Thread: Lands of the Southern Cross Board: All Saints / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Happy New Year to all. I hope this year is a blessing to all..

If any of you have a better titlet, please let me know for consideration by PM. This is not what I had originally thought of and i find it a bit saccharine sweet.

I had thought of something like "Here I stand, under the Southern Cross." It sounded vaguely familiar and on searching, I found it was started by Rod Marsh and David Boon as the anthem for the victorious Aussie cricketers . Not exactly inclusive of those who live downunder or who have some interest down here.

So I changed it a bit.

Happy New Year to you all. Many of us have had a pretty rotten year. World events have definitely not helped. I hope the coming year brings useful change to us all.

Now back to my G&T, a drink made for this weather in Sydney if ever such a drink was made.

[ 31. December 2016, 08:48: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Happies, y'all
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I wanted to start the thread early by Aussie time to accomodate those in NZ.

I had decided to stay up till midnight, quite a change. However, two hours still to go and I am almost asleep.

A million in Sydney around the harbour and more watching on TV. I guess tomorrow morning may be much quieter than the usual traffic down the main road.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Happy New Year under the Southern Cross from down here at the foot of Africa! You're all way ahead of us (just after 2pm here) but it will be a clear starry night for sitting outside.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
A few odd fireworks popping off early around here...but I am grateful to have seen 2016 through, and am content to face 2017 where God already is.

Happy New Year...though as always it will be a minute by minute endurance run.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Giving thanks for the best of 2016, and looking forward hopefully to whatever awaits us in 2017, because there will surely be blessings to come.

Woke at 1.30 and decided on a drink of hot chocolate. Well, that was one blessing.

Good cheer to all.

GG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Wishing all of my antipodean chums all the best for 2017.

BTW, why do I keep typing 1017 when I'm trying to type 2017? I know I'm a bit behind the times, but this is ridiculous ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
A Happy New Year to all.

Not one of great promise at th moment though, is it?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Very heavy cloud here, 6:30 am. The fireworks woke me at midnight but I went back to sleep. Then woke at 4:00 and that was it. A nana nap later may be in order.

Happy New Year to all, and yes MaryLouise, the Southern Cross is visible across Southern Hemisphere . Clear night sound good but I did not stay up.
 
Posted by Rowen (# 1194) on :
 
Happy new year..... At my vacation spot, in Mallacoota, there were 12 of us in my friends' farm.... A great party in itself.

Tired now.
And hot.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Not hot by Oz standards, but 30c here today [Help] Georgie-Porgy fat'n'fuffy and I will be happier tomorrow when 17c is forecast.

I think my brain is scrambled. I got to church today at 8.00 am instead of 9.00am, because I misread the time when I was at home and caught the bus a whole hour earlier than usual [Roll Eyes] At least I was able to grab some breakfast at the local mall before the service. I was on duty welcoming at the door. Usually welcoming people need to be early - but not that early.

Huia
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Happy New Year antipodean peoples!
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Happy New Year under the Southern Cross from down here at the foot of Africa! You're all way ahead of us (just after 2pm here) but it will be a clear starry night for sitting outside.

Always nice to hear from another antipodean, and from another of my favourite spots
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Happy New Year, Zappa! Yes, when I'm overseas and look up at the summer night skies of the Northern Hemisphere without being able to find the constellations of the Southern Cross, I feel thrown off balance. And I think too of Thomas Hardy's poem about Drummer Hodge dying and being buried out on the veld during the Anglo-Boer war:

His homely Northern breast and brain
Grow to some Southern tree,
And strange-eyed constellations reign
His stars eternally.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
January is when local congregations worship in a different church each Sunday, in different combinations. Considering there were four congregations in one church this morning there was not much of a crowd, but then the famous wind was throwing 140 kph gusts – I got to my car between blows and hung on to other parked cars when a big gust came.

GG
 
Posted by Dal Segno (# 14673) on :
 
Fascinating weather here in NZ to start the New Year. Blowing a gale, cool and cloudy in the middle of summer. The daughter is at the Scout Jamboree in Blenheim, sleeping under canvas. We're assuming that scouts know how to put up a tent that can survive 30 km/h wind.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
If the NZ scouts couldn't do that they would probably never go camping. We breed 'em tough here [Biased] .

Huia - not a camper
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
The idea of breezy NZ weather sounds very appealing after all the heat of the last few days. We've been trying not to use the air conditioning, but the classic Brisbane humidity coupled with 38 degrees has nearly melted us to nothing. The excellent Dyson fans have had a good workout.

..and yet, as I write...thank you God for the cool change that has just this minute arrived with some rain!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
We went to early church yesterday and then drove straight down the coast to our beach house. Very comfortable yesterday to have the sea breeze in the late afternoon, and then of course we woke this morning to a cool day and showers. It will get back to summer soon and in the meantime we shall enjoy being away from what had been an extremely difficult week of Sydney weather at its hot and muggy worst. Into town this morning to get some fresh fish from the co-op (it may be a public holiday but no-one told the fish), simple dinner, now sitting quietly together.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
... with some rain!

Kiwi perspectives differ to many OZ-spots, but many here could do with some of that.

Here and on the sides of the north though it tends to mean "hasn't rained for three days." In Wankydilla it could be a few years. In Fred's it was ... "running a bit late this year".

Ah, I love weather.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Clarence, the hottest days we've had in Christchurch ( nowhere near Oz standards of course)reach into the 30s because of the wind. The nor'wester sweeps across the Tasman, hits the Southern Alps and the West Coast gets a downpour. We on the other side of the Alps get a hot wind akin to the Mistral in France. Some people are energized by it, while others get migraines and other nasty effects.

We also get what locals call "the beasterly easterly," that comes off the sea and lowers the temperatures. I like it in summer and hate it in winter.

Mostly I like the variety of the weather, although I draw the line at snow, which looks lovely on the Alps, but not in my backyard.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
The week ahead has forecast of mid 20s ° C; for here. Then another blast of heat at the weekend.

A few years ago I paid a very large sum for good quality blinds for my balcony. Not quite opaque, they cut down the glare and heat tremendously. My plan is to leave them down for January. They also deter the pigeons. I have an ongoing battle with them as they descended to roost in planters on outside wall. Seven nests. and eggs removed, and some money in spikes and more have begun to change their minds.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
The idea of breezy NZ weather sounds very appealing

A good gust in the Capital can blow a Mature Female over. I hang on to something and then walk quickly between gusts – and I'm not what you'd call skinny.

GG
 
Posted by Vulpior (# 12744) on :
 
Happy New Year to all. Spent it at a friend's in Bendigo and am back at work today. I missed Epiphany (transferred) on Sunday but apparently there is a stick of blessed chalk awaiting me; I will apply it to the house on Friday.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
... forecast of mid 20s ° C; for here. Then another blast of heat ...

In my book, the mid-20s° C is a blast of heat. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Happy New Year! I'm relaxing at the cricket with Biggest and Middle and 5 of their friends. Not so much of a father/son thing, but we're all having fun.

Back to work tomorrow!

mr curly
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Did you get to see all those fours from Warner?
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Did you get to see all those fours from Warner?

Every one. And Renshaw blossoming through the afternoon.

mr curly
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
A good day to be out there.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
A slight, shallow earthquake was felt in Sydney overnight. Apparently some felt it in Sydney too. The last time there was a similar quake in this area was quite a few years earlier,. We went to a small holiday cottage in the Blue Mountains a couple of days after. First task on arrival was to clean fuel stove and kitchen floor of a large amount of soot which had come down chimney.

Nothing much at all in comparison with NZ and other places in the Pacific, but we do get them here.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I would think the unexpectedness would be a shock in itself.

Meanwhile here in the Shaky Isles I thought I felt the beginning of something nasty, but it was only Georgie-Porgie bracing herself against my chair as she had a wash [Roll Eyes]

I know I have said I like variety in the weather, but that doesn't include this morning's hail storm when I was out in the lightest of summer clothing. I should have looked out the window, before I left home rather than checking with the Met Service, who at that time informed me that rain was expected after dark.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
That's right.
I had a shower and hung my towel out in the sun, went for a walk in the sun, and forgot about my towel until it had been rained on.

It happens all the time.

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Yes and I was congratulating myself on getting the washing out before I went to the shops. [Roll Eyes]

Ah well the cheap shop at the mall sold me a purple umbrella for $7.50, which was heaps cheaper than getting a taxi home, and the umbrella is still intact.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I bought a dome shaped plastic umbrella in Enmore Road Newtown, for a fifteen minute walk home in a sudden downpour. Very inexpensive and it did me for quite a few months.. The only thing I did not like was the noise of the rain on the thick plastic. It had broken by the time I moved here , so it went in bin, but for the price I paid in an emergency, it was good value.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
We could do with some rain here. Wildfires on the slopes of mountains around Somerset West in the Cape have destroyed property and evacuations are taking place. Dense clouds of black smoke billowing over the Cape Winelands. As a rule, fires out here aren't as destructive or on a scale comparable with wildfires in Australia (we don't have stands of eucalyptus or other tall trees with volatile oils) but the Cape is very dry from this year's drought.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
The Cape vignerons would be extremely worried about smoke-taint which may ruin the vintage. We have been lucky here in the Hunter Valley, but in recent years much wine in northeastern Victoria has been lost due to smoke-taint on the fruit from bushfires.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Happy New Year, Zappa! Yes, when I'm overseas and look up at the summer night skies of the Northern Hemisphere without being able to find the constellations of the Southern Cross, I feel thrown off balance. And I think too of Thomas Hardy's poem about Drummer Hodge dying and being buried out on the veld during the Anglo-Boer war:

His homely Northern breast and brain
Grow to some Southern tree,
And strange-eyed constellations reign
His stars eternally.

That poem always reminds me of Alan Bennett's excellent play/film The History Boys - but the point of the post is that during my brief sojourn south of the line I found the sky equally disorienting. Even on my first trip to India back in the early 1990s I also found the attitudes of the moon and stars/constellations a bit flummoxing as well with the moon on its back, etc. On my return to the UK a physicist friend tried to explain it to me and although I accepted his explanation intellectually I still found some weird emotional rejection of them not being as I thought they ought to be!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
WW, I am disoriented on board when I read about cold from north and warmth from south. I have to mentally turn my head upside down and although I know it is true, it is strange every time I read about south facing gardens and similar. Here, I am used to the Sydney southerly buster at the end of a hot day. It rips through when it is a good one and temperatures can fall fifteen degrees Celsius in the same number of minutes.
 
Posted by Tobias (# 18613) on :
 
Although I've lived in Australia all my life, my reading has been so thoroughly European that in the abstract I tend to think of north as cold and south as hot. If you gave me a sheet of paper and asked me to draw a map of an imaginary world, it would have icy mountains at the top of the page and deserts at the bottom (much like Narnia).

Here in Perth, though, we don't get much weather coming from north or south - if we did, perhaps personal experience would have overcome the influence of the books. In winter the storms and the rain come in from the west; in summer the hot winds in the morning are easterlies, coming from inland, and the cool sea-breeze comes from the west.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I have an electronic hygrometer and thermometer thingy that sits just inside the fly-screening on my north-facing window and the other morning, when I was getting dressed half an hour before dawn, both temperature and humidity were both rocketing upwards so I assume a warm front had just passed through after a fairly cool [by our standards] night.

Mid-April to mid-August the electronic doohickey lives elsewhere as I reckon early afternoon temperatures in direct sunlight might be a bit much for the systems!
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Now we're talking about the north-south thing...
Taking scenic photos in the northern hemisphere I would have to say to myself 'The sun is going round that way so will the scene be lit more effectively if I wait, or less?'

We stayed on a farm in the South Island once, which had an elegant, solidly built two storey farmhouse built when the land was taken up a hundred years ago. A very English style building – including the orientation indicated by the architect. So 'sunny' windows faced south and small store room, bathroom windows etc faced north. Not the only instance of such an error. But why didn't the local builders put it right? Maybe the farmer didn't think to check – maybe he organised it while at Home stocking up – maybe he imported Pommie builders?

GG
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Barnabus Aus: yes, there are several wine estates with still unpicked grapes that have been damaged by smoke-taint or even scorched vines.

WW: I get a similar geographic vertigo when I stand at out on the rocks at Cape Agulhas where the warm Indian Ocean meets the cold Atlantic, two oceans colliding as the Agulhas current meets the Benguela. Obviously this is more of a notional meeting than bathymetric, but it reminds me of hemispheres overlapping.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I was getting dressed half an hour before Dawn ...

She got dressed a bit later ... [Snigger]

**fetches coat very quickly**

I have to turn my mind upside-down when reading about weather and wind directions on this thread too - to this hyperborealian little piglet, North is always up.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I was getting dressed half an hour before Dawn ...

She got dressed a bit later ... [Snigger] ...
...by which time I was feeling Rosy all over!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Piglet! Wodders! [Disappointed]

Hosts definitely aren't what they used to be!

Huia

[Biased]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
You still have me, Huia. They beat me to it this time. Next time perhaps. [Biased]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
I suppose we'll have to wait until they relinquish rosy-fingered Dawn for the wine-dark sea.

Hedonism and the southern hemisphere ...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Just as well I didn't make a New Year's Resolution to behave myself, isn't it?

Ah well, I reckon I'm far too old to make New Year's Resolutions beyond Having Fun - far more point to that one!
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
We could do with some rain here. Wildfires on the slopes of mountains around Somerset West in the Cape have destroyed property and evacuations are taking place. Dense clouds of black smoke billowing over the Cape Winelands. As a rule, fires out here aren't as destructive or on a scale comparable with wildfires in Australia (we don't have stands of eucalyptus or other tall trees with volatile oils) but the Cape is very dry from this year's drought.

When I was in Cape Town about 18 months ago fires had just swept through the Silvermine / Muizenberg region
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Zappa, that was a devastating fire. The great thing about Cape mountain fynbos though is how it regenerates after fire -- so many seeds are smoke-germinated or resprout from underground root stock. I saw a recent pic of that Silvermine area with new spring flowering, proteas and leucadendrons making a comeback. What is always sad with these wildfires is the loss of small wildlife, klipspringer buck, the Cape mongoose and geometric tortoise, rare frog species etc.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
WW I think I'll copy your New Years resolution - it's the best I've heard yet.

MaryLouise I wish I could send you some of the rain we've been having. Georgie-Porgy fat'n'fluffy has come in so wet she looks several sizes smaller (I wish it had the same effect on me).

Yesterday we had thunder and lightening - which is more exciting if you're watching it from inside instead of being out and about in summery clothes. And no, I didn't learn from last time, neither did I have my new purple umbrella with me. [Roll Eyes]

Huia
 
Posted by Arabella Purity Winterbottom (# 3434) on :
 
I'm starting the new year with a bang and resigning from my job on Monday, a decision made on New Year's Day (admittedly after some thought prior). Not sure what comes next, but I'm going to take a few months to decompress and work it out.

We had our housewarming today, and a good friend was talking about what happens when you give up a vocation. He was talking about singing, but it occurred to me that my 9 years in a really challenging social work role were displacement activity from not being able to follow my vocation. I think I've proved to myself that I can hack the tough stuff! Watch this space.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
May you be blessed as you follow through on this resolution, Arabella. May the road ahead open before you with exciting vistas and the help you need to navigate it well.

My New Year's Resolution is just to keep finding the Joyful things in each day and to become more tuned in to what is right under my nose.

Less grim thoughts and more gratitude! Giving up watching the news might help there....
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Best of luck with whatever you decide to do next, APW. [Smile]

[ 08. January 2017, 01:01: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
Aside form profiteering, why has petrol increased from $1.19 to $1.449 a litre overnight at the same servo??
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Good luck, Arabella!

This time of year I wait with bated breath for price increases on everything from petrol to basic food stuffs to electricity and water. Ugh.
 
Posted by Arabella Purity Winterbottom (# 3434) on :
 
Thanks.

I told my boss today. He was great.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Our petrol prices took a bit of a hike just after Christmas as well; I suppose it must have been to pay for the oil company executives' Christmas lunches ... [Devil]

Of course, when the price of petrol goes up, so does the price of everything else, as everything has to be transported from A to B, but does it happen in reverse? Not bleedin' likely!
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Biggest and Middle have just met our good friend Jugular at the Uniting Church National Yoof Conference. There is evidence on Facebook in the form of a selfie.

Biggest and Middle are both performing music at various times, Jugs is corrupting the young people doing his comedy.

mr curly
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Our petrol prices took a bit of a hike just after Christmas as well; I suppose it must have been to pay for the oil company executives' Christmas lunches ... [Devil]

Of course, when the price of petrol goes up, so does the price of everything else, as everything has to be transported from A to B, but does it happen in reverse? Not bleedin' likely!

I have a snaking suspicion that our grocery prices have gone up since the earthquake in November knocked out part of State Highway 1 necessitating an extra 4 hours drive to reach Christchurch. I only just twigged this week [Waterworks] I was wondering why my bill at the supermarket was higher than usual.

Huia

[ 09. January 2017, 08:28: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
That was a sneaking suspicion. NZ may have earthquakes, but we don't have snakes [Biased]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Our petrol prices have jumped too – in the metropolitan areas. Go up country for a cheap fill. I know if I'm heading for Matarangi I fill up at Tirau (and try to time my trip for a good midday meal there at Bugger), but nearer the city Levin/Otaki can be have good prices.

Hi, MaryLouise, great to have you in our Southern Hemisphere midst.

GG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
... Go up country for a cheap fill ...

That's interesting - here the prices tend to be higher out in the country than in the bigger centres, although in Newfoundland there's a dormitory-town outside St. John's where they keep the petrol prices deliberately a few cents below the city prices, presumably to encourage people to fill up there.

eta: or maybe to encourage people to live out there, so that they're spending more on petrol to commute into town ... [Paranoid]

[ 09. January 2017, 22:47: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Thanks for the welcome, Galloping Granny.

The other source of financial stress at the outset of a new year is waiting to see foreign exchange currency fluctuations as the South African Rand rises a little, dips and falls against British sterling, the Euro and the US dollar. Yo-yo season...
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
... Go up country for a cheap fill ...

That's interesting - here the prices tend to be higher out in the country than in the bigger centres, although in Newfoundland there's a dormitory-town outside St. John's where they keep the petrol prices deliberately a few cents below the city prices, presumably to encourage people to fill up there.

eta: or maybe to encourage people to live out there, so that they're spending more on petrol to commute into town ... [Paranoid]

This is a bit of a puzzle, as in really remote towns the price can be highest 'because of the cost of transport' (of fuel to bring the tanker).

Tirau I can understand because they're on the main north-south highway and they'll get a lot of custom from long-distance drivers who plan to stop there because they know the prices are good.

Common belief is that the country towns' prices are realistic but in the metropolitan area the petrol companies combine to keep it up, which is immoral and probably illegal.

I did notice that petrol prices here drop slightly when there's a holiday weekend, but when visiting in Oz they seemed to go up.

GG
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Good luck, Arabella!

This time of year I wait with bated breath for price increases on everything from petrol to basic food stuffs to electricity and water. Ugh.

It's the charities that drive me mad at Christmas time. I give the odd occasional donation to quite a few causes, and a more substantial one to half a dozen. The former, and one of the latter, all want a donation at Christmas time. This is ludicrous, when everyone's coping with the cost of presents, Christmas dinner, and travel to join family.

If they asked for an annual donation in June I'd be more inclined to oblige.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
It is hot, hot, hot. 32°C here at 9:30 am, forecast to reach 39. For inner west, that is hot, although several years ago it reached 43 and I took shot of thermometer which had suburb and time on it. That was matched by a friend from England in suburb of same name. Down in the minuses for her.

Everything is closed up and I am in front of a fan.
Roll on the southerly, although arrival time has been pushed back. 27° forecast for tomorrow which will be blissful, then more heat.

[ 10. January 2017, 22:09: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
It is hot, hot, hot. 32°C here at 9:30 am, forecast to reach 39. For inner west, that is hot, although several years ago it reached 43 and I took shot of thermometer which had suburb and time on it. That was matched by a friend from England in suburb of same name. Down in the minuses for her.

Everything is closed up and I am in front of a fan.
Roll on the southerly, although arrival time has been pushed back. 27° forecast for tomorrow which will be blissful, then more heat.

At 27° I'd be gasping.
We did reach 24° the other day, when the Capital and Matarangi each had the same maximum – Matarangi is regularly 2° higher.

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
The forecast here for today and tomorrow is 29c with 28c on Sunday. I hope they have it wrong. It's just a tad over 27c at the moment.

Poor Georgie-Porgy fat'n'fluffy is doing it hard. There is plenty of shade and I've just topped up the water bucket. It's amazing how many strange cats visit for a drink in this weather, sort of like the local watering hole.

I forgot to top in up once after it had spilled and found G-P with her front paws in the water - at least it cooled her down.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Temperature has been climbing all afternoon, as is the custom.. It is now 40.3 according to Weatherzone program.

That is a local reading for my suburb.

I had to take myrubbish downstairs and it was very unpleasant. I was most grateful for a young man whom I did not recognise. He went to get in lift as I came out and took my fairly heavy bag over much more quickly than I could have done.

One benefit of losing weight in summer. For years my feet have swollen in the heat, as have ankles. Today is a a fair test of them. Trim and terrific, if I say so myself, not the slightest sign of puffiness.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
38 degrees celsius here in Canberra. I have spent the afternoon with the fan on putting together flatpack furniture for TP's study.
Email from my sister in Serbia says she is snowed in, and ice on all the steps that lead to her local shops means she is staying inside for at least three more weeks.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
39 deg C here in the Valley with a grass fire burning on the edge of town, but being controlled by fairies with helicopter assistance. Some small tasks accomplished this morning but the afternoon has been in aircon with the stereo on. Janet Baker's contralto evokes cooler climes somehow.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Bloody iPad. For fairies in my last post read "firies". I hate machines that think they know better than me.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Southerly has arrived and temp dropped from 41 to 32 in eight minutes.

I am not sure RFS would be happy being called auto-correct fairies instead of firies. It tried the same trick on me just now. I wish it would fix up my frequent typo of "remeber." It lets that one slide, unnoticed.

So glad I have leftover lamb roast from yesterday. Add some salad and there is dinner.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Fire alerts here too. Strong winds yesterday fanned fires in the Drakenstein mountains and 650 hectares of farmland was destroyed across the Paarl valley before firefighters with aerial support brought the blaze under control.

Filling up the dogs' drinking bowls several times a day and putting ice cubes in their water during the hottest time, late afternoon. Getting through huge quantities of iced tea myself. And mugs of hot tea every now and then too, which is oddly refreshing. We're looking at temperatures peaking at 42 degrees C later.

I could do with your Southerly cooling winds --
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have just sat outside, MaryLouise. It was cooler than the day had been but not what I would really call cool. As a child, we called the southerly, a southerly buster. No buster about it today but better than heat. Mid afternoon to about 5:00is the hottest time and today it reached 41°C AT 5:00 pm.

Only 27 tomorrow then more days over 30 but not as hot as today.
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
40 deg here in the old steel city today. We spent the day in a club along with two from our church to escape the heat with much lively conversation about various topics, our church and past connections with various churches in the area only to learn that our paths crossed at various functions back in the early 70's but we never met. We spent over $60.00 on lunch, snacks and coffee and were there for over 8 hours. On the way home I mentioned to HWMBO that what we spent to save running the a/c at home would run the a/c for the whole of summer! Still it was worth it for the company.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Barnabas Aus:
Bloody iPad. For fairies in my last post read "firies". I hate machines that think they know better than me.

One did wonder! [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Your weather reports are making my eyes water; here we were delighted to welcome positive numbers to the weather today. According to Environment Canada it's currently +9°C, and feeling positively balmy.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:

I had to take myrubbish downstairs and it was very unpleasant. I was most grateful for a young man whom I did not recognise. He went to get in lift as I came out and took my fairly heavy bag over much more quickly than I could have done.

I'm lucky that it's only a few metres from the rubbish tin to the kerb. I tie the top of the rubbish bag, tip the tin over, pull the bag out and drag it to the kerb.

Slept in. I really must have my breakfast before it's time for morning tea.

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Another hot one forecast for today - but not as hot as yesterday, for which I am grateful as I am running an outside market stall over the weekend for charity. The cooler change arrived at midnight as I was at my sewing machine under an open window, and it was like someone had suddenly turned some aircon on. I don't have aircon, but I do live in an oasis of greenery thanks to TP's gardening skills. It really makes a difference in hot weather.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
My breakfast is also turning into morning tea. I used the aircon in bedroom last night. The temperature had dropped but inside was still very warm and stuffy.

This morning I have my front door propped open a bit. This allows through movement of any breeze through the place.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Workers wearing high-vis in the street again. The wastewater system is being checked to sort the need for even further repairs [Roll Eyes]

They do a essential job, which I appreciate, however it is easier if they do it at night(less traffic and lower water flow), so there's no escaping the rumbles by an extended visit to the library.

At least they won't be carried off with heat exhaustion or sunburn.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Given the forecast, we've decided to stay down the coast for a few more days. Good summer weather here rather than the extremes of others. In other words, pleasant for long walks along the beach morning and evening, swimming in the warmer hours and comfortable sitting on the verandah for dinner and after (well protected by screens, I'm glad to say). Also the fish at the markets has been very good this year, and at a fraction of Sydney prices.
 
Posted by Arabella Purity Winterbottom (# 3434) on :
 
Oh my goodness, the sun is shining! We've had the most midwinter weather the last few days, including a severe weather warning for the high winds yesterday.

Might be able to do some gardening tomorrow????
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Scooped up the boys from their Yoof Conference yesterday and drove south. Now a resident of Thredbo until Tuesday, hoping for some milder weather.

It is increasingly clear that when Mr Curly Senior offers to do something (like have beers ready for the travelers on arrival) the chance of him remembering to actually do it is way less than 100%. This is of course more worrying than the state of unsatisfied thirst I found myself in at 7 last night. Observation at close quarters over next few days will be enlightening if not enjoyable.

Today will be a Day of Rest, with the Holiday Feast and dress up night tonight. Then, there will be walking.

mr curly
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Nursing a crushed finger today after I jammed it in the wheels of a book trolley yesterday. Crafting may be seriously impeded for a while...and typing not easy either!

Searing winds forecast for this avo. Bad fire weather around here so all will be on high alert.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Middle son usually has holiday this time of year at Chalotte Pass and spends a lot of time walking. Somehow his booking was stuffed up so he is now on Central Cast beach holiday and having a ball. Still wistful about CP.

BL, I notice forecasts for today have been updated. 38° C now for here again. That finger injury sounds nasty. Do you have cream for bruising? I speak as one who had bad finger for over three weeks when somehow I caught it in catch of the belt which holds balcony blind to balcony rail. It is still painful to touch, although bruise has gone and that is a month or ore ago.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yes...not broken, but nail is black and 5 cent sized slice of flesh flap on the top of my pointy finger means I have a most unhappy digit. It didn't help that a few hours after the injury I shut my car door accidentally on the same finger and re-opened all the clotting. Not happy with my klutzy self at all. I am monitoring the bruising.

Obviously need to slow down, like the rest of the country in January.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Sympathy, Banner Lady, it sounds as if you're going to lose the nail. I swear by arnica for bruising.

Wild fires breaking out all around the Cape peninsula in the last few days but it is cooler this morning, a faint possibility of rain.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Weirdest freaky squall just hit. At 1pm the temp was 29, by 2pm it was 39 with hot gusty winds blowing twigs off trees and empty bins off kerbs. Then at 4pm the wind began howling hard and the huge trees around us were bent almost double. Every firies nightmare - suddenly changing to a rain squall with very warm water falling out of the sky. But within 2 minutes the temp was back to 29. Power is out across Canberra and the damage is only just beginning to be noted. At the northside markets heavy glass doors were blown off their hinges and shattered.

Our house obviously still has power but up the hill where my daughter and mum live, it is off and it is out across the street too. Hoping no more wind is on its way, as this would be a linesman's nightmare. Prayers for all the emergency services people who will be having a long night.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Visual evidence here.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Drat, that's eucalyptus, I can see the problem. We had a two-three story one fall on our bedroom once.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
That is some storm. I hope that your mother's place is OK, very hard at her age to cope with an event like that.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
You are a bit far from SA to have the dregs of the storm they have just had. Big warnings about ice and batteries etc. Yours seems to have descended then gone. SA had warning. My sister is doing some emergency house sitting for friends in Gladstone SA in the Flinders Ranges. Storm was not quite as bad as forecast but she was there a year ago when they had one like yours today.

Hope your mum is OK, that sort of sudden bad weather is unsettling.

Please be careful with the finger . It may need professional attention. It sounds very nasty, much worse than mine was.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
It is Friday evening and I didn't pay a great deal of attention to emergency vehicles screaming up and down outside. Then I saw a news item. A short distance down the road from my place a truck hit a power pole which snapped in half bringing down wires and causing blackouts etc. I have escaped those. All west bound traffic along Parramatta Road was stopped for at least two hours. Fortunately, there are back ways around in that area.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
It's been a bit windy here, but nothing even remotely approaching that [Eek!]

I'm meant to be going north of Christchurch tomorrow into a country area to collect firewood but if it's too windy I'll stay home and do my needlework. (Thanks Banner Lady and Loth - your posts have reminded me I need to take gloves to protect my hands).

Huia
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
12.45am and it is 32 degC outside, not a nice night for sleeping
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Gosh, BL, that sounds like a very nasty injury. [Frown]

Hope you're all managing to keep as safe as possible through all the mental weather you're having.

[Votive]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dennis the Menace:
12.45am and it is 32 degC outside, not a nice night for sleeping

There are nights I can cope and then there are nights like last night where bedroom aircon goes on first off. Last night was one of those. It is installed in bedroom sppecifically for such times. Not in rest of house. I close things once temps start to rise, and open up in evening. Most days sea breeze in afternoon is good.

Not a good looking day although forecast is for slightly cooler. Very heavy cloud, overcast and extremely muggy and humid.

[ 13. January 2017, 20:11: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's the mugginess and humidity that gets me when the temperatures start to soar; when we moved to Fredericton people told us that the winters would be much colder and the summers much hotter than they were in St. John's, and in absolute temperature terms they were right, but in the summer, while it was certainly very hot, it didn't seem quite as moist, which definitely made a difference.
 
Posted by Marama (# 330) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Weirdest freaky squall just hit. At 1pm the temp was 29, by 2pm it was 39 with hot gusty winds blowing twigs off trees and empty bins off kerbs. Then at 4pm the wind began howling hard and the huge trees around us were bent almost double. Every firies nightmare - suddenly changing to a rain squall with very warm water falling out of the sky. But within 2 minutes the temp was back to 29. Power is out across Canberra and the damage is only just beginning to be noted. At the northside markets heavy glass doors were blown off their hinges and shattered.

Our house obviously still has power but up the hill where my daughter and mum live, it is off and it is out across the street too. Hoping no more wind is on its way, as this would be a linesman's nightmare. Prayers for all the emergency services people who will be having a long night.

Indeed, they're still working this morning round here. Knowing it was going to be hot yesterday I retreated to the Big Library (hi, MM!), then emerged at 5 to find branches strewn all over the place, and my bus then delayed by a tree down across the road. Power still on at home however. A bit sad for the guys clearing leaves and minor debris along Commonwealth Avenue at 9 am yesterday - by 5pm their work was completely redundant.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
For more than fifty years I've been driving from time to time past the house where my mother was born in 1903, and wishing I could just step inside. Finally I turned off the motorway last year, found no one home but left a note in the letterbox, and was invited to visit, which I did today.

My hostess had done quite a lot of research on the house, and had among other things a description of its solid construction in totara, rimu and matai in 1868, much more substantial than the cottages being built at that time for most of the immigrants. It's kept its, I think, original colours, and been well looked after, with some obvious changes inside.

My grandfather moved often for his health, and I don't know exactly how long they lived there, but I printed a photo for her of the family as they would have been when they moved there or a year or so before, ie the baby in the photo is the one before Mum.

That was a long awaited treat!

Here the weather is comfortable, if with some quite violent wind at times, while son and his family are swimming twice a day at Matarangi (since I have to mention the weather).

GG
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Last gig at my former gig place tomoorrow. Weirder than a weird thing. I hope I get outa there alive as I have one or two things to say. I won't be back. [Mad]
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
[Votive] [Votive] [Votive]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rexory:
[Votive] [Votive] [Votive]

What he said, Zaps.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
All the best, Zappa. [Votive]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
You don't need me to say don't say them. But prayers that all goes well.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Cooler weather but still no rain, went out and looked at the patch of dust that was grass a few months ago. I save water from my shower but that goes on stoep pots and planters. Regulations against using hosepipes, water restrictions with serious fines in place.

Hope everything went well, Zappa.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Returning home from the relative cool of the Snowy Mountains to another hot coupla days in Sydee. This have been our extended family's 9th biennial Christmas/New Year holiday here, and could well be the last in its current form - the senior generation are struggling with the stairs and the terrain.

Back to work tomorrow, and university offers out tomorrow evening. If Biggest was any more laid back about this he'd fall off his chair.

mr curly
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Bushfires reported near Vulpior's abode. Hope all are safe.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Barnabas Aus:
Bushfires reported near Vulpior's abode. Hope all are safe.

We drove close enough to see the substantial smoke from the fire.
Likewise, hope all are safe.

mr curly
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have friends with 100 acres and a few "temporary" sheds at Tarago. Hope they also are ok with fire there. Just watching ABC news and there is a lot. of smoke and aerial photo shows a big area burning.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
King's Highway has now been blocked and fire heading towards Bungendore where B3 resides. Hope those we know on Vulpior's mountain have found safe refuge. It doesn't sound good and will be an uncomfortable night for all in these parts.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
19:20 and 39.4 degrees. I love Albury. [Roll Eyes]

Hello all. Back again. Hopefully I'll stay. Good to see familiar faces here.


Hope all went well Zappa.

[Votive] Vulpior and all dealing with fire, and our brave firies.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Hello lovely Ian, good to see your iconic face again!

Lake George Hotel is taking in those displaced by fire, God bless 'em.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Hi Ian. Albury was not the only hot place. My suburb was 39.8

When son was at uni at ALbury he swam in the river on a similar hot day but said it was icy.

RFS update on Tarago fire. Now downgraded to Watch and Act although RFS volunteers will be working on it through the night. 7:48 pm update.

[ 17. January 2017, 07:51: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Hi Ian! Great to have you back.

mr curly
 
Posted by Vulpior (# 12744) on :
 
Thank you all for the good wishes. We didn't get back from work in time to get through the roadblock so were stuck in Bungendore for a while. Mum came down with the pets and documents, but we've since been able to return. There's even been some rain!

We're probably a good 2km from the southern edge of the fire.

I suspect the phone and Internet will be out for a while.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Good to hear from you, Vulpior. I think RFS want to get on top of things as tomorrow is supposed to be very hot again before a gusty change.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
My cousin says he's pretty safe, and if he is, then Vulpior should also be - but then there are wind changes. Even greater heat forecast for tomorrow.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Glad to hear you're safe, Vulpior - long may it continue.

Good to see you back, IC! [Smile]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Crazy summer weather. Yesterday I did some grocery shopping at 7pm and afterwards had to lie down with my feet up feeling dizzy with the heat. Today I am battening the hatches as 100 kp/h winds are forecast. In Wellington the forecast is 150 -160kp/h. I'm not sure how much rain we will get, but it's been heavy in the Alps and on the West Coast.

Hold tight GG and Arabella.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
32 when I went to bed. At 3:00 am, it was 25, at 7:00 am it was back to 32. I am about to close everything up. Forecast says change and storms in middle of day with a further wind change later in afternoon,

Bad fire weather.

[ 17. January 2017, 19:43: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
That's a strong wind even at 100. Keep indoors.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Such a hot and weary night - even for those of us safe from fire - so I can imagine the stress of the country dwellers nearby. And summer only half over. Today is the anniversary of the 2003 fires in Canberra where 500 homes burnt down and people and their pets died. It will be a tough day for many.

TP and I are heading to the cool of the movie theatre this morning for some relief in a galaxy far far away.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Now 36 and it is not even 9:00 am. However forecast says change in morning. Allowing for inaccuracies in forecast, hopefully that means by lunchtime. I will have four grandchildren here today. My apartment is not small, quite roomy and well deigned really,but everything is closed and with four children here it will be noisy and warm. I usually send them upstairs to roof garden to run off some energy, but that will be like a branch of Sahara up there at the moment and almost no shade.

Vulpior, your district even scored a mention by name in today's SMH. Glad you are ok, but it seems as if at least one house burnt.

