loathe and detest rugby, what's more I can't name a current All Black* and couldn't give a hoot whether they win or lose.

On the other hand I was glad when the first post quake game could be played in Christchurch because I knew how important it was for some people's morale.

* the last one I could name was Tana Umaga, but that's because I taught him when he was 6.

Huia
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
I don't know how you have managed to get through a supermarket checkout anytime in the last several years without being visually assaulted by women's magazine covers relating the latest dealings of Dan Carter, Richie McCaw et al. - why, only last month, Israel Dagg's wife had a baby! [Biased] [Projectile]

I am quite literally sitting in front of the TV with my laptop right now, about to watch the (delayed) coverage of ABs vs. Pumas in New Plymouth. Huia, never pass up an opportunity to watch 15 very fit Argentinian men capering about a field! (Anoesis' other dirty secret - the rugby isn't entirely about the rugby...) [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I'd rather watch the Argentinian polo team. Horses as well to watch as well as players.
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I'd rather watch the Argentinian polo team. Horses as well to watch as well as players.

Indeed. Where can one see such a thing, though? I doubt that would even feature on the full SkySport package...
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Well, the Polo World Cup is taking place in Sydney in mid to late October and teams from Argentina, Chile, USA, England, New Zealand, Spain, India and Australia will be competing. New Zealand haven't qualified before so they're very much the underdogs.

If you contact the NZ Polo Association (I think they're based in Auckland) they'll be able to tell you what coverage there is - probably a live link to clubs but you never know...
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I didn't realise Ritchie McCaw was still an All Black - I did know he was a Crusader (Christchurch team) at some time because they supported a "reading crusade" encouraging Primary School children to improve their reading.

I think a lot of the celebrity stuff passes me by because I don't watch TV or read women's magazines unless I have forgotten to take my book with me when I go to the doctor's and I only listen to RNZ national, mainly the weather forecast.

Huia - probably not a dinkum Kiwi [Razz]
 
Posted by ChaliceGirl (# 13656) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I don't really get babies and toddlers. I liked my OWN kids when they were that age, and tolerated the children of my friends during the same period, but I do not get the oohing and aahing over babies.

No, I agree, they're much more interesting when they're a wee bit older.
I think babies are very interesting. I like watching them figure things out.

Moo

From a distance, until they start crying.

When my niece's twins were babies and visiting our house she asked if I'd like to change a nappy. She looked a bit surprised when I said 'no thank you'! Her Mum and sister happily did so. I have a very high ick threshold and happily clear up after pups. But - other people's babies nappies? - NO thank you!

I feel the same way! I'm not a baby person, and never wanted one. Give me pets any day!
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
Good to see you, ChaliceGirl!
[Smile]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Thanks to the influence of a friend who is a serious contemporary musician, I listen to difficult modern composers like Philip Glass, Bartók, Elliot Carter, Arnold Schoenberg. And I love the avant-garde edge of jazz.

But when it comes to popular music, I'm stuck in the worst (and I do mean worst) pop schlock of the 1970s: Seasons in the Sun (Terry Jacks),Love will keep us together (Captain and Tenille),You light up my life (Debbie Boone), I think I love you (The Patridge Family).

I know all the words by heart and can sing along, like someone with a good taste/debased taste Jekyll and Hyde syndrome.

'I think I love you so what am I so afraid of/
I'm afraid that I'm not sure of/ a love there is no cure for'
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
MaryLouise
You are not alone!

Yes, I earn my living as a "serious" musician and even listen to/play "serious" music for pleasure - BUT, if I had to choose my 8 records for Desert Island Discs one would have to be the Chris Montez recording of The More I see you - it even wins over My baby just cares for me.
 
Posted by wild haggis (# 15555) on :
 
All those folk who don't like children! I can guess what they were like as kids from their descriptions. It takes one to know one. We were all once kids Or were they born fully formed adults - poor mothers if they were!

Kids are interesting, intuitive and tell it as it is.
Wonder what the kids think of those critical adults?