[ 17. January 2017, 21:00: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Rowen (# 1194) on :
 
It was one of our extremely rare hot days here yesterday, in the lower Victorian Alps. 36.
So, I went up to the top of my local Alps bit, and visited some folks. 26. Much better.
19 today at home

[ 17. January 2017, 21:37: Message edited by: Rowen ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Lucky you. Over 38 here now before 10:00 am. I went to check something from freezer and tray of ice blocks smashed on floor. Cubes everywhere and corner of tray obliterated. There is another small tray still in freezer which won't go far armong four grandchildren. I have one more tray but it is cracked and unstable. Have just asked son to get me more in Coles etc on his way down here. The all broken or cracked trays will be pitched out.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
40 here and a bushfire has just flared on the edge of town a few hundred metres from us. Southerly change is getting closer, which will blow it back on itself. A few cool days and some rain would go well right about now.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Looks like we might have a firebug. Three fires in quick succession in bush on town borders. Brigades coming from all directions.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Prayers ascending for your safety, and that of all affected. Scary times. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
I'd say you're right. Not good news at all.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Firefighters are diminished to skeleton crews because of the number and length of containments going on. Exhaustion is beginning to be a factor. They are publicly calling for assistance from those living on the outskirts of towns in the Monaro region.

Loved the interview with the man who was helplessly watching fire race towards his homestead, wondering what he and his family could possibly do to avoid it. Suddenly a huge machine appeared overhead, dumped its water and the fire was entirely extinguished. Can only happen like that when there is no wind, so he was feeling very blessed.

The wind this avo is ferocious. But at least a cool change and some rain is forecast for the next two days.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
That went to hell very quickly. Within minutes of my last post, the fire was raging along the road at the rear of our house. We started hosing the house down. Back neighbour's pool pergola roof caught fire, then embers set fire to next door's palm tree. As I turned from helping extinguish that, ferns on the far side of our house went up. Thankfully, the town brigade and a couple of RFS trucks were able to save the house, but we have lost our fernery and the workshop/storage area adjacent, which had much of my late mother-in-law's sewing and other gear in it. We have power but no lights, so just waiting for the electrician to see if he can get here. This is the scariest day of my life - I now understand what people say about the noise of a firestorm. The southerly change arrived about 20 minutes too late for us, but that has put others under threat as the fire changed path.
 
Posted by Vulpior (# 12744) on :
 
Prayers and best wishes, Barnabas Aus.

Fire remains away from us. The nearest through road is open again. And the internet is back, thanks to some quick repairs by our great local ISP.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
That sounds freakily terrifying - prayers for all in these situations.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
That does sound terrifying BarnabasAus. [Votive]

Much cooler day here... Humid though.

And thanks for the welcomes back.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Waves at Ian Climacus! Lovely to see you again.

Adding my prayers for all those in fire stricken areas.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I meant to add my voice to the Welcome Back lobby but my attention span some days is rather less than that of a gnat!

Good to see you Ian C.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Barnabas Aus, That is terrible news indeed. Preyers for you and your family.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Barnabas - way too close a shave. Thank God you had help so close at hand. And sparing a thought for all who are out in the heat cleaning up the mess a fire leaves in its wake. That is no picnic either. Hope you have some hands to help you out, BA.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Thanks everyone for thoughts and prayers. We have many offers of local help. My wife spent much of the time while the brigade was here up the road at a friend's house keeping an eye on our 92 year old next door neighbour who has very severe dementia.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
[Votive] Barnabas Aus and everyone affected by the fires.

I hope the person lighting them is found quickly.

In my small corner of the world the threatened storm has yet to make an impact. I woke to clear skies and a wind that barely stirs the leaves of the cabbage trees. People living on the Canterbury Plains, and the Alpine areas were not so lucky, and in Wellington the wind reached 160k/per hour with flights and ferry services cancelled and roads closed due to either wind or
flooding.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Big fire near Whitianga, our shopping/worshipping centre for Matarangi. Four (five?) homes and Wilderlands commune wiped out. In the City, yes cancellations, and noisy winds round the house, but we're relatively sheltered here.
I had to take a bus in to the city yesterday and promised myself that if the gusts that blow old women over had started and I had to cross the street I'd ask s sturdy pedestrian if I could hang on to their arm.

GG
 
Posted by Arabella Purity Winterbottom (# 3434) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
...I'd ask a sturdy pedestrian if I could hang on to their arm.

GG

Reminds me of my first year in Wellington, doing postgrad library and info science. We had a lovely guy on the course who was around about the size of a medium sized car. He and I were walking down Lambton Quay one windy afternoon, when we saw a little old lady struggling to stay upright.

My friend walked over to her and said, "Walk behind me, the wind won't reach you, and my friend can give you an arm." The three of us proceeded to her destination, with him walking in front like a stately barge.

Sadly, he died later that year, of heart failure - which was just the wrongest diagnosis, because he surely had the biggest heart of anyone I knew. Thank you for bringing him to mind again.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Barnabas, today is very grey but not wet yet and a good deal cooler. I hope you have a cooler day too. Take care, both of you as you wind down from yesterday.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
That's a lovely story, Arabella Purity Winterbottom.
[Tear]
 
Posted by Dal Segno (# 14673) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Crazy summer weather ... In Wellington the forecast is 150 -160kp/h

150 kph last night. The house creaked like a ship at sea.

Twelve hours later it is relatively calm and gloriously sunny with blue sky, red pohutakawa and lush greenery. The latter owing to the fact that we have yet to have days consistently above 20 degrees.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Arabella, my first secretary was around 60, very slight, and an arthritis sufferer - very severe arthritis with quarterly gold injections and so forth. She would have trouble with even a stiff breeze, having to hang onto street posts and so forth. A pity she did not know your friend or his twin.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
[Votive] BarnabusAus and neighbours

Lovely to see you Ian Climacus!!!!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... I hope the person lighting [the fires] is found quickly.

You mean they were started deliberately?? I was assuming they were the result of the hot, dry weather. [Eek!]

Prayers continuing to ascend for you all, especially Barnabas and Mrs. Aus and their neighbours - that is way too close a shave.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
The strong suggestion is that those around the town where Barnabas Aus lives were deliberately lit. They all started very close in time, and from memory someone was seen running. A person who deliberately starts a fire and is reckless as to its spread is liable to a sentence of up to14 years.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Thanks again for your support and prayers. Our insurance assessor has been, and has engaged a professional recovery team to help clear out the wreckage, and then a building consultant will come in to arrange repairs and reconstruction. We are feeling much more settled. And it's raining!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Raining here too and also at son's place on coast between Gosford and Woywoy. All afternoon and evening would be good. Lots of stressed trees and shrubs here and even the agapanthus and clivea strappy leaves are bleached and burnt.

Professional clean up sounds a really good idea. I hope you and others can now move forward.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Glad you're safe and the danger is over, Barnabus. Out here we have teens starting wildfires who don't really understand the devastating consequences but arson destroys community spirit in so many ways.

Lothlorien, you could be describing my garden -- agapanthus, clivias half-dead, even the herbs have shrivelled up. I'm good at using grey water (standing in tubs for soapless showers etc) but it isn't enough.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Nasty shooting in Mebourne. One friend of mine was in the vicinity and says it was pretty scary. Three dead. Unlike the USA the incident did not end in a hail of bullets, but three dead is three tragedies.

Friggin' 'eck ... fresh snow fell on the mountains where we have been this week. It's mid-January fro crying out loud.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dal Segno:
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Crazy summer weather ... In Wellington the forecast is 150 -160kp/h

150 kph last night. The house creaked like a ship at sea.

Twelve hours later it is relatively calm and gloriously sunny with blue sky, red pohutakawa and lush greenery. The latter owing to the fact that we have yet to have days consistently above 20 degrees.

I was in Featherston. Got over the Rimutakas just before they were closed. Got caught by a gust yesterday morning in Featherston that was the closest I've ever been to being blown off my feet.

Calm in the Bay, but not warm. Definitely not warm.

[ 20. January 2017, 05:42: Message edited by: Zappa ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Nasty shooting in Melbourne ...

Is there any other sort? [Frown]

[Votive] for the souls of those killed.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Good news Barnabas Aus.

Horrific events in Melbourne. My manager is from there and seemed dumstruck by it all, particularly being somewhere he frequented and knew well. [Votive] for all killed, injured or affected.

Some lovely rain yesterday and the promise of a sunny day today. Planning on driving along the Murray east to Corryong and doing a small bushwalk or two. Saturdays are nice days.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
I think Zappa that the gales you've been experiencing have mangled the news beams across the Tasman. Only 1 shot, but 4 killed, when a man drove his car into a pedestrian mall; the assertion is that this was deliberate.

The shooting was of the driver. If what the police allege is true, we find it hard to have much sympathy for the gunshot wound he received; wrong of us, but hard.
 
Posted by Laud-able (# 9896) on :
 
Sympathy be damned! The man is drug-addled criminal who - but for the gutless magistrates - would not have been out on bail. Starting in a pedestrian mall he drove down whomever he could hit - so far four, including a child, are dead.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
He was also apparently well known to police because of a very long history of domestic violence. It is alleged he stabbed a family member earlier before the rampage.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Laud-able, Laudable, where was there an appeal that the decision to grant bail was wrong? I can't say much of what has happened in Victoria, but in NSW there is a presumption against a grant of bail in so many cases, not good at all.

On another front, we drove back home yesterday. Not the best of drives but we made it. The garden needs days of rain to recover from the heat, and replenish the tanks we use to water it. Not all that happy with the idea of recycling grey water onto the garden.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
As it happens two of my friends were nearby, and caught up in the pandemonium. Of my family none were near, though one daughter's partner had planned to be there at that time but got waylaid, and my former-wife's partner had just left the area.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Horrible ...and even moreso that he could have been picked up earlier.

At least we can't blame a criminal act for the fire near Vulpior. A bird flew into overhead electrical wires, incinerated itself and then set the grass on fire when it hit the ground.

Bet it was a galah. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Laud-able (# 9896) on :
 
The Premier has just announced changes to the bail system in Victoria. To begin, a night court of magistrates is to be established to hear bail applications from those accused of crimes of violence - part of the disaster that led to the (so far five) murders in Melbourne arose because a bail justice granted bail to the perpetrator who was already on bail for a prior offence. Bail justices, l should explain, have hitherto been volunteers (with minimal training) to whom the police have been obliged to refer out-of-hours applications for bail.
 
Posted by Mili (# 3254) on :
 
I hope they do change the bail laws. I thought they had made them stricter since the Jill Meagher murder, but things like this happen again.

We also need better mental health and drug treatment as so many of these violent crimes seem to be by people on ice or similar drugs suffering from psychosis. Obviously most people with a mental illness are not violent, but those who are a danger to themselves and others should be off the street getting appropriate treatment.

It also seems domestic violence is still not being taken seriously as they seem to give bail more frequently when it is a spouse/partner or family member who has been attacked, rather than a stranger.

My parents were having lunch where the crime occurred the day before and a couple of friends narrowly missed being caught up in it. One ran to catch a tram - if she missed it she would have been there. The other had been there and was 50 metres away when the incident happened.

A baby has died now too and there are still 6 people in a critical condition in hospital. Praying for them all and the families of the victims.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Godspeed the change in laws. And continued thoughts and [Votive] s for those affected.

Gosh Mili: 50 metres isn't far! Thanks be to God.

---

Went for a dip in the, slightly chilly, Murray tonight after a 39 degree day. Was lovely to float down the river for a while, with many others and a number of ducks. I am lucky to live here.

[ 23. January 2017, 09:06: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
The ABC news is now reporting that a man has been charged with setting fire to the grass near Barnabas Aus's house.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
The ABC news is now reporting that a man has been charged with setting fire to the grass near Barnabas Aus's house.

RFS site has more fires in that area with the water dropping aircraft in use again. Even though there was a fire there last week, hot conditions and winds can carry embers a long way. Embers in gutters and under houses etc can cause a fire even when vegetation has already been burnt. Hope all is well.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
It has indeed been full on here again. The fire was on the opposite side of town almost adjacent to the hospital and retirement village. Choppers, C-130 Hercules and DC-10 waterbombers deployed, and knocked the fire down relatively quickly. Southerly about to hit, which I hope doesn't flare it up again.
The police have been fairly vigilant in their monitoring of suspects, I gather, so hopefully the arrest of this young man will see an end to it.
We need rain, but it seems to be blowing around us.
 
Posted by RainbowGirl (# 18543) on :
 
I'm near(ish) you Barnabas and we've been absolutely hammered with rain over the last couple of hours, I'm hoping it hit you and sorted the fires out! Bush fires absolutely terrify me.
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
The ABC news is now reporting that a man has been charged with setting fire to the grass near Barnabas Aus's house.

They also reported he was out on bail!!!!
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
I for one love the inclusive message of this year's Lamb advert for Australia Day. I know it's a bit stereotyped, but it is funny, e.g. this dialogue
British commander stepping ashore, " We are the first fleet"
Aborigine already on the beach, "not quite, mate".
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Bail refused, Dennis. Back in court today. Heavy rain late last night should have really helped, but we're down for 41 degrees again on Monday.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Great advert, Tukai, can I assume that it does NOT carry a Pauline Hanson Seal of Approval?
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Some rain at last here in the Cape, a few hours reprieve from the heat. As always, the rain came down just as I finished carting buckets of precious water around the garden. [Frown]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
MaryLouise I always think the pre-rain watering helps the rain soak in better. I don't know if it really does, but I am wondering if I heard it somewhere (of course I am not beyond inventing something then believing it [Roll Eyes] ).

As the so-called weather bomb mostly avoided Christchurch (apart from I night of light rain) we are having water restrictions. At this stage they're more suggestions and not compulsory, but could become so if the high temps and lack of rain continues. On the other hand my favourite small town has 2832.1mm (or 111.5 inches) of rain a year so there are no restrictions on watering and some lovely gardens.

Huia
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
MaryLouise I always think the pre-rain watering helps the rain soak in better. I don't know if it really does, but I am wondering if I heard it somewhere (of course I am not beyond inventing something then believing it [Roll Eyes] ).
Huia

If rain falls on hard, dry ground it pretty much just rolls off. Pre-watering softens the soil so that the rain can soak in. (Try mopping up a spill with a dry sponge -- it doesn't work as well as a damp sponge.)
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Well, of course. Sometimes I make more sense that I think I do. [Biased]

Thanks Pigwidgeon,

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Water saving crystals work well in the potting mix for pots. Just don't use too much as I once did and went outside after rain to see a quivering mass of clear jelly on top of one of my pots. The crystals had spilt in the pot and when wet had expanded upwards and outwards.

For both pots and garden soil, wetting agents help so water is absorbed into soil and it does not merely run off.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
As it's presumably now well into Thursday Down Under, may I wish all the Australian shippies a happy Australia Day?

Have a good one! [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Have a good Australia Day, folks - it is Republic Day here in India.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Thank you both. Happy Republic Day WW, and all in India!

Interesting choice for Australian of the Year. I had not heard of him. And a variety of recipients for Young Australian of Year, Australia's Local Hero and Senior Australian of the Year. Well done to them all for their work.

A bit of gastric has kept me indoors today. Friends have been floating down the Murray on pool floats and having bbqs. My boss is taking the family to a waterfall I visited last weekend where you can, with some scrambling, get to the pool of water underneath. Good day for it.

[edit: can't spell Happy]

[ 26. January 2017, 04:42: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Hope that complaint goes quickly for you, Ian. I remember some of your trips abroad from times past and also some of the walks you took up here. Around Waverton perhaps, seems familiar?

It is quite warm and stuffy up here and scrabbling around in a bush pool sounds a good idea.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Doesn't Professor Alan Mackay-Sim come across as a really nice bloke? Congratulations to him on his award.

I watched that Lamb advert again this morning - yes, it is stereotyped AND it is also excellent, particularly the question at the end.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Pre-watering is now my favourite word (thanks Huia and Pigwidgeon)and I shall look out for the water-saving crystals Lothlorien mentioned.

Happy Australia Day to those who celebrate it!

I'm on final deadline for an editing project so planning to spend the morning making a complicated roast vegetable stock for tonight's mushroom risotto. Procrastination, c'est moi...
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Just pointing out that there are two products. Wetting solution which affects surface of soil to absorb moisture and crystals which absorb water and expand, making water available under soil to roots.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I must say, Ian, it's so good to have you back around the decks!
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Thanks Zappa. [Hot and Hormonal]

Great to see you too. I still have fond memories of my Wankydilla visit.

Gastric seems to have passed... Now just trying to be motivated [and as you can tell by my presence here, failing] at work. A Friday after a public holiday is a tough thing.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Most of my Friday work conversations went:
Me: So how was your yesterday?
Colleague: oh pretty good, caught up with a few friends and had a nice relaxing day...but I'm really messed up about what day it is today. It feels like I got done out of a weekend and it's Monday again.

Maybe we should stick to keeping the national day to a long weekend.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Most of the public holidays here happen on Mondays even if the actual date doesn't; in Newfoundland St. John's Day, St. Patrick's Day, Victoria Day and Orangemen's Day were all marked by holidays on the nearest Monday.

The exceptions were Canada Day (1st July) and Remembrance Day (11th November) which were always marked by the actual day (although if they fell at weekends you'd get the following Monday off).

It makes sense in a country where people* often have country retreats, be they cabins, cottages or mansions, where they like to go for weekends.

* Not us - we can barely afford one house, let alone two. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Oh what a perfect day here ... 28°C, 3% humidity, a 3 kph NE wind. Like Darwin in the dry season. Sheer bloody heaven.

Shame about the world, though.

[Edit: bloody miscreant K [Roll Eyes] ]

[ 28. January 2017, 22:06: Message edited by: Zappa ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Most of the public holidays here happen on Mondays even if the actual date doesn't; in Newfoundland St. John's Day, St. Patrick's Day, Victoria Day and Orangemen's Day were all marked by holidays on the nearest Monday.

Anzac Day and Australia Day are holidays on correct date. otherwise usually a Monday is the day chosen. We too double up if Christmas etc is on the weekend.

Bank Holiday is in August on a Monday for those associated with banks etc. Public servants used to get that holiday too till there was a huge outcry from those who did not get it. A premier, Carr I think, supposedly abolished it for public servants and the uproar died down. He then added it without fanfare to the general holidays at Christmas. My son in public service gets an extra day there,
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Most of the public holidays here happen on Mondays even if the actual date doesn't; in Newfoundland St. John's Day, St. Patrick's Day, Victoria Day and Orangemen's Day were all marked by holidays on the nearest Monday.

Just to safeguard the reputation of Canada, Orangeman's Day, St; John (the Baptist)'s Day and St. Patrick's Day are not holidays in the rest of the country.

John
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Fair play, John. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
"Orangeman's Day" might take on a whole new meaning here in the U.S.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Ah, the advent of orange squirrels on a folliucally challenged scalp ... so attractive
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Most of the public holidays here happen on Mondays even if the actual date doesn't; in Newfoundland St. John's Day, St. Patrick's Day, Victoria Day and Orangemen's Day were all marked by holidays on the nearest Monday.

Anzac Day and Australia Day are holidays on correct date. otherwise usually a Monday is the day chosen. We too double up if Christmas etc is on the weekend.


True now, but I am old enough to remember the good old days before 1994 when Australia Day was always marked on a Friday or Monday to make a long weekend, after which most schools resumed from their summer break. But PMs Howard (of white armband history) and Abbott (10 flags per speech and military parades galore) wanted to mark Aust Day as more than just a good excuse for a barbecue or a day at the beach.
Personally, I reckon they went far too far in the other, flag-waving, direction.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
A cloudy day, warm but not hot and enough wind. Perfect for the Christchurch's annual kite day held at New Brighton Beach. This is one of my favourite free events as part of the Summertimes Festival and marks the end of the school holidays. Lots of people of all ages but they were spread out along the beach so it didn't feel crowded. The kites were magnificent and came in all shapes and sizes, birds, fish, butterflies, dragons and a very effective small one that looked like an octopus. The friend I was with finally managed to get both his kites flying successfully, not helped much by me as I was just there to enjoy other people's efforts.

It was a wonderful break from the tidying and cleaning I've been doing to prepare a space for my new bed. (I jumped on the other one holding Georgie-Porgy and it broke so she is going on a diet tomorrow [Biased] )*

*Actually it was not made of wood, but something that looked like compressed cardboard that had been painted. It was a bad buy on my behalf, but I was seduced by the shape [Roll Eyes] Unfortunately the shop is no longer trading and the site is a barren piece of ground.

The salesman (who looked a bit sceptical at my blaming Georgie [Razz] ) assured me this one is solid pine and is bolted together. We will see if Georgie is up to the implied challenge.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
I went into work for 3 part-days last week, but tomorrow sees me back in full swing for another, and hopefully my last, year. I've thought about part-time, but beyond a bit of fiddling around the edges that's not really feasible.

A significant day for me this week, and Dog's still with us to help celebrate. Unfortunately he won't last much longer and we won't be getting another. That would leave us in our early 80s caring for a dog at a time when we may well be wanting to move into a unit apart from the other considerations.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Hope that significant day goes well for you, GeeD.

A significant day in extended family here. Son of my new DIL starts High School today and Miss M does also. Not quite so much a jump as it could be as their school is K-12. Uniform differs to primary school. The two of them are hoping to be in different classes to each other. They were deliberately separated in sixth class after being in same class the year before. They both brought home tales from school, so separating was a good idea.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Ah, the advent of orange squirrels on a folliucally challenged scalp ... so attractive

You may be being unfair to squirrels - they're cute. [Smile]

Huia - that's right - blame the cat. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thank you Lothlorien'
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Kite day sounded wonderful Huia! As does a new bed.

Thanks for explaining why we uni workers got an extra "In lieu of Bank Holiday" after Boxing Day Lothlorien.

My eldest niece started high school as well [same school as last year, K-12] as well today, and she seemed to enjoy it -- though "a lot to remember". Better than my younger nieces who both pronounced Year 3 and Year 2 "rather boring". The youngest because the music player was broken so a particular game, Musical Statues, could not be played.

Heard from a friend their daughter was told at preschool by some other kid that they did not want to play with her as she was dark [mixed Malaysian-Japanese-Italian]. [Tear] Poor girl.

(Early) Happy significant day GeeD, and hope your full week goes well.

I had a productive day, despite the hot winds blowing through the air vents from outside and heating up my office -- and my bare lower legs as I wore shorts. 40C+ day. Not sure if I've said but we have a environmentally friendly building [with drop toilets!] that is supposed to be naturally cool. A/C was retro-fitted in the middle, and we get a bit of it; but as they were built to Euro standards it struggles a bit in the heat.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Happy significant day, GeeD!

Working on copy for art gallery monographs and an exhibition catalogue, one of the more enjoyable projects to start 2017.

And it rained this weekend! Not nearly enough to help with water shortages, but the garden revived miraculously.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Feels like a good day to Tasman-hop
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Feels like a good day to Tasman-hop

Sounds like a dance from the 60s.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Depends where you are hopping to, Zappa. Yet another 37+ day down here and several more forecast for end of week. You would welcome it, but it is getting mighty tiresome here. 41 in my area yesterday, more than that westwards.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
A cloudy day, warm but not hot and enough wind. Perfect for the Christchurch's annual kite day held at New Brighton Beach. This is one of my favourite free events as part of the Summertimes Festival and marks the end of the school holidays. Lots of people of all ages but they were spread out along the beach so it didn't feel crowded. The kites were magnificent and came in all shapes and sizes, birds, fish, butterflies, dragons and a very effective small one that looked like an octopus. The friend I was with finally managed to get both his kites flying successfully, not helped much by me as I was just there to enjoy other people's efforts.

It was a wonderful break from the tidying and cleaning I've been doing to prepare a space for my new bed. (I jumped on the other one holding Georgie-Porgy and it broke so she is going on a diet tomorrow [Biased] )*

*Actually it was not made of wood, but something that looked like compressed cardboard that had been painted. It was a bad buy on my behalf, but I was seduced by the shape [Roll Eyes] Unfortunately the shop is no longer trading and the site is a barren piece of ground.

The salesman (who looked a bit sceptical at my blaming Georgie [Razz] ) assured me this one is solid pine and is bolted together. We will see if Georgie is up to the implied challenge.

Huia

Heavy cats are a common problem, Huia. I always pick one up when I get on the bathroom scales.

[ 31. January 2017, 04:21: Message edited by: rexory ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Depends where you are hopping to, Zappa. Yet another 37+ day down here and several more forecast for end of week. You would welcome it, but it is getting mighty tiresome here. 41 in my area yesterday, more than that westwards.

Miserable bloody 14 here at the moment ... I like the parts of OZ that don't get cold overnigh. Melbourne ... not so much. In fact it's only about 100 kms north of where I live so the only suprising thing is that I always forget ... [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's -7° here at the moment, but it's been a glorious, bright, sunny day. [Smile]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
It's 15c here, which I think is great because I have to finish cleaning the bedroom and it's easier when it's cooler. It was over 30c yesterday and I had to keep stopping so I could cool down.

Bed arrives tomorrow morning [Yipee]

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Please keep GeorgyPorgy from jumping on the new bed. [Big Grin]

That temperature sounds blissful. Over 40 at my place again, yesterday and more of the same at next weekend.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Interesting few days with 3 grandchildren starting at new schools and B1.1 and B1.2 entering their last years at primary and middle schools respectively. So 2 big fish in small ponds and 3 small fish in big ponds. We have been busy providing reassurance, advice, cheer leading, back up support and various school bits. We are tired already!

TP went to the mall to get away from the heat on Monday and was amused at the number of completely fed up mothers wrangling ratty kids and essential supplies. One small bored person managed to poke holes in an entire display of toilet paper while TP was waiting in line. I think he found it fascinating (not exactly what the mother thought when she noticed). A week not for the faint hearted.

And then the sadistic sales gurus follow this stressful week with flogging lovey dovey Valentine's Day merchandise everywhere. Hmmmm....


[Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Not a holiday I have ever had anything to do with.

Cooler today but still stuffy inside.

I was guilty once of taking my three to a local Westfield in a heatwave. It was not a cheap outing as there was very little by way of entertainment and we bought drinks etc. Local library was situated elsewhere. However, they did not poke holes in toilet paper display or do anything else along similar lines.

I am suffering from too much heat and not enough sleep. I replied to an email from ex Mr L warning of a virus spread in a photo of cops arresting Trump. It is old news and false. Sent him a link to Snopes, and managed some derogatory comment about being gullible and hoping I would soon see news of a real arrest. Spoke about alternative news etc. In nine years since I walked out, this is the first time I have replied but this was a good opportunity. A swipe at his being gullible, a swipe at Trump, and an opportunity for education about sites like.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Miss M and Master M, new step grandson, both started high school yesterday. He is apprehensive, having just been diagnosed with mild epilepsy and a form od sensory disorder. He is having occupational therapy which has been some help and is just getting medication sorted for epilepsy.

They attend the same fairly large Christian school k-12 in western suburbs. Eldest grandchild has just graduated from there. Not my choice but better than many other choices there.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Piglet, spare a thought for central NSW where some places like Moree have endured 36 consecutive days of temps over 35 degrees celsius.

I'm not sure even heathogs like Zappa would enjoy that.

Here in the national capitol we have had two cool rainy mornings in a row - a blessed respite from the searing midsummer fiery numbers. Due to climb again after today, but the garden is looking much less stressed, as is TP.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Captain Middle and Little Miss are back at school and have resettled into routines OK. MIddle turns 17 in a couple of weeks - hard to believe. Biggest is enrolled in his Uni course - his full time load involves 9 contact hours a week. He is working hard at building up his music tuition business.

One of our home group members talked about selling his plumbing business and retiring in our "share your hopes for the year" session. I (excitedly) asked him what his post-retirement plans were, and he said going on dialysis and waiting for a kidney transplant. It wasn't the only challenging news last night..

[Votive] For G.

mr curly
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Captain of cricket Middle? I must have missed something, but congratulations in any event.

The kidney transplant sound worse than it may end up being. The husband of my elder sister had one done a dozen years ago. Not easy, and he took 6 months off, but he went back to work for another half dozen or more years after that, and is still going strong. I hope all goes as well as that for your colleague.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Captain of cricket Middle? I must have missed something, but congratulations in any event.

No, he's Captain of the School - remembering that he's at the local public school rather than at the hallowed halls graced by his brother.

mr curly
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Still, congratulations to him - and my aged brain did have him at the correct school.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thank you all for your kind wishes. Yesterday went well - my floor put on drinks, then a quiet dinner at home with Madame, Dlet, my father and my mother-in-law. Dlet chauffered both of them The real treat of the day was an extra squirt of tomato sauce on my devon-and-tomato-sauce sandwich at lunch.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
The real treat of the day was an extra squirt of tomato sauce on my devon-and-tomato-sauce sandwich at lunch.

It's the little things...

Like today when at home I was making myself a smoked salmon sandwich for lunch. I was about to grumble at the lack of light cream cheese in the fridge when I found a half-eaten brie. It went quite nicely.

mr curly
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Back to school today and I was welcomed with open arms as a huge pile dual language, English/Samoan reading books had arrived and need to be processed. The school roll is about 50% Samoan and the books are aimed at helping the parents to help their children. It's a huge step up from when I was teaching.

The problem is that there was an equally huge pile of solely English reading books that arrived late last year (from a difference source) and are still unprocessed.

Part of me wanted to run screaming from the building [Help] [Help]

Being a volunteer(with no 'clout' in the system)I'm thinking of suggesting a dual language group of parents might be invited to help as part of the launch of the new books [Two face]

Seriously though I do think it is worth celebrating.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Much more decadent a lunch than my usual.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Have people seen this news story about a million dollar cross in the NT outback.

Not my cup of tea at all. What do people think. (I haven't seen another thread on this topic)
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Not my cup of tea either. Then again I am not in favour of the Big Prawn, sheep, bull or whatever else there may be on our highways.

That website is very vague on details except to say the community wanted it.

A caravan park was suggested in its stead. My sister has travelled extensively in outback and says decent parks are very good, but far too few in number.

The mention of Mel Gibson would send me scurrying in opposite direction.
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
The mention of Mel Gibson would send me scurrying in opposite direction.

Snap!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Gee D I hope you thoroughly enjoyed your decadence, and will do so annually for years to come.

About the cross - Blerk. Did I read that correctly, that one of the promoters was a landscape photographer??? So why can't he just enjoy the uniqueness of this corner of creation? And, I totally agree about Mel Gibson, double blerk.

Huia- iconoclast
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Another Blerk (that's quite a mess we're making – let's send it to Mel Gibson).
quote:
"Seventy per cent of people who come to the Territory want an authentic experience of meeting with and understanding Aboriginal culture and only 3 per cent actually get that."

So we build a gigantic illuminated cross ??????

You can have your Mel Gibson – we have dear Sam Neill, currently voice-over for 'Wild New Zealand'.

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Sam Neill also stars in two of my favourite NZ films - Sleeping Dogs and The Hunt for the Wilderpeople - though I'm not sure I'd agree with his opinion on other matters. Frustratingly I can't remember the issue.

Today is World Wetlands Day and I'm off to a celebration of the Christchurch Estuary.

Monday is Waitangi Day. I've just discovered Wikipedia states that the Treaty was only signed by some North Island Chiefs, whereas it was also signed by some South Island chiefs too.

I'm not impressed!

Huia - proud citizen of Te Wai Pounamu.(the South Island of NZ)
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Julia Zemiro's Home Delivery did a very good interview with Sam Neil.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Overcast weather,a relief it is cooler. Off to the farmers' market to buy heirloom tomatoes for Caprese salad, planning to spend the afternoon picnicking under oak trees while listening to jazz. Unless it rains.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Sam Neill also stars in two of my favourite NZ films - Sleeping Dogs and The Hunt for the Wilderpeople - though I'm not sure I'd agree with his opinion on other matters. Frustratingly I can't remember the issue.

Today is World Wetlands Day and I'm off to a celebration of the Christchurch Estuary.

Monday is Waitangi Day. I've just discovered Wikipedia states that the Treaty was only signed by some North Island Chiefs, whereas it was also signed by some South Island chiefs too.

I'm not impressed!

Huia - proud citizen of Te Wai Pounamu.(the South Island of NZ)

I too have a feeling Sam N once voiced an opinion I didn't go along with. But he comes across as a nice guy and a genuine New Zealander.

I'd have to look it up and it's after my bedtime, but I'm sure I remember reading of the Treaty being brought south and signed by some chiefs around Banks Peninsula.

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Family dinners can be interesting around here. Off we went to Cow Pat Pastures, taking homegrown plums, an old sideboard and an unwanted screen door (Son-in-Law is building a greenhouse). I packed a homemade mermaid costume for Miss 4 and a Minecraft sticker book for Master 5.We returned with eggs from their chickens, duck poo juice for the garden, a bale of cornstalk hay from their veggie garden and an enormous slice of cherry/chocolate cake.

A good exchange.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Overcast weather,a relief it is cooler. Off to the farmers' market to buy heirloom tomatoes for Caprese salad, planning to spend the afternoon picnicking under oak trees while listening to jazz. Unless it rains.

Given your recent weather, I'd imagine that you'd prefer some good solid rain. I know that we would.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
So very true, GeeD. Showers were forecast but didn't arrive and the heat was stifling.

Although February and March are often described as the hottest months of summer, already we have March lilies (nerines) coming up and plectranthus in flower, autumn red foliage. The dawns are dewy and misty, and evenings are wonderfully cool. Nights without mosquitos!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Onuku was the signing place in Akaroa. A group from our church went there last Waitangi Day. It was also signed On Ruapuke Island (near Stewart Island), near the entrance to Otago Harbour, Cloudy Bay and Rangitoto Island off Marlborough.

I knew about the Akaroa and Marlborough signings, but didn't realise it had been taken as far south as Stewart Island*

* (For overseas people) Stewart Island, Rakiura, is the third main island making up NZ. It's to the south of the South Island. If you ever get a chance to go there - take it. The bird life and the bush are stunning, although crossing Foveaux Strait can be a bit choppy.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
10:15 pm here. I am about to head for bed and it is still over thirty degrees. 32.5° C actually. So over this.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... Cloudy Bay ...

... where The Best Wine On The Planet™ comes from. [Smile]

**sigh**

eta: Cloudy Bay Sauvignon Blanc used to be imported to Northern Ireland in limited quantities, and one Christmas we heard a rumour that a particular wine shop had some. D. drove 20 miles each way to buy some to give as Christmas presents* (and keep one for ourselves for Christmas lunch, obviously) and, on finding that they were rationing it to three bottles per sale, went back later that week to get some more.

* to people we really liked. [Big Grin]

[ 05. February 2017, 15:32: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
It's a bit wasted on me Piglet, but I know it's won quite a few medals.

I went out to water the garden early this morning, feeling virtuous because that is what the City Council recommends, when I realized that today was an even date and my house number is an odd number [Disappointed] . I salved my conscience with the knowledge that I had not watered at all in the last 5 days.

Loth, I don't know how you bear it. We have 31c forecast for today and that is way beyond my comfort zone. I may even have to test out the cooling settling on the heat pump.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Onuku was the signing place in Akaroa. A group from our church went there last Waitangi Day. It was also signed On Ruapuke Island (near Stewart Island), near the entrance to Otago Harbour, Cloudy Bay and Rangitoto Island off Marlborough.

Huia

Sheila Natusch wrote Brother Wohlers: A Biography of J. F. H. Wohlers of Ruapake. which I must have read many decades ago. I remembered it as 'Pastor Wohlers of Ruapuke' which here appears as the title of an article in 'Te Ao Hou'. Among several references in an online bibliography is an article in Te Ao Hou in 1968 titled 'Pastor Wohlers: A Tohunga by Adoption' which I'd love to see.
Curiously the bibliography of NZ Christian publications appears on a website on which everything else is in Russian.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Ah, some relief ... a pleasant few days in Melbourne, though predictably the weather was no better than NZ. Then I leapt in the rental car and drove up the Newell to Brisbane and beyond. Just touched 38C in the north of Victoria near Strathmerton, but mainly around 35. Tricky to sleep in the car, as the overnight temperature stayed above 30 until well after midnight, when a storm near Coonabarabran lowered things down to about 25 and I grabbed a couple of hours.

And here I am, happily ensconsed chez Draught, where I am going to be quietly working on a book for a few days, surrounded by warmth, sub-tropical vegetation and birdlife, fermented fruits of the earth, and the wonders of friendship.

Life's tough. [Cool]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
[QB
And here I am, happily ensconsed chez Draught, where I am going to be quietly working on a book for a few days, surrounded by warmth, sub-tropical vegetation and birdlife, fermented fruits of the earth, and the wonders of friendship.

Life's tough. [Cool] [/QB]

Tough indeed, Zappa. Sounds heavenly. Especially the friendship bit.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have washed sheets and hung them out. Dry in about ten minutes I think. Well, no more than half an hour.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Have a good break/write Zappa. Say Hi to FD from me.

[ 05. February 2017, 22:35: Message edited by: Latchkey Kid ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks for mentioning your sheets Loth, it reminded me that I have been promising myself I would wash my fluffy woollen mattress topper when the right day came, it's now on the line.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Anything like here, Huia, it won't take long to dry. It is not as appalling as yesterday was, but it is still hot and inside is now beginning to heat with the long run of hot days.

When I was looking to buy, a non negotiable criterion was no westerly facing windows. My previous house had western facing windows onto main bedroom and also living room downstairs. I was not having that.

[ 06. February 2017, 01:37: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:
Have a good break/write Zappa. Say Hi to FD from me.

Done! Greetings returned, with interest.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Happy travels Zappa.

Been a busy week for all here in the antipodes.

A weekend spent back north, giving the eldest and youngest nieces their birthday presents. Took all 3 to the park and out for milkshakes. Very nice, but I forgot how humid February can be. The parents' dog wanted a walk but I wasn't going out in 35+ temps and 60% humidity, sorry doggy.

Some rain down here today...but unusually humid now.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Good to see the PM and Opposition Leader behaving kindly and generously to one another today in parliament.
[Roll Eyes]

I despair. And hate when parliament is on as NewsRadio broadcasts it rather than the BBC into the night... Yes: first world problems I know.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
Good to see the PM and Opposition Leader behaving kindly and generously to one another today in parliament.
[Roll Eyes]

I despair. And hate when parliament is on as NewsRadio broadcasts it rather than the BBC into the night... Yes: first world problems I know.

Yup. Pathetic politicians. Sigh.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I am stuck inside till son can get here and fix my door closure. I returned from taking rubbish downstairs yesterday afternoon and heavy front door, fire door rated, slammed shut as I manoeuvred things inside.

Went to open it this morning to let breeze through before three more stinking hot days. Door will open about a third of the way and no more. I think something inside the closing mechanism shifted when door slammed. No way can I reach it at all. Son is skinny but he will have trouble wriggling through.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Crikey, Loth - that doesn't sound good. Hope you have good air-con, and that you can get the door mended ASAP.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks, Piglet. Son told me how to lift mechanism and I can now open and close door. Fire doors at front of apartment are common property, not my personal area, so rang strata management and visit from repair will be scheduled. Eldest son thinks door hinges need attention as he thinks they are loose and pulling door crooked, thus mechanism is out of alignment. I have let strata manager know it is probably a rehang the door exercise, not just five minutes with a screwdriver tightening things.

Thankful I was inside, not stuck on outside and unable to open door.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
I despair. And hate when parliament is on as NewsRadio broadcasts it rather than the BBC into the night... Yes: first world problems I know.

And the news on child abuse is offered by Radio National. Another cause for despair.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yep, no good news anywhere it seems. Even listening to the Press Club yesterday was depressing as figures were rolled out showing how far Australia had slipped in the global gender equality ratings over the last 12 months. Dropped ten places - and now ranked 46th in the world for equal pay. As the mother of four working daughters I am dismayed by those figures.

So much seems to be going in the wrong direction. I must be getting old! The good news is that I WILL be going in the right direction tomorrow - heading down the coast where it will be a blessed 20 degrees cooler than blistering Canberra. Two days of 40 degree temps is the forcast in this neck of the woods. They really should cancel school. That is dangerous heat.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Enjoy the coast, BL.

It reached 43° C here this afternoon and more elsewhere. Even up Gee D's way it was 44 early afternoon.

I went to High School in that area and hated the broad brimmed Panama hat which was part of summer uniform.

I looked down this afternoon when it was 43, to see two girls from local High School walking along in the sun after school. Each had an exercise book opened and on the head for some protection. Suddenly the memory of the panama made more sense.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Many of the Primary schools here have uniforms that include a broad brimmed hat. Children at the school where I volunteer are not allowed out to play unless they are wearing them. I always wear one during the summer months too, even though I look a bit like a mushroom.

Huia

[ 10. February 2017, 05:46: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Primary schools are like that here, it often falls apart in public high schools.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
I think that wearing hats outdoors at schools has become almost universal.

We used wear boaters and they are still part of the uniform. While we were allowed to remain in sports uniform after mid-week practices rather than change to go home, we still had to wear the boater and blazer. Not so long ago, Madame and I were at a local restaurant for an earlyish dinner. Some young fellows walked past wearing wet board shorts with their boaters and blazers - no shirt of any kind.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I used to see boys going to rowing practice from school well down the line fromyou, rhymes with more. Early morning practice with tracksuits, blazers and boaters. I was on 6:15 or thereabouts at Killara.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
That school and mine are the only 2 retaining boaters.
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
I've spent the last week at the annual conference of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society. Several sessions were about heat waves past present and future, which was appropriate as it was 40 deg in the shade here on Friday. The invited lecture on the subject was by a young scientist from Sydney who must be feeling the heat even more than the rest of us, as she is 6 months pregnant and thus has built-in central heating.

For what it's worth, the good news is that heat waves are not getting much hotter (in terms of maximum temperatures). The bad news is that they are getting more frequent and occurring over a longer season (i.e. beginning earlier in the summer and finishing later in the summer).
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Tukai, I keep reminding myself of heatwaves in January which we spent at the beach. Sometimes we did not get to swim as the walk down was so hot and the sand on beach burned through soles of shoes.

However this run of hot weather has made me long for cooler seasons. I am over it, just over it.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
While you can keep your 30°-plus temperatures (40°-plus? Don't even go there!), a few more degrees wouldn't hurt here.

We got well over a foot of snow last night, and the current temperature is -18°, but feeling more like -22, and that's a bit parky even for me.

[Eek!]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
41.5 here now Piglet, and we are getting close to the hottest part of the day which here is between 3 and 4:30 pm.

Southerly expected "in the evening," which is somewhat elastic as a time frame.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
While our temperatures are not (thank God) as high as those Australia is experiencing, they have been sufficiently raised to make me sick. I have high blood pressure which is well controlled by medication. Unfortunately hot weather lowers the B.P which means the combined effect has led to nausea, headaches and difficulty with thinking straight and with balance.

It should be fixed by halving the meds (according to the Doctor) but it was horrible to start with, because I knew I was confused but couldn't sort out why or what to do about it. Really scary when you live alone.

I have just Googled the 'America First, NZ Second' video and it's a hoot.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Not good, Huia but at least you know the principle. Now for the fine tuning.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
All the best Huia. The heat here would have sent it plummeting. 44.1 here. I love living alone, but like you am concerned about sudden ill health. I hope you get the dose sorted out and also pick the best time to up it when it gets cooler.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
I stood on the esplanade as a stiff sea breeze came inshore with the tide this morning. It was heavenly. Now back in baking Canberra where there is an evil red cast to the sky that has nothing to do with sunsets. The last time I saw it look like that was in 2003 when 500 homes burnt down on the outskirts of town. All across NSW the authorities are steeling themselves for a bad fire day tomorrow. Please God it will not be as bad as feared.

However on the drive back as the thermometer steadily climbed I passed a nasty accident that made me count my blessings. I cannot imagine anyone survived as the car was a pancake. You know it is bad when one police car, two ambulances and three fire rescue trucks pass you.

I will not moan about it being too hot - there are always far worse things than that.

Huia, have you tried cucumber peel on your wrists to bring down your core body temp? An old country trick that some ladies were telling me today really works.

[ 11. February 2017, 08:23: Message edited by: Banner Lady ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
We used to fight over the cucumber peel when we were young.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
We have been at a wedding in Cessnock today, where there is a temperature readout on the covered outdoor bowling green at the venue. It maxed out at 46degC. Even the air-conditioning in the bowling club could not cope, being supplemented by large pedestal fans. And more of the same expected tomorrow.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Well, apparently the crash victims did survive. I hope everyone recovers, but the pic of the car shows it a miraculous thing.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Sickening BL. Three critical unsurprisingly. [Votive]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Crikey - that crash does look bad.

[Votive] for all involved.
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Well, apparently the crash victims did survive. I hope everyone recovers, but the pic of the car shows it a miraculous thing.

A dreadful road. Should be named Kings Goat Track
 
Posted by Mili (# 3254) on :
 
Hope all NSW and ACT shipmates are keeping safe today. I'm skipping the Aussie summer heat this week having a holiday in Rotorua, but the weather and fire news from home sounds ominous. Praying all my Dad's relatives are ok in western district of NSW. My great uncle there is 94 so hope he's coping with the heat.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Woken at 4am by heat and mosquitos, so got up at 5am covered in itchy lumps. I have found that placing a small bowl of malt vinegar on the windowsill helps keep most mosquitos away but it didn't work last night.

Ready to try cucumber peels on my wrists though!
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
40C yesterday, 22 when I woke up and 19 now. It felt rather cool when I went out for a walk.

Enjoy Rotorua Mili.

Sorry to hear of the pestilent insects MaryLouise.

That accident looked horrific BL!
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Oh, and hope cool weather comes your way Huia for your BP.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
The southerly's arrived, and it's a proper old-fashioned "buster". Temperature has dropped from 45 to 28 and still going down. Doors and windows opened to let the fresh air flush through the house. What a relief!
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yes, it is 25 degrees cooler here than yesterday. A blessed relief - and I am now wearing a cardigan!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Enjoy Rotorua Mili. I lived there for 7 years, about 30 years ago, and passing through on the bus last year barely recognised it. I remember cool evening with the wind coming off the Lake.

I used to enjoy sitting in one of the hot pools down by the edge of the Lake after work, but that's an activity better suited to winter.

The temperature reached 27c today, but now it's 15c, with a note that it feels like 11. It's delightful.

I will go to be with the security screen doors locked and the inner door open so I catch all the breeze [Axe murder]

I think I've sorted the meds [Yipee]

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Woken at 4am by heat and mosquitos, so got up at 5am covered in itchy lumps. I have found that placing a small bowl of malt vinegar on the windowsill helps keep most mosquitos away but it didn't work last night.

Ready to try cucumber peels on my wrists though!

I was bitten last night on fingers and back of hand. I find the lavender oil diluted with water works well on the itchiness and even acts as mosquito repellent. Unfortunately there was a bite on eyelid near eye, not really suitable for the oil.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Barnabas Aus:
The southerly's arrived, and it's a proper old-fashioned "buster". Temperature has dropped from 45 to 28 and still going down. Doors and windows opened to let the fresh air flush through the house. What a relief!

Lovely, isn't it?
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Another year, another street barbecue, everyone here except a mum with a sick child. Weather no good so I'd run the car forward so the barbecue could go under the carport, and tidied the living room so that some sturdy men could shove the furniture around.
All I have to do is provide the place; everyone looks forward to it and everyone looks after me.
How lucky I am to be surrounded by great neighbours.
If only other neighbourhoods could be as friendly

GG.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Good neighbours are a blessing. There are a lot of apartments here, just over sixty, originally built as serviced apartments. Quiet,pleasant gardens etc.

I know quite a few people but not all of them by name. I have found them easy to speak to and helpful. Since I hurt my hip I have discovered how helpful many are. It is recivering but I still use a cane and take my rubbish downstairs, balanced on the frame I used to use. Many times I don't get that far, someone takes it for me. I would prefer to take it myself as part of exercise but they insist.

There is one young fellow who has been here about as long as I have, six years next month. Right from the beginning he has told me to call on him if ever needed. He works shift work at very odd hours but when I said I did not want to disturb him, he told me to just knock loudlyand not be worried

Then the other day I shared the lift with a delightful little girl and her mum. She was walking, about fifteen months old. She smiled and laughed and when they got out, needed no prompting to blow me lots of kisses and waved. Made my day
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I shall have to have an easy day. With the Cuzzies' Lunch on Saturday and the barbecue yesterday I've hardly read more than the front page* of Saturday's paper. And I must start on today's over breakfast. Two of my favourite columnists write in Monday's DomPost.

Lothlorien, I'm glad that you too have people to look after you. With church, neighbours and family I feel so safe.

GG

*Slight exaggeration. But two little voices in my head are saying 'Don't even look at that puzzle' and 'But it looks quite doable!"
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Not good news for some places in our state.

42 degrees celsius was horrid - the water in our tanks was steaming - so I can't imagine 49. Hope the cool change has reached most parts by now.
 
Posted by mousethief (# 953) on :
 
49?!?!?! Holy Mother of God, I can't even imagine.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Our pool gets to just over 34C. Quickly jump in and out and hope there is a breeze to cool yourself off.
Some cloud today. We are hoping for the predicted rain.
The 2.5 metre python that often suns itself round our pool is also taking some dips in our pool today.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
Here in Arizona we reached 50 (122F) in June 1990. It is definitely not pleasant. Luckily everything here is air conditioned, so it was just a matter of getting from the office to the car, the car to the house, etc.

The airport was closed because they didn't know how the extreme heat would affect landing and take-offs -- and because the baggage handlers could not be expected to load and unload planes on the black tarmac.

The only good thing about it was that here was virtually no humidity. Talk about a "dry heat"!
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Yeah, it's been reasonably warm. I'm currently in coastal/hinterland Queensland where the ocean has modified the heat somewhat - 33C at the moment but because of the 40% humidity a "feels like" of 36. Inland OZ has been a wee bit warmer.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Tried Lothlorien's suggestion of lavender oil last night on my calves and it helped to keep mosquitos away and soothe bites from the previous night -- many thanks.

Huia I hope the cooler weather and adjusted meds continue to help with BP
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
I assume that being in Cape Town you get the equivalent of our southerly busters - very strong southerly winds that drop the temperature dramatically in a haf hour, cause havoc on the Harbour and so forth, but not necessarily rain.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Gosh...can't imagine 50C Pigwidgeon.

Hurrah for soothing suggestions MaryLouise. And hurrah from heat relief. Still shocked as per BL's link of that town, village, wiped off the map.

Some help from the wordly and literate people here, please.

I shall soon be off to drown my sorrows with the fact I turn the big 4-0 [just completed a survey today and realised I'm not long for the 30-39 category [Biased] ] and I'm headed first to the US to visit my best friend and his family. They have 3 daughters, 4, 2 and just born.

I was thinking of taking some Mem Fox or other suitably Oztralian books for the 4 and 2 year old, and possibly a stuffed toy [koala, etc.] for the one just born. Thoughts? Thoughts on books? I'm going through what my nieces liked, but any suggestions appreciated. And I'm wondering if I get a stuffed toy for the youngest, if the books will be seen as a very poor subsitute by Misses 2 and 4 and they'd prefer a stuffed toy too. Thanks.

[ 13. February 2017, 06:03: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Jackie French's Diary of a Wombat and its sequel have proved popular many times as gifts for overseas children from me.

The toys are cute, but far too often have tags attached which say "made in China," or similar. Her writing is marvellous.

ETA. Often available, evein in local Coles, although I would prefer a local bookshop.

[ 13. February 2017, 06:25: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Ian, I did not realise I had known you for that long. A privilege.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:


I shall soon be off to drown my sorrows with the fact I turn the big 4-0 [just completed a survey today and realised I'm not long for the 30-39 category [Biased] ]

Lucky you, Ian! Some of us vaguely remember 40 [Frown]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Tried Lothlorien's suggestion of lavender oil last night on my calves and it helped to keep mosquitos away and soothe bites from the previous night -- many thanks.

Huia I hope the cooler weather and adjusted meds continue to help with BP

Glad it helped, MaryLouise. I always have some inthe house as it is useful in a variety of ways.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
My absolute favourite Mem Fox book is Wombat Divine , but I once bought a nativity story for non-Christian parents who thought I was trying to convert their son [Roll Eyes] so I am now a bit more careful.

I looked at Mem's website and discovered Ducks Away which I thought might appeal to the 2 years old ( as with most books at this age level the whole family will probably learn it off by heart). I've also always liked Possum Magic and, from what I remember it depicts a diverse range of animals and would probably appeal to the 4 year old. For the baby possibly The Little Fingers and ten Little Toes because it could be read with finger and toe play.

Ok, my bias is showing here - I don't think children (babies included) are ever to young to be read to, besides books pack much more easily. I don't know whether price is a factor for you, but getting quality soft toys that would last may be expensive.

If either of the parents have experienced depression you could buy them my absolute favourite Australian book - The Red Tree by Shaun Tan. It's a picture book too, but it has one of the best depictions of depression of any book I have ever read. It is stunning, and it ends with hope.

Sorry Ian [Hot and Hormonal] I'm passionate about picture books and I get a bit carried away. There are so many good Australian picture books.

Huia
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Don't apologise. Appreciate, and love, your enthusiasm. I too love books but just wondered about one so young. Books would be much easier to take!

Thanks Huia and Lothlorien for the suggestions. Much appreciated. And I may get The Red Tree for myself [thanks]; the parents already told me to bring chocolate for them -- they say they miss the taste of Australian chocolate.

And a joy and privilege to have known you for as long as I have too Lothlorien.

[ 13. February 2017, 07:27: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
By the way there is a large fire burning in Christchurch, mainly in farmland but there are houses involved. In case anyone sees a news bulletin and wonders, it is nowhere near me, but I'm praying for those who will have to spend the night in the local primary school.(using the votive seems a bit insensitive).

Huia
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:


I shall soon be off to drown my sorrows with the fact I turn the big 4-0 [just completed a survey today and realised I'm not long for the 30-39 category [Biased] ] and I'm headed first to the US to visit my best friend and his family. They have 3 daughters, 4, 2 and just born.

Surveys whose age band is 45-54 get an accurate response from me. If they have 50-59, then not so much.

mr curly
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:

Thanks Huia and Lothlorien for the suggestions. Much appreciated. And I may get The Red Tree for myself [thanks]; the parents already told me to bring chocolate for them -- they say they miss the taste of Australian chocolate.

If you have not got the Red Tree then you really should! I will second everything Huia said plus suggest it might be a useful way to explore the different forms depression takes.

If you are concerned about refugees then look at his book the Arrival. Not sure if that takes you to the book or just to all his books and you need to select it.

Jengie
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I was thinking of The Arrival too Jengie, but I couldn't see how to work it in. I am quite evangelistic when it comes to my favourite authors [Biased]

And of course (ironic that this one slipped my mind) there's Wilfred, Gordon, Mcdonald Partridge

They may be easier to pack, but if you took all the ones I could suggest your baggage would be overweight and you wouldn't have room for a spare pair of socks. [Big Grin]

And for your birthday Ian there's also an Australian song, Life begins at Forty written and sung by Judy Small.

"Life begins at forty/ til then you're simply learning how/ the Overture is over/the symphony starts now..." it's probably on the net somewhere.

In other news ... I think my Doctor and I have finally sorted things. In addition to the low blood pressure I had low blood sugar due to the timing of some meds. So a simple switch should fix that [Yipee]

Huia
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Great news Huia!
[Yipee]


Thanks Jengie jon and Huia...more books for my collection.

Woke up at 3:15 for some reason. Worse, got on the computer and started work. I'll be frightened to recheck what I actually did when I get in to work. [Smile]

Off to Bathurst this afternoon for the rest of the week for work. Looking forward to it, catching up with people and meeting new people. Should be fun.

[ 14. February 2017, 16:49: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
The fires around Christchurch and in Hawkes Bay look every bit as scary as any from overseas. One house destroyed and one helicopter pilot killed, and miles of flames and black earth.

Take a book for the littlest. People read to their babies almost from birth and are amazed at the way the wee ones focus on the pictures and want the experience go on.

Makes you all the sadder to learn that there are children who arrive at school not knowing that you hold a book this way up and turn the pages likes this.

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Studies have shown that babies learn three things in utero...taste (if mum likes garlic, so will bub!)...I've often wondered if that explains why all mine love chocolate! Music - babies will respond positively to favourite pieces. One doctor I know used to put headphones on his wife's belly and play lullabies at the same time every night before the baby was born. (Talk about conditioning.) And the cadence of certain voices - especially voices that read aloud.

So yes, don't be afraid to grab a baby book for the littlest one. There are also some fab board books out there these days. Always popular while junior learns the art of turning a page.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Studies have shown that babies learn three things in utero...taste (if mum likes garlic, so will bub!)...

My mother and I had very different taste in food (I was also breastfed, which I would think would reinforce similar tastes.) My mother was so fond of onions that I used to tell her she'd put them in chocolate cake if she thought she could get away with it -- and I can't stand the smell or taste of them.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Maybe I should have stated babies have been shown to react to certain foods in utero...pigwidgeon was obviously the one reacting very badly to the things being sent down the tube...
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Huia and Gallopping Grannny, thank you both for your news on the fires. How tragic that someone carrying out fire-fighting duite has died. But good Huia that you're safe.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
From a quick Google of "Christchurch fires":
Four more homes destroyed, hundreds evacuated as Christchurch Port Hills fire rages out of control.
Hundreds of Christchurch residents have been evacuated from their homes this afternoon, as the battle against the Port Hills fires continued ...

There are also electricity outages as pylons have been in the path of the fire.

[Votive]

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Electricity supply on this side of town is fragile, but we are grateful that the lines company Orion put in extra lines after the quakes, which may make a difference. I feel for all the people most directly affected as this area was very close to the epicentre of the Feb 2011 quake and many of the homes have only been fixed in the last year.

I got to the shops just as the power went off, but fortunately it came back on just as I caught the bus going towards home so I shopped in another centre.

Huia - heading off to bed with a torch ... again.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Just seen this and your posts on the Prayers thread. Are you still safe?

The partner of a friend had a house on the northern slope of the hill with a tunnel in it to the port just south (does that make sense?) which was lost in the second quake. Is that the area you're calling the Port Hills?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Yes. The hills around the Port are the remnants of an extinct volcano. I think I've got my directions right by saying an area to the South of the actual Port has been evacuated - Governor's Bay is one of the areas that has been specifically mentioned. I'm a bit vague as to other suburbs but The Sign of the Kiwi and Westmorland have been mentioned on the news.

I'm on the flat, about 5 kms from the tunnel you mention. Mostly the winds here are NW or East to North Easterly. The wind would have to be coming from the south east for me to be threatened. I suppose something catastrophically different could happen, but I don't think it's likely.

Having just read the "Stuff" news site it appears the fires might now been contained - I hope so.

I know for some people this will have brought back memories of the quakes with sirens, helicopters, evacuations and uncertainty, and my heart goes out to them. On the other hand as most of the rest of Christchurch has been unaffected ( except by smoke and worry about friends) many people are reaching out with offers of accommodation, food etc through facebook and other social media.

Huia
 
Posted by Emendator Liturgia (# 17245) on :
 
[Votive] [Votive] [Votive] For all those in and around fires!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
That's good news Huia, particularly about the prevailing winds. A strong southerly would be something else though.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Poor Christchurch.
[Votive]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
There's an article on Christchurch fire in SMH this morning. [Votive]

Totally unrelated to above, I think I need to go back to bed and start the day again.

I had to edit a post on British thread this morning to actually post some content, not a blank page.

I went to wash up breakfast plate and pan. Not a job I like especially after having used dishwashers for decades.

I plunged my hands into soapy water to find it was totally cold. No fault of the system, I had run cold water into sink.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'm a great advocate of going back to bed and starting all over again - but I do like a gap of an hour or two to rest my eyes as I deal with the trauma.

[Cool]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I like it when I can con Georgie into joining me back in bed - better than a soft toy, apart from the sharp bits at the end of her paws.

Day 4 of the fire, (it didn't really hit my radar until yesterday when the two fires merged and.
light levels changed) and it is expected to go on for several more days. I think the army has been called in. Firefighters must be exhausted.

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Firefighters do a tremendous job. Stay safe, Huia.

I've had days that began like that, Lothlorien and WW. An hour back in bed with a pillow or two over the head sometimes works wonders.

Nervously watching the progress of Cyclone Dineo hitting landfall in Inhambane, Mozambique. I have friend setting off on a cruise to the Portuguese Islands and friends working on the Mozambique coast.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Hoping you stay safe, Huia. [Votive]

[ 16. February 2017, 07:29: Message edited by: Latchkey Kid ]
 
Posted by Mili (# 3254) on :
 
Praying for Christchurch. I'm back home in Australia now and only holidayed on the North Island so didn't visit Christchurch. I have a friend there, but I contacted her this morning and she is not in a danger area. Praying for everyone, especially those who have lost houses and for the family of the helicopter pilot. Keep safe Huia.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Cyclone sounds alarming, ML. But cruise liners have very advanced weather equipment on them these days so they can avoid nasty weather systems. My daughter went on a pacific island cruise last summer and there were two cyclones brewing. We were a bit worried, but she reported back that the captain simply steered between them and other than it being too windy to be on deck much, did not affect them.

Much harder to be stuck somewhere on the coast. If they are not near a river mouth they may be okay.

Glad Georgie Porgy is doing a good job as a comfort cat, Huia!

[ 16. February 2017, 19:56: Message edited by: Banner Lady ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I saw a reasonable length clip of the fires Huia, on news last night. Hope they are being brought under control now.

One thing the RFS stresses down here is how quickly fires can move and warns about complacency. The terrain there was quite different to areas of fires last week.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Poor Christchurch.
[Votive]

That's about right - if it isn't one thing, it seems to be another.

[Votive] for Huia, Georgie-Porgy and all affected.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I had some hopes after I was caught in the rain today, but the spokes person for the firefighters said it was like "spitting on a barbecue" [Frown]

The weather is making it more difficult for the fire fighters because they cant get heavy machinery in to dig out hotspots and visibility is limited. The air seems a bit cleaner though.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
There has been a huge storm threateninghere for all afternoon. Now here and much more than spitting on a BBQ.

Far too dark to read without a light on.

Son has been in Brisbane at a work conference since last weekend. He was on board at Brisbane but they have been disembarked as Sydney airport has been closed. I think he will get home tonight but it could be sometime before it reopens. Another message that they have been told two hours delay.

He has just had his flight cancelled but no other news yet. Storm is passing, but there could be another rolling in behind it.

He took a photo from cab of an ugly squat red brick building. Sign says, "Salvador Deli. Mediterranean beach food." No sign of melting clocks.

[ 17. February 2017, 04:26: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Cyclone sounds alarming, ML. But cruise liners have very advanced weather equipment on them these days so they can avoid nasty weather systems. My daughter went on a pacific island cruise last summer and there were two cyclones brewing. We were a bit worried, but she reported back that the captain simply steered between them and other than it being too windy to be on deck much, did not affect them.

Much harder to be stuck somewhere on the coast. If they are not near a river mouth they may be okay.

That makes sense, Banner Lady. The destruction onshore in Mozambique was bad though: seven dead and 20 000 homes destroyed. So little infrastructure or emergency support. But Cyclone Dineo seems to be ebbing to the status of a tropical storm as it moves across Limpopo Province in South Africa.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Fires here again. It's good to see that the Christchurch fires have been halted and it's now time to go in and start clearing up, always a sad task.

The end of a very difficult week for me with next week not looking any better. A case which should have taken no more than 4 days looks as though it will take the full fortnight allocated to it. A pleasant dinner ahead though. I'll get off the train a few stations early and meet Madame at a favourite restaurant.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Another extremely humid February day, and Sydney has forecast of a repeat performance of yesterday's storm. Son has been rebooked on a flight this afternoon, but earlier than yesterday, so hopefully he gets back today. Even if he had reached Sydney yesterday, he would still have had problems in trains.. Trees on lines and power outages meant no trains from Gosford almost to Newcastle. South of Gosford had very intermittent services. He is just a couple of stations south of that station.

I thought the storm was violent. One of the worst hit areas is just up the road opposite a couple of minutes.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Friends in Waitara messaged me a photo of the hailstones...they were rather large. Hope your son got home safely, Lothlorien.

Terible weather around the world, from cyclones in Mozambique to those fires near Christchurch and Queanbeyan, and fires near Gee D again. [Votive]

Hope next week goes well for you Gee D.


Back from Bathurst. Had a grand old time at work, meeting people I've only spoken to on the phone, discussing and making steps to resolve issues, etc. And driving around Mt Panorama racetrack in my work-supplied Corolla! Bathurst is a delightful town. Also managed to get the books for my friends' children from a bookstore -- thanks again for the recommendations: they had them all in stock.

[ 18. February 2017, 20:22: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
That is wonderful Ian - and belated birthday wishes. TP and I will celebrate by attending Evensong where MM and his renowned choir are raising their voices in all sorts of delightful ways. A special treat.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thank you Ian. Son is probably still in bed. Not an early riser. Trip home was slow. Usually 90 minutes from Central. A stop at Beecroft, a lengthy stop at Hornsby where train changed from a through to WoyWoy to all stations to Gosford. Signal failure up the line added to time and it was still raining from storm yesterday. His boss rang himfromGosford to see if son had returned fromQld and offered to pick him up and drive him home from Gosford. That was good. He is not far from the station, but it is up a very steep hill inthe dark and rain and absolutely no shelter.

Gee D, hope you suffered no damage from yesterday's storm. My brother was out and returned home to a white lawn which he thought was murraya flowers. Huge hailstones. Later he and neighbours heard a very large cracking tree out the front. All searched but could not find signs of damage although they looked up and down street. Both sides.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
We were on the edge of the real action yesterday. Friends more up GeeD's way have pockmarked cars, some even smashed windscreens, and cracked skylights.

Played in the worship band at a wedding last night. Service at 7, supper in church hall afterwards for a multitude - it was lovely.

Family brunch today celebrating Middle turning 17 during the week, then leading the service tonight, where the input will be three interviews /testimonies on faith and work. Those with long memories will appreciate that BlackAxe will be one of the guests.

Never a dull etc.

mr curly
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thank you Ian for your thoughts for this coming week - those fires are near my cousin and Vulpior, not me in suburban Sydney - and Lothlorien and Mr Curly about the storm. No damage I'm glad to say, cars in under cover and no branches down. It was the heaviest hail we've seen in years, large rather than enormous stones, but so many of them. The street's covered with leaves.

[ 18. February 2017, 23:05: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Black Axe?her family must be growing up. The last meet I remember was quite a long time ago.

[ 19. February 2017, 04:25: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Both Friday's and Saturday's storms were fierce in the Valley. Trees down and property damage on Friday, the wind so strong that the rain blew in under our front verandah, which was at right angles to the prevailing blast and saturated the front door.
I was at a conference in Sydney on Saturday and had left the car parked on the street near Lindfield Station. By some miracle, no hail damage, and we managed to avoid the worst of the storms as we made our way slowly north along the M1. Arrived home to find Mrs BA had pulled something in her back clearing drains which the cleanup crew had left blocked with fire debris. Luckily only pea hail, so no damage at home either.

[ 20. February 2017, 00:10: Message edited by: Barnabas Aus ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
This time last week we were baking in 39-42 degree temperatures. Today I seriously thought about putting the fire on in the lounge room. It was 5 degrees when I woke up and it snowed overnight at Perisher Valley south of here.
Go figure. [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
That valley sounds as though it has an apt name, Was it based on the experiences of early settlers?

We has 25c forecast today, but it only reached 20c. I hope something similar happens tomorrow when 30c is forecast.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Apparently Wellington made 27° today. I'd say 'I can't believe it' but I can.
I came home from tai chi (only managed 20 minutes, between the sciatic pain and the balance) and survived by opening doors on both sides of the house. Yes it did help, though there wasn't an actual breeze.

GG
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
That valley sounds as though it has an apt name, Was it based on the experiences of early settlers?

We has 25c forecast today, but it only reached 20c. I hope something similar happens tomorrow when 30c is forecast.

Huia

No reliable source for the name, except that it's below Mt Perisher - for which there's no reliable source either, of course. The valley base is at about 1700 - 1750 m, not much by the standards of much of the world, but plenty high enough to give a cold climate.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Tomorrow is the sixth anniversary of the earthquake that killed 185 people in Christchurch. There will be a public memorial service and the dedicated memorial will be opened.

I won't be going to the service as I avoid large crowds, but I will visit the memorial when it is less busy.

I treat February as a day for reflection, thinking of the lives lost, but also the tremendous changes to the city and in our lives since then.

In my opinion one of the best additions has been the building of the Margaret Mahy family playground in the city. I have watched children and adults playing there and it is a fitting tribute to one of NZ's best children's authors.

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Six years already, Huia? A terrible event. Moved to read about the playground.

Here we have ongoing water shortages as dams shrink away, no sign of rain yet. The dawns and dusks are much cooler though and from March we'll have morning mists with dew for garden plants. Yesterday the winter supply of firewood arrived to be stacked in the garage, so useful for the wood-burning stove and grilling outdoors in fine weather.
 
Posted by Arabella Purity Winterbottom (# 3434) on :
 
I went to a wonderful funeral today for the Right Reverend John Murray, formerly minister of St Andrews on the Terrace in Wellington. He was known for so many things, and most of them got a mention. We sang lots of lovely hymns by his wife, Shirley Erena Murray (including one written for the funeral, which I suspect will turn up at a lot of ministers' funerals in the future), and after the prayers, Auld Lang Syne, complete with handholding.

There was a very thoughtful reflection from Sir Lloyd Geering, in which he outlined the theological life of an intelligent stirrer. He finished by saying that John was by far the most social justice-oriented minister he had ever known. (And on a complete tangent: Lloyd is about to turn 99, still looks about 80, and appears to be more vigorous than most 60 year olds - is he never going to age?).

I came into John's orbit when I got together with Rosie and started going to St Andrews, where Rosie was an elder. Having been an Anglican for the previous 28 years, John's extensive sermons took some getting used to (the very first one I remember was nearly an hour long). John loved to sing, and as Rosie and I are both singers, we got to hear him enthuse on the subject. He had an extremely theatrical nature, and I was amazed, talking to him on the phone a few weeks ago, that he sounded exactly the same as he had 20 years ago.

It was also a great time for catching up with people I hadn't seen for ages. As the man sitting next to me said, "well, if you have to die, this is a great way to say goodbye." Truly a mighty totara has fallen in the forest.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Oh Arabella. I met John and Shirley once about 30 years ago when they hosted an SCM meeting. He challenged the insular views of the Victoria University group (which at that time had some very conservative members). I also remember walking along The Terrace on the way to University just so I could read whatever St Andrews had on the noticeboard which was often a theological or social justice challenge.

A great loss, but as with all totara the seedlings will be sprouting for many years to come.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I did so want to go to John's funeral but my body was setting out to have a very painful day and I was stuck at home.
I spent a lot of time with John and Shirley when he was University Chaplain; I flatted nearby and we were involved with some inter-denominational youth thing. It was John who married us and Shirley was my matron of honour, which the boys explained was an elderly bridesmaid.
I have not seen them often since they've lived up the coast, but I'm so glad I was able to talk with them last month. Several times in the last few months word had gone round that John was about to leave us. I'd checked with Shirley to be sure it was an okay time, and John came out and talked for half an hour.
So I'll remember him very frail but with a spark left of the old fire.
As for Shirley, it gave me such joy on my farewell visit to Iona in 2011 to worship at the Abbey and sing her hymns there. They were also in the UCC church hymnbook when I visited there.

GG
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
UCC United Church of Canada, for any who didn't know. Should have written 'when I visited Canada'.

GG
 
Posted by Leaf (# 14169) on :
 
They are in the Anglican and the Evangelical Lutheran hymnals in Canada as well.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Love the bits of Shirley Murray's work that I've come across. Didn't know about John...will have to explore!

May he rest in peace and rise in glory, and may he and all the saints continue to pray for us. Our world sure needs it.
 
Posted by Arabella Purity Winterbottom (# 3434) on :
 
GG, it was the most wonderful occasion for catching up with people. Shirley said to me that she was really enjoying seeing everyone, even while she was sad. The funeral itself set up an expectation that people would talk afterwards, and talk they did.

Huia, I love the idea of the totara seedlings! Specially as I've spent the afternoon rooting out various seedlings so the forest doesn't overtake the garden (not totara, fortunately).
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I thought of it because it reminded me of when I travelled to the Coast with people from the church the first time. There was a fallen tree in a clearing and I was overwhelmed by the lichens, mosses, ponga and other tree seedlings that were growing from it. I remember thinking it was a vivid illustration of life in all its fullness.

Photos couldn't do it justice.

Then I thought about people like John and how they spark off growth in others. I know there have been, and still are people who do that in my life, and I am richer for having known them.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Huia, there was a time when if you went into the bush you looked for a little bit of fallen moss-covered branch to take home and keep damp with a water spray, and all sorts of things might grow out of it – moss, little ferns, seedlings.
Now it's strictly forbidden – what falls must be left to continue the cycle of growth and decay.

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Not quite on the same scale because of the drier climate, but the plants that sprang up after demolished building were cleared following the quakes were fascinating. There were research projects, which may be ongoing studying the plants and the succession of their appearance, which in themselves are another kind of flowering.

I know there are theories about entrophy, but sometimes it's the relentlessness of the life force that astounds me.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
BL, a little bird whispered in my ear that today was special to you. Have a wonderful day.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Thanks Loth - like my mother, I always enjoy every birthday that comes along, knowing that I am younger than I ever will be again! [Razz]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Happy Birthday BL!

And thanks for the early wishes...still a month and a bit to go though. [Smile]

Wonderful memories and descriptions Arabella, Huia and GG. Memory eternal John!

Two weeks til holidays: hurrah! My manager had what seems to be an annual chat with me about management aspirations...of which I have none, but he thinks I should consider it at least. May surprise him and answer "Yes". Can't hurt to learn new skills.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
BL, Happy Birthday from us as well.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Thanks Loth - like my mother, I always enjoy every birthday that comes along, knowing that I am younger than I ever will be again! [Razz]

That's a gem Banner Lady [Big Grin] and best wishes for your birthday and the coming year.