No wonder children have given up on church/religion with that kind of attitude from adults. Didn't Jesus tell off the disciples for chasing children away?

Marmite ................I'm married to a lover of the brown stuff. Love the hubby not the brown stuff! But I just have to put up with the 'orrible smell.

Now daddy long legs (or jenny long legs as we called them in my far and distant youth in the land of the mountain and the flood)....that's another story. The boys used to capture us girls at the close mouths (entrance to houses for the Sassenachs) and stuff the beasties down our backs. These boys were mean and horrible and the daddy long legs were..........

Even after all these years, if I see one today, I run or duck under the duvet.

Didn't put me off the boys, just the daddy long legs!
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Hubby ain't got long legs and/or ain't a daddy?

Enquiring mind wants to know! [Confused] [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
It has that ambiguity in English-English too, I think. Blame the Marmite.

Source of endless single-gag fourth-form humour.
UK shipmates with longish memories may recall that Jeffrey Archer - a rugby referee as well as a novelist and politician- was accused of having paid a prostitute £2000 to keep quiet about an alleged liaison.
Sure enough, first game he referees after this comes out, up comes one of the players- 'I'm a hooker- now, where's my two grand?'
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
All those folk who don't like children!

Shocking, yeah. [Roll Eyes] I have kids, by choice. (Do you?) I wouldn't un-have them. But God, they're hard work. All the time. Every day. And not the rewarding kind of hard work, like going to the gym, or finishing a piece of copyediting.

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
I can guess what they were like as kids from their descriptions.

I note you conveniently fail to pad this one out. I think you should. I can't, for instance, tell what they were like as kids, from their descriptions. It might be good to clarify, here, because it sounds a little like you might be suggesting they're basically lifelong selfish assholes.

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
It takes one to know one.

Wot? Sorry? A kid? Or a kid-hater?

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
We were all once kids Or were they born fully formed adults - poor mothers if they were!

Yeah, I'd hate it if my kids had empathy, ate without making an entire room sticky, could refrain from hitting one another, made their own toast when hungry, drove themselves places, and went to the toilet at 2am without telling me they needed to do so. Oh, wait...

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
Kids are interesting, intuitive and tell it as it is.

The thing that surprised me the most about my kids, once they became verbal and I had continuous, non-optional insight into their train(s) of thought, was just how not interesting those thoughts were. Really, even if you allow for the fact that they're figuring stuff out as they go along, 99.9% of it is just total dross. With one, minecraft, minecraft, minecraft, food, minecraft, food, parties, minecraft. The other, food, food, food, ninjas, minecraft, food, ninjas. And here's the thing. They're normal - I see enough other kids on a daily basis to be able to attest to this.

quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
No wonder children have given up on church/religion with that kind of attitude from adults. Didn't Jesus tell off the disciples for chasing children away?

1.) That's exceptionally harsh, even measured against the rest of your content.

2.) I don't think that folk who've chosen not to have kids should have to be answerable for what's (apparently) going on with the current generation of kids. You can blame me and my compatriots for that, instead.

3.) Do you have any evidence that children are giving up on church/religion? I mean, they kind of have to go where their parents go - or don't go - and also, they are not amongst the most surveyed of groups, in respect of either memberships or convictions.
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
Thank you, anoesis - much more elegantly expressed than I would've managed.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kittyville:
Thank you, anoesis - much more elegantly expressed than I would've managed.

I agree. I started to respond but then remembered that this is Heaven, so my response would not have been appropriate.
 
Posted by Ethne Alba (# 5804) on :
 
DLS?

My spouse is on a very strict diet and weekly i make dark chocolate krispie cakes for myself and hide them at the far end of a cupboard that i know cannot be (easily) seen.....
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
In a confession that I just know will have our dear and much missed shipmate ken spinning in his grave, I have to own up to currently having a big craving for mild cheddar.

I actually find myself thinking of ken every time I cut myself another slice of that glorious, plasticky, nuclear orange marvellousness.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
In a confession that I just know will have our dear and much missed shipmate ken spinning in his grave, I have to own up to currently having a big craving for mild cheddar.

I actually find myself thinking of ken every time I cut myself another slice of that glorious, plasticky, nuclear orange marvellousness.

Out, out, I command you, Spirit of tastlessness! Out and to the Abyss!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
... modern composers like ... Bartok ...

He died in 1945 - does he really still count as "modern"? [Two face]

Did you have to mention Seasons in the Sun? Now I've got that really unsubtle key-change as an ear-worm. Thanks for that ... [Devil]

My own confession: we've just had our cable TV hooked up and I can't tell you how pleased we were to be able once again to watch Jeopardy!. High intellectual culture it ain't, but it is addictive. [Hot and Hormonal]

Oh yes, and I actually thought the music, fashion and style of the 1980s was rather good (except for the avocado bathrooms - see the "Moving" thread in AS).
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
... modern composers like ... Bartok ...

He died in 1945 - does he really still count as "modern"? [Two face]


I wondered about that myself, Piglet. The terminology is a bit imprecise, in the same way that Virginia Woolf (died 1945) is described as a 'modern' writer where her contemporaries Arnold Bennett and JB Priestley are seen as following on in 19th-century traditions of the novel.. Modern as akin to Modernist, but not contemporary.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
The terminology is a bit imprecise, in the same way that Virginia Woolf (died 1945) is described as a 'modern' writer where her contemporaries Arnold Bennett and JB Priestley are seen as following on in 19th-century traditions of the novel..

Arnold Bennett was born in 1867. Virginia Woolf was born in 1882. Those fifteen years made a huge difference. I am a great fan of Arnold Bennett, and his writings resemble that of the earlier Victorian novelists, who were his role models. By the time Virginia Woolf started writing, the Victorian model was no longer so powerful.

Moo
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Moo, it isn't so much about when they were born as the kind of writing they did. Jules Laforgue who influenced TS Eliot and is known as a proto-Modernist was also born in 1860. But 'modern' is a slippery word.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
In a confession that I just know will have our dear and much missed shipmate ken spinning in his grave, I have to own up to currently having a big craving for mild cheddar.

I actually find myself thinking of ken every time I cut myself another slice of that glorious, plasticky, nuclear orange marvellousness.

I think of him every time I play "Dear Lord and Father of Mankind" on the piano at church.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
In a confession that I just know will have our dear and much missed shipmate ken spinning in his grave, I have to own up to currently having a big craving for mild cheddar.

I actually find myself thinking of ken every time I cut myself another slice of that glorious, plasticky, nuclear orange marvellousness.

You might as well go the whole way and have processed cheese slices.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
wild haggis:
quote:
All those folk who don't like children! I can guess what they were like as kids from their descriptions. It takes one to know one. We were all once kids Or were they born fully formed adults - poor mothers if they were!
Well, I think that's a bit unfair. I can see where these people are coming from; I don't like all children. I like some people who happen to be children at the moment.

I like chip butties, but this is not really a secret as part of the pleasure of eating them is due to Other Half and Daughter pretending to be embarrassed when I have one...
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
When candidating for my present Pastorate, I was asked, "Do you like children?" This was important as the church seeks to be very child-friendly.

I didn't have the wit to reply, "It depends: do you mean roast, boiled or fried?" [Devil] What I actually said (truthfully) was that I like most children, most of the time.

[ 14. September 2017, 10:48: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
wild haggis:
quote:
All those folk who don't like children! I can guess what they were like as kids from their descriptions. It takes one to know one. We were all once kids Or were they born fully formed adults - poor mothers if they were!
Well, I think that's a bit unfair. I can see where these people are coming from; I don't like all children. I like some people who happen to be children at the moment.

I like chip butties, but this is not really a secret as part of the pleasure of eating them is due to Other Half and Daughter pretending to be embarrassed when I have one...