Huia
 
Posted by Galilit (# 16470) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:

A great loss, but as with all totara the seedlings will be sprouting for many years to come.

Me, for example

May flights of angels lead you on your way...may choirs of angels receive you
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Lovely time yesterday; lunch with my Aged P and TP, chocolates, flowers, good wishes from far and near... and then a beautiful antique brass mirror came my way. Though I really don't know who the matronly old broad looking out of it is,,,,, [Roll Eyes]

If we both make it to next year, I will be 60 and Mum will be 100. Oy vei.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Many happy returns, BL! [Smile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Perhaps a double celebration?
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
And my sister will be 70 and TP's mum 80. I suspect serial partying will be done. [Biased]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Many happy returns, Banner Lady! Nothing like shared birthdays.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yesterday we staked out a rose garden for our front yard. It has taken him 60 years, but TP is finally developing a liking for flowers. That, and being given a dozen rose bushes from someone who moved into a house and didn't want them!
I suspect it will be an interesting learning curve.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
A late Happy Birthday, Banner Lady.

I am reading Tim Winton's The Boy Behind The Curtain.
I have just finished reading the chapter Twice on Sundays which resonated with me even though my child and adolescent church experience were different (but similar in some ways). Especially the last paragraph.
quote:
I remain a believer and even a churchgoer, though I am in more than one sense irregular. Church was my village, but I doubt I'll ever be truly at ease there again. All the same, on a Sunday evening, wherever I am, I feel that tidal pull, the old melancholy descends, and it's as homely and as unsettling as the smell of the sea.

 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
As you might imagine, following the events of the last few years, there are some resonances for me in Winton's experience. I'm undecided as to whether I'll ever operate in a stipended role again ... though I am drifting back from time to time to my little Māori faith community who have exercised so much arohanui (great love) to Kuruman and me these past twelve months.

And that, I remind myself, is where God is. Amongst other place (like a Queensland waterfall three weeks ago, or the central NSW sunrise a week before that).
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Our congregation has joined with the local Anglicans to have a six-week Alpha Prayer Course.

I escaped and went to a nearby suburb where the minister and her husband, our Lay Supply, are showing a Living the Questions series of John Dominic Crossan based on his book 'How to Read the Bible and still be a Christian'.

At my age I don't want Alpha to 'deepen my prayer life'. I can go into my garden (or anywhere, but that's a nice place to be) , surround myself with the presence of God, and remember all those who I would want to know that Presence in their turbulent life.

Maybe I've said it before, but Zappa's post made me remember he too is covered by the cloak of the atua tapu..

GG
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Zappa
I think many find resonances. The majority of my friends who were in churches or the Christian Counter culture in the 70s retain the ethics but not the religion, and the others who remained are mostly participating for the practice despite the problem with some of the content of services.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Swallowing my pride. I have always said I would stay and fight for integrity from within. I no longer have the strength (as it happens I have just pulled out of conversations regarding what would have been an exciting appointment [Tear] ... I think I'm over any appointments, exciting or otherwise [Frown] )
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
That's sad, Zappa, but possibly it is a bit soon for recuperation?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
GG I did a Living the Questions course and got a lot out of it. I think it's been updated since then, and would be open to doing another if it was offered somewhere in Christchurch.

For Lent I'm doing a Retreat/ reflection course centred in the CBD in Christchurch. The Minister who retired from out church was offered a job as an inner city chaplain by Durham St Methodist church. He has written a set of Lenten reflections on the inner city and will be using this.

Zappa, my prayer life is somewhat sporadic, [Hot and Hormonal] but I am remembering you.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Zappa, did you get to the Franciscans at Stroud for a retreat? As a bonus, I think you may find the new rector at St John's very congenial. We knew him in another life.

And talking of lives, another significant day - my father's 101st birthday and we'll be having a large gathering for a simple meal at my elder sister's this evening. Just family, but that does include parents-in-law. Given that he was born late in the evening, he is of course called David.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Happy birthday to him , Gee D. A goodly age indeed. A couple of years ahead of BL's mother.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Swallowing my pride. I have always said I would stay and fight for integrity from within. I no longer have the strength (as it happens I have just pulled out of conversations regarding what would have been an exciting appointment [Tear] ... I think I'm over any appointments, exciting or otherwise [Frown] )

You have been through an extremely traumatic experience, and recovery will take as long as it takes. Meanwhile, be kind to yourself and don't feel you 'should' do this or that.

Moo
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thank you Lothlorien. We did not celebrate his birthday last year as may have been expected. He was very seriously ill with a bad prognosis. We made up for it last night.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yes, we are already thinking of the best way of getting my Aged P through what is predicted to be a dry autumn followed by a colder than usual winter. Funnily enough it is usually at the change into autumn and spring that the older ones seem to struggle most.

My mother seems to have lost the ability to dress appropriately for the weather. On cool days she will be in short sleeves and on hot ones in long sleeves with a jacket on. She is too frail to wear many layers, and is becoming increasingly vague about days and dates...but apart from that can still look after herself reasonably well.

Glad your Dad bounced back for the celebration Gee D. Their ability to rally is amazing! Some tough genes in there...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Happy birthday to your dad, Gee D. [Smile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Yes, we are already thinking of the best way of getting my Aged P through what is predicted to be a dry autumn followed by a colder than usual winter. Funnily enough it is usually at the change into autumn and spring that the older ones seem to struggle most.

My mother seems to have lost the ability to dress appropriately for the weather. On cool days she will be in short sleeves and on hot ones in long sleeves with a jacket on. She is too frail to wear many layers, and is becoming increasingly vague about days and dates...but apart from that can still look after herself reasonably well.

Glad your Dad bounced back for the celebration Gee D. Their ability to rally is amazing! Some tough genes in there...

BL, this seems to me to be one of the first abilities to go. Dad was the same and my friend with dementia is firmly convinced of the relationship between clouds and temperature.

Grey clouds mean it is cold and like your mum, multiple layers go on, regardless of actual temperature.

He had a bad day yesterday as pharmacist forced Doctor's visit which he ws not expecting and which was therefore out of his control.. I think the problem was that script had finished its series of repeats and needed replacing. He can't undertnd that. He blames doctor nd pharmacy for the resulting mess. Hei is good at shifting blame. He is happy we are pleased with his ability to manage medication. Take away the Webster pack,and the ability goes with it. he did not know what the medication was and seems to think there is new one.

Total mess late afternoon. I hope he managed to get a frozen meal heated. He certainly needed it.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thank you all for your messages. In February 16, we were very doubtful that he'd make his century and even though he did, he was far too ill for any partying. This year was a different story - and the extra year meant that the great-grandchildren were able to be there, a source of great pleasure for him.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Wonderful news, GeeD

No ... my retreats are with God-in-Nature at the mo ... and writing
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Belated Happy Birthday Pater Gee D!

And I can sympathise with the communing with nature Zappa. I read through the last thread to see what had happened -- sorry for all you went through, and [Votive] s for the future.

[Votive] s to for those with aged relatives.


A warm start to March here... Uni students back on campus, so the place feels a bit more alive. Even if I now have to wait longer for my coffee. [Biased]

[ 02. March 2017, 06:51: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
World Day of Prayer service this evening. This year's service was prepared by women of the Philippines, and behold! of the four congregations present, Presbyterian, Anglican and Catholic, this last congregation has a big flock of Philippinos, who turned out in force, and contributed their share of the service. Well, what could we do? as one of them said at supper, a very happy gathering after worship. The biggest turnout I've seen at a WDP service. And what a pretty flock of young women in their sparkling colourful dresses!

So did anyone else out there join in the World Day of Prayer?

GG
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Well, it's not yet 9 am in the UK!

But I'm afraid I'm not going, although the service will be at our local A-C church which I know well. I have a funeral to conduct instead.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Ian, I have sent you PM with details of Fr Rod Bower of Gosford Anglican in your neck of the woods this weekend.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
The word for Sydney today is not soggy but sodden. A week of rain followed by more rain will do that. Storm water canal near me down to the river is running a banker after non stop overnight rain and heavy rain this morning.

The rain is much needed after multiple 40+ days of heat but time for a break.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Goldstone was shown at our local film society last night. Despite some inadequacies it was a moving and sometimes uncomfortable film. David Gulpilil, David Wenham, and Jacki Weaver.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
It is a film I want to see. Jacki Weaver seems to get better and better in each role I've seen her in.

Thanks to Lothlorien I heard Fr Rod Bower, he of the most famous billboard in Australian Christendom, preach at the local Anglian church this morning. A challenging message on values over structures. They seem to attract speakers, esp. during Lent when they have guest speakers - the Human Right's Commissioner at Evensong tonight, our local member [of the Gold Coast apartment expenses] next week...Julian Burnside some weeks later...

A warm day down here. I await autumn making its appearance.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Disaster struck this morning. My burr grinder, an integral part of my Breville coffee machine stopped grinding halfway through amount needed. I dug out my separate grinder and was able to have coffee, although not upto my preferred standard.

I suspected a jam of beans in burrs, thinking it was a long time since that had been done. Machine was too high for me to see into properly, Iam definitely not tall. Finally took my torch and I could see the jam. I had to use my mother's old vegetable paring knife with a pointyend to dislodge beans. Knife is probably fifty years old, not the oldest I have, but it did the job.

Re-assembled everything and it works. The jammed beans were old and dry. I usually have coffee only once in day,, but look forward to cup with breakfast. Mum's knife to the rescue.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
A great autumn day here, starting with walking Dog and now getting ready for dinner. Already the smell of bbqs from neighbours, and I'm about to put a leg of lamb onto ours, as we're having friends over. Bbq lamb, some salads Madame has made, and a bottle or 2 of red - just the night for it.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Certainly just the night. I have had the place wide open, but have closed up a bit sincethe cool breeze arrived.Fish tonight, lamb steaks tomorrow. I see southern Highlands have forecast of 11 overnight. After some of our overnight temps, that will be a pleasant change.am just having some red before dinner, more to follow.

(I do know red with red meats, white wine with fish. Thisislight and was opened already.just me here unless I have visitors.)

[ 11. March 2017, 07:41: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Definitely moving into autumn here - today's high is forecast at a whopping 11c ( I remember my late Father visiting once and saying rather sarcastically that the temperature "Galloped all the way up to 11c" [Tear] ),

I'm a wee bit stiff this morning. The friend who mows my lawn killed all the weeds in the 25mx 300mm strip along my driveway and I'm grubbing out the remains, with the intention of digging out some soil, laying black plastic and covering the area with shingle. Yesterday I got halfway before the rain started, which was lucky because otherwise I would have kept going and been even stiffer. I finished the day with a bath using the last of my arnica bath salts. I'm never sure whether they really make a difference, or whether it's the placebo effect, but it works so I don't question it too deeply [Biased]

Huia

[ 11. March 2017, 20:50: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Off this avo to the Aged Care Facility where Mum lives to do some redecorating. Staff are scurrying about because there is a deposition arriving from Sydney on Tuesday re accreditation.

One of the pushes is to get more bright colours around...simply done with pictures and flowers, but it all takes time. Yesterday I took some wedding flowers up there from the church. (No flowers in church during Lent). And these were gratefully received - a change from funeral flowers anyway.

It is kind of fun to be given carte blanche to decorate four whole wings of a building, even if it all has to be done with whatever is to hand. Life is always full of interesting challenges!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
... Already the smell of bbqs from neighbours, and I'm about to put a leg of lamb onto ours, and a bottle or 2 of red ...

I'll be right over. [Big Grin]

eta: Loth, there's no reason why you shouldn't drink red wine with fish. Although I once had an unfortunate pairing of salmon with red wine which resulted in each making the other taste of iron-filings, I understand there are some lighter-weight reds which pair very nicely with more robustly-flavoured fish dishes.

In any event, you should drink whatever appeals to you - never mind what the experts and wine-snobs say.

[ 12. March 2017, 00:29: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
(No flowers in church during Lent).

Not being a Lent person, I can only guess the reason for this. Are flowers seen as self-indulgent?
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm not sure whether it's that they're seen as self-indulgent, or maybe that their absence helps to concentrate the mind, but it's traditional.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Lent is a time for self-examination and quiet reflection, leading up to the 3 Great Days. So no flowers, we cover statues and icons, brass crosses are either covered or like brass candleticks give way to wooden, and so forth. A sombre time.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Sending bottled water, juice and canned goods to those left destitute after a devastating fire in the informal settlement in Hout Bay near cape Town.

The fires made worse by galeforce winds and heat. Yesterday the Cape Argus Cycle Tour was cancelled for the first time in all its 40 years because the winds were too dangerous for cyclists, as shown in this video: cyclists blown over.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Sending bottled water, juice and canned goods to those left destitute after a devastating fire in the informal settlement in Hout Bay near cape Town.

The fires made worse by galeforce winds and heat. Yesterday the Cape Argus Cycle Tour was cancelled for the first time in all its 40 years because the winds were too dangerous for cyclists, as shown in this video: cyclists blown over.

I saw the cyclist on the news down here. That fire sounds very nasty.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Good grief!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Crikey! [Eek!]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Brilliant idea - sending food catered for the race to the victims of the fire (of course more long term they will need canned goods).

Even when I rode my bike regularly I avoided strong winds.

The South Island has been really lucky, further north they've has torrential rain, but we've had a few days of fairly light rain.

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Huia, yes, a generous gesture by the catering company that donated all the water and juices intended for the cycle race. The problem is that 15 000 people were left homeless and so members of the general public are also sending in foodstuffs, toiletries and blankets. Emergency shelters have been put up and rebuilding has begun. Because the shacks (sheets of corrugated iron insulated with cardboard and newspaper) are built so close together with dodgy electrical wiring and open gas burners, firetrucks can't get in close enough to extinguish blazes. An ongoing recurring dilemma until decent housing is made available.

Saw an African ground woodpecker under an olive tree this morning, very happy to think it may be nesting in the garden.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Emergency shelters have been put up and rebuilding has begun. Because the shacks (sheets of corrugated iron insulated with cardboard and newspaper) are built so close together with dodgy electrical wiring and open gas burners, firetrucks can't get in close enough to extinguish blazes. An ongoing recurring dilemma until decent housing is made available.

I was in Guguletu a couple of years back, also in Joe Slovo Park, and the former firefighter in me cringed at the flammability and access issues of the area. So many issues to face.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
MaryLouise, I'd never heard of the African ground woodpecker so I Googled. Lovely birds, and I can imagine them being really useful in controlling ants too. I could have done with a few when I lived up North. Eating a packet of raisins and discovering too late that it has been invaded by ants is not an experience I'd like to repeat.

Huia
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Eating a packet of raisins and discovering too late that it has been invaded by ants is not an experience I'd like to repeat.

Huia

[Snigger] [Snigger]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Sugar, fibre, minerals and protein all at once!

Good to see you back Rexory.

[ 16. March 2017, 06:11: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Sugar, fibre, minerals and protein all at once!

Good to see you back Rexory.

Thanks, Gee D. Haven't been anywhere: reading but rarely posting. It could be argued that I haven't much worth saying! [Smile]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Wild birds in the garden means fewer spiders and insects, including ants! Though tiny black ants got into an imperfectly closed bottle of sweet chili jam last week. (Huia)
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Rexory, as long as the congregation does not say that after your sermons.

On another note, it is so very sad to read that Bp Greg has resigned - not because he did something wrong but rather that he did a lot that was right.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I hadn't read about the Bishop's resignation before I Googled it Gee D. The phrase "martyrs of the Church" came to mind, but in his case, more accurately, martyred by the church. I hope his retirement allows him space to heal and enjoy his life.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Sitting with my old MacBook in the library at Whitianga, which is easier than fiddling on my iPad.
What was once a day's drive from Home to Holiday I did gently in four days, 600 km, but Oh! the peace now I'm here.
While I was travelling there was a huge wind/rain/heat event up this way, and when I got as far as Coromandel there were emails and texts from friends and neighbours back home, filled with concern. In fact, the floods etc were on the east coast, and I was comfortable in perfect driving weather on the other side of the mountains, warm but not hot, overcast but no rain.
Church here can't afford a minister so any old lay-preaching friends who visit take a turn to lead worship. My health makes it difficult to stand for any length of time but they'll be happy if I lead sitting down. We'll have to see.

Back next week....

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
So sending pics of flowers can have interesting outcomes. I texted the floral guild some pics of the arrangements I did at the nursing home by way of thanking them (and assuring them that the flowers were used as instructed). The nursing home manager also added her thanks. The floral guild have intimated I may be inducted forthwith into their hallowed ranks without any further training (one has to train for these things???). I would be flattered if I wasn't laughing so hard.

They really don't know what they might be getting by inviting me to join the roster - I hope my sense of humour doesn't get me into trouble. Leaving me to obtain "suitable flowers" could see me using a lot of red hot pokers and snapdragons or belladonna lilies and wormwood. Most of the time I absolutely detest how my denomination is run...stay tuned...this could be the shortest stint on a guild in history!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Ive used roadside wildflowers. [Devil]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
LC, I was informed by the esteemed guild that even this has a name...in floristry it is called "Roadsidia" !!
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
And there were flowers in church today - because the parliamentarians and glitterati will all be there for Evensong to celebrate the Queen's sapphire jubilee. Fabulous blue and gold arrangements that by tomorrow afternoon will also be gracing the nursing home.

I think I could get to like being a floral courier for Jesus.
[Smile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Well done, BL on your new role. [Big Grin] I think the nursing home people may well appreciate the flowers and the reason for them, more than the parliamentarians may.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
A (70s) couple at the hospital where I provide spiritual care wanted to renew their marriage vows. I asked our UCA pastors to lead the service and everyone was very happy. It was the talk of the nurses that week. It turned out they had been married for 22 years, and people were expecting the marriage to have been longer.

They are now in an aged care home and I have to keep my promise to get the photos to them. A task for tomorrow.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Double post. Sorry.
With all the recent rain our smoke detectors are going off from the humidity coming in the windows and steam from the bathroom (a real bathroom with bath and shower). The last time this occurred was 3am this morning and the neighbours heard them. I had to take them down and remove the batteries. They do say they need replacing after 10 years so I went to buy replacements at the electrical supplier.
However, that model is no longer in production, nor is there an equivalent. When they were put in the regulations required that they be mains powered and linked so if they do not recover when it gets dry it looks as though I may have to get all three replaced by an electrician.
Built in obsolescence strikes again.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I seem to have sorted my alarm problems from last year.continual working, batteries replaced. It was six months old and I refused to pay, said it was surely under warranty. Contractor changed his tune when Isaid I would tell everyone about poor workmanship etc. He replaced it at no charge to me, just in time for our annual compulsory inspection of every apartment.

It did go off a couple of days ago, possibly similar cause to yours. However it soon stopped.

I also had to have front door closure fixed a week or so ago.Over the years the screws had loosened and did not fit. Fortunately I was inside when this happened. Had I been outside, door may have needed drastic treatment to let me back in. It is a heavy fire door and part of common property, so fortunately I was not responsible for payment.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
An electrical fault caused part of the roof of a train carriage at Burwood Station to blow off this afternoon. It blew uphigh onto adjoining platform and some reports suggest over double tracks to platform 5.

Platform 3 is possibly the busiest platform at that station as most trains stop there, regardless of their destination from Strathfield, the next station up the line where trains branch out to other lines.

Just a few minutes away.

[ 20. March 2017, 04:14: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
That is worrying, with those high voltage lines.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Amazing that no one was seriously injured.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Smoke alarm problem the same here at Matarangi.
The day after my arrival I was in the shower and had just worked up a great lather with the shampoo mwhen the alarm outside the (open because of hot climate) door started up. No visible steam; poked at the stop button with my walking stick but no luck, and I can't climb on to a chair. I just had to let it run its course.
It did it again next day, but after that I shut the bathroom door.

GG
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Smoke alarm problem the same here at Matarangi.
The day after my arrival I was in the shower and had just worked up a great lather with the shampoo mwhen the alarm outside the (open because of hot climate) door started up. No visible steam; poked at the stop button with my walking stick but no luck, and I can't climb on to a chair. I just had to let it run its course.
It did it again next day, but after that I shut the bathroom door.

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Wonderfully wet here, and rain (but not too much) predicted for the whole week. Cannot remember the last time we had a week of rain. It has wrecked our courtyard's canvas pergola cover which couldn't cope with the sudden weight of water. My fault - I thought about taking it down last week but didn't get to it. We were out grocery shopping when the heavens opened today and by the time we got home the metal roof supports had buckled on one side the awning. TP's tanks are full for the first time this autumn. He is as happy as a duck and spent the afternoon sloshing about putting plants in the garden. And our daphne is flowering for the first time. May it be the harbinger of a good outdoor season for the garden.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
We can sound as if we'reom yje English thread and talk of the weather. A tremendous downpour here at about 6.30, and I was planning on catching my usual train about 7. Probably the heaviest since the current wet started. I left at the usual time, and took forever to get on a train home. To maake ligfe easier all araound, I rang Madame, I got off the train a few stations earlier and met her at a favourite restaurant. I don't know how much fell, but I'd guess about 50 mm. Lucky I got out when I did though. Dlet left a half hour later and took 2 hours rather than the usual 35 minutes. But the garden's responded very well to all this deep-soaking rain and will get through winter comfortably.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
50 mm of rain is not to be sneezed at - I think the technical term would be "more than mildly moist". [Big Grin]

Is it generally regarded as a Good Thing in your neck of the woods to get some really heavy rain, to keep forest fires and such at bay, or, like us, do you just see it as a bl**dy nuisance?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Piglet, your question has several answers. We needed the rain after the massive heat. Even the deep rooted big trees around here are stressed.

Come spring there will be complaints about hazard reduction burn smoke. Then there will be warnings about the growth encouraged by the rains in autumn. Complaints that Sydney is a tinderbox are regular at that time.
 
Posted by Emendator Liturgia (# 17245) on :
 
For all in Sydney - and coming soon to those in other centres as well.

OFFICIAL PUBLIC LAUNCH OF EQUAL VOICES, Monday 3rd April at Pitt Street Uniting Church.

Equal Voices is a national, ecumenical movement of Australian Christians who seek to work for reconciliation and to equip LGBTIQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer) people and their friends and advocates to bring into being a truly inclusive and welcoming Australian church. For more information, please visit Equal Voices

The Hon Michael Kirby will officially launch Equal Voices on Monday 3rd April, 6.30pm at Pitt St Uniting Church. From 6.30 to 7pm there will be wine and canapés served before proceedings commence. At the close of official proceedings there will be a time for discussion over coffee/tea and selection of cakes, tarts and slices.

Following Michael Kirby's speech there will be a reading of the National Apology and we will also be announcing our plans for the next 12 months, including a Symposium in October, and an Apology will be offered to LGBTIQ Christians and Australians, for the ways in which they have been hurt. Our home page includes a link to RSVP for the Launch.

The homepage also has the National Apology for people to sign. If you would like a hard copy of the apology to sign, or to disseminate through your church and/or social network, let me know and I can send you a copy.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Do you mind if I pass this on to some I know who would not see this here, but would be interested.?
 
Posted by Emendator Liturgia (# 17245) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Do you mind if I pass this on to some I know who would not see this here, but would be interested.?

By all means Loth - please pass along to anyone and everyone who is a GLBTIQ+ supporter!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks, I thought that would be the response, but wanted to be polite and not just take.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Sounds like a great initiative, Emendator!

Packing for a work-related road trip to Swellendam (South Africa). It is still ferociously hot but rain is predicted for tomorrow and drop in temperatures as autumn begins. But the heat may resume with soaring temperatures the day after that, so I have to pack twice as much clothing as I'd like and feel irked.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Piglet, it was so hot here over summer that even under many layers of mulch the ground is hard and bone dry. The first few days of rain merely moistened the surface. Much soaking rain is needed, but with breathing space in between for the water to settle in. Let's hope the earth gets what it needs.

I had to do the reading of the Samaritan woman at the well today. It made me think about how much of creation around me is thirsting.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Details in both prayer and thanksgiving threads of a nasty accident Rowen had this afternoon when the side of the mountain road collapsed and her 4WD rolled two or three metres into a culvert, landing on its side. She had to be pulled out through a hole cut in roof. Unhurt!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
{{{Rowen}}} [Votive]

My parents had a similar sort of accident forty-something years ago when their car (a Volvo estate, which is probably why they survived) skidded on melting snow in the Scottish highlands and went down a ravine. They landed on their wheels, and escaped by breaking the back windows, and the only injury sustained was Dad having to have stitches in his hand (presumably cut on the broken glass).

It was long enough ago that seat-belts weren't universally worn, but they did, and it probably saved their lives.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Best wishes Rowen. As with Piglet's parents, I'd bet that the seatbelts plus the sturdy construction of the 4wd saved any real injury. Bet you're in a bit of genuine shock though, so take things easily.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
A rural hospital in Victoria or elsewhere, I wonder? Poor Rowen, I expect she will be feeling very battered and bruised.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Poor Rowen, I expect she will be feeling very battered and bruised.

... but pretty darn lucky as well.

[Votive]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Best wishes Rowen. I guess you're being well looked after.
[Votive]

GG
 
Posted by Emendator Liturgia (# 17245) on :
 
[Votive] Prayers for you Rowan - and blessings for it being a 'close' call: you're probably really sick and tired of seeing the inside of hospitals from a patients' viewpoint! [Votive]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Family in Mackay now without power. Niece who works in the Emergency Services call centre at Townsville says so many extra personnel have arrived from down south they are stacked in like sardines waiting for the aftermath of Cyclone Debbie.

The slower the system the more intense it gets. My sister is predicting it will go up the Burdekin River towards the huge dam there as warm water draws cyclones. A tense waiting period over the next few hours. Lord have mercy.
 
Posted by bib (# 13074) on :
 
Prayers for all affected by Cyclone Debbie.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
[Votive] Rowen
[Votive] Those facing Debbie down
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Votive] for all in danger from the cyclone.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
I hear Rowen is delighted with her new spectacles and is in good spirits. Hope many more new good things come her way to replace that which was lost.

Family have all checked in okay...except for the children who are going stir crazy without electronically powered devices to keep them occupied. They have been reduced to the slowdom of actual rather than virtual books, monopoly boards and packs of cards. A second full day without electricity and the parents are beginning to unravel a bit. I checked the stats for Mackay yesterday afternoon on the BOM site and it stated Mackay had !00% humidity.Hmmm.... does this mean they are living in water?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Some friends in Mackay are into their second day without power but otherwise are ok. Mackay is fairly low and flat so they may be snorkelling soon.

Pictures this morning are astounding. Tremendous damage over such a wide area.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yes, I notice that if you draw a line directly inland from where the cyclone crossed the coast at Airlie Beach, you find Collinsville, then Lake Proserpine, then the Burdekin Dam. Guess Qld family was right about Debbie heading towards inland water. As it is now just a rain depression I expect things will be just as wet but not as windy for everyone. Mackay rellies have sandbagged as much as possible, but are not looking forward to the next few days. It will become critical when the beer runs out!

They posted a pic of an upturned coffee table and the monopoly scattered everywhere. Guess the kids are getting heartily sick of it all...
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Hope Cyclone Debbie has passed by now and everyone is safe.

Very sad week here in South Africa after the death of human rights activist and Struggle veteran Ahmed Kathrada aged 87 on Tuesday. He spent 26 years in prison on Robben Island alongside Mandela. Kathrada had been ill, so his death wasn't unexpected but a loss all the same.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
A generation passing, the one which really suffered in their efforts to bring the extreme racism to an end.

[ 29. March 2017, 08:33: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
That's how it feels Gee D, the sense of a generation of titans passing. Essa Moosa, the Cape lawyer and judge who fought so hard against apartheid died at the end of February and many of the old leaders of the ANC and UDF are now frail and retired from public life. Archbishop Desmond Tutu sent a message to be read out at Ahmed Kathrada's funeral -- Ahmed Kathrada will be buried next to the grave of his friend and fellow lawyer, the Afrikaner renegade Bram Fischer, about whom Nadine Gordimer wrote in Burger's Daughter. Another world, in which politics was a matter of life and death.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
And we, perhaps unfairly, judge those now in power against these and find them lacking.
 
Posted by Evangeline (# 7002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
(No flowers in church during Lent).

Not being a Lent person, I can only guess the reason for this. Are flowers seen as self-indulgent?
In addition to what others said, I have found that making the church more austere (so no flowers, covered pictures etc) not only focuses the mind on the crucifixion but when you come to church on Easter Sunday and there are flowers and everything is bright and happy it makes the celebration more vibrant & joyous.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Word just in from Rowen asking me to post on this thread for her.

The aches and pains are lessening. She has some new glasses to replace those broken. She is now in a motel, paid for by insurance, while things are being sported. Some progress with insurance and replacement vehicle.

She is very grateful for the friends she has in town who took her in late at night after accident and for those who have added their care and love.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Word just in from Rowen asking me to post on this thread for her.

The aches and pains are lessening. She has some new glasses to replace those broken. She is now in a motel, paid for by insurance, while things are being sported. Oops. Sorted, not sported. Some progress with insurance and replacement vehicle.

She is very grateful for the friends she has in town who took her in late at night after accident and for those who have added their care and love.

[ 30. March 2017, 03:36: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Good to hear Rowen is getting better although I'm sure the shock of an accident like that will stay with her for a while. [Votive]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I gather FD and Clarence are a bit wet
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
That's how it feels Gee D, the sense of a generation of titans passing. Essa Moosa, the Cape lawyer and judge who fought so hard against apartheid died at the end of February and many of the old leaders of the ANC and UDF are now frail and retired from public life. Archbishop Desmond Tutu sent a message to be read out at Ahmed Kathrada's funeral -- Ahmed Kathrada will be buried next to the grave of his friend and fellow lawyer, the Afrikaner renegade Bram Fischer, about whom Nadine Gordimer wrote in Burger's Daughter. Another world, in which politics was a matter of life and death.

(boasting hat on)

I remember being very sad when Beyers Naudé died. I interviewed him once .. quite a dude. And I was Tutu and Leah's driver for three days. But I have mentioned that a few times I suspect!

(boasting hat off)
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
I gather FD and Clarence are a bit wet

I do not have a causeway near me, but if I did, it would look like the picture I saw elsewhere this morning. Heavy, non stop rain all day here. Cold change from south is now meeting rain from cyclone in north. Trees are wild, not cyclone wild but wild for my sheltered corner of this block. Must see if storm canal is full. Most likely.

FD will be getting cabin fever what with bypass op and this weather.

[ 30. March 2017, 05:28: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Zappa -- Beyers Naudé, Desmond and Leah Tutu. Cherished memories and meant to be shared. Such remarkable and brave people in a dark time. I attended a UCT seminar given by Beyers Naudé in the 1980s with security police hanging about outside in the corridor. He spoke with such sincerity and pain about what was happening to the church in South Africa.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
An expat Orcadian living in Broadbeach, Queensland posted a picture on Facebook of his Orkney flag flying proudly and undamaged - they're made to withstand a fair puff of wind. [Smile]

Seriously though - glad to hear that you're all OK.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
So it should be. Broadbeach is a long way from actual cyclone. Yes, wind and rain moved south, even to Sydney which is a very long way away, but Broadbeach would have probably had just a bit of a blow. A bit of typical , laconic, Aussie understatement there. LOL. Qld is a big place and cyclone was based in far north.

Sunshine here , sort of, today but very much cooler and less humid than it has been lately.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
I gather FD and Clarence are a bit wet

They were flooded in for a while, but not now.

I had to cancel two appointments yesterday and today as we can get to the few shops that opened after their power was restored, but not out of town.

I joined the Uniting Church of Australia a year ago after my house church stopped meeting. They are now electing the council and elders and I have been nominated as an elder. The pastors would like me to accept. I am rather reluctant and wondering how others would approach or react to this.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
All Blacks reveal tactics for complete world domination of rugby.

Nice try, pun unintended.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Latchkey Kid:

I joined the Uniting Church of Australia a year ago after my house church stopped meeting. They are now electing the council and elders and I have been nominated as an elder. The pastors would like me to accept. I am rather reluctant and wondering how others would approach or react to this.

Is your reluctance based on just having been there a year? From their point of view I can see that having some new blood amongst the Elders could be an advantage. From your point of view - if you're not yet ready, and don't feel confident, discuss it with the Elders. If you still feel really reluctant would "Not yet", be considered an acceptable answer? It leaves the door open for them to ask again later, after you've been around a bit longer.

Huia - been on a Vestry and the words, Never
Again!!
spring to mind.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Daylight this morning when it ought to be. Clocks back. A few weeks and it will be dark early again. I do enjoy light in the early evening, but the cycle goes on.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I had heard so many times about clocks being adjusted at 3am that my brain woke me then to do it [Frown]

I did enjoy my later awakening though (7 am) as it was light and we didn't have any of the sea fog which has spoilt the last few mornings.

I even made it to church this morning where we had a trumpet and cornet playing various pieces of music including a couple of verses of Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" and some brilliant preaching.

We had someone "Preaching for a Call" - I think is the phrase. It's a Presbyterian tradition I don't really understand - but she was great, and if it's a matter of voting or anything I say YES . There's a meeting after church next week. (fingers crossed).

In the interregnum we have had a couple of people who were dire, as well as a couple who were great, but either working elsewhere or retired, and so not available.

Huia
 
Posted by Rowen (# 1194) on :
 
Home again

Thank you for your prayers. I am thankful to be alive and whole. Work has leased a car, as we begin the process of buying a new suitable vehicle.

It's getting colder in the Alps. No surprise really.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
[Votive] for all those dealing with the after effects of TC Debbie and for the ongoing flood issues.

We had all the drama without the pain - exciting flooding of our road, and some loss of telecoms, but otherwise nothing - and it seems somehow wrong we got off so lightly when others are suffering.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Clarence, good to hear you're OK. I had a similar feeling of the wrongness off getting off lightly after the quakes, so I recognise that feeling.

Today at church one of the Elders mentioned a meeting coming up that involved people coming from Marlborough (one of the areas badly affected by earthquakes last year). A gift basket of small, "thinking of you" type things is being collected as a symbol of support. My mind went totally blank on possibilities - then I remembered that planting bulbs as a promise of hope was important to me following the quakes, so I am sending some spring bulbs.

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Lovely thought Huia. This week I get to plant some anemones and crocus in my waterless iris pond, and will also be hosting a few rellies from far north Queensland. No doubt they will fill me in on many things that have failed to make headlines down south. As someone with relatives in the affected areas I had the news on pretty much all the time. By the third day I was so tired of the vulture like commentary I just switched off. It seemed that they could hardly wait to report on the first flood related fatality.

Last weekend I was at the Sapphire Coast - towards the bottom of NSW and the wind was fierce enough I could not sleep through it. However it was a southerly buster heading up the coast towards Sydney and a blessing as it forced the moisture from TC Debbie out into the Tasman. I expect not so much of a blessing for our NZ cousins...

BL does not like wind. At all. Thoughts and prayers for all those being blown about by it.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Even the tail end of Cyclone Debbie is doing dramatic stuff here, things like: month's rain in 24 hours, kids' school camp cut off, mud slides, man thought to have been seen struggling in water,evacuations taking place before Whanganui river floods, and so on.

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
My sister reports that a certain morning show news team are definitely not welcome again in north Queensland. Having landed in Townsville they were miffed at being denied air access to the Whitsundays through emergency services and police channels. Ignoring police advice, they loaded their crew into hired vehicles and went looking for devastation to show their viewers. After using up their petrol and provisions they then had to beg the victims to share with them what little the poor and suffering had left. It was ill considered, intrusive and bad behaviour.

The North Queenslanders en masse turned off the reporting as it was so voyeuristic. Heaven help us, if this is now the standard practise in telecasts. [Projectile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Unfortunately, BL, this does not surprise me. I see an attitude of entitlement among many media members. I remember seeing one reporter trying to jump into ambulance as it left with the two miners rescued from Beaconsfield mine after days and days of being trapped. Disgusting.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
After the Virginia Tech shootings, the national media descended on Blacksburg. They behaved as if they believed that the people here had a duty to provide them with stories.

I still cringe when I see a media truck.

Moo

.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
These people did not have the common sense to carry their own water or petrol - did not even occur to them that if there was no electricity then no petrol pumps could work. One local syphoned fuel out of his boat just to get rid of them.

Also copping a serve are those island resort operators who neglected to give booked holiday makers any option of cancelling - or even a heads up that they might run into problems when they arrived. Nightmare stories are now filtering out and to avoid public scrutiny the "missing persons file" quietly grows without being officially linked to the weather event.

After TC Yasi dozens of people from one beachside campsite area went missing. Behind the campsite was a 4-5 metre deep gully, After TC Yasi there was no longer a gully - the topography had been rearranged by the wind and water, and so much sand, soil and vegetation dumped on top it was not feasible to try to excavate it. Access was a huge issue so It was simply left as the probable gravesite of some of the surfing and camping nomads that roam the north coast. They may have got away - they may not. No one really knows.