Why would this cause embarrassment?
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
They think I am being Common. Or at least, that's what they *say*. I think they just like pretending to be embarrassed. Having dinner in a fish and chip shop is Common anyway, to those who worry about such things.

[ 14. September 2017, 13:46: Message edited by: Jane R ]
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
When candidating for my present Pastorate, I was asked, "Do you like children?" This was important as the church seeks to be very child-friendly.

I didn't have the wit to reply, "It depends: do you mean roast, boiled or fried?" [Devil] What I actually said (truthfully) was that I like most children, most of the time.

In an interview, if you want the job, you should be yourself, but if this isn't what the people hiring are looking for, then be someone else, rather quickly!
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
posted by JaneR
quote:
They think I am being Common. Or at least, that's what they *say*. I think they just like pretending to be embarrassed. Having dinner in a fish and chip shop is Common anyway, to those who worry about such things.
The only people who worry about things, situations, or people, being "common" are the nouveau middle-class [Two face]
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Well, that's why I think they're just pretending to be embarrassed. We're not nouveau anything.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LutheranChik:
I lied to my Fitbit albout what I ate today.

[Killing me]

It's hard to be honest when it's only a machine!

I tried Slimming World online, it didn't help me at all - I need a human to be answerable to.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
DLSs?

I'm not particularly fond of country music, but I love the banjo (and relate to Billy Connolly suggesting that it should be played on a porch in close proximity to a chicken).

I adore bagpipe music and go weak at the knees at a solitary piper or a full pipe band.

I knit wild tea cosies and silly hats.
 
Posted by anoesis (# 14189) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
DLSs?

... I love the banjo (and relate to Billy Connolly suggesting that it should be played on a porch in close proximity to a chicken).

Tick!

quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
I adore bagpipe music and go weak at the knees at a solitary piper or a full pipe band.

Absolutely, tick! The more the merrier.

quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
I knit wild tea cosies and silly hats.

While not a dirty little secret, exactly, it is kind of shameful that I can't co-ordinate a pair of knitting needles any more than I can bring something successfully to my mouth with a pair of chopsticks...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
When candidating for my present Pastorate, I was asked, "Do you like children?" This was important as the church seeks to be very child-friendly.

I didn't have the wit to reply, "It depends: do you mean roast, boiled or fried?" [Devil] What I actually said (truthfully) was that I like most children, most of the time.

Here is a list you could have given them [Razz] [Razz]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
[Smile]
 
Posted by Kitten (# 1179) on :
 
I like long hair on a man and find male ponytails and man-buns quite attractive
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
Not long hair in the man-buns, Miss Amanda should hope. [Ultra confused]

(She'll get her wrap.)
 
Posted by Kitten (# 1179) on :
 
Another DLS

I'm a popaholic - I love to watch Dr Pimplepopper videos on Youtube
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Kitten, I once watched a YouTube video about someone pulling out a loo-oo-ong black hair embedded and coiled up in a swollen pus-headed pimple under their chin. It was ghoulish, revolting and utterly fascinating.

Never again, that way lies madness.
 
Posted by Ethne Alba (# 5804) on :
 
Dirty Little Secret?

Our cat poops in ornamental jars, preferably when they are on window sills.........
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
When asked about a meal I use "subtle" as a euphemism for "utterly bloody tasteless." But then I prefer traditional chips and pies, meat and veg to the arty farty gumph that most cafes favoured by my friends and family tend to serve. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:

... back in grammar school, I had been a hooker.

Which is a sentence to be used only in certain contexts [Razz]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Such as this one.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
But then I prefer traditional chips and pies, meat and veg to the arty farty gumph that most cafes favoured by my friends and family tend to serve.

We had fish and chips (from the chippie) tonight, as we were too lazy to cook.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I love watching ‘Gogglebox’ [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Kitten, I once watched a YouTube video about someone pulling out a loo-oo-ong black hair embedded and coiled up in a swollen pus-headed pimple under their chin. It was ghoulish, revolting and utterly fascinating.

Never again, that way lies madness.

...
Now I understand all those people who are angling for a "like" button.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Kitten, I once watched a YouTube video about someone pulling out a loo-oo-ong black hair embedded and coiled up in a swollen pus-headed pimple under their chin. It was ghoulish, revolting and utterly fascinating.

Never again, that way lies madness.

Even the imagined recreation of this is a fantastic dietary aid. One cannot intake food if one is simultaneously expelling it.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
It is a work of art. A finer specimen of descriptive narrative I have rarely seen.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kelly Alves:
It is a work of art. A finer specimen of descriptive narrative I have rarely seen.

No one said art need be pretty, I suppose.

[ 01. October 2017, 18:54: Message edited by: lilBuddha ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Revulsion in modern art is a big thing.
 
Posted by LutheranChik (# 9826) on :
 
True confession: A friend of ours says she hates onion and garlic and asks us to not put them in food we bring to her dinners and parties. But we know that she only hates the onion and garlic when she can see the pieces in the food, so we chop everything as finely as possible, and she loves our food. [Devil]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We used to know a couple like that, LutheranChik, but they loved my kipper pâté, which is probably more garlic than kippers.

As you say, as long as you don't tell them ... [Devil]
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
That sort of subterfuge is OK if it's only a matter of liking/disliking, but a bit tough if the guest is allergic to the food.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
I say the same thing about garlic, but really it's the smell: no garlic bread, no aioli, no Italian kitchens (cue churning stomach [Projectile] ) If it's in food with no obvious garlicky smell, however, then there's no problem. Maybe it's the same with your friends?
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
I used to serve up wobbly servings of vanilla pannacotta to a vegetarian friend without realising the gelatin had animal products in it. A confession of ignorance, not deliberate deception. Now I use agar-agar. And before inviting vegan friends around, I double-check all my condiments.

I don't mind deceiving friends who are only fussy about disliking certain ingredients and who eat them in disguise (garlic-haters). I wouldn't secretly serve volatilised alcohol in dishes to a recovering alcoholic because I understand that even the smell or a faint winey taste can trigger cravings. When I know people have strongly held objections on ethical grounds to animal products, I respect that. One friend is a vegetarian who occasionally eats bacon and likes fish and chicken without specifying why or when. I don't know I'd bother to tell her I've put chicken stock not root-vegetable stock in a casserole.

A tricky slope.
 
Posted by Cathscats (# 17827) on :
 
When I was an undergrad, a long long time ago, one year I lived in a house with four others. One of the others declared that she didn't like tuna. But we were poor students, we more or less lived on tuna, so the rest of us conspired to hide the cans and tell her that what was in the sauce poured over the pasta was chicken. She never did twig. I expect she wonders now why her chicken never tastes quite like those delicious things we ate as students!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I also had a student flatmate with a habit of declaring she didn’t like things without trying them. One of the things she refused to eat in any shape or form was eggs. I served her a soufflé without telling her how it’s made and she liked it. Only afterwards did I say “so you do like eggs after all”.
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Polly Plummer:
That sort of subterfuge is OK if it's only a matter of liking/disliking, but a bit tough if the guest is allergic to the food.

I avoid foods with onion and garlic also, which can make it difficult to find a suitable dish at potlucks and at some of our favorite restaurants. I love the taste, but it gives me industrial-strength dragon breath for several days afterwards.
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
I also had a student flatmate with a habit of declaring she didn’t like things without trying them. One of the things she refused to eat in any shape or form was eggs. I served her a soufflé without telling her how it’s made and she liked it. Only afterwards did I say “so you do like eggs after all”.

This sort of game is played on me periodically, and makes me feel sorely aggrieved, consider breaking off friendships, salt their coffee and dream of duels at dawn. Wouldst thou also secretly serve meat products to vegetarians, pork to Jews and Muslims, communion to Beelzebub?