Hope everyone is now accounted for in NZ. It sounds like it has been a wild few days over there.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Still happening down here, but as far as I know not nearly as badly as further north. I was out in it and the worst few minutes were the 100 metres from the bus stop to home when I was heading into either rain or hail. An hour later and my face and teeth are still aching.

The river at the end of the street doesn't seem to be flooding and the next high tide is in about 7 hours time, so I guess that will be the crunch time (on the other hand the rain is forecast to ease - so it should be OK.

[Votive] For all those affected - in both countries

Next time Australia is welcome to send its used tropical cyclones elsewhere - how about the Anartic?

Huia

[ 06. April 2017, 06:22: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
A very difficult time Huia, waiting for the tide - I hope there's quite a rise from the river to your house. Just seen the photos of Edgecumbe on a news site.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
The river did flood, but further upstream, where it has flooded before. When I opened the back door at 6 am to let the cat out I could hear the sound of water pumps being used, so it has probably flooded somewhere nearby. The river hasn't flooded in this area for years, so long term residents told me, but the earthquakes raised the riverbed so who knows what could happen. There are also helicopters flying around now that it's light. Today's forecast here is for a fine day, which is a relief.

Edgecumbe has had a hard time. They had a big quake in 1987, which changed the shape of the landscape and made the town more flood prone.

Huia- earthquakes, the gift that keeps giving.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Good to hear that you're safe. But let's also remember those who were out in the night on emergency work, many of them volunteers.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Yes indeed, Gee D. I used to mind young grandchildren while DIL was on SES work. I remember she was away several days on flood relief work further north. She was exhausted and arrived home with nothing dry, all wet and smelly. Those volunteers and others like them do dangerous, hard work.

Others in family were with RFS till injury forced withdrawal.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Votive] for all affected.

From what I've seen of New Zealand (on film and TV), it looks like such an utterly beautiful place, if it would only stay still. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Not just beautiful Piglet, but so clean. Once you get out of the big cities, you can feel the fresh air drink from many creeks and so forth.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Dropping in for a breather from the real world.

My usual Easter dramas have their usual Easter dramas! Two of the cast returned from Cadet Camp on crutches, while of more concern is our guitarist who admitted himself to hospital with depression on Thursday. (Please pray for N.) Thus I will be stepping to the breach for our three lead up performances (Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday nights) and the main gig on Good Friday in the city.

Numbers are not exact but I think Thursday night at my home church could be the 100th time I've directed an Easter drama performance. Will reflect on that and the future after Easter.

Kids all on church camp so Mrs Curly and I, while we didn't organise our weekend away, are looking forward to a smidge of peace and quiet tonight before opening night tomorrow night.

mr curly
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
What a dramatic start to a season, Mr Curly. Prayers definitely for N, in a nasty situation. Not too sure how Biblically authentic the crutches would be - perhaps some rough wooden ones might pass muster.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
An interesting article in today's Guardian. It speaks of the by-elections, starting with Gosford and then moving to the one in North Shore - which does not cover the North Shore at all, rather some northern harbourside suburbs, but we'll let that pass. It then moves on to the electorate of Manly as being "further north"!!!! Most of us would say east of the area stretching from Wollstonecraft to Mosman. This in what's supposed to be a serious newspaper.

Time for Dog's walk, ruminating on changed geography.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Gee D, I guess if they gave directions purely from a map, then those suburbs are North Shore. I very much doubt Rose Bay would appreciate being called a southern suburb because it is on southern side of the harbour. [Biased] Gosford is obviously a bit north to be called North Shore in the eyes of someone who does not know not only Sydney but also Sydney traditions, for want of a better word.

Gosford used to be Liberal but has well and truly switched. My youngest son lives and works in the area and reports to me of feelings there. Very much Labor now. He spends time before any elections to decide which group gets the privilege of being place last on his ballot paper. Spoilt for choice in Senate votes, but this was easier.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
An interesting article in today's Guardian. It speaks of the by-elections, starting with Gosford and then moving to the one in North Shore - which does not cover the North Shore at all, rather some northern harbourside suburbs, but we'll let that pass. It then moves on to the electorate of Manly as being "further north"!!!! Most of us would say east of the area stretching from Wollstonecraft to Mosman. This in what's supposed to be a serious newspaper.

Time for Dog's walk, ruminating on changed geography.

Meh ... everything from Wollongong to the Hawkesbury and inland to Katoomba is just an amorphous grey mass! [Biased]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Wet and windy. Young friend studying to be a doctor hit a slippery patch on the Federal highway yesterday and flipped his car. After emerging and checking he was okay a second car with an elderly driver came around the bend, slipped on the same patch and hit a tree. Emergency services, when they arrived, were somewhat surprised to find the occupant of the first accident doing first aid on the occupant of the second accident. Take care on the roads today - it looks like it is not good driving weather all across the southern and eastern states.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I live in Wilton. I know people near the northern boundary who give their address as Wadestown, which must have more prestige, being a much older subdivision with its share of notable homes. Someone bang in the middle of Wilton was offended when a land agent used the expression 'middle-class'. Others use the designation 'Otari', reverting, as the local school did, to the Maori name.
Our cul-de-sac, which has been here 50-odd years, appears on GPS screens as a blue dot and nothing more. Two taxis and an AA mechanic have reminded us always to give our address as 'off Warwick Street'. This message didn't reach the man who was coming to deal with my flat battery last week, but he did spot the street sign as he drove past, directed by his GPS voice to go down the hill, turn right (we were on his left) and head off into the blue.
OTOH my taxi driver when I headed home from A&E the other night (and that's another story) had a larger and more sophisticated device which I think directed him correctly. He said it should do: it had cost him $1500. But then he had me there to direct him anyway.

GG (unashamedly middle class)
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
That sounds nasty, BL. It is lovely here so far, cool but sunny. Unlike last night when I could see distant lightning and was just checking radar on storm when it arrived in full force. Widespread over a large swathe of the state.

[ 09. April 2017, 21:34: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Satirist John Clarke dies while hiking.

He will be missed, a very clever man, born in NZ but working here for years. I loved the brilliant film of the preparations for Sydney Olympics where he seemed to have prophetic gift for snags and disasters. I tried to never miss the Thursday night series with Brian Dawe, just before the ABC news. Four minutes of rueful laughter.

[ 10. April 2017, 02:36: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Groans from our household as well. After chewing through all the crap dished up on the weekly political menu he and Bruce always delivered the tastiest morsels to savour. A unique and delightful talent and I am so glad Oz and NZ got to share him.

[Waterworks]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
For a boy from Fairfield all those suburbs are north somewhere to me, Gee D. [Biased] Seriously: you'd expect that paper to get them right.

[Votive] N ; and your play is now presented in the city Mr Curly??? I fondly remember visiting your church and seeing it.

Terrible news re John Clarke. We'll claim him as we do all successful NZers. A mighty talent.


Back from just over 2 weeks in Iceland to celebrate my 40th, and a quick visit to California to visit friends as well. A wonderful time, and a wonderful country with wonderful people. Felt I was there for months. I seem to have brought the cold weather back with me.
 
Posted by Dark Knight (# 9415) on :
 
Clarke is a colossal loss - one of NZ's greatest exports. [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
I was one of many at our local Palm Sunday rally in support of refugees, especially those still stuck on Manus or Nauru.

Weather was overcast, but fortunately (thank God!) the rally finished just before the hailstorm hit!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
My new phone is due for delivery today by AusLost. I also have another grocery delivery due and am hoping they do not coincide. Grocery drivers are wonderful from my supplier, on time,trackable, polite and helpful. AusLost couriers are totally the opposite. Am planning to ask him to bring phone up as my mobility is improving but not good yet.

Once I have phone, I will organise new SIM as I am continuing my plan.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
... Back from just over 2 weeks in Iceland to celebrate my 40th ...

Many happy returns! [Smile]

D. and I went to Iceland for a long weekend for his 40th and absolutely fell in love with the place, so we went back six years later for mine.

Both of our birthdays are in the winter (his in December, mine in February), and I can highly recommend swimming in the Blue Lagoon with hailstones falling in your hair.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Am abaout to start yet another complaint for AusLost. I just checked the tracking info again. It now has that at 7:50 am the courier could not deliver , no safe location. I live in a security block and buzzer needs to be rung to be let in or to give notifications. At that time, I was dressed and eating breakfast. No buzzer at all. [Mad] [Mad] This is the usual response from me for a delivery by them. Had I known from website when I bought phone that they used this courier system I would have requested another means.

I will go down later to see if there has been a card left. Probably not. Nothing possible till later in day when courier returns to PO.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
ooooh...not often we get to see a triple burn from Loth...some couriers are dreadful but it is usually the individuals not the company. I have been at home with lights on, curtains and door open, doorbells front and back working and actually been standing at the window in time to see van pull up, driver leap out, chuck a card in the letterbox and drive off. Obviously had no intention of getting to the front door (@ 2 metres behind said letterbox). Others from the same company are wonderful.

I know this, because eldest daughter has regular deliveries of new fashion accessories arriving for her. TP used to joke that she was holding up 5% of the Chinese economy. TP also gets books delivered once a month. Really seems to depend on who is driving the van as to how diligently things are delivered, if at all.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
We once posted in the special home postcode box at our PO to a place 1km away in town. It took a week to get there. Apparently, it still has to go to the sorting office in Casino 90 minutes drive away.

At the end of February my sister in England let us know that our Christmas Card, sent at the beginning of December, had just arrived. I think the Australian postal system may not have many years to go.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks, BL. I do not know how that happened. Have deleted two of them.

You are right, it is the person although the system is far from perfect. This fellow lies often. My hairdresser said the sa,me when she was here the other day, voicing the same opinion as I held re local PO. Uber driver collected a bulky but light parcel for me while I waited in cab. He voiced an opinion of local staff and their skills when he returned with my parcel. Other residents here would back me up about this particular fellow. This is the second time he has used 6:50 as a time of ringing. Last time, there were three people here. .

I had an incident number and a phone number for several years because of the rudeness of courier. "I am only doing this because you are old and helpless." Not true at all. That complaint brought his boss to pay me a visit.

Christmas 2016 saw christmas presents for grandchildren disappear. They "fell off the back of a truck," as the saying goes. They were stolen. Eventually tracked down.
On the other hand, my groceries have just been delivered halfway through the time allowed in tracking. Drivers are unfailingly polite and helpful.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Amazon.in, and presumably other companies as well, have a scheme where you can nominate a courier or two - one of the ones down on their list for this area is, frankly, a waste of time so I have simply asked them to use one of three with offices based in nearby town and it was done, instantly.

Result me being a happy customer.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Good to see you back WW, and prayers for a speedy recovery.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
My new phone is due for delivery today by AusLost. I also have another grocery delivery due and am hoping they do not coincide. Grocery drivers are wonderful from my supplier, on time,trackable, polite and helpful. AusLost couriers are totally the opposite. Am planning to ask him to bring phone up as my mobility is improving but not good yet.

Once I have phone, I will organise new SIM as I am continuing my plan.

2degrees rang a couple of months ago to say they were giving long-time customers a new phone. She described its features; when I said I only needed a granny-phone, to make and receive phone calls and texts, she said they had that option too, and it would arrive in a few days. It arrived two weeks later, after I'd left on holiday, but finally last week Son arrived to insert sim and battery and put a selfie of the two of us on the screen. But I still couldn't send a text till he brought the 16-year-old round to help me sort it out. She knows she's not to seize the phone and show me what to do, but to give it to me and tell me what to do.

RIP John Clarke. Apparently he said he never revisited us because he so hated flying. We did miss him.

GG
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Cyclone Cook is dribbling in and predicted to reach the intensities generated by Cyclone Giselle, better known as The Wahine Storm on April 10 1968. I remember that day well.

I doubt it will, but a few rivers are rising - GG, up your way it's vulnerable, isn't it? We're in a storm shadow here, so just some steady-heavy-drizzle predicted. Kuruman is flying out to Oz on Friday, though, and that may be more tricky.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Apart from going to church (if the wind and rain permit) I'm staying home to make soup (chicken and barley broth as well as bacon hock) and read.

YaY for e books on the kindle and tablet. In a move that I have never really understood, the library system here is closed on Good Friday, open on Saturday and Sunday, and closed on Monday [Confused] Apparently Easter Day is not a Public Holiday, (but shops have been prosecuted for being open then) whereas Easter Monday is. I know the law is changing, but it's still weird.

Added to all this my branch library is in a shopping Mall so is closed on Easter day as well as Easter Monday.

I also wondering whether ebooks, which are available 24/7, can be borrowed on Public holidays.

Probably only an obsessive library user would be wondering about such matters.

Huia [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Up in Pretoria for work, rain early this morning but took the day off to walk with a group of old activist friends from Church Street to the Union Buildings and join a massed opposition rally calling for corrupt President Zuma to resign. The weather cleared and the atmosphere on the lawns of the Union Buildngs was lively but relaxed, friendly, helpful. Huge crowds and disciplined marching through the streets. Glad I'd lost some weight, able to keep up with those +40 years, if not the dancing and running youngsters.

Heading back to the Cape and another cold front, hoping for rain. The glimpses of depleted dams and bone-dry river beds from the plane window were scary.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Cyclone Cook is dribbling in and predicted to reach the intensities generated by Cyclone Giselle, better known as The Wahine Storm on April 10 1968. I remember that day well.

I doubt it will, but a few rivers are rising - GG, up your way it's vulnerable, isn't it? We're in a storm shadow here, so just some steady-heavy-drizzle predicted. Kuruman is flying out to Oz on Friday, though, and that may be more tricky.

Hope you will all be ok and everyone else anywhere near too.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
What Loth said - prayers ascending for all likely to be affected. [Votive]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
...Heading back to the Cape and another cold front, hoping for rain. The glimpses of depleted dams and bone-dry river beds from the plane window were scary.

Drought is scary! This state has just been declared officially afflicted by it but because of the topography I don't think it will last too long and the declaration may well have left out this District.

[Votive] for enough rain for all.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Lots of weather warnings in NZ still. Am hoping it isn't as bad as the predictions suggest.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Apparently Auckland has escaped the rain and the strong wind warnings there have lifted.

It looks like some areas on the east coast of the North Island won't be so lucky.

At this stage Christchurch is forecast to have a couple of hours of heavy rain around midnight and strong winds tomorrow. The forecast is due to be updated at 9pm. If it's too windy I will just batten the hatches and continue to make soup and read books,. I do want to go to church on Good Friday, but it's silly to take a risk that could end up endangering other people too.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
To all in NZ, Madame and I are remembering you.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Heading back to the Cape and another cold front, hoping for rain. The glimpses of depleted dams and bone-dry river beds from the plane window were scary.

As WW says, drought is scary. 10 years or so ago, towards the end of our last major drought in eastern Australia, water became very scarce, even in Sydney with its large storage dams. The city of Goulburn, about 2 hours drive SSW from here on the way to Canberra, was in very real danger of running out of water. More recently, there've been similar fears for the town of Broken Hill, about 1,000 km west, on the NSW/SA border.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Thinking of those struggling with drought (WW) and those facing storms in NZ. [Votive]

Woke up before dawn and the rain was falling! A great relief although the highways out of Cape Town are going to be congested and nightmarish later, as city people head out for the Easter weekend. Capetonians drive like lunatics in the rain. Years ago, an otherwise sane Capetonian told me that when it starts to rain while he is driving, he puts his foot on the accelerator 'to make a dash for it' and get back indoors out of the damp. I imagine this sentiment would be inexplicable to most Brits, but even if there's brief light cloudburst in the city, you see everyone speed up and overtake so as to get somewhere safe and dry.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Kuruman's flights have been cancelled, with both the local and Auckland airports shut down. The official warning for my area is "avoid all travel." So I wagged Maundy Thursday.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Patience for all concerned and safety for all. A good idea to stay at home and a good excuse.

Son had flight cancelled home from Brisbane when very severe storms closed Sydney. He managed a flight almost 30 hours later. Only a few weeks ago but before cyclone Debbie.hope she gets accommodation. He got last room in close hotel and luckily his work really had little choice but to pay for it as he had been at work conference.

Lots of picture over here of water everywhere.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Rain and wind have been worse than usual for Christchurch, but nothing near as bad as a normal southerly storm in Wellington but the next few hours will probably be worse. It's forecast to clear this afternoon.

Apparently the now down graded storm detoured further east. Large parts of the east coast of the North Island weren't so lucky and are without power. There will be a lot of cleaning up to do after flood waters recede.

Hoping you're in the city GG - it seems less affected than Matarangi

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
May it be a GOOD and blessed Good Friday for all, whatever the weather where you are.

A glorious golden autumn day has dawned here in the National Capital. Up to the aged care facility this morning to spend time reflecting with those on the cusp of life and death. Poignant.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Grey autumnal Good Friday here, very welcome cooler weather. In the back garden the plectranthus is blooming purple and mauve, which feels quite liturgical.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
The sun shone today. Over 1,000 people came to watch our play at Martin Place and follow Jesus up Pitt St. Jesus was crucified on a food court balcony, and then Pitt St resounded with the whole assembly singing Amazing Grace.

I have set the firepit in the back yeard ready for a quiet and reflective cast after-party.

Very,very tired

mr curly
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
hope she gets accommodation

She has a strategically located brother in law 15 minutes from AKL airport! Should be sitting on the tarmac about now
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Prayers ascending for all travelling, or trying to, in difficult conditions.

I still have to put what passes for my brain into a different gear to think of Good Friday/Easter in the autumn. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Not as difficult as us here in the southern hemisphere coping with all the Spring themed Easter gift stuff in the shops, Piglet.

What would we do without Chrysanthemum daisies and packets of bulbs?

On Maundy Thursday we planted some crocus and anemones out in our waterless Iris pond. The crocus were beginning to shoot so will be watching all winter for the flower spikes.

Today I will be packaging my little homemade dried fruit Easter eggs for the family gathering tomorrow. Gifts for the adults.

First ever family Easter egg hunt scheduled at B1's place- we have six pre-schoolers in the family now, and two primary schoolers. Should be interesting. Largest grandson is working tomorrow, but somehow I don't think he minds missing out on it at all....
[Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Great news Mr Curly about your good season.

A couple of very enjoyable autumn days here also. Quite a bit of gardening done yesterday and more to be done this afternoon. The rain and then the mild weather have seem weeds spring up in areas they have not been seen for years. Once this afternoon's work is done, we can then move onto planting more spring bulbs.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Shows how much I know about gardening - i thought you stuck 'em in in spring
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Here it's best to get them in before the first frost, although I have planted them in spring, but they weren't as successful the first year.

There is a church further north, but still in the Sth Island that is named for the same saint as the church I attend. The area was hit fairly badly by the November quake. Someone in our congregation had the idea of sending some small gifts in solidarity (as many people sent things to Christchurch). I am sending some mini daffodil bulbs because, for me the daffodils coming up in the spring after the big quakes and amidst the thousands of aftershocks were a sign of hope. I know it may sound weird, but I found the fact that the seasons continued in the usual way immensely comforting in the midst of so much uncertainty.

Huia
 
Posted by Vulpior (# 12744) on :
 
Looking in before bed to wish all a blessed Easter. It's been an unusual Triduum. Mr Vulpior and I attended a funeral instead of the Good Friday liturgy; a friend took his own life a week ago and the National SDA church hall was packed for the farewell and tributes. Today we headed into Monga National Park for an ashes scattering; marking a far more timely death with picnic and red wine.

I am (lay) deacon for the dawn service tomorrow, so I'll be leaving the house at about 5am. Mr Vulpior turns 21 again tomorrow, so we're aiming for a 2pm lamb roast. The Anzac biscuit cheesecake is cooling, the fruit-infused vodka is bottled, and I just have to wrap his present and write the card.

Posts here have been read semi-regularly, but I've not been chipping in.
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
Our friend L (the one who had her brain tumour recur) died on Good Friday. A very fitting day fro a good Christian to die. We pray for new life for her and her family (in their different ways) on Easter Day.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Tukai, I'm so sorry for the loss of your friend.

May she rest in peace and rise in glory. [Votive]

Re: bulb-planting, I remember my dad planting hyacinth bulbs at some point before Christmas, so in the Southern hemisphere now sounds about right.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tukai:
Our friend L (the one who had her brain tumour recur) died on Good Friday. A very fitting day fro a good Christian to die. We pray for new life for her and her family (in their different ways) on Easter Day.

Thoughts and prayers [Votive]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Yes, indeed remembering L.

A full day, starting with the new fire service at 5.30. A great service, but so early! Maybe not make the change back from daylight saving until after Easter? It will be a very simple and easy pasta dinner for us and early to bed.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Lovely day here, actually good weekend. Friday saw church and visiting with middle son and family, then family meal at night. Eldest son is back in China on business, but our chat program has been running hot all day and lots of photos. Youngest son and his eldest came for lunch from Central Coast.

I put a leg of lamb in to slow cook early in morning. Fresh herbs with lots of rosemary . After son arrived around midday, he took over. PileS of baked vegetables and his famous gravy., complete with some anchovies. They make a great gravy, but you would not know the secret ingredient. Red wine and a leisurely meal. Miss 16 did the cleaning up without a murmur after her father suggested it would be a good thing for her to do. We sat and chatted and they left after 5 for train home. Loads of leftovers, always a good thing.

[ 16. April 2017, 08:53: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
During the Easter service this morning I noticed how many hymns referred to spring, longer days, etc. Do you all sing these hymns down under?

Do you have any Easter hymns that refer to autumn?

Moo
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Moo, out here in Africa it's all cognitive dissonance and pretending it is spring -- we only get to sing our winter hymns and carols about snow falling and wassail at Christmas when mid-summer temperatures are peaking.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Moo, out here in Africa it's all cognitive dissonance and pretending it is spring -- we only get to sing our winter hymns and carols about snow falling and wassail at Christmas when mid-summer temperatures are peaking.

And as I am borderline SAD (no, not Trump's version) I find it very difficult. As the icy touch of a southerly (Piglet will need to rejig directionality, too) and the sight of autumn leaves comes on my I feel a rising panic. I repress it, but only just - and so miss Darwin.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Sign of Easter for us was watching three rosella parrots happily munching pomegranates in our garden, while the golden leaves fluttered down from the trees around them.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
... As the icy touch of a southerly (Piglet will need to rejig directionality ...)

Rejigging in progress ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
During the Easter service this morning I noticed how many hymns referred to spring, longer days, etc. Do you all sing these hymns down under?

Do you have any Easter hymns that refer to autumn?

Moo

Yesterday at the aged care facility the chaplain did something quite unconventional at the end of the service. The usual 3 hymns were sung, beginning in time honoured tradition with Christ the Lord is risen today. The concluding hymn, she explained, was to put to rights the intention of the author Isaac Watts, who always intended Joy to the World to be sung at Easter. Somehow it is always trotted out at Christmas in these parts... but it was a wonderful way to finish the Easter service. I thoroughly recommend it!

And the music neatly circumvented the seasonal thing entirely.

[ 17. April 2017, 02:32: Message edited by: Banner Lady ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Given the number of leaves falling in our garden, the season is definitely fall, not even autumn
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
A brisk wind since yesterday, so we're also looking at heaps of leaves piling up in corners of the garden and in street gutters -- red oak leaves, sere yellow of catalpa and poplar, brown from the liquidambar, orange from Pride of India and fiddlewood, russet and pink from the indigenous Lavender Tree (Heteropyxis natalensis). The forest plectranthus is in flower and there are green olives visible on the olive trees. Aloes branching up and the kalanchoe are deep burgundy. I love this time of year (sorry, Zappa).
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
If you missed it, make sure you catch up on iview John Clarke: Thanks for your time . I'm hoping it screens in NZ too. Such a fantastic tribute.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
A blast from the past to see different scenes and people.

[ 17. April 2017, 11:24: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I can't think of any autumn Easter hymns*, there are some summer Christmas songs. Shirley Erana Murray wrote one called, Carol Our Christmas with music by Colin Gibson, and there is a CD with this and other NZ carols written by others as well as a song book of more.

All of the clips of Carol our Christmas on You Tube have it sung a bit more slowly than the CD, and one even has it listed as a lullaby, which seems just wrong to me. I am not knowledgeable about what makes a hymn, a hymn, but my understanding is that a carol is light and joyful.

* I have a feeling that William Wallace (a contemporary writer, not the Mel Gibson one [Biased] ) may have written some autumn in Easter songs, but I can't remember them specifically), Arabella and GG probably know heaps more about this than I do.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I can't think of anything for an autumn Easter. At Christmas there are several Australian songs. The north wind is tossing the leaves is one and Orana, orana, orana for Christmas day is another. There are another couple as well but they have slipped my mind right now.

John Wheeler has written several and some other Christmas related writing as well.

[ 17. April 2017, 22:51: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
The other day I used the last of a pack of Elastoplast fabric strips bought when I moved here six years ago. Rarely used by me, but the girls used them often on blisters caused by strappy sandals. When in chemist for flu jab i bought another box to have on hand. They have gone the way of Minties, Fantales and Iced Vo-Vos. They have shrunk. The strips in this packet are just over half the width of the previous pack.

Sic transit Gloria Mundi,so passes the glory of the world.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
The other day I used the last of a pack of Elastoplast fabric strips bought when I moved here six years ago. Rarely used by me, but the girls used them often on blisters caused by strappy sandals. When in chemist for flu jab i bought another box to have on hand. They have gone the way of Minties, Fantales and Iced Vo-Vos. They have shrunk. The strips in this packet are just over half the width of the previous pack.

Sic transit Gloria Mundi,so passes the glory of the world.

Don't they usually come in a choice of different widths? Elastoplast or other brands, but not necessarily your favourite ones.
My chemist a couple of years ago had trouble tracking down Alka-Seltzer, my only choice for upset tummy or reflux, so I bought two packets. Surprised to see a couple of packets on their shelves the other day – I should have bought them.
Not that I need them often.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Different shapes, spots, patches. I was comparing the strips I had just finished with the ones bought today. I rarely use anything like that, even the expensive low allergy German adhesive plasters bring me out in blisters after a day. If not attended to promptly, they can easily become infected.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I knew someone years ago who was allergic to sticking plaster, and wondered what on earth she did if she cut herself.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I knew someone years ago who was allergic to sticking plaster, and wondered what on earth she did if she cut herself.

I'm allergic to Elastoplast, too. Many small blisters. There are plenty of non-allergenic alternatives at the chemist, though.
Many years ago, I had an appendicectomy in Royal Melbourne. My papers were all marked in large red lettering - "Elastoplast Allergy". I woke up with a 6"x 3" strip of Elastoplast over the wound! Took much longer for the allergic blisters to heal than the surgical cut :-(
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I've got an allergy like that, but it's to surgical glue and tapes. And since the situation is that much more serious, they make me lump the itching and welts and scarring.

For lesser wounds I can beg off the tape in favor of gauze pads held on by an ace bandage rolled round and round the arm or leg.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Rexory, Elastoplast lasts slightly longer than J&J products and German expensive tape about another day. Some years ago, I had an infected cyst removed from the back of thigh. I told them about allergies but they tried. One day the nurse told me she could see every place where she had tried to stick dressing down. Eventually, she used a tubular, stretchy knit dressing on thigh to keep bandage on. The main problem was that the actual removal had left a deep bullet shaped hole which had to heal from the bottom up so needed a dressing for a long time.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
TP is allergic to bandaids too. We just pack gauze pads on to any wounds and tie them on with strips of cloth torn from my cotton petticoats... [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
You learn something every day. Did not people could be allergic to sticking plasters. Being a clumsy sort I am thankfully not!

My manager and I are planning a bushwalk to a WWII plane downed in the mountains near here on Sunday. Should be good fun.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Unfortunately, I seem to have passed this allergy on to Miss M. When she was so sick with chemo tubes, tests etc things were much worse as everything had to be bandaged on rather than stuck on with adhesive
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Band aid plasters are of the devil. If someone sticks one on when I am not looking, great pussy blisters erupt. I usually ask for paper tape and gauze or cotton.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I had flu jab yesterday and it was so smooth I did not realise a tiny round spot had been placed on injection site till it began to itch.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Years ago, cuts and grazes were swabbed with Dettol disinfectant, then Savlon ointment or red Mercurochrome was smeared on and a plaster (Elastoplast) put on over that, or a linen bandage secured with a safety pin. Now it seems that just a little salt and water and no Elastoplast is preferred for minor cuts and grazes. I always wanted a great splosh of crimson Mercurachrome on my knee or my entire leg to be swathed in bandages before going to school and affecting a limp. #childhooddramaqueen
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Rarely used by me, but the girls used them often on blisters caused by strappy sandals.

Don't you Austrailians have Compeeds. Yes, they are expensive but they work and are classed as essential walking kit* these days over here. So much so that they have many imitators.

Jengie

*Full Walking Blister kit


[ 20. April 2017, 08:59: Message edited by: Jengie jon ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have seen plasters for blisters but these were my then much younger granddaughters who visited every second weekend. It would depend on what they brought with them as to blisters etc.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Years ago, cuts and grazes were swabbed with Dettol disinfectant, then Savlon ointment or red Mercurochrome was smeared on and a plaster (Elastoplast) put on over that, or a linen bandage secured with a safety pin. Now it seems that just a little salt and water and no Elastoplast is preferred for minor cuts and grazes. I always wanted a great splosh of crimson Mercurachrome on my knee or my entire leg to be swathed in bandages before going to school and affecting a limp. #childhooddramaqueen

My eldest son was accident prone and I always had a good supply of first aid stuff. It seemed mostly best to just clean it and keep a watch on it.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Rarely used by me, but the girls used them often on blisters caused by strappy sandals.

Don't you Austrailians have Compeeds. Yes, they are expensive but they work and are classed as essential walking kit* these days over here. So much so that they have many imitators.
Blister plasters yes, but not under that brand name. From memory, it's a Johnson and Johnson product and the name incorporates the word blister. Essential for cadets breaking in new boots (they always cause blisters, always have, always will) . Dearer than usual band-aids but not outrageously so, work extremely well.
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
Compeed are on sale in Australia and have been for years.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm very prone to blisters with new shoes, and I find Compeed is the only thing for it - the imitations (like Boots' own brand) aren't bad, but Compeed is actually worth the extra money. For blisters, ordinary sticking plaster is almost worse than useless.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Mr S discovered he was allergic to Elastoplast when he chipped an elbow bone playing football as a teenager. They strapped the arm, wrist to shoulder, in it [Eek!]

He soaked it all off in the bath (the chipped bone had to get by as best it could) and now has to use gauze and micropore tape for cuts.

Mrs. S, too clumsy to manage without sticking plaster1
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kittyville:
Compeed are on sale in Australia and have been for years.

Thanks - not seen them here, just the others, which have worked well for us.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
And after a beautiful week of golden light and lovely chocolatey Easter celebrations the sky is now overcast, the trees are becoming skeletal, and the annoying whine of leaf blowers is filling the air.

I hate to sound Stark,,,but today we can really feel that WINTER IS COMING. [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Winter is coming a bit further SW to where you are BL too...a rainy and chilly day, with much rain forecast tomorrow. My manager and I's weekend bushwalk has been postponed. The large tree in my backyard has started its annual shedding of leaves...

I do like Albury in the autumn, though; lots of trees changing colour. And we generally have bluebird days. But not currently.

Felt like comfort food tonight. Got takeaway pasta and a lemon meringue pie from the pasta shop. Mission accomplished: I feel very comforted after the pasta. Now for the pie... [Smile]

[ 21. April 2017, 08:41: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
What might be called an unusual combination, and hope you're still with us.

Definitely mid-autumn here, and good weather for bbqs. A bit of chill in the air, grilled meat of some sort and a couple of glasses of red are a good combination. The end of daylight saving is very welcome to me - it somehow seems ok to walk home from the station in the dark, but not to walk to it in the morning until there's more than a suggestion that day is on its way.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Another glorious autumn day here, although there's a definite chill in the air and the day takes longer to warm up. Autumn is my favourite season - all the colours, and the leaves to scrunch through.

Christchurch is a city of deciduous trees. Historically the image of Christchurch as the "most English of NZ cities" and "The Garden City" has been promoted, but since the quakes more evergreen natives have been planted as a deliberate council policy. I like seeing some of my favourite tree species in the city, (though the prevalence of lancewoods is a bit overwhelming), but at this time of year the deciduous win hands down as far as I'm concerned.

Of course the Council with their practical responsibilities for keeping gutters running freely and footpaths cleared of leaves made slippery by rain, have different priorities.

Huia
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Still here. [Biased] Should've went for gelato, I suppose, but the pie, and pasta, was great.


I visited Christchurch in 2005 [?] in autumn...it was beautiful. Drove down to Akaroa which was also rather stunning. A quick trip, but one I remember fondly - even if I've forgotten what year it was!

[ 21. April 2017, 23:01: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
... today we can really feel that WINTER IS COMING. [Waterworks]

Does it cheer you up that here in what passes for spring we had a few inches of sn*w yesterday?

Admittedly it didn't lie, but they're forecasting some more for tomorrow ... [Frown]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks Ian. Even further south, around Central Otago is incredible, because the temperature differential is greater. In some years here dead, brown leaves just hang on the trees - but I don't think this year is going to be one of them.

Huia
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
In some years here dead, brown leaves just hang on the trees...

In the northern part of the US, dead oak leaves stay on the trees until they are pushed off by the new leaves of spring.

Moo
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We've noticed a couple of trees here with dead brown leaves still hanging on them right through the winter; I didn't know they could do that.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Sweet gum trees (liquidambar) will do that. Very unattractive all winter. But I still like them the rest of the year.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
In some years here dead, brown leaves just hang on the trees...

In the northern part of the US, dead oak leaves stay on the trees until they are pushed off by the new leaves of spring.

Moo

Those would be the pin-oaks. We have them elsewhere in our suburb and they make me feel sad all winter, seeing them shrouded in their tattered brown leaves. Many different kinds of oak trees - our street is lined with American hairy oaks. The acorns have little hairy hats on them. The trees are now so big that the acorns are the size of golf balls - you really don't want to get hit by them when they fall. And parking underneath one can be very hazardous at this time of year.

The council have been out massacring trees along Canberra Avenue again. Enormous stately cottonwood poplars have had ALL the branches removed from the side facing the footpath. This makes them look drunkenly lopsided and tortured. But the power lines near them are clear. Sigh.

I have no love of cottonwood fluff, but I would rather see a beautiful tree replaced with a shrub than dealt with like that.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I'm not sure I would want to be called an "American hairy oak." Lacks a certain luster I feel.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have just watched the ABC coverage of the Sydney Anzac Day march. If was still going after over three hours when they switched to coverage from Gallipoli.

So many banners, all interesting. The Polar Bears who served in the Arctic. I wondered about that one then my brother said he knew someone who had been part of escorts for convoys around Norway. I knew about that,but had not made the connection.

Dozens of bands, some of which did the circuit two or three times. Several from local schools, Burwood Girls , Trinity and others. Masses of green blazers from Trinity as the band was large. Of course, what other colour could they have?

Some dogs, complete with vests in colours, six marching with one group. They all were applauded loudly.

Am now watching the ceremony from Gallipoli.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Wet, windy and cold in the National Capitol. I felt extremely sorry for the old and frail braving the elements for ANZAC Day...and the Tongans who marched in sandals and traditional tropical attire.

Had the fire on most of the day. Projected top of 12 degrees tomorrow. Brrrr.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's 13° here, and I was just thinking what a lovely warm evening it is. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Briefly, briefly got to 12 mid morning. By lunchtime back to 9 when a cold rain squall hit. Mid afternoon it was 11. Temperature now falling again. Seriously starting to put hibernation plans in place.

TP is loving it. He is out communing in the garden, praying over all the box hedging he has just put in and planning more landscaping. I suppose at least one of us is enjoying it, and that is a good thing?

Sigh.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
A top of 15° here today.

Our new employee, recently arrived from up north in Darwin, is not impressed.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
It was around. 20 here this afternoon when the southerly change moved through. A few minutes later it was 12. Snowing in Alps both NSW and Vic.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
It was around. 20 here this afternoon when the southerly change moved through. A few minutes later it was 12. Snowing in Alps both NSW and Vic.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
21c forecast today. The mist has disappeared, which is really good. I hate those clammy starts to the day.

Hopefully this will be a day where children can get outside and enjoy their holidays. I am waiting until the afternoon to go to the library as the school holiday activities there are planned for the morning. [Biased]

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Do both North and South islands have school hols scheduled on the same weeks in NZ? In Australia it is staggered so only 2 states have school hols at identical dates. This causes us some interesting moments as we have grandchildren in three different zones. It is never easy to organise family gatherings.

Facebook post from son-in-law asked if anyone else forgot to send their children back to school yesterday! He was looking after two of his own and one step-child from interstate who doesn't go back to school until next Monday.

I am sure he is not alone.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That does sound confusing! Over here AFAIK (being childless, it doesn't affect us), when the schools go back after the summer is dictated by Labour Day (the first Monday in September), but as it's a national holiday, I assume everyone goes back at the same time.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
State schools in NSW resumed yesterday. The school several grandchildren go to went back on Monday, then Tuesday was Anzac Day, so no school. Two of the grandchildren were allowed Monday off by my son and their mother. They went to to Titanic exhibition at Moore Park and enjoyed it thorooughly. Learnt heaps and not just about Titanic. Son said it was a worthwhile day.

School must be back and extra long weekends are over. The traffic in both directions on Parramatta Road and even on side street opposite is heavier than I have seen it for a long time. Barely moving and cars are waiting more than one set of lights to get through intersection downstairs.

Cold too. Snow on alps down south is sending chilly tentacles up this way.
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
Cool here today.

The schools started yesterday, but the school time speed restrictions start on pupil free days for some reason.

LKKspouse is working on flood relief for Justice dept. They call up the Alumni (as they call them) to do this. 8:30- 5pm 7 days on one day off.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Do both North and South islands have school hols scheduled on the same weeks in NZ?

Yup ... small country, no need to stagger
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Schools resume for the 2nd term on Monday all over NZ.

The Ministry of Education guideline is that all schools must be open for a certain number of half days per year, but fine tuning is in the hands of the Board of Trustees of each school. The school where I volunteer was open on Maundy Thursday, whereas the school down the road closed on the Wednesday. (I think they started the term a day before us).

Secondary schools have longer holidays, finishing a week or so before Primary. (I always said Secondary Teachers didn't work as hard [Razz] ).

Such a lovely day today and I achieved Things
[Yipee]

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Todays challenge was to create a stage worthy Moana costume in less than an hour for Miss 9.

Almost. Got. There.

She will have to pick up the other half of it tomorrow on her way to the airport. I fully expect Miss 4 to demand the same when I next see her.

Studio work will have to go on hold until after the weekend though, as I pick up more people from the airport tomorrow. [Ultra confused]

Took Miss 9 to church service with her great grandmother at the nursing home this morning. Arrived to find everyone upset. One of the residents who had his birthday yesterday and was fine at breakfast gave up the ghost before morning tea. He just simply stopped.

I am glad for his sake. He was a lovely man. RIP Gordon.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Schools resume for the 2nd term on Monday all over NZ.

The Ministry of Education guideline is that all schools must be open for a certain number of half days per year, but fine tuning is in the hands of the Board of Trustees of each school. The school where I volunteer was open on Maundy Thursday, whereas the school down the road closed on the Wednesday. (I think they started the term a day before us).

Secondary schools have longer holidays, finishing a week or so before Primary. (I always said Secondary Teachers didn't work as hard [Razz] ).

Such a lovely day today and I achieved Things
[Yipee]

Huia

I went to an elite snobby private school for ten years ... we had a few weeks extra holidays (but school on Saturday mornings) ... I loved it after the mere mortals had gone back and we hadn't
[Snigger]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Took Miss 9 to church service with her great grandmother at the nursing home this morning. Arrived to find everyone upset. One of the residents who had his birthday yesterday and was fine at breakfast gave up the ghost before morning tea. He just simply stopped.

I am glad for his sake. He was a lovely man. RIP Gordon.

May he rest in peace and rise in glory, along with our risen Lord.

I'll bet that there are quite a few other residents wanting to go as Gordon did.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Like most Brits, I have Australian Relatives™; two of my grandmother's sisters emigrated to Australia in the early years of the last century and many of their descendants are still there.

I had an e-mail today with an obituary notice from the Sydney Morning Herald for one Bettye Harcus, aged 94, who was the daughter of one of them. I understand she was quite well-known in her younger days as a singer of gospel music; I remember meeting her about 30 years ago when she was doing the rounds of her Orcadian relations.

May she rest in peace and rise in glory. [Votive]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
And for Bettye Harcus as well.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
[Votive] Gordon [Votive] Bettye Harcus [Votive]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
I always said Secondary Teachers didn't work as hard [Razz] ).:

Huia

My son's a secondary teacher. He spends half his holiday or more back at school doing stuff in his lab. (That is, stuff he can't take home).

Is there a putting-tongue-out imoji?

GG
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Yes: like this.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:

Is there a putting-tongue-out imoji?

[Razz] (colon followed by lowercase p)
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
It's the one I used GG. That really was just a stir [Biased] . I remember when one of my brothers was taught by the father of a child I was teaching. On Parents night we both agreed that both of us were well suited, and neither of us would want the other's job.

Seriously though, I don't think the job good teachers do is really appreciated in much of the wider community. I sometimes read and post on a NZ website and the comments about teachers and the length of their holidays is enough to make my blood boil.

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Prison ministry weekend training is over. It is wonderful to serve in an organization that is committed to training its volunteers so well. May it bear much good fruit.

Tired now. The trainers who stayed with us commented that our home is very "English".

I wonder what gave it away....the large and small hedges around the house? The chairs around the fireplace? The walls lined with old books and shelves full of black and white photos? The oak trees outside and the autumn leaves in drifts around the garden?

Or maybe it is just the Englishman in residence.... [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Another Sydney institution closes after fifty years.

Fine dining it wasn't but queues out the door and around the block often. Basic, good pasta. Help yourself to bread and cold cordial. Just a couple of choices of pasta, but well cooked.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
...I sometimes read and post on a NZ website and the comments about teachers and the length of their holidays is enough to make my blood boil.

Huia

I think teachers in general deserve all the holidays and time off they get but I'm not so sure about the kids - surely it is not beyond the wit of man to devise an equitable sort of shift system for teachers such that the teachers do the same total hours and get the same holidays whilst the kids are schooled from something like 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., for 7 days a week/52 weeks a year with 3 hours statutory homework a night.

I keep trying to explain my plan to the local kiddywinks but they appear to be universally opposed to my plan but then think how many more teachers we could benefit!
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
I went to an elite snobby private school for ten years ... we had a few weeks extra holidays (but school on Saturday mornings) ... I loved it after the mere mortals had gone back and we hadn't
[Snigger] ]

And we mere mortals despised all you snobby private school kids for being so precious that you needed more holidays [Razz]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
It's the one I used GG. That really was just a stir [Biased] . I remember when one of my brothers was taught by the father of a child I was teaching. On Parents night we both agreed that both of us were well suited, and neither of us would want the other's job.

Seriously though, I don't think the job good teachers do is really appreciated in much of the wider community. I sometimes read and post on a NZ website and the comments about teachers and the length of their holidays is enough to make my blood boil.

Huia

I remember going to in-service courses in the holidays.

And of course it's not just the holidays – it's the prep and marking after class, and the extra-curricular activities. For several years, not being a sporty person, I had a great Scottish Country Dance club.
Early in my career, I went to relieve for a year at a small-town high school, and spent some time with a friend and her husband. He was newsly trained and it was his first job, and it was made plain to him that he'd be expected to coach a cricket team – and take them to their Saturday matches. Essentially a six-day-a week job, rather rough on a newly married couple just settling into their first home and approaching parenthood.
For my part, I was directed as the year wore on, to supervise a hockey team on games afternoon (ie inn school hours). I said that's fine by me, I can supervise but I can't coach as I don't know anything about hockey. Fine, until a senior player came to tell me I was to take them to a match on Saturday. I went to the (male) principal and said I'm not prepared to look after them on Saturday. He said that was quite okay, no problem. But the Senior Woman took me aside and gave me a good telling off. How would I feel, she asked, if one day I had a daughter who couldn't play sport because no teacher would take her? (Daughter enjoyed sports and there was always someone to take her, ie shared parents' cars, sometimes mine, or someone else's.)
My son, incidentally coaches, and goes round with, the underwater hockey team, because he loves it.

GG
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Now I'm off to the megalopolis for a few days for a block course ... at least I'll enjoy the drive, even if I remain frustrated that NZ drives are so little
 
Posted by Latchkey Kid (# 12444) on :
 
I wish our drives were shorter. I have a delivery and collect trip to Melbourne that I plan to spend a reasonable three days each way on. In a car I could do it in a tiring two days, but in my son's rough old ute it would be too tiring.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
B2 has just sent a message to say she has achieved 100% in her last essay for her MBA, and that her teacher, a woman of formidable energy and intellect, took her aside to tell her she could not believe B2 had done no other prior degrees. She also commented that B2 had a "brilliant mind"....as some of B2's classmates scored below 50%.

She may indeed have a brilliant mind, but she also put in more than 40 hours work on this particular assignment, because she was so anxious about doing "enough" to pass. This is her first experience of tertiary education so she has no prior benchmarks by which to measure standards.

I told her it was all down hill from here.... [Razz]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Congratulations to her. I don't know about these days, but 100% for an essay sounds a remarkable achievement to me.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
One student some years after me received that mark for a theology essay. Possibly an exegesis assignment. From a very picky, hard to please lecturer who said she had done all he asked and much more. It is a pity I cannot remember more details. Until BL's post, that was the only one I had heard of.

Congratulations to your daughter. A brilliant start to the MBA. [Overused]

[ 03. May 2017, 08:28: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
She was so anxious about it that she requested a couple of coaching sessions with her dad...so he too is now basking in the reflected glory.

A satisfying family effort!

I commented that both her grandmothers had the smarts to do tertiary ed but never had the opportunity - so she is fortunate to be born in a time and place enabling her to hone the gifts given to her. Also a good thing to be able to show her upline at work, as they are underwriting this degree.

Exam worth 60% of the assessment is next. We'll see how her nerves hold up!
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
I have achieved such a result only once throughout five tertiary qualifications. My Eng Lit lecturer's comment on my perfect-score essay on Richard II - "What more can I say?" - was one of the most satisfying moments of my education, and sticks in my memory 47 years later. She should bask in the feeling as long as possible, it's a great achievement.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Well done indeed, B2! [Overused]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:


Congratulations to your daughter. A brilliant start to the MBA. [Overused]

It was her third essay in this particular unit, and it is the second unit of her degree. The first essay she got 60%, the second one 89%, so she is hoping to do enough in the exam to earn an HD for the whole unit.

I think the teacher has a lot to do with it. The first unit was taught by someone who she found out of date, out of touch with current business, and profoundly bored and boring. This tutor is exactly the opposite.

Very glad there are a few good ones about!
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
My Godmother, God rest her soul, died a few days ago, aged 102.

I have just discovered the death notice for my mother's "stepmum", who apparently is listed in the Australian archives as a collector of botanical specimens along the Upper Murray. She shuffled off at 107.

Mum is not looking forward to her 99th winter, but if I was a betting person, I'd lay odds on her surviving it.

Note to Rowen: they sure breed 'em tough down your way. Possibly because they spend so much of each year snap-frozen....
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Sorry to hear about your godmother, BL. May she rest in peace and rise in glory. [Votive]
 
Posted by Rowen (# 1194) on :
 
My sympathy, BL


Yeah, it's the cold that us tough.
And the local wine.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
The mother-in-law of one of our parishioners is approaching her 109th birthday in a week or so, but news yesterday was that she was confined to bed, and didn't want to eat. At her 108th birthday last year, she went missing from the party. When found, she said she'd got bored and just wanted to go for a walk. Praying that M has to travel for a party rather than a funeral.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Prayers, Barnabas, for her and her family.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Prayers also for Mark Colvin and his sons

The ABC is taking a beating this year, first Clarke, now Colvin.

[ 11. May 2017, 02:52: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
[Tear]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Ordination to the priesthood of our local deacon today. He is a navy chaplain learning the ropes in our parish. I was part of the set up team yesterday and spent a lovely afternoon messing about with flowers.

Sea Holly is a revelation. What an amazing plant. How did I never come across this before? Is it something you have seen growing anywhere?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I looked that one up, BL, and found I knew the plant , although the name was new to me. Not to others, heaps of references.. Easy to grow, likes hot weather, poor soil and can cope with little water. Sounds ideal.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
In the next installment of First World Problems I lost my footing on a bushwalk this afternoon and went sliding down a hill, tearing my (new) pants in the process. Oh well. It was a nice walk. I just need to take it slower next time.

My gardening consists of sweeping all the leaves that have fallen from the trees in the street and the one in the backyard. Not sure what type it is - it gets purple berries which delight in staining my white shirts should I forget and hang them under it on the line!

[Votive] BL for your Godmother; and Many, Many Years to the deacon-now-priest.

And prayers for Madame 109 Barnabas. [Votive]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
So long as it was only the pants that were damaged, Ian.

I saw Sea Holly some years ago at Chelsea Flower Show, listed as an ornamental plant. There are a number of Eryngium varieties named Sea Holly and the one I saw was Miss Wilmot's Ghost, taller than other varieties and native to the Mediterranean or Eastern Europe. I see these plants in South African gardens from time to time but local gardeners often prefer indigenous plants to exotics.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
There are a number of Eryngium varieties named Sea Holly and the one I saw was Miss Wilmot's Ghost, taller than other varieties and native to the Mediterranean or Eastern Europe.

What a wonderful name for a plant.

The overnight low temperature is forecast to be 0c, but at least the next 3 days are forecast to be sunny, rather than the sea fog we have been enduring. I don't mind the cold or the rain, but fog is just depressing.

And I've mislaid the remote for one of the heat pumps [Waterworks]

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Under the bed? Next to TV control? In cutlery drawer? Down back of lounge cushions?
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I wonder who Miss Wilmot was.

GG
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Don't just wonder; Google it

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
More than the usual suburban gardener.

What a lot of work she did with plants.

Edited for over devotion to lots of vowels.

[ 13. May 2017, 10:07: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
I am always inspired by women gardeners, especially those who wrote about plants and gardening: Gertrude Jekyll, Ellen Wilmott, Vita Sackville-West, Margery Fish who designed naturalistic woodland planting from the 1930s, more contemporary plantswomen like Beth Chatto with her gravel gardens. Mary Keen, Helen Dillon, Penelope Hobhouse, Rosemary Verey. And too many more to mention -- I still miss the Telegraph columns from the late Elspeth Thompson.

Out here in South Africa we had Eve Palmer who not only published books on trees and her gardening diary, but also a classic of farm life in The Plains of Camdeboo.

[ 13. May 2017, 10:53: Message edited by: MaryLouise ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Many years ago I first read about Georgiana Molloy in the book Australian Pioneer Women by Eve Pownall. She too gardened , raised a family, collected seeds to send to England and much more. Her first child died soon after birth and a son drowned. She took to observing plants and how they grew and were gardened and described by indigenous peoples as well as new colonists, in an effort to assuage her grief..

[ 13. May 2017, 11:38: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I'm feeling like an old lady. I picked a 6 litre slow cooker full of a very thick soup up from the floor with my back bent. Yes I did know better, but didn't stop to think. ACC, the state run injury insurance scheme often publishes figures of which sports cause the most injuries. I expect to see extreme soupmaking on the list any day now [Hot and Hormonal]

Stupidity isn't a category, I suspect it would encompass too many of the claims.

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Georgiana Molloy is new to me Lothlorien -- and what a character!

'Extreme soupmaking' made me laugh, Huia, but I do that sort of careless bending over and picking up heavy things too. I tried to lift up a crate of chopped firewood in the garage the other day (we have a woodburning stove in the kitchen)and it isn't just the heaviness of the object that causes problems, it is that I bend so awkwardly and put strain on the most vulnerable part of the back.

[ 14. May 2017, 04:42: Message edited by: MaryLouise ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... extreme soupmaking ...

Love it! [Killing me]

I think it should become an Olympic sport! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
The English would win.

I must look up Beth Chatto - we are about to put in some gravel landscaping.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I will also enter Olympic extreme soup making. Five year old son came home from visiting his great aunt to tell me she had soup but from a tin. Did I know soup came in tins, mum?

In light of Mark Colvin's death last week, I have been reading his Light and Shadows, Memoirs of a Spy's Son. I bought it a couple of months ago but had not started it. A good read as it covers a period of recent history. I have written more in book thread in Heaven.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
TP and I are both struggling with head colds....yesterday he made a thick soup loaded with garlic and celery tops, admittedly from a base of canned minestrone...but it was the perfect pick me up.

Yes, the English would be hard to beat in a soup off, even when handicapped!
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:

Yes, the English would be hard to beat in a soup off, even when handicapped!

And you have not even seen the Scots entrant.

The congregation that holds my membership is largely Scots immigrants to England. Whereas in other English congregations people tended to have their own bakery goods (my Mum's were cheese scones), at this congregation people tended to have their soup. Therefore, when it was soup and sandwiches you chose your options by picking your soup makers. All soups were homemade.

Jengie
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Hoping that all those under the weather are being plied with copious amounts of hot soup and warm support. There are a number of clergy shippies especially in need of TLC at present. May you be back on deck soon - but not before you have made a full recovery.

[Votive] [Votive] [Votive]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
From my experience of clergy friends they are not good at self-care and often return to work [if they even allow themselves time off] far too soon!

Listen to Banner Lady and give yourselves time.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:

Yes, the English would be hard to beat in a soup off, even when handicapped!

And you have not even seen the Scots entrant.

<waves trotter excitedly>

I'm here! [Smile]

Soup-making (extreme or otherwise) has to be one of the most therapeutic things. My default soup is made of potatoes, onions, carrots and celery, with a couple of handfuls of pulses and home-made chicken stock, but you can make soup from anything.

D's definition of a good restaurant is one where they can make a soup that he likes out of ingredients that he doesn't (a notable example having been red pepper and aubergine).
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
D's definition of a good restaurant is one where they can make a soup that he likes out of ingredients that he doesn't (a notable example having been red pepper and aubergine).

Off to the quotes file with you!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I used to hide leftovers from such foods in completely new dishes, then listen to the compliments.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Soup is always [always, always] better after it has sat for a day to allow the flavours to meld and mature so leftover soup is guaranteed to be better the next day.

The problem here is that it never gets the chance as we always eat it all on the first day!

[Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Soup is always [always, always] better after it has sat for a day to allow the flavours to meld and mature so leftover soup is guaranteed to be better the next day.

The problem here is that it never gets the chance as we always eat it all on the first day!

[Hot and Hormonal]

I usually make 5 litres, and as Georgie-Porgy doesn't partake there are left overs which are frozen into plastic pottles for future meals after a day in the fridge to let the flavours develop (and give me time to sort the pottles and the lids).

Today's effort is Kumara, Pumpkin and Peanut Soup. Which is sitting on the stove cooling down before I add the peanut butter and attack it with the stick blender. I was wondering why I hadn't made any soup with pumpkin in it for ages, then when it came to chopping and peeling the pumpkin ... I remembered. Extreme soup making calls for a creative approach, so I went outside and threw it on the concrete for the initial cut/break. (Then I recalled reading that partially cooking it in the microwave is the more civilized method [Roll Eyes] )

If we have a fine day on Sunday I will take my large knife to the Market to be sharpened again. I was only charged $5 last time and a sharp knife is safer than a blunt one (the cut is cleaner so it's easier to sew amputated fingers back on).

According to ACC pumpkin is the vegetable associated with the most injuries people claim for, and injuries to people preparing avocadoes cost the country over $70,000 last year
[Eek!]

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Any passing mention of soup turns a thread into a recipe thread. Huia, that sounds like a very good soup -- is kumara that orange-coloured sweet potato?

I make winter soups each week for a local soup kitchen and the most popular soup is not my cure-all chicken soup but a curried butternut soup with coconut cream and a topping of toasted coconut shavings and fresh coriander puree.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Those soups sound amazing...

All I can do is a vegetable affair. But it does keep me warm and happy so I should be content.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
A lot of discontent around B1's workplace this week. She works in the Australian Taxation Office. TP commented today that things may be looking up for her career prospects....seems there may be a few openings at the top....... [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
MaryLouise - yes, NZ grows the original red as well as orange and golden kumara. I usually buy the orange as they're not as knobbly and are easier to peel.

Kumara

Ian - I cheat and use a recipe (sometimes x3 for volume) except for Mum's bacon hock soup where I use my memory of the recipe she followed.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Yesterday I made a small amount of curried caulflower and onion soup. It wasn't cold here today but miserable and fairly dark. The soup was a good choice for lunch. I cheated and used a commercial korma paste.
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Soup is always [always, always] better after it has sat for a day to allow the flavours to meld and mature so leftover soup is guaranteed to be better the next day.

The problem here is that it never gets the chance as we always eat it all on the first day!

[Hot and Hormonal]

Same for casseroles, stews or any wet dish
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
It seems that a Lands of the Southern Cross cookbook might be a good idea.
I do very little real cooking as it involves standing. I've actually consented to go on to five meals on wheels a week until my laminectomy (27 June) is over and done with. Having seen the meals that another DHB (District Health Board) gets frozen from the other end of the country, I cannot sing the praises loudly enough for our chef who I suspect is expected to cope on a ridiculously basic budget but who can cut up a couple of cooked sausages and put them into a more than acceptable sauce, and whose vegetables are fresh (the abovementioned disgraceful DHB meals had a spoonful of Mr Wattie's peas and chopped carrots most of the time).
My neighbour makes brilliant soup, according to what she has in the fridge, and brings me a pot.
But I shall still do my jellies and marmalades for CWS (Christian World Service), the preparation of which can be done sitting down, or cooked with my apprentice to help. Yesterday I juiced a kilo of limes and began to shred them, because my old-fashioned shredder has to be screwed to the barbecue table outside so it needs a sunny day. In twenty minutes I only produced about a spoonful of shreds: the peel was as hard as leather. I'd decided I'd have to use the bender but had another go today and it was much better; it must have softened a bit in the fridge.
The shredder came from a dear Scots neighbour who taught me to make marmalade and lent me her shredder (a bit like Mum's old mincer) each year; when she died I asked if I might have it, so she lives on in my marmalade. I make lime because people are frightened by the stickers on their medication that says they mustn't have grapefruit, but my GP just laughed when I told her I have grapefruit marmalade on my toast every morning. Her predecessor said 'Well, spread it thinly then.' But the chemist said that over the years they've had a couple of customers becoming seriously ill after eating grapefruit, or drinking the juice.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
GG, your sausages and sauce could have been my meal tonight. Good quality pork sausages, different veges which were fresh and a can of crushed tomatoes. Easy and I deliberately made enough for two meals. Tomorrow night will be chicken thighs with dried porcini mushrooms and other vegetables. Also deliberately made for two serves. I try not to hasve the same meal two nights in a row but to vary them for variety. So glad winter is coming. That means good parsnips, a favourite of mine in many forms.

My damaged hip ligaments are slowly heaing but standing for any length of time is difficult. Unfortunately I still have to convince my brain that I do not need a cane.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
One vegetable I really miss here in the tropics is parsnips - they are very much a temperate zone veg but roast parsnips or parsnips parmesan...

Where is the drooling smilie?

Yes, I have been salivating whilst typing this.


eta: and they go wonderfully in soup.

[ 20. May 2017, 12:57: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
You may drool alone, Wodders dear. I ABHOR parsnips.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Parsnips are fine in small quantities, but they do have a very strong flavour, which can overpower others.

My next venture into soup-making is going to be with fiddleheads - there's a stall selling them down the road from us and I bought a big bag yesterday. We were at a dinner-party a while back where we had fiddlehead soup and it was so delicious I decided I'd have a go once they came into season.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
and when is a gingernut not a ginger nut?
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Parsnips are fine in small quantities, but they do have a very strong flavour, which can overpower others.

My next venture into soup-making is going to be with fiddleheads - there's a stall selling them down the road from us and I bought a big bag yesterday. We were at a dinner-party a while back where we had fiddlehead soup and it was so delicious I decided I'd have a go once they came into season.

Fiddlehead in te Reo Maori is koru. I think they were on the menu before we Europeans arrived. Now you see them on our national carrier when it's not decked out in the actual fern leaf for the sake of the All Blacks.

I had one dead banana (ie black skin all over) and one terminally ill so I had to make a banana cake. I don't do much baking these days but grandson and I made a great one in October. So what do you call it when you have to leave it in the oven for twice the stated time? I think it will be all right. After the Stick a Fine Blade Into It test I checked using Mum's rule: Listen to it. If it's absolutely silent it will be dry; if it's very faintly ticking, not still sizzling, it's ready.
Too soon to cut it, and I'm going out soon.

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
If it's too dry you could always eat it with custard or cream.

Yesterday I went over to the Port where they have a Farmers' Market. It was cold and I could have done with a wind-proof layer of clothing as the hills on the other side of the harbour, which is the breached crater of an extinct volcano, had more than a dusting of snow. The wind was blowing off the snow and the sun didn't reach the market until 10.30am. Thank goodness for the soup seller (tomato and basil - yum).

I bought 3 humungous leeks for $5, some freshly dug spuds and some parsnips.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Great purchases, Huia. Love leeks here. One son will not eat onion unless it is chopped so small he can't see it. It is texture not taste that he hates. Leeks are quit acceptable. I use them a lot, even just for myself.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... I bought 3 humungous leeks for $5, some freshly dug spuds ...

I can feel some more soup coming on ... [Smile]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... I bought 3 humungous leeks for $5, some freshly dug spuds ...

I can feel some more soup coming on ... [Smile]
Who? Me? [Razz]

In other, totally unrelated news...The Bishop of Christchurch has announced that the decision on what is to be done about the earthquake wrecked Cathedral will be made at the Diocesan Synod in September. Given that an announcement was to be made before last Christmas, that the decision is affecting the rebuild plans of nearby developers and there is a well connected outside pressure group that wants total restoration of the building to its pre-quake condition,this will probably not be received well in the wider community.

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Great - let's pour a whole stack of money into making a mausoleum for nostalgia's sake. Then let's watch the white elephant moulder away until it is taken down by another catastrophe. Sounds like a plan. The same kind of plan that brought us Brexit and Trumpdom. Yay.

Is there still an active cathedral community, Huia?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Yes. Scroll down here to see a small photo of the temporary Cathedral.

The trouble is that many people, even those with no affiliation to any religious group, have an emotional attachment to the building. I remember when the Visitors' Centre, where I volunteered for some years, was added there was a huge outcry because some felt in spoiled the Gothic effect of the building (which has a category 1 Historic Place listing). In addition ratepayers money was used for earthquake strengthening* so some feel they have a vested interest.

* Although this didn't save the building, it is thought to have saved lives in the 2011 quake, when, despite the damage, no one received a physical injury. (I am so grateful for this).

I parted ways from the Cathedral some years ago, but I was in there on Christmas Eve 2010 minding the Christmas tree where generations of Christchurch children left presents for those who might otherwise not have any.

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Dealing with my own cathedral disaster today. Some little darling(s) graffiti'd the side of my studio last night while TP and I were at Evensong. I wouldn't have minded so much if it had been even vaguely artistic graffiti - but no. They spray painted the word BLANK on the side facing the laneway in raggedy black and silver letters with two big X's inside the B.

I felt like marking it with a big red F for artistic effort.

I suppose I needed the exercise, and at least it is not too cold today...but I begrudged the two hours it took to get the gunk off.
And I have learned so much about cleaning products! (Need to get stuff with xylene in it). [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
May 24, Empire day. Now day and empire seem to have gone. A half holiday from school to prepare the bonfire and 5/- from my grandmother to buy fireworks or crackers as we called them. I could spend a lot of time choosing the best value for my money.

I also remember the night when a catherine wheel spun loose from the post it had been nailed to and cartwheeled into the shoe box of crackers of one of us.

The best part was afterwards where we would enjoy Mum's pea and ham soup and home made sausage rolls.

[ 23. May 2017, 23:38: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
"The 24th of May is the Queen's birthday
If you don't give us a holiday, we'll all run away!" -schoolyard chant.

On the last day before that auspicious date, we had a special assembly singing patriotic songs for Empire Day. And for some reason, The Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire attended to hand out New Testaments with Psalms to public school kids! My Jewish classmates loved this part. The IODE continues to this day on its sclerotic way.
 
Posted by Dark Knight (# 9415) on :
 
In WA, the holiday is at the beginning of October.
I don't give a good God damn when Liz was born, but it's nice to have a public holiday in the second half of the year.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dark Knight:
In WA, the holiday is at the beginning of October.
I don't give a good God damn when Liz was born, but it's nice to have a public holiday in the second half of the year.

psst: We're talking about Victoria RI. The holiday was established long before you or I or anyone else on this Ship were born. Currently in Canada it is known (where celebrated) as "Let's Open the Cottage (or camp or cabin) weekend.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Queen's birthday gives thos of us in NSW a long weekend in June. A welcome break after the number in late summer and early autumn. Then nothing till June.

Long weekend in October is LAbour Day.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Any excuse for a public holiday! That said we have far too many public holidays here in South Africa and, as a freelancer, schedules fall apart in months like March/April. Human Rights Day, Easter, Family Day, Freedom Day, plus Workers Day to begin May.

The Western Cape has been declared an official disaster area and emergency relief will be given as the drought and water shortage worsens. I keep waiting for the morning when we turn on the tap and no water comes out. On the other hand, I'm an expert at washing my grubby bits in a mugful of water and recycling the mugful as grey water for the blasted garden.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Thoughts for you MaryLouise, and all on the Western Cape.


We came first in trivia last night. Quite a surprise. And a nice voucher for pub food for next week.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I used to hide leftovers from such foods in completely new dishes, then listen to the compliments.

We have a friend who doesn't like (?won't eat) pumpkin. So a friend cooked pumpkin pie for dessert and he had two helpings.

GG
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
I can understand that.

I do not like pumpkin, but love pumpkin soup.
[Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:

The Western Cape has been declared an official disaster area and emergency relief will be given as the drought and water shortage worsens. I keep waiting for the morning when we turn on the tap and no water comes out. On the other hand, I'm an expert at washing my grubby bits in a mugful of water and recycling the mugful as grey water for the blasted garden.

Things did not get that bad in the last long drought in the eastern states here, a decade ago now. Goulburn, a city roughly two thirds of the way from Sydney to Canberra very nearly ran out but hung in there. More recently there have been similar fears for Broken Hill, a town near the NSW/SA border, about 1000 km west from Sydney as the crow flies. So far, the taps haven't run dry there yet. A terrible position to be in, yet still governments talk of increasing the population..
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We have had a little sporadic rain in the last week or so but we are desperate for next week for the onset of the monsoon, and for the kids to go back to school - but that is a whole other subject!
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Ooo...Oooo...I have found a new addiction. On line family tree research - very suck-in-able. Thirty years ago I had a go at putting a tree together and it was a nightmare of photocopied microfiche records and typed pages that didn't sync. Research was a bit hit and miss if you didn't have loads of cash to employ people. Now so many records are on-line and linked, that it is a breeze. Really enjoying seeing the automatic links come up where others have already done that bit.

It took me all of one night to go back 400 years and as far afield as China. And putting census records together with google maps meant that I could turn to the stately gent in the daguerreotype on my mantlepiece and tell him I had just had a virtual stroll down his street in Cornwall. Nice place. I wonder if he used to have a pint at The Fountain pub after work? [Razz]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I used to hide leftovers from such foods in completely new dishes, then listen to the compliments.

We have a friend who doesn't like (?won't eat) pumpkin. So a friend cooked pumpkin pie for dessert and he had two helpings.

GG

Very occasionally I used to make a sweet tart when sons were small. They did not like it. I called it "sunshine tart" and it went down easily. One of them now makes one around Christmas as part of his cooking tradition and it is very good.

All in the name.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Yes, BL, a bit addictive. I have a couple of booksfor both sides of my family, quite thick and I dip into them occasionally. I opened the one for Dad's side when I first got it and there he was, staring at me from a full page photo. Except it wasn't, it was from someone several generations before him. My sister had the same experience with that photo and sent me an excited email about the resemblance.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Ooo...Oooo...I have found a new addiction. On line family tree research - very suck-in-able. Thirty years ago I had a go at putting a tree together and it was a nightmare of photocopied microfiche records and typed pages that didn't sync. Research was a bit hit and miss if you didn't have loads of cash to employ people. Now so many records are on-line and linked, that it is a breeze. Really enjoying seeing the automatic links come up where others have already done that bit.

It took me all of one night to go back 400 years and as far afield as China. And putting census records together with google maps meant that I could turn to the stately gent in the daguerreotype on my mantlepiece and tell him I had just had a virtual stroll down his street in Cornwall. Nice place. I wonder if he used to have a pint at The Fountain pub after work? [Razz]

Bloody hell ... I've spent hours over months an barely got back beyond 1900
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Researching online genealogy is both fun and madly frustrating. I found out all kinds of surprising things about my mother's family line but drew a blank on my father's family history. And everything can come to a stop if there is an adoption or disinheritance or emigration.

Made a large pot of tomato,bacon and barley soup, too hearty perhaps.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
One of my cousins on each side of the family has done an exhaustive family tree, so I don't feel any need to do a genealogy. Having said that I visited the museum library here and found Mum's family tree going back to an apprentice in England in the 1700s. Her family were early settlers in Christchurch (not the First Four Ships, but within a year of them) and a family member visiting from England had been helped by the library staff so he sent them a copy of his research.

MaryLouise I think barley is a wonderful ingredient in soup. I've been told it's good for diabetics too as it doesn't cause a rise in blood sugar the way some rice can.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
One of my cousins on each side of the family has done an exhaustive family tree, so I don't feel any need to do a genealogy.

Huia

Same here, but on Dad's side the cousin was in Oamaru so although she did a lot in Dunedin I did the Wellington bits. In those days (30 years ago or more) you could do the Births Death etc, find what you wanted (no charge for looking) and pay for a photocopy; it seems that part of it is now much more expensive.

GG
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think it was at my dad's funeral [2006] that my brothers and I met a [now] elderly cousin who had been tasked by an even older cousin to complete his family research and told us [without much explanation] that he had come across some, what he called, disturbing information and decided that none of us really need or want to know!

We know we come from Huguenot stock and, realistically, that is enough.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Someone on D's side of the family has done a lot of research and got back as far as the sixteenth century, which is quite impressive.

Whenever we had Australian relatives visiting us back in the 1970s, they would usually come armed with lots of information about who they were looking for. One particular couple, who were - how shall I put it? - a bit holy, came with quite an elaborate family tree, but with gaps where there would have been anyone they didn't deem holy enough*.

* i.e. didn't subscribe to their particular brand of holiness

Piglet, who surely would have been deleted. [Two face]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
[Killing me]

My family tree if done by them would be holey rather than holy; a few skeletons in the recent past that only came to light after funerals.


Off today for a weekend away at Buchan in Victoria...almost now have got rid of 50 hours overtime by flex-days. Staying at a B&B and looking forward to exploring the caves, a bushwalk or two, and a nice cooked breakfast. Hope you all have a good weekend, and hope it rains across the Atlantic in SA soon.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Atlantic!?!? Indian Ocean, I think. I haven't had a coffee yet, if that is an excuse.
 
Posted by RainbowGirl (# 18543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I think it was at my dad's funeral [2006] that my brothers and I met a [now] elderly cousin who had been tasked by an even older cousin to complete his family research and told us [without much explanation] that he had come across some, what he called, disturbing information and decided that none of us really need or want to know!

We know we come from Huguenot stock and, realistically, that is enough.

I wish my family had the same policy, we trace back to the first fleet and are not from the "just stole a loaf of bread but are pretty decent otherwise" convict stock. I was only six or seven the first time someone excitedly told me the family history, I had nightmares for weeks.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
Atlantic!?!? Indian Ocean, I think. I haven't had a coffee yet, if that is an excuse.

Of course that is an excuse, Ian. One I use myself.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Our South Island cousin, our paternal family researcher, was contacted by a woman whose grandparent had been one of two children sired by our great-uncle Tom. Cousin knew members of this family and they had quite a fun reunion; the illegitimate daughter who'd made contact had always proudly given Tom's name as her father on legal documents. Tom had one legitimate son and four grandsons, of whom three were fascinated by the new information; the fourth said it must have been someone else of the same name.
A second cousin remembered great-uncle Tom, who used to visit his family, and who still gave the impression of being a bit of a lad.
Even more shocking for the upset grandson (if it even reached him) was a press cutting of the wayward young woman taking Tom to court for financial support. She claimed that he'd come with his sister to an arranged meeting and had pushed her to the ground. The magistrate found that a financial arrangement had already been made between the two families, that the young woman had a history of fainting, and ruled that there was no case to answer.
When family history is concerned, some of us have a good laugh and others go into denial.

GG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I can't remember the exact details (even if I ever knew them) but I understand that the emigration to Australia of two of my great-aunts sometime around the time of the First World War was precipitated by an illegitimate birth.

I think the baby stayed in the UK and was brought up by her grandmother (my great-grandmother) as though she was one of her own children, but the mother and one of her sisters emigrated.

Anything to avoid a scandal, eh? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I felt really sorry for a young, married woman several generations back in my family tree. Her husband came on ahead to prepare a place for the family, and when she arrived she found he was living with another woman. ( My mother, who was the youngest in her family and 'protected' by them, wasn't told this until she was married with children herself).

My Aunt, who had a copy of her Grandfather's marriage certificate and the birth certificate of his son, laughed when she realised the son was born only a few months before the wedding because said Grandfather was always very 'proper' and censorial about anyone else's behaviour. Mum, probably because she had been so sheltered, was [Eek!]