Story:

I do not eat yoghourt in any form regardless of the spelling (yogurt, yoghurt, yogourt, yuckgourt), its attested fruitiness, alleged intestinal benefits from patented bacteria, its Greek pudding-like texture, nor the suggested similarity in frozen form to icecream. --My mother was fully incompetent, lazy and uncaring in the kitchen. Liked to open tins of food and stand them directly on stove burners or in a pan of water to heat up the contents. How she loved an electric frying pan filled with an inch of water and the cooking labels of tinned stew, alphagetti, peas and beans.

To the point to the story:

She thought powdered milk was a grand thing, low cost for 50 lbs at a go. She would mix up the milk and turn it into a form of this yuckgourt stuff. Later she figured out how to add tofu to it, and also to make icing for cakes from the yogourt-tofu snot. So I don't eat the glairy substance out of as much conviction as any vegetarian and more than most gluten avoiders, with the addition gustatory trauma (I feel nausea coming even typing about it). So if you decide to slip yoghourt to me, you'd best not tell me and pray to eternal God for forgiveness and the strength to maintain the deception to the grave and beyond!
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Polly Plummer:
That sort of subterfuge is OK if it's only a matter of liking/disliking, but a bit tough if the guest is allergic to the food.

I'm not sure it's ok even then. I know parents often do it if a child refuses to eat certain things. Sometimes, kids have a food sensitivity, and the grown-ups don't realize it.

Lots of people have food sensitivities, and/or were forced to eat certain things, and/or have negative emotional baggage associated with particular food, and/or have private religious/ethical dietary practices, **and/or have health problems that you don't know about, like diabetes**, and/or simply don't like a particular food.

Hosts, please be really, really careful.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Mine is a clean little secret.

I don’t have sweaty feet at all, but I like to change my socks at least three times a day [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet's flag is set so...:

I do not eat yoghourt in any form regardless of the spelling (yogurt, yoghurt, yogourt, yuckgourt)

My grandma hated it too.

She called it yogmuck.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
I say the same thing about garlic, but really it's the smell: no garlic bread, no aioli, no Italian kitchens (cue churning stomach [Projectile] ) If it's in food with no obvious garlicky smell, however, then there's no problem. Maybe it's the same with your friends?

Not really: there was one restaurant where they would cheerfully eat the garlic bread. [Ultra confused]

If they'd genuinely been allergic, obviously I wouldn't have given them anything with garlic in it. It was more of an affectation: he was a bit "unreconstructed" and didn't really like anything "foreign" - including the people ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by ExclamationMark (# 14715) on :
 
Breakfast whilst having a bath
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
My latest secret is so shameful that I can only tell it here where hardly anyone knows me. We now have a car with an automatic transmission.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
My latest secret is so shameful that I can only tell it here where hardly anyone knows me. We now have a car with an automatic transmission.

It's virtually impossible to find a car with standard transmission in the U.S. I've driven nothing but stick shifts for the past 35+ years, and people think I'm strange (which I probably am, but not because I drive a stick shift).
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stercus Tauri:
My latest secret is so shameful that I can only tell it here where hardly anyone knows me. We now have a car with an automatic transmission.

That is not a proper car, but an oversized children's toy. Hang your head in shame.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Re: "smuggling" ingredients past unsuspecting guests

posted by LutheranChik
quote:
True confession: A friend of ours says she hates onion and garlic and asks us to not put them in food we bring to her dinners and parties. But we know that she only hates the onion and garlic when she can see the pieces in the food, so we chop everything as finely as possible, and she loves our food.
posted by Polly Plummer
quote:
That sort of subterfuge is OK if it's only a matter of liking/disliking, but a bit tough if the guest is allergic to the food.
Indeed. Which is why I carry an epipen.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I try to carry stuff in case cranberries might have been creatively thrown into the salad/cider/sangria/stuffing/what have you. People don't tell you, because who the hell is allergic to cranberries? Besides me, I mean. And they often have no clue what is in their fruit whatsit.

[ 13. October 2017, 16:03: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I’m allergic to melon - same problem.
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
Although I am in my mid-forties, and mildly respectable, I still like eating a kebab now and again, a wonderful relic of my various student days.
 


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