Huia

[ 26. May 2017, 23:39: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Just had a conversation with one of my daughters who had never heard the term "common law wife".

Family trees do open up some interesting subjects!

Also had to explain to her why one of her great grandfathers, who was Chinese, would marry an English woman and not a Chinese one.

When I told her there were no Chinese women, because they were not allowed to emigrate here, she asked Why?

Therein followed a thumbnail explanation of the White Australia Policy, but she still could not grasp the past reality that if, as a Chinese Christian, he wanted to legally marry, he had to marry either a white or a native woman. Or a half-caste.

Nope, didn't understand what that was either. Makes me rather pleased we have moved this far in so few generations. Not fast enough for some, and still a long way to go with how we treat refugees...but it does give hope that things will not always be this way.
 
Posted by Dal Segno (# 14673) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
In other, totally unrelated news...The Bishop of Christchurch has announced that the decision on what is to be done about the earthquake wrecked Cathedral will be made at the Diocesan Synod in September...and there is a well connected outside pressure group that wants total restoration of the building to its pre-quake condition,this will probably not be received well in the wider community.

Why oh why rebuild a building that is a not particularly exciting copy of hundreds of buildings across Europe. Why not build something new and striking and exciting and noteworthy. Sydney Opera House is an icon because it is exciting in a way it would not be if it were a facsimile of European opera houses.

[ 27. May 2017, 12:14: Message edited by: Dal Segno ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Couldn't agree more Dal. The problem is that many people in Christchurch have an emotional attachment to the old building, derivative though it is. It is seen by many, who may only walk in the door to donate presents at Christmas, if that, as a landmark and a symbol of Christchurch. Even when The Visitors' Centre was added to the side there were irate letters to the paper along the lines of "how dare the Anglicans change our building?" Christchurch has a history of social justice, but in many ways is a conservative place.

Ratepayers money has also been used to strengthen it and for running costs.

I like the idea of Synod deciding, but am mindful that the Minister for Earthquake Recovery has wide, (some would say draconian) powers, which she has said she is reluctant to use, but given that developers are putting pressure on, and it's election year, who knows what might happen.

Huia
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
BL and others undertaking online genealogical research, take caution.

We have been doing the same, but have found many discrepancies. In one case, when we consulted the original records with the help of local experts on Guernsey, it was found that whoever had done the previous online work had followed the wrong family line altogether. We have even found an error in the standard reference book on Guernseaise emigrants to Australia which attributed a cousin to our mob who didn't belong.

My wife is currently following online some very distant threads of her family who seem to have emigrated to WA, but I am treating that with some caution until we check sources.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Barnabas Aus:
...our mob...

That is a perfect descriptor for my family!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by Barnabas Aus:
...our mob...

That is a perfect descriptor for my family!
I have set up a login for the younger grandchildren on my computer. Name? The mob. They actually like it after I read riot act to them about even thinking of using my login. If I know they are coming, I logout before they get here. Better safe than sorry.

[ 28. May 2017, 09:14: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
WW, I am as guilty as any of making wrong assumptions - especially when many families use the same Christian names in every generation and along every branch of the tree. So I am crosschecking the census roles with parish registers just to make sure. I have also spent the last two days plotting every family with the same surname in lower Cornwall for my own peace of mind. It is quite entertaining!
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
My mother's cousin once received a letter from someone in England claiming kinship with her father's family. All the names were spot on, but totally misplaced. As George Bernard Shaw once said, in quite another context, "My dear, you know all the words, but you haven't the right cadence"
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
... "My dear, you know all the words, but you haven't the right cadence"

Or, as the late comedian Eric Morecambe put it, "I was playing the right notes, but not necessarily in the right order".
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Ah, but if you go back far enough, there is probably going to be a connection. Just not in the generation you first thought. At the moment I have lost one of my forebears completely. He was a 15 year old at home with his family in Penzance in the 1841 census and emigrated to Oz in 1858 with wife and child. But he is not listed anywhere in the 1851 UK census.

I am now rather mystified as to where he might have gone. Perhaps, as a joiner, he might have been a ship's carpenter for a while. Maybe he was out on a smuggling run!

The census records are quite fascinating in themselves as a snapshot of households in the 1840's. Particularly the lists of those in poorhouses and asylums. I am guessing that the church also supported widows who clubbed together to live - there are a few households that seem to be full of unrelated women of all ages. Given the dangers of working on the sea or down a mine, widowhood was not uncommon at any age.

Unless these are covens or cathouses! I am also guessing that the group houses along places like Market St could be taverns or fish shops or whatever other enterprises were operating along the town foreshores of the time. So guesswork is part of the sleuthing. Sometimes it's right and sometimes not, but a considered guess can still lead down fascinating paths.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Please remember also that among the farm laborers and that class in England at least, spelling of family names is anything but reliable, depending on the accent of the person registering the name and the wit of the person registering it, especially in the days when the parish clerk did it.

My late uncle managed to work out a family tree for his father's family in Devon, back to sometime in the 1560s. Many or most of them would have been illiterate until at least the mid 1800s. In no two successive generations was the family name spelt the same. I grant you it's not like Smith or Black, but still...

In fact in my own great-grandfather's family (two sets of children by successive wives), the name was spelt one way for two children (of four) by his first wife, and for three children (of five) by his second, and a different way for the rest. And he was certainly not illiterate.

Just don't take too much for granted.

John
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yes, I was puzzled by one person being listed with the surname Hanes in one register and same person as Hawes in another until I realised that in handwritten records it would not be difficult to mistake an N for a W. Or vice versa. I have no idea which is correct now. And I am aware of the plethora of spelling anomalies, and happily disregard vowels, plurals and double letters. Though I still smile when they are listed as "Henery" & "Mertha". I am guessing that is pretty close to how the occupant of the household described their names to the census man!

One thing that seems to have tripped up a lot of others working on this particular branch is assuming that "Christian" is always a male name. My lot seem to have used it only for female children, as the census records clearly show. And I do feel sorry for the poor little tot baptized "Triphena. " I wonder how that went down in a fishing village!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Wow! I have just heard Bishop Victoria Matthews interviewed on the radio about the future of the Cathedral. Apparently it was part of a longer interview which will be posted online later. She questioned spending millions of dollars on a building when there are so many people in pain. Suicide has increased alarmingly since the quakes and there is strong evidence of a growing mental health crisis.

I think some of her response is because the government has offered a loan of millions to the Church and she is saying it would be better spent on mental health.

I'll try to find it on the RNZ website because I need to hear it again, but what I heard impressed me.
Checkpoint interview

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Good on her - probably there are many more who need help than attend the Cathedral on any sort of regular basis. I appreciate the symbolism that a rebuilt Cathedral would bring, but a less expensive version and use the balance elsewhere may be the way to go.

[ 29. May 2017, 07:51: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
This was my take on it – Joe Bennett had referred to an article in the Sunday paper, which I don't get.

The Christchurch cathedral formed the centrepiece of a city that was to reproduce the society that the settlers left behind in the Old Country: Anglican, where everyone knew their place and all worshipped in a Gothic cathedral every Sunday.

The society that has developed in the intervening years is very different, and an imitation Gothic cathedral does not symbolise the culture of the 21st century. One wonders how many of the people who are so determined to have it restored would be regular worshipers.

It grieves me to think of the glorious churches that have been built in other countries in the last century, as well as on a smaller scale in New Zealand, while we are offered a rebuild of a structure that doesn't belong in this place and time.

GG
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I should have said – I sent this to the DomPost. They print about one in seven of what I send them.

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Lovely surprise packet in the mail this week with a photo in it of one of my great grandmothers. Only ever knew her by name and did not know a photo of her existed. It is interesting how much one can tell from a photo. She was caught in mid stride, erect as a ramrod and with a bag clamped firmly under her elbow. She is looking purposefully ahead.

Not to be messed with, I suspect! My old mum told me yesterday that her father did not get along with his wife's mother at all. But then that is the lot for most mother-in-laws I know.

Anyway, I enjoyed getting the photo immensely - and probably moreso because it was not a posed shot.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I had a great aunt who sounds similar. Her back never touched the back of the dining chair she sat on, never a lounge chairs and she stood very straight. A person of very definite views which she was good at promoting.The last on her side of the family, Alberta. There was an Albert in each generation but as she appeared to be the last, she became Alberta, which she hated. Late in life she changed it to something very different.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Yay, tomorrow I'm off to the West Coast for the day. A friend has work over there so I am hitching a ride. The forecast is for sunny weather and no rain [Yipee] which isn't bad for an area that had 18 metres [Eek!] of rain one year (the average being only 14 metres).

Hoki is my favourite small town and a walk along the beach with its crashing surf will blow away the cobwebs.

I'm also hoping to see some keas at Arthurs Pass, but numbers ate dwindling a bit [Waterworks]

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Safe travels, Huia, and have a great time! [Smile]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Who remembers the days of he street photographers? They were a part of a trip into the city; they stood on the footpath and snapped you as you approached, and I think they'd take one or two more if you were in the mood. Then you had to be able to go into the shop next trip to town to look at proofs and hopefully order one or two.
I know there were one or two among our family archives but I don't know of whom or where they were taken.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Yes, GG I remember as a child that i hoped they would not step out in front of me. I hated having my photo taken. There was a small space between two buildings in Market Street in Sydney city. Just over the road from our hairdresser. A photographer kept his equipment there and would pop out unexpectedly.

I have a couple of photos of my mum from that era and some others of other members of the family. One of mum in particular was a superb photo, could hardly have been bettered in a studio.

I find them interesting now as they give some idea of every day "good" clothes and fashions. Shoes and bags too, and all the womenb wore hats to town.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yes indeed. Great grandmama was a dressmaker, so the dress is quite something, with a scarfed neckline, and a contrasting cloche hat. It's a black and white photo, and she is past middle age, but clearly took care in what she wore. Unfortunately it is just a grainy photocopy of an old snapshot, so I won't be framing it. But fascinating nevertheless. The old daguerrotype on my mantel is of my father's great great grandsire. Dark jacket, dark cravat and white wescott...he is sitting in a chair, posed like a gentleman. In real life he was a carpenter and cabinet maker, and the rather large ruddy nose and his girth suggests he liked a pint or two.

I just hope my kids don't toss the lot into the recycling bin when I go.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Happy travels Huia!

Hadn't heard of street photographers...

Took a walk along the Kiewa River this morning [dr told me I'm Vitamin D deficient and need to get out more - when it's 0C in the morning before work I don't feel like it!], near my manager's house, and who should I bump into when getting out the car but him, his 2 kids and dog. Walked with them for a while.

13C now, but warm in the sun. Off to sweep the leaves...the trees around me are almost bare.
 
Posted by Evangeline (# 7002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dal Segno:
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
In other, totally unrelated news...The Bishop of Christchurch has announced that the decision on what is to be done about the earthquake wrecked Cathedral will be made at the Diocesan Synod in September...and there is a well connected outside pressure group that wants total restoration of the building to its pre-quake condition,this will probably not be received well in the wider community.

Why oh why rebuild a building that is a not particularly exciting copy of hundreds of buildings across Europe. Why not build something new and striking and exciting and noteworthy. Sydney Opera House is an icon because it is exciting in a way it would not be if it were a facsimile of European opera houses.
Because it is/was part of the history of the city and of the antipodes. I appreciate that it might not be the best thing to do to rebuild what was there before but I believe we need to acknowledge that the Cathedral in Christchurch was a much loved and significant piece of architecture and respect that, even if ultimately it is decided to build a more economically sensible and earthquake resistant structure.
 
Posted by Dal Segno (# 14673) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Evangeline:
quote:
Originally posted by Dal Segno:
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
In other, totally unrelated news...The Bishop of Christchurch has announced that the decision on what is to be done about the earthquake wrecked Cathedral will be made at the Diocesan Synod in September...and there is a well connected outside pressure group that wants total restoration of the building to its pre-quake condition,this will probably not be received well in the wider community.

Why oh why rebuild a building that is a not particularly exciting copy of hundreds of buildings across Europe. Why not build something new and striking and exciting and noteworthy. Sydney Opera House is an icon because it is exciting in a way it would not be if it were a facsimile of European opera houses.
Because it is/was part of the history of the city and of the antipodes. I appreciate that it might not be the best thing to do to rebuild what was there before but I believe we need to acknowledge that the Cathedral in Christchurch was a much loved and significant piece of architecture and respect that, even if ultimately it is decided to build a more economically sensible and earthquake resistant structure.
Is the Coventry solution appropriate here then?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
The Coventry solution has been suggested by a few people Dal, but doesn't seem to have much support. I can see that it would acknowledge the historical aspects, but from what I can see (and I don't follow the arguments in detail) it seems to be a compromise that would make few people happy. Those who are most interested in the historical aspects seem to be arguing for a replica of what was.

I am aware I may not be doing their arguments justice, and am conflicted about this myself. In the past I was a volunteer there, and a Cathedral Regular (it's not a Parish, so doesn't have parishioners), but for various reasons had moved on before the quakes started, although I continued some contact with the people, and my gig on Christmas eve minding the tree.

I think the past can be acknowledged, but would prefer to see a building that reflects present day NZ, and can be used by people, rather than being a historical monument.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Here's a good piece on the subject
 
Posted by Dal Segno (# 14673) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Here's a good piece on the subject

Thanks - that's very helpful.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Grandson, aged 5, took a tumble yesterday and was yelling in pain. His mother was a bit mystified as to where exactly it was hurting. Finally she asked him if he had hurt his "boy bits". He asked what she meant. Thereafter followed an anatomy lesson.
When his father arrived home, master 5 informed him quite seriously that he had fallen off a chair and hurt his "skittles."

I suspect this terminology is going to be in our family for a long time to come...
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks for posting that Zappa - I had missed that week's Listener

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Another thought on the forebears popped up. Paternal Grandmother had Ideas – can you blame her for giving her elder son every opportunity to go to university and become a headmaster, even if the other kids got pushed into the background; the family were probably not far from illiteracy. She did, however, note that her mother-in-law and her sisters had made kid gloves, a suitable activity for young Ladies. What she didn't appreciate was that her husband's family were farm labourers from a village where glovemaking was a village craft, meaning that children didn't have to go off into service or working for other masters, but worked together as a family in winter when there was not so much to do on the farm work. That they had wits if not education led them to emigrate when there was much rural unrest over the low wages and condition of farm workers.
I only met Dad's mum once, and all I remember is her telling me that if I went outside in summer I should wear a good hat and gloves to keep my skin nicely pale.

GG
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
And in the southern hemisphere it would probably be much healthier for us to wear hats and gloves as well as sunbloc!

Severe winter storms battering the Cape, trees down, roofing blown off, flooded roads and hundreds homeless an sheltering in community halls -- wildfires caused by lightning causing havoc in Knysna and eight dead so far. Much needed rain but accompanied by really destructive weather conditions.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Well, we've had a squally change, but not even the powerful April cyclone caused 8 deaths. And fires amongst it all as well! Remembering you all.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
And in the southern hemisphere it would probably be much healthier for us to wear hats and gloves as well as sunbloc!

Severe winter storms battering the Cape, trees down, roofing blown off, flooded roads and hundreds homeless an sheltering in community halls -- wildfires caused by lightning causing havoc in Knysna and eight dead so far. Much needed rain but accompanied by really destructive weather conditions.

Just saw this on news. Prayers for all, it certainly looked violent.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It looks and sounds awful - [Votive] for all there [Votive]

[ 08. June 2017, 12:17: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Much needed rain but accompanied by really destructive weather conditions.

And isn't that so often the way, "nature, red in tooth and claw"?

Thoughts and prayers ... my FB connections in your area are keeping me up to date
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
{{MaryLouise and everyone in the Southern Cape}}

[Votive]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Thoughts and prayers especially with the people of Kynsna,on the South African south coasts, where people have lost lives in the fires [Tear]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Back on line briefly, we have cables down in my neighborhood. Thanks for the thoughts and prayers, this has been a horrible week. Latest news is large numbers missing as more than 4 000 people have been displaced along the Knysna fireline, homes destroyed, destruction of forests, a young volunteer firefighter dead.

And down in the Cape so many homeless and sheltering in community halls, snow falling on the Cape mountains, the elderly and babies sick, low-lying areas still flooded. Collecting blankets and tinned foods to take to shelters, but so much more is needed in terms of infrastructure, upliftment and municipal services, a better co-ordinated emergency response.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
[Votive]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
[Votive] from here, too.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Compass, Channel 2 next Saturday, 6:00 pm is on Father Rod Bower from Gosford Anglican. Episode titled This troublesome priest. On ivew from day after. Download app if needed for iview.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Moderate quake last night. Probably too small to cause damage but, before I checked, enough to make me wonder if it was a bigger one elsewhere - it wasn't. I'm a bit jumpy since the Kaikoura one last year that caused me to evacuate due to a possible tsunami. I hope it didn't disturb visiting Lions or their supporters too much. Mind you if they were outside at an after-match function they may just have put it down to the beverages consumed. [Biased]

Huia
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
[Votive] Huia and those in quake-prone regions.
[Votive] ML and those impacted by horrific weather and fires.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Prayer much needed here -- the fireline still extends more than 100km between Sedgefield and Plettenberg Bay. More emergency personnel and firefighters brought in, helicopters waterbombing inaccessible ares. Emergency food and medical supplies arriving, donations pouring in to vetted Knysna Disaster Relief organisations. But until the fires are put out, nothing can be done and the bigger picture showing the scale of the disaster won't emerge.

Huia, I'm glad the quake was just moderate. Right now with blustery winds and snow on the mountains, I'm watching the weather quite nervously.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Bishop Kay Goldsworthy has been awarded an AO in today's Honours List. Congratulations to her, but given that a dressmaker was awarded an AC, Bp Kay should have been awarded that.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I've met her occasionally - she left my almer mater the year before I started. I've been impressed by her integrity over the years, and think it's a fine award for her. Will she be ++ Perth, though?
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
I suspect not, bearing in mind one of the Assistant Bishops there - but she's well qualified for it.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
I've met her occasionally - she left my almer mater the year before I started. I've been impressed by her integrity over the years, and think it's a fine award for her. Will she be ++ Perth, though?

I'm sure she's too smart to take on such a poisoned chalice!
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
It's a couple of weeks in, but I'm finally catching up on iView with David Stratton's Stories of Australian Cinema . It's a rather marvellous perspective on Australia, its culture and its maturing film industry. Highly recommend it!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Fr Rod Bower was elsewhere saying the parish of Gosford has a history of troublesome priests active in indigenous affairs etc. Compass tonight on Channel 2 at 6:00 pm explores the current troublesome priest.

[ 16. June 2017, 23:50: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Here we are only two days from the winter solstice and the dashboard readout at lunchtime today was 24degC. Climate change anyone?
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
You can send it down here. Birds doing it tough this week with so many birdbaths frozen solid...
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
I went up to Newcastle, well, just north at Port Stephens but few people here know where that is so I say Newcastle...anyway...went up there over the weekend and it was pleasantly warm compared to life on the Murray. My parents complained at how cold it was; it felt like an early spring to me. [Smile]

Thanks for the TV recommendations too...perfect viewing for the cool winter nights.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
TP & I took refuge from the fog and frost at the cinema today...I have to say I was pleasantly surprised by the script writing in Wonder Woman. Far exceeded my expectations (which admittedly were rather low) and without thinking too much about immortal beings dying, ethnic minorities black marketeering in the middle of no man's land and Remus Lupin becoming Ares... I thoroughly enjoyed it. Great bit of escapism and some interesting myth weaving.

Nothing like a bit of midwinter to make one appreciate the Marvel Universe.
 
Posted by Dark Knight (# 9415) on :
 
Yo, Australia.
My mate AwkwardAnglican may be down here soon. Make them feel welcome, yeah? You all being sweethearts and all ...
 
Posted by AwkwardAnglican (# 18802) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dark Knight:
Yo, Australia.
My mate AwkwardAnglican may be down here soon. Make them feel welcome, yeah? You all being sweethearts and all ...

Naw, you're making me even more awkward.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Welcome to you. DK has possibly told you about us. Not sure what he might have said, but we are welcoming. Settle in, look around,check out the Ten Commandments. There is a link to them at top of page. Get a feel for the different boards.

Lothlorien AS Host.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
You do realise we are welcoming AA on the winter solstice. Google informs me this will occur at exactly 2.24pm Eastern Australian time this afternoon.

I shall toast some marshmallows to celebrate that the sun will be up for longer each day from now on. TP informs me it is only a few seconds each day until the equinox in September, but the little flower in my soul will grasp at any thought of more sunshine in the day right now.

BL...dreaming of warm sunshine....
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Oh yeah, hi AA!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
You do realise we are welcoming AA on the winter solstice. Google informs me this will occur at exactly 2.24pm Eastern Australian time this afternoon.

I shall toast some marshmallows to celebrate that the sun will be up for longer each day from now on. TP informs me it is only a few seconds each day until the equinox in September, but the little flower in my soul will grasp at any thought of more sunshine in the day right now.

BL...dreaming of warm sunshine....

More sunshine BL but colder weather because the earth slants more away from the sun . I am currently sitting at table in brilliant sunshine through balcony door. MY feet are very warm as sun is directly on them. I have sun in my loungeroom till about 2;00 PM, although by that time, it is just a narrow strip.

In summer, the sun is higher so it does not come in at all.

[ 20. June 2017, 23:01: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Still waiting for the sun to appear here, Loth. It is 9.40am and no sign of it. I have wet washing ready to go on the line but am not going to put it out until at least the fog lifts. It is dark by 5pm.

Spending today doing a paper purge = I probably have enough for a bonfire! Of course, that won't happen as it too is now against council regs.

Grateful for all the pansies and violets in our garden, which seem blithely unaffected by the frosts. Unlike me. Brrrrr.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have good new roller blinds on balcony doors. They are shut by 5:00 pm and make a marvellous difference to the warmth in the room.. There is quite a drqaught set up by interchange of heat inside and chill outside. I can feel the difference as soon as I put them dow. Yes, dark at that time of the afternoon, and I really prefer to be able to see out. However I have used my big gas heater only a few times and with gas going up as well as electricity, that must be a plus.

Have you tried negotiating a new rate for utilities? I had a pensioner concession and was paying wit with that, just for my use, almost as much as son paid fopr three people with long showers etc. I rang and now no longer have that concession but a much cheaper rate overall with more off because I pay by direct debit and therefore pay on time. I could hardly believe how much cheaper it was with new arrangements.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I have a good overhang so the sun warms the living room beautifully in winter. On a cold day, though, the heat pump on 18° has me too hot with a cardy on and not quite warm enough without.

Some people just have to find something to complain about.

My winter flowering kowhai has been in bloom for about ten days. While the common spring ones will be covered in gold in September for about a week and then it's all over, mine continues to produce flowers for almost four months. And I don't know where I got it, about 40 years ago – maybe an angel dropped it.

GG
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Freezing cold here in South Africa despite sunshine, aloes flowering red and bright yellow. Magnificent sunrises. I'm up to see them because I have so much writing/editing work on my desk (not a complaint).

As always, we could do with rain.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
GG, I wonder if that is a Stephen's Island kowhai? They start flowering in winter, and flower for longer, than most of the others. Also, initially at least, they grow more horizontally than vertically. I used to have one, but mow have only the smaller one with twisted branches.

In honour of the shortest day, and the coming colder weather, I've added another blanket to my bed. I've found that a blanket immediately on top of the top sheet provides more warmth when first getting into bed than does a duvet which is cotton covered.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Freezing cold here in South Africa despite sunshine, aloes flowering red and bright yellow. Magnificent sunrises. I'm up to see them because I have so much writing/editing work on my desk (not a complaint).

Your first line reminds me to ask how housing those whose houses burned or were storm damaged are being accommodated.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by AwkwardAnglican:
quote:
Originally posted by Dark Knight:
Yo, Australia.
My mate AwkwardAnglican may be down here soon. Make them feel welcome, yeah? You all being sweethearts and all ...

Naw, you're making me even more awkward.
Hey, bro, wassup?
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
(oh, hosts, should I have offered a translation for that /\ ? [Biased] )
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The hosts here in AS are magnanimous and forgiving...

...sometimes.

[Two face]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Hi, GeeD. I'm not sure how to answer that and haven't really wanted to post on it because there's no good news. The (mostly white) owners of beach houses and suburban homes are probably waiting for insurance payouts and hoping smaller insurance companies don't go bankrupt. Those in disadvantaged communities (RDP housing) may be hoping municipal or government authorities help with rebuilding housing. Those from informal settlements are probably scrounging around for pieces of corrugated iron and cardboard in order to put up new shacks. Many are still squatting in community halls. And we're in mid-winter.

South Africa's a very hard country for most people to survive in and the lack of infra-structure means that charitable donations and goodwill don't go very far. It's both First World and developing world rolled up into one and last week it was revealed that because of chronic unemployment, more than 17-million South African are dependent on paltry social grants. Natural disasters just leave people much, much worse off.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Not good news at all. I suppose that many of the residents can just get by on their day-to-day expenses, but something like this is too far beyond them. Probably so far beyond them that they are dispirited to the extent that thinking about what they can do is out.

Many of the South Pacific Islands are in a different category. There's no money, but by the same token there's ample food for all and you don't see people without food or the sort of basic shelter that has done them for centuries. It is basic, but come a cyclone, the house gets blown over but rebuilding is a community activity and gets done.

[ 22. June 2017, 06:40: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Well, there's no shortage of ingenuity or resolve in informal settlements, but soils are poor and water is in short supply so growing your own food isn't feasible in most places, more sophisticated or durable building materials are unavailable, there is limited access to running water or electricity or municipal services or healthcare. And these settlements aren't co-operative 'communities' as such -- they have serious problems with gangsterism, xenophobia, gender violence and drug-fuelled anti-social behaviour.

This is an example of what I'm talking about: Hellish Blikkiesdorp
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
That is real poverty indeed. The islanders I was referring to have no money but they are not in that sort of poverty at all. Of course, we've not been to Fiji since the coups, but beforehand it was a very pleasant place for a winter holiday - warm, close and welcoming to tourists. No beggars on the streets then, and as I said, no-one looked to be underfed. Certainly not the crime referred to in this article and I doubt that that has changed.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
GG, I wonder if that is a Stephen's Island kowhai? They start flowering in winter, and flower for longer, than most of the others. Also, initially at least, they grow more horizontally than vertically. I used to have one, but mow have only the smaller one with twisted branches.

Huia

Yes, that's what I think it is. I hadn't heard of the horizontal shape but it is that, very graceful. I love it to bits, and so does the tui – and there's been a couple of kereru around lately. They tend to ignore tui if he tries to chase them off.

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Good for the kereru - tui are really aggressive. I should get another Stephen's Island kowhai as they flower when nothing much else is around, and the one with the twisty branches is very slow growing.

About 60 years ago Mum planted her first kowhai hoping tui would come - which they did, about 40 years later when the possum culling got underway. I was always glad she lived long enough to enjoy watching them.

MaryLouise, I hope the insurance companies stay solvent. My insurance company - a national one, but based in Christchurch, was bailed out by the government following the quakes here. The uncertainty added horribly to the stress, which is ongoing for some people whose claims are not yet settled over 6 years later.

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
A distant family member sent me a USB stick with various records on it. In amongst the stuff was this link.

Relative who set this psalm to music was apparently a singing master in Caythorpe, and his manuscript of psalm settings is in the British Library. Someone resurrected his setting for Psalm 47 and set it to music...I am assuming on instruments of the 18th century. So, by the wonders of technology, I am able to listen on my computer to something one of my ancestors wrote 200 years ago. Simply amazing.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
That is very interesting BL. I am not surprised at all by your reaction to it. I think I would feel much the same way.

My great grandfather drove first car over the Blue Mountains. To Lithgow. Not the first car on the mountains but Sir Mark Foy had his taken by trainto the HydroMajestic which he built . He believed the mountains were too steep for it to climb. I think my brother has the photo of it.

A few weeks ago, I found a facsimile of a letter he wrote about it and another of replacing theengine in 1928. Fascinating.

Enjoy your studies and hopefully more serendipitous discoveries too.

[ 23. June 2017, 00:15: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
we've not been to Fiji since the coups

Kuruman is there at this very moment
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Tomorrow I was to have quite scary surgery, a laminectomy.
Just before lunch I got a call to say it was postponed as the surgeon was unwell.
I'd got myself mentally prepared, cancelled things and organised others – and my son, my only next of kin and support (well, friends were stepping into the breech), was off to China the same day for nine days.
And worst of all, I'd originally been offered an earlier date but at short notice, and I'd opted to have more time to get organised.

Well, I hope I don't go right to the bottom of the list, having started out at the top.

GG, busy finding ways to cheer myself up.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Prayers, GG for a swift and successful completion of this.. There are some things you need to "get your head around" as my friend with dementia says.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
we've not been to Fiji since the coups

Kuruman is there at this very moment
I don't want to sound holier-than-thou, but we decided that after the coups we'd no sooner go there than to South Africa.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
I hope that whenever you get to the operating table, all goes well.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
GG, I hope he recovers soon and the operation happens soon.

We had swallows doing acrobatics in the air over the street again when I came home today. I'd been feeling a bit blue and they broke my mood so I was really grateful to them.


Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Lovely to see swallows doing their figures of eight!

And GG I hope that op is rescheduled soon.

Call from a close friend to say her daughter's partner has had a severe manic episode and has been hospitalised. I've wondered what was wrong and why she couldn't talk about her daughter or stress levels in recent weeks, thought she might have had depression herself. No, it was all about confidentiality and shame. If the partner had hurt himself physically, I would have had blow-by-blow accounts. But because he has been diagnosed as acutely bipolar, everything is being hushed up and only a handful of people 'know', all of whom are minimising and telling each other it was just one outbreak and once his meds are 'tweaked' he will be fine. His stigmatised condition is to be hidden away -- his mother doesn't believe it is anything more than an 'emotional upset' and she doesn't want malicious gossip.

In reality, he tried to destroy a city apartment and the police were called. He threatened his professor at the university and has been asked to take a break from his course. He gave away large sums of money to friends and the friends are being asked (tactfully) to return the money. Etc, etc. His parents are paying for psychiatric care (they fired a psychiatrist who told them something they didn't want to hear), begging my friend's daughter to marry the partner and start a family so as to give him something to live for.

I know this is what happens, I've been through something similar in my own family. But between the secrecy, denial and determination to put everything right all at once, the situation is just spiralling out of control. And the bipolar patient is incarcerated in a private clinic, manic, sleepless and has no idea what has been going on. He thinks he is saving his friends from the apocalypse. My friend's daughter is furious at his behaviour, frightened by this weird stranger inside him, and determined to save him from himself even if it means sacrificing her own career to nurse him for as long as it takes. His family thinks she is wonderful; her mother wants to get her away from all of them.

Sorry for the long post, it felt very cathartic to write this down in a safe place.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Prayers for you and your friends...navigating bipolarism is like learning to dance along the top of a chasm while juggling meds, hormones, energy, memory and moods at the same time. And once diagnosed it is a dance that has no end. I spent the afternoon talking to a similar young sufferer going through a black period. May the young man find and hold the light and hope he needs to get through this season.

[Votive] [Votive]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Thanks for kind thoughts, and – oh, MaryLouise, didI think I had troubles? My thoughts are with that troubled family right now, and with their friends like you who are distressed and helpless.

GG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
{{{GG and ML}}}

Prayers ascending for both of you (and ML's friend and his family) from over here. [Votive]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Many thanks for the support and prayers Banner Lady, GG and Piglet.

Still reeling from that conversation and subsequent disclosures about manic excesses, when I clicked on Facebook and saw that an old friend I knew at school is dying of advanced inoperable cancer, only discovered when she collapsed at an airport and was rushed to hospital. A horrible shock and this seems to me to be one of the more 'unbuffered' aspects of social media, the unexpected posts and how to respond in a form of media designed for fluffy light Likes and smilies. I emailed and sent private messages -- again feeling helpless and unsure what to say.

A small comfort to see snowdrops (leucojems) and clumps of the white paper narcissus are coming up and about to flower despite the drought and harsh dry winter.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
[Votive] , MaryLouise
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
MaryLouise [Votive]

I'm not on FB, but I can understand the disconnect between the medium and the message. It would be a difficult way to discover bad news.

I hope the young man gets some good medical help.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
My sister is house sitting for my niece while she is away. Before she left, niece's two dogs escaped their enclosure. The female returned but the male has been missing for some weeks. A very bushy area near the Hawkwsbury on top of the ridge. Yesterday a man told my sister that there was a dog barking in the bush near his place, miles from my niece's. It was Curtis who was very glad to see her indeed. Living rough and he had lost a lot of weight.

Home to a smallish meal. She will give him several small meals through the day, so as not to overload the system.

Unfortunately it will be a while before my niece gets the good news. Two years ago she went on riding and photographic safari to two African countries. She has just arrived in Botswana and is riding totally away from phone or net access. A couple of weeks there and then she goes to Zambia. Hopefully she will be in some contact soon. Last year she went with the same company which is run by a friend to Argentina and Patagonia. Lots of polo coaching by Argentinean team.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Few things are more worrying than missing pets, Lothlorien: good to know Curtis is back! And those horse-riding adventures are the best way to see the wilderness. I did a horse trek in the Okavango Delta (Botswana) when I was in my early 20s and loved it.

Poor Z still manic and sleepless in the clinic, meds not helping. He has lost so much weight, none of his clothes fit. And his parents have gone from minimising ('Just a phase he's going through, he needs to pull himself together') to 'All of This is All our Fault, We Failed Him as Parents'. Even less helpful, if understandable.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
She loves riding and photos fropm Patagonia show trails along knife edge ridhes of mopuntains foillowed by sure footed ponies. She has two polo ponies of her own and has just bought a smaller horse to learn camp drafting.

Will send PM.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
ML - so scary for all involved. Even more heartbreaking is that the sufferers are often wonderful brilliant people when right minded, and so totally lost when the pendulum swings the other way. It takes such a lot out of all those trying to be supportive - may the pendulum swing back soon, and all those crafting his care regime be given great wisdom. [Votive] [Votive]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
ML - prayers from us for the young man, his family and supporters and for your long-term friend.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I hope Banner Lady has some cosy blankets. I see Canberra has a forecast of -7 overnight tonight.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
-7

[Eek!]

I remember those sorts of temperature from Orange. Dear God I don't know how I survived. Anything under 30 is risky (night time I can survive down to 20C)!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I don't remember even having -7 forecast as an overnight temperature here [Eek!] though if it meant a sunny day afterwards, albeit at a low temperature, it might be OK. I find the lack of sunlight more difficult than the low temperature, as if it's cold I pile on warm clothing, turn up the heat pump, snuggle with the fat'n'fluffy one.

My power bill might be a bit steep though.

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm with you Huia - you can always add an extra layer or a blanket when it's cold, but when it's hot there's a limit to what you can take off. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I just saw an official photo from Rural Fire Service. It showed a fire hose dispensing a slushy. It also said ground temeprature at Bungendore when picture was taken was -15. Back to bed, Banner Lady, and hope Vulpior and Orfeo are somewhere near some heat.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I'm with you Huia - you can always add an extra layer or a blanket when it's cold, but when it's hot there's a limit to what you can take off. [Big Grin]

To a point. It was just on 1C this morning. I was wearing seven layers (down to five now because its 11) including multiple thermals. Mobility becomes something of an issue. My feet (two pairs of socks plus shoes) have still not warmed up.

At 45C I wear just one layer!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Spare us if the temp goes any higher then.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
[Killing me]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Ah yes, Zappa, mobility. It is 3 degrees C indoors and about 7 degrees C outdoors. I've got on socks, sheepskin slippers, kneewarmers, leggings, layers and layers of vests and sweaters, all topped with a thick stripy blanket poncho that makes me look like a circus tent. If I waddle out into the garden, I shall have to start unlayering and then dress again when I get back indoors. So I am just staying put on the sofa.

Unheated houses in supposedly hot countries.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Heh. Currently snuggled up in front of a toasty fire. Mum
's 99th birthday dawned with a -8.7 and the birdbaths remained frozen solid all day.

Spare a thought for the Townsville Cowboys who are playing the Raiders in Canberra tonight. Expected to be -3 at kick-off and -6 by final siren. If they win it will be because they didn't dare stop running in case they froze solid. At the beginning of the season the Raiders played the Cowboys in Townsville in 30 degree heat. The beginning of a long losing streak for the Canberra Raiders - maybe tonight it will be the dish of revenge that is best served cold. (Very cold).

So glad I am not a football goer. Cannot imagine being out in the weather tonight. BRRR indeed.

Mum, however, has sailed through the day and looks likely to be going a while yet. Guess I may have to begin planning the big 100 soon.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Happy birthday to your mother - time to start organising the telegram (done though your local MP). My Father was too ill for his last year, so we made a grand occasion for 101.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
There's a Lions vs All Blacks game on tonight in Wellington. MetService says, "Rain with an All Blacks victory hopefully developing tonight."

Lions fans say , "It's just like home" and were shown on TV complete with brollies. The field will be a mud pool by the time they finish.

Unpatriotically I hope the Lions win - those fans deserve something for coming so far to sit in the rain.

That's a lot of layers Zappa - think 4 is the most I wear and that includes a possum and merino beanie, with a thin merino one under it if the temperature is in negative numbers with a high wind chill factor.

Winter must be a real challenge for you.

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
The Cowboys won, and I hope they had hot steam baths awaiting afterwards.

So cold this morning that the vestry pipes were frozen. I was sacristanning and couldn't wash up the silverware. I figured any germs and lurgies would be hard put to survive anyway. The priest flinched visibly at the hand washing. Yes, the water in the carafe was very very cold.

Church in the Canberra midwinter is only for the very dedicated, very desperate or totally insane.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Apparently the Lions beat the All Blacks. I don't know who won the first test.
A small curly headed boy with a huge smile, holding hands with a Granddad on one side and a Grandma on the other, approached me as I was about to go into church. As I came up to them the wee boy had to tell me in the most excited voice imaginable, ' I'm going to have a birthday party!!!' 'What fun', I said,'How old are you?' 'Three!' and they went on their way, with the joy still shining on the small face.
Very heart-warming.
GG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
Apparently the Lions beat the All Blacks ...

Wow! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
And I was there to see it! Oh happy day, indeed.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
The priest flinched visibly at the hand washing. Yes, the water in the carafe was very very cold.

My beloved makes sure that there's warm water for lavabo [Axe murder]

[ 02. July 2017, 10:42: Message edited by: rexory ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Friend near Boorowa posted photo of ice from dripping tap. -10 at 10 this morning
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Colder in Canberra the last two mornings than in Thredbo (high country ski central in these parts).

The world I woke up to this morning is very very white. No snow. Just very thick frost everywhere. Bird bath has not unfrozen for 3 days straight.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Two separate layers of cloud are moving in here from the west and the day has an unpleasant chill to it. It went down here to 2 last night. Inner west of Sydney. Not normally anyhwere near as low as that here. But also not normally 45 in summer as we had last summer, several times. The times, they are a-changing.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Just very grateful the grandchildren have moved out and we have the luxury of being able to change in front of the fire. A most miserable TP emerged from his midday siesta time yesterday, declaring it was "too cold to read" in the bedroom, despite having some heating on. HIs fingers were struggling to hold the book! We inhabit the warm centre of the house during the day although I also have the heating cranked up in my studio. The back of the house has high ceilings and is wonderfully cool in summer - but not the right place for winter resting.

I will be spending my usual Monday at the nursing home, where it will definitely be warm enough. Doesn't seem to be worrying the cockatoos though - they are everywhere. When I drove to church early yesterday there were two entire streets full of them feeding on the nature strips. It was like playing dodgems and I was lucky not to collect any - two very near misses. Silly galahs.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Be careful changing in front of fire. For many years we had a Norwegian box heater, slow combustion. It had raised decorations, pine forests, foxes, wood cabins etc.

It burned day and night in combined dining and loiunge rooms and was marvellous. Dried washing, warmed boys' pyjamas etc.

I repeatedly told sons not to get too close, but one of them branded himself with a fox brand. Bare bum, bent over to put PJ pants on and connected with very hot surface. It healed OK but it took him a long time to live it down. I think he was about six at the time.

[ 03. July 2017, 02:32: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
BL, a local publisher decided to revive the kids' Annual of old times – but they roped in a whole gallery of our top kids/young adults' authors, artists etc. I can't wait for next year's!
The big success for my grandkids was the board game 'The Naked Grandmother'. If you landed on the square in which 'you accidentally saw you grandmother naked' you were out of the game.

I've had the heat pump on for much of the day. draped on a coffee table in front of it are the woollen socks and two merino singlets; cottons go in the tumble dryer. I dread the arrival of the winter power bills.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
GG, have you seen the electric throw rugs? My sister lives on north coast, on top of a windy cliff right on water . Her heating is from the big bottles of gas which also power her stove. The first year she was there, she used her gas heater which gobbled up a big bottle in next to no time. Now she uses one of the electric throw rugs over her on lounge. Much less money used. OK, it won't dry clothes, but they just take longer. At least she is warm. Something like this. prices both higher and lower than this one.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
My wife has an electric throw rug which gives tremendous relief of her severe arthritis. It is a great blessing on winter nights like the few recent ones.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
An electric throw rug is like an electric blanket then? I might look out for one here.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yes, they have them on sale sometimes in auto shops as you can get ones that plug in to your car socket. I have also seen "American style" electric blankets in bedding shops - apparently electric blankets are usually put on top of the bed in the US rather than between the sheet and the mattress. Someone may be along to reject or verify this but that is what I have been told.

As for naked grandmothers...what on earth makes you think we get down to bare skin except in the bathroom? Thank God for whoever invented the Tastic.

Birdbath was not frozen this morning. TP is hoping for rain, but I fear he will be disappointed yet again.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Yes, like an electric blanket but not as large. It goes over anything, unlike an electric blanket which is under all bedding on top of the mattress. Mine has a removable electrical fitting so it can be washed if needed. Great over legs when sitting at computer desk or lounge while reading. Mine has nine settings and the feeling of spreading warmth as it heats up is just wonderful.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
As I recall, the electric blanket on my parents' bed was an "overblanket" - i.e. it lay somewhere between the top sheet and the bedspread, and was left on all night (presumably on a fairly low heat). I don't know if they had any other blankets in between.

My own experience of electric blankets is all of the under-the-lower-sheet variety that you switch off (assuming you remember [Ultra confused] ) before you fall asleep.

When our blanket (inherited from my grandmother) went fairly spectacularly phut (with a flash of light and a bang [Eek!] ) we bought a fleecy under-blanket (not electric) which was reputed to keep the bed warm in winter and cool in summer. We still have it (after about 15 years) and I have to say, it does work.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kittyville:
And I was there to see it! Oh happy day, indeed.

Jealous!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Tropical conditions for you tomorrow, BL. Forecast of 3-12.
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
It was excellent, Zappa. I'm not generally a fan of rugby played on ovals, but the cake tin is small enough to carry it off. And any weekend in Wellington is a good one. The result was icing on the cake.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
The one time I'm more or less neutral is when the ABs play a / the British team. So I was pleased with the outcome - for rugby and all that - and look forward to this weekend.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
We had an electric over-blanket for many years – sheet, electric blanket, duvet. When it wore out we were quite happy to go back to old-fashioned hot water bottles.

I'm happy with that warm duvet and extra night clothes, so that when I get up in the night I don't freeze.

GG
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
...we were quite happy to go back to old-fashioned hot water bottles.

There is an alternative to a hot water bottle which I greatly prefer. It is a plastic bag with a cloth cover which is filled with some sort of gel. You heat it in the microwave and then put it in your bed.

I have disliked hot water bottles ever since the occasion when I was very ill and filled a hot water bottle to put in my bed. Apparently I didn't put the stopper in tightly enough and it came out. I was in no shape to change the bed, so I put a folded bath towel on top of the wet area and went back to bed.

If the microwave gel things fail, they fail in the microwave, which is easier to deal with. Actually the only time one has failed for me is when I got a new microwave and discovered that it put out a lot more heat and overheated my bag to the point of bursting it.

Moo
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Yes, the microwavable heat packs are getting a workout this week. Cold does make the bones and joints - that have suffered the most stress during life's journey - to ache. I have an electric blanket on the bed in the studio and it is a great blessing.

Tropical indeed today. A range of 7-12 all day but with cloud, wind and the chance of rain. TP snorted in disbelief at the forecast - asking what kind of "rain" probability is 90% of 1mm?
Last night, driving home from Master 5"s "Born of the 4th of July" party, there was just enough to make the dust on the windscreen streaky. Then it stopped. Though maybe its enough to make snow in the high country. [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
A warm dog is better than a hot water bottle or one of those microwave gel packs -- a dog is still just as warm the next morning.
[Smile]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
A twelve dog night is a cold night indeed.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
A twelve dog night is a cold night indeed.

I've only heard of Three Dog Night(s).
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
and very fine they were too
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Aboriginal scale of cold is how many dogs it takes to keep you warm. A three dog night is a cold night. Hence the song. But it gets very cold in the desert so a twelve dog night I imagine is the same as the scene in Dr Zhivago when they heap every fur coat and rug in the house on the bed and snuggle in under it.

I guess the fleas come free.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Aboriginal scale of cold is how many dogs it takes to keep you warm. A three dog night is a cold night. Hence the song. But it gets very cold in the desert so a twelve dog night I imagine is the same as the scene in Dr Zhivago when they heap every fur coat and rug in the house on the bed and snuggle in under it.

I guess the fleas come free.

I thought it was the number of women???
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Gee D, I cannot imagine you are implying women = dogs....so pleease exploin...
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
The problem with cuddly, clean and flea-free dogs warming the bed in winter is that you can't pack them away when summer comes and you want the bed to yourself again. And as the years pass, you find yourself sharing bed-space with rabbit-chasing-in-sleep,snoring, farting, moulting ancient dogs who won't budge from the centre of the bed. (This is also true of humans sharing beds but we won't go there.)

I have flannel winter sheets, bed socks, thick flannel pyjamas and a vast featherdown duvet brought from France years ago. And some quilts and throws as well. I haven't used hot water bottles in years.

A good duvet retains heat very well -- I have considered tucking bowls of rising bread dough (covered in cling wrap and towels) under the duvet to rise during the day.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
The problem with cuddly, clean and flea-free dogs warming the bed in winter is that you can't pack them away when summer comes and you want the bed to yourself again.

Not a problem for me -- I love having my dog next to me any time of year. And in the summer she isn't quite as cuddly as she is in colder weather -- except last night when she was a bit uneasy about the fireworks. (Her story is that she was concerned that I might be scared, so she was snuggling to give me comfort. That's her story, and she's sticking to it.)
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Gee D, I cannot imagine you are implying women = dogs....so pleease exploin...

Not that, but the saying as I knew it was that a very cold night was a 3 women night.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Interesting circles you move in Gee D..."money for nuthin' and yr chics for free..." then?
[Smile]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
It used be in pretty racist terms - cold enough night for a blackfellow to need 3 women to keep him warm. Said by farm hands including those on a property not very far from you as well as in more remote locations. Not too sure just how domesticated dogs were in pre-1788 days.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
On a brighter note, I am heading West in a week, and lunch with Jugular, Rexory, Dark Knight and AdamPater is duly arranged.

We won't talk about you, honest.

Mr Curly
 
Posted by mark_in_manchester (# 15978) on :
 
I dipped in here just being nosey; I'm glad I did, it was +30C today and much too hot for me, and it's good to be reminded of winter misery so as to appreciate the summer a little more.

I have a massive pile of cut firewood at work which is proving hard to give away at this time of year, in case any of you happen to be passing with a van or big trailer [Smile]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mark_in_manchester:


I have a massive pile of cut firewood at work which is proving hard to give away at this time of year, in case any of you happen to be passing with a van or big trailer [Smile]

Yes please. Maybe mail it piece by piece? (So friggin cold) [Frown]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Curly:
On a brighter note, I am heading West in a week, and lunch with Jugular, Rexory, Dark Knight and AdamPater is duly arranged.

We won't talk about you, honest.

Mr Curly

Well, I hope it is a bit warmer in the west, Mr Curly. I hear Jugular is temporarily a bionicle...am thinking there might be some movie roles around for him if he keeps being accident prone. At least a new stage play with a Robot Priest in it, anyway. Between the two of you I am sure you could come up with a script!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mark_in_manchester:
... it was +30C today ...

In Manchester??? [Eek!]

Zappa, maybe you should try Cyprus. [Help]

PS Sorry about the link to the Daily Fail, but it was sent by a friend on Facebook.

[ 06. July 2017, 23:38: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
The heatable gel pack sounds good – how long does it stay warm? I have a wheat pack, basically for pain, and that doesn't keep its heat like a hottie. And yes, I have had a hottie leak or burst in the bed, once or twice over the years.
The bed and my clothing are keeping me warm, with a starting boost from the wheat pack.
I understand that in rest homes they use wheat packs as less likely to be too hot for oldies, but an extra half minute in the microwave can make the wheat pack dangerously hot.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Not feeling brilliant today although it is beautifully sunny, so have not looked up link. Gel packs are safer than wheat packs. There have been cases here reported by Fire brigade where a wheat pack was heated long than recommended. Place under bed clothes it smouldered and set bedding on fire. Gel packs can be quite hot, but at least should not do that.

Obviously care is needed, whatever the product.

[ 07. July 2017, 00:42: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
There have been cases here reported by Fire brigade where a wheat pack was heated long than recommended. Place under bed clothes it smouldered and set bedding on fire. Gel packs can be quite hot, but at least should not do that.

I once overheated a gel pack in the microwave, and it started leaking in the microwave.

Moo
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
There have been cases here reported by Fire brigade where a wheat pack was heated long than recommended. Place under bed clothes it smouldered and set bedding on fire. Gel packs can be quite hot, but at least should not do that.

I once overheated a gel pack in the microwave, and it started leaking in the microwave.

Moo

Yet another reason why dogs are the best bed warmers.
[Smile]
 
Posted by Vulpior (# 12744) on :
 
The bedroom is the preserve of the cat, not the dog. It's currently cat-under-blanket weather; early in life she tried getting right under the doona too but was advised otherwise.

Our current essential is the fan heater in the walk-in wardrobe. Getting dressed without it would not be pleasant.

Looking forward to the (relative) warmth of Sydney this weekend.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Dogs can leak too [Two face]

I mislaid my purple possum and Merino beanie, [Waterworks] so I bought another one. One less possum predating on our native birds. I do have other warm hats that I enjoy wearing, but this design really hugs my head and doesn't set my hearing aids screaming with feedback. When it's really cold I have been known to wear a close fitting, very thin merino beanie under it. The trouble is that when I go into a shop or the library it's so warm I have to strip off a few layers - but I always keep a careful count [Hot and Hormonal] .

I have flannelette sheets on my bed and a warm blanket between them and the duvet. I find that without that blanket the cotton covered duvet takes longer to warm up. I also put a really soft artificial fibre throw in my bed so I can snuggle my feet into it as I find bedsocks too confining. That way I manage without an extra heat source(except on really cold nights when I have a purring one.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Here is Fire Brigade advice for the safe use of wheatpacks.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:


Zappa, maybe you should try Cyprus. [Help]

Ah. 57. Now that's getting warm.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
(PS .. though I suspect that was an "in the sun" temperature ... )
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Here is Fire Brigade advice for the safe use of wheatpacks.

I'm surprised that they don't mention always having a cup of water in the microwave with the wheat bag.
The one time I could have caused a fire I'd put it in without the water, and it had gone on to 30.00 instead of 3.00. Fortunately it smelt hot quite quickly.
However the present one is looking a bit scorched, so maybe it's time for a new one.
GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Yes I also use water in microwave for things like this. Actually I no longer have wheat pack type warmer pad. The one I had was many years old and seams frayed till it was beyond repair. Have not used anything this year so far, although temperatures here have been almost zero here.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Slightly warmer here, hovering around 2 degrees Celsius.

Making my fail-proof heal-all chicken soup for my neighbour's father-in-law who is very ill with cancer. I don't know him but large pots of chicken and vegetable soup are always welcome in winter. I shall make him a mug of beef tea next week -- in another life I would have specialised in invalid cookery because it is something I enjoy doing and appreciate when I am ill myself.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Home-made soup isn't just therapeutic for the eater - I find it's very therapeutic to make as well.

Prayers ascending for the gentleman concerned. [Votive]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Yes, prayers as Piglet says and I echo her thoughts on the therapeutic properties of both making and eating soup.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Home-made soup isn't just therapeutic for the eater - I find it's very therapeutic to make as well.

Prayers ascending for the gentleman concerned. [Votive]

You need bread to go with soup and few things are more rewarding than home made bread.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Obviously in need of comfort food up at Mum's aged care facility too - a Food Matters meeting between residents and suppliers saw lots of requests for hearty soups and rice puddings. I ended up leaving them a recipe for a simple condensed milk and rice favourite of my MIL.

Also on the must try list is Ice cream sweetbread - just 4 cups full cream ice cream (any flavour) mixed with 3 cups SR flour and baked slow for an hour. Sounds too easy to be wonderful but as I do not enjoy spending time in the kitchen, I'm willing to try all short cuts available. Apparently it is popular in Singapore, where melted ice cream is a fact of life.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I back the call for soup, I love it and used to make a wide range when I was feeding a number of people.I still make it fpor myself, although I have trouble getting quantoties right and so some is usually frozen.

Rice pudding? Not for me thanks and never has been. Once, newly married I was cooking rice for a savoury dish. It did not taste right so twice I added salt from the bulk packet of common salt, marked CS. Unfortunately , the shopkeeper had marked caster sugar as CS. It was revolting. It became rice pudding for my husband for about a week. Not to my taste at all.

Your mention of condensed milk reminded me of my aunt's mayonnaise. Condensed milk, vinegar and mustard. Adjust quantities to suit your taste. Not my favourite at all.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Condensed milk and vinegar sounds completely revolting!

Do you take it to facilitate a visit to the vomitorium?

The mere thought has been sending shivers down my spine.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Here is a Recipe My mother did not make this but her sister did, as did many other home cooks of years ago.

I don't like it, but it is not as bad as you may think. It is sweet from the milk.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
You need bread to go with soup and few things are more rewarding than home made bread.

Absolutely - further Kitchen Therapy™. [Smile]
 
Posted by Evangeline (# 7002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Here is a Recipe My mother did not make this but her sister did, as did many other home cooks of years ago.

I don't like it, but it is not as bad as you may think. It is sweet from the milk.

I had this once, in Cairns, many years ago I didn't realise it was more widespread than that. I went to a cafe/restaurant with my Aunt and she said they have really nice mayonnaise here, I tasted it and immediately detected condensed milk, she responded with "of course, that's how you make mayonnaise". News to this southerner. I agree though Loth, it isn't as bad as it sounds, I just found it too sweet-can't say I noticed the taste of vinegar in it.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Yes to the suggestion that homemade bread is therapeutic, anything that involves kneading brings out the soulful and cathartic, and processes the odd resentment. I have tried no-knead breads once or twice but always go back to kneading by hand.

Thank you for the prayers for my neighbour's father-in-law. He is calm and resigned but weakening by the day and not able to swallow much, not even strained soup. I am thinking of salt-free consommes and more beef tea, egg flips etc. His wife has never learned to cook and burns everything from toast to a boiled egg. Her nerves are shattered and I think she needs soup more than her husband!

Lothlorien, your faux mayonnaise is called sweet and creamy salad dressing or salad cream out here and was very popular in the 1950s. (Plenty of old cookbook recipes around.) I don't know I could face it.

BannerLady, rice pudding -- I've made one with coconut milk, basmati rice, lime zest and cardamom, aromatic and Asian-inspired. Very popular with dinner guests but I wasn't crazy about it. Years ago in a vegetarian restaurant called The Granary, I had a wonderful rice pudding with honey and brown rice -- not heavy or too sweet, but I haven't seen any recipes for that.

And thanks too for those here who prayed for my friend Jenny M, who died peacefully yesterday, family with her.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
I could now pop in for a kneadless pun, but I reckon I shan't. [Smile]

Always good to read from you Upside-Downers, and what's going on in your neck of the wood! Please carry on.

[Angel]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Prayers for your friend and her friends and family, MaryLouise. How sudden!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
... I have tried no-knead breads once or twice but always go back to kneading by hand ...

Um ... I use a machine ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Kneading by hand doesn't appeal to me in the least (I have quite small hands, which is my excuse and I'm sticking to it [Big Grin] ) but I find rolling and shaping the loaves (usually French sticks) very therapeutic.

Not to mention the feeling of satisfaction when you take them out of the oven! [Smile]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Condensed milk and vinegar sounds completely revolting!

It is! When I was a child this was the main salad dressing used in my family until my middle brother did a cooking class at High School and introduced us to French and Italian dressings and (best of all)... Garlic! I have a feeling that bell peppers were introduced to our family at the same time. I'm so glad he didn't take woodwork or metalwork, which was what most boys took at that time. The programme was called Wider Horizons and it certainly widened ours.

Huia
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
How about the miracle that has seen [former] Archbishop Pell make it back to Australia to face trial in connection with long-ago child abuse scandals in the Australian RCC. It's only last year (IIRC) that his doctor's claimed he was unable to make such a journey, so that he could give his witness testimony only by video link from Rome. Perhaps he's bene to Lourdes in the meantime.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tukai:
Perhaps he's bene to Lourdes in the meantime.

[Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me]

Meanwhile it is cold beyond my ken. And I'm in the North Island.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Perhaps you could invent some wired up, battery operated warm underwear. Your own personal electric blanket. [Biased]

Meanwhile I am immersed in NBN plans. I checked a while ago and the waiting period was a couple of years. Personal letter from my ISP now says three months, as does NBN site.

I have been very happy with the mob I now use, not a problem of any sort in over six years. However they now suggest another $10 a month for same benefits. Benefits for my current payment are not as good as I have now. I will set IT son to find me best deal with a large amount of knowledge.

The only problem I have had here was caused by our largest mob who boast of service and coveraqge. They went into theroom downstairs devoted to such wiring and cut my connection wires as they could not be bothered re-routing some of their wiring. that was a week after all was connected when I moved here. Once that was fixed by T-----a, all has been fine
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Snow falling on the nearby hills, and a ripsnorting southerly buster ... the weather apps tells us
quote:
6°C RealFeel® -3°

 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Commiserations Zappa. Feels like -2 here. Snow on the hills (about 2 metres away and the wind is blowing off them). Major panic this morning when I mislaid the remote for the heat pump, but then I found I was looking at its underside. [Hot and Hormonal]

Bad timing on my part, but blood tests revealed an underactive thyroid, which had led to me being underactive and sensitive to the cold . Yesterday I had 6 layers of clothing on, including slink lambskin gloves, and Zappa, you were right, adding more layers is not as comfortable.

I rang my power company because I'm a bit worried about a cost blow out, but so far I'm OK. I am on a "level pay" system where they average out my year's bills, so no great spikes in winter or savings in summer. In addition they let me know if I need to top it up, or they need to drop the amount I pay. Peace of mind for the easily bewildered [Biased]

Huia
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Very thin knit silk underwear does a great job of helping keep you warm without bulking you up.

Moo
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Good suggestion, Moo. I have a thin thermal top on underneath today and should have done it yesterday. Weather is not as cold in Sydney as elswwhere mentioned, but still cold. We have had overnight minimums in my suburb of 1. Yesterday was grey and damp and downright unpleasant all day. Iturned the heater on several hours earlier than usual and left it on.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Also thermal clothing "skins" - used by active people in the cold. Soldiers wear them under uniforms. Military and sports shops stock them. Textile technology has come a long way since waffle weave. [Smile]
 
Posted by Rowen (# 1194) on :
 
Bit chilly in the Alps. Not surprising really!
Frost everywhere outside this morning. Snow up further, but not here thankfully.
You never really get used to it. You just wear warmer clothes!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Welcome back Rowen - how are you?
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Slightly warmer here, hovering around 2 degrees Celsius.

Making my fail-proof heal-all chicken soup for my neighbour's father-in-law who is very ill with cancer. I don't know him but large pots of chicken and vegetable soup are always welcome in winter. I shall make him a mug of beef tea next week -- in another life I would have specialised in invalid cookery because it is something I enjoy doing and appreciate when I am ill myself.

I've had a huge pot of brilliant soup from one neighbour for me to freeze and eat when I come home from hospital (I don't have a date for surgery yet) – enough for eight lunches, frozen in pottles.
Another neighbour brought some great thick soup that has given me two days' lunch.
All I've made lately was cupcakes, because I was longing for some, but I shared those.
The dear soul near our Coromandel place sends me grapefruit from her neighbour's tree – with permission. Having sworn I would not waste the time while I wait for surgery, I let her post as usual eleven fruit in a NZ Post size 2 box. I made the first dozen jars today, when I had someone here to help.
I've just been hearing that lovely 'ping' as some of the jars cooled and the lids proved they were sealed.

Marmalade, anybody?

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thank you but no marmalade for me. I think I am the only one in the family who does not like it. Except the lim and ginger which I like because of the ginger.

I actually like raw peel, lemon or orange or mandarine and will happily eat any of those. But marmalade? No. You have done well to get it made. Please let us know when there is a date for the surgery.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Love marmalade, especially homemade. I'm not good at making jams or preserves myself although I have made jars of fig jams and figs in syrup (here called konfyt) because I have two fig trees that produce brown figs and white Genoa figs in such abundance each autumn.

GG, I'm happy to hear you have such thoughtful neighbours.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Birdbath has been frozen solid for the last two days. But at least there is some pale sun and no wind. TP showed me an old picture of one of our local retired clergy back in the day he was hosting the ABC at a bush church. The communion wine had to be kept in a thermos to keep it from boiling, because the summer was so hot. Can't imagine how the Archbishop of Canterbury would cope without aircon, in vestments, and 45 degree temps. Probably lucky it didn't kill him.

But anyway - there's a good tip for our clergy to remember as the world is globally warmed - pack a thermos for the wine!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
Marmalade, anybody?

Ooh, yes please. On toast. [Smile]

I've never tried making marmalade; D. isn't wild about it*, so there wouldn't be much point in making jars and jars of the stuff. My preserving skills extend to red-pepper jelly (dead easy) and plum chutney (when someone gave me a load of plums).

* It's one of those things, like port, that he feels he ought to like, but doesn't.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Love marmalade, especially homemade. I'm not good at making jams or preserves myself although I have made jars of fig jams and figs in syrup (here called konfyt) because I have two fig trees that produce brown figs and white Genoa figs in such abundance each autumn.

GG, I'm happy to hear you have such thoughtful neighbours.

A friend fond some funny fruit on a bush in the back corner of his house and asked if I could identify them. Cape gooseberry, I said, and made a pot of jam for a friend who came many years ago from South Africa. MaryLouise, you can imagine his joy, whether or not you fancy cape gooseberry jam.

My son has a fig tree – he just loves eating the figs.

GG

(It is nice to be approved for previewing but it's a pain that you can't make corrections on the preview page but have to remember what you want to alter. Just sayin')
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Bumped into Orfeo at the airport tonight while waiting for family to arrive. Denmark obviously agrees with him. He was looking most cosmopolitan.

We have new wheels. Our first SUV, so we have gone up in the world. It is very easy to drive, and TP and his arthritic knees are enjoying the extra space and height in the vehicle. I guess we are finally beginning to look like retirees.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Health to drive it, BL! [Smile]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Lovely story GG, and cape gooseberries grow like crazy in the garden, self-seeding and coming up everywhere. I've never made jam or even used them in dessert, I just eat them by the handful when the papery capes show they are ripe. For a long time I thought they were named after the Cape in South Africa but they originate in Latin America and are named for the capes around the berry. English gooseberries are completely different, I love them too but as a novelty.

Homesickness so often shows itself in longing for particular foods -- I have South African friends in the UK and Antipodes who write about craving biltong, bobotie, Mrs Ball's Chutney and boerewors (a spiced sausage). The taste of home.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:

Homesickness so often shows itself in longing for particular foods -- I have South African friends in the UK and Antipodes who write about craving biltong, bobotie, Mrs Ball's Chutney and boerewors (a spiced sausage). The taste of home.

When one son moved to central coast here, he was overjoyed to find South African butcher making such things. Unfortunately, he closed with some family problems but my son patronised his businees for over a year and butcher was always pleased to see him walk in.

Several suburbs down the line from GeeD there is a busy delicatessen run by a Jewish family from SA. Always busy, especially at Passover as they kept separate fridges etc for kosher food.

My niece arrived home yesterday from Capetown. She has spent time there before but had about a week this time round after riding in Zambia and Botswana. She enjoyed it.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Homesickness so often shows itself in longing for particular foods -- I have South African friends in the UK and Antipodes who write about craving biltong, bobotie, Mrs Ball's Chutney and boerewors (a spiced sausage). The taste of home.

Mrs Ball's Chutney is available in supermarkets here as are the sausages and dried meats you mention - perhaps neither quite the style or quality you're used to in RSA.

BL, you'll probably come to appreciate the extra height as you step out of the SUV - you just swing around in the seat and the ground's where your feet are. The same getting in and no stooping either. My father bought a well-known small one 20 or more years ago for that reason. Both he and my mother appreciated it very much.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I had Uber ride in one of those cubes on wheels a few months ago. I was surprised how comfortable it was, don't know if that was a feature of the particular model I was in. Also easy to get in and out as you mention. My sister's Hyundai is awkward, son's Megane is fine.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
For the making of marmalade, we have transferred our loyalties to the slow cooker. Made some lovely orange-based brandy and whisky marmalades last winter. I was given a huge bag of mandarins yesterday, so there is a new recipe to be tried, probably after church tomorrow. We also have lemons and limes in stock, so I'm considering that as a variant. The great advantage is that the jam doesn't scorch, and in the case of the orange recipe, doesn't even require water, just the flesh, peel and sugar which gels nicely.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Slow cooker marmalade sounds wonderful. Is there any chance of a recipe share?
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Homesickness so often shows itself in longing for particular foods -- I have South African friends in the UK and Antipodes who write about craving biltong, bobotie, Mrs Ball's Chutney and boerewors (a spiced sausage). The taste of home.

While I was living in Belfast, I became pregnant with my first child. I developed an intense craving for cranberry juice, which was completely unknown in Belfast at the time. [Waterworks]

Moo
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Clarence, I will post some recipe links in Heaven once I find out whether the mandarin recipe works as well as the other.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Marmalade is sticky, doesn't know whether to taste like petrol or treacle, is consequently horrible, and makes the baby Jesus cry.

Just saying. Not opinionated at all. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:


Marmalade, anybody?

GG

Grapefruit marmalade -- what a lovely thought. Unfortunately, grapefruit is contra-indicated for just about every drug taken to deal with diabetes, no matter how mild the diabetes.

John
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
Marmalade would be o.k. if it didn't have pieces of peel in it, but I guess then it wouldn't be marmalade.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Keillor used to make delicious lemon marmalade, but apparently they've discontinued it.

Moo
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
Marmalade would be o.k. if it didn't have pieces of peel in it, but I guess then it wouldn't be marmalade.

Wilkins of Tiptree make orange marmalade without bits. It's available by mail-order, but whether they can export it to Foreign Parts™ may be another matter.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
You're right GeeD, many South African favourites are imported and available, but often more expensive and without the context. The craving is often bigger than the food itself.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
And very understandable.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Marmalade is sticky, doesn't know whether to taste like petrol or treacle, is consequently horrible, and makes the baby Jesus cry.

Just saying. Not opinionated at all. [Roll Eyes]

Well, FD would agree with you. So all the marmalade in our house is mine, all mine.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Marmalade is sticky, doesn't know whether to taste like petrol or treacle, is consequently horrible, and makes the baby Jesus cry.

Just saying. Not opinionated at all. [Roll Eyes]

Well, FD would agree with you. So all the marmalade in our house is mine, all mine.
FD and I are persons of fine taste
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
I happen to agree with Zappa and FD, so all the marmalade in the house belongs to TP, his mother, or Paddington Bear, depending on who gets to the fridge first.

Mind you, I feel the same way about jam - awful waste of fruit.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Grapefruit interferes with a surprising range of medication, including some contraceptive pills, diabetic (as mentioned above) and some blood pressure meds. A pharmacist told me that it prevents some medication working, but potentiates others. I've often wondered if those properties could be used in some positive ways.

The plumber has been and gone and a shiny new hot water cylinder is in place, now I just need the electrician to connect it to the power supply and the bloke to come and install the shower dome and I will have burnt through the best part of $2,000. [Eek!] . I'm trying to prepare my house so at when I retire next year I will need to spend less money on emergency maintenance - fingers crossed!

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
The batch of marmalade I made on Saturday was definitely Not My Best – it was indeed sticky, though it was set well enough. I just wanted to do some useful things while I can (no date yet for the deferred surgery)but I was pretty uncomfortable by the end of the day. My usual marmalade is a clear jelly with small pieces in it.
I do make lime marmalade for those with stickers on their meds. I've never stopped eating grapefruit marmalade and it hasn't done any harm. When I confessed to one GP she said 'Spread it thin then' but a later one just laughed. But my pharmacist said that over a good many years at least two customers have had serious reactions.
I love my breakfast, always starting with a locally grown orange. There are still a few valencias but the first navels are in the shops – as well as lots of Aussie ones, which I won't buy.
I'd better get it ready and then off to bed.

GG
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:

Mind you, I feel the same way about jam - awful waste of fruit.

Oh, yes ... though back when I could eat icecream (without stacking on 30 kgs just by looking at it) i did like jam on that.

My first wife at one stage became partial to whisky on iceream. I was a little shocked to find large doses of Islay Mist (etc) violated in so terrible a way ... [Eek!] [Help] [brick wall] [Mad]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Well, I had the whole batch (10 Jars) and a few unused jars, on a very unstable wheeled bed table, which I turned round rather carelessly in order to trundle them to the cupboard.
I think there are 3-4 jars, and a couple of empty ones, saved.

Pollyanna says: a good thing it was a disappointing batch.
And isn't it a mercy we have cork tiles instead of carpet.

I'm only sorry two of my eight Tang jars broke. When we were first married, 49 years ago, we had Tang for our breakfast drink, and I've always used those for our/my own marmalade.

Have a nice day.

My day can only get better.

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Spending time with my eldest granddaughter today - a rare treat. She has a very enquiring mind and a rather dramatic way of presenting information, so the day will no doubt be entertaining.

Yesterday I had to make a dental appointment for my mother. I did enjoy the reaction of the receptionist after she enquired my mother's DOB. After "Could you please say that again?" and "Really?" she finished with "Well, that's impressive!" Not sure if she was referring to the fact that mum is 99 or that she has any teeth left to look at, but I am quite sure that by midday tomorrow the mater and I will both be in need of a nanna nap. Mum is starting to get muddled a bit, so tomorrow's appointment will be challenging to navigate.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Oh dear, GG. What a mess, cork tiles or whatever.

Hope you andf your mum get on OK today, Banner Lady.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Most unfortunately, Rexory and Dark Knight were late scratchings from lunch yesterday. However, Jugular and AdamPater were both in fine form.

mr curly
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Zappa, I have a teetotal friend who took a Cordon Bleu cooking course and decided that cooking with wine and liqueurs was 'sophisticated'. She plonks at least half a bottle of sweet sherry into desserts and makes an orange sauce that has enough unvolatilised Cointreau to knock out a grown man. She doesn't eat these dishes herself but serves them up to guests with the idea that 'some more of what you fancy can't go wrong'.

GG, so sorry to hear about that and the loss of the Tang jars.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
As promised, the orange brandy marmalade recipe is posted in the recipe thread in Heaven. It works just as well with a good blended Scotch [never single malt!!]

The mandarin marmalade recipe is still under trial. We have two slow cookers, and my wife made the first batch in the larger one, which didn't seem to get hot enough, so that batch was finished on the stove. I will try again in a day or so in our smaller cooker, which has been successful with other recipes.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
GG I read your post about the Tang jars, now I have the jingle, Start everyday with a Tang as an earworm [Roll Eyes]

I had the first shower with water heated by my new cylinder this morning - pure bliss. [Axe murder] The temperature is set higher, so the water is warmer and the volume has also improved. In addition the temperature control is easier, so the water doesn't go from freezing cold to burning hot with the slightest adjustment as it previously did.

I'm getting a shower dome too, which will lessen the amount of steam in the bathroom. I've always preferred a bath, and wouldn't buy a house without one, but I am beginning to be persuaded that showers can be almost as enjoyable - apart from the fact that you can't read in the shower.

If I had realised it could be this much better I would have got the cylinder earlier. It was well worth the money.

I am impressed yet again, by the woman in the office at the plumbing firm - it she were in charge of the Christchurch rebuild, everything would be sorted by now - AND she can translate plumbers' language into plain English - she's a gem, and one of the main reasons the firm has had my repeat business.

Huia

[ 18. July 2017, 07:46: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:


I'm only sorry two of my eight Tang jars broke. When we were first married, 49 years ago, we had Tang for our breakfast drink, and I've always used those for our/my own marmalade.


GG

I hope the day did improve GG. It's awful when a little piece of history goes.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
We echo what Clarence and others have said.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Zappa, I have a teetotal friend who took a Cordon Bleu cooking course and decided that cooking with wine and liqueurs was 'sophisticated'. She plonks at least half a bottle of sweet sherry into desserts and makes an orange sauce that has enough unvolatilised Cointreau to knock out a grown man. She doesn't eat these dishes herself but serves them up to guests with the idea that 'some more of what you fancy can't go wrong'.

A while ago, a shippie told about a woman who never drank but somehow had a bottle of Jack Daniels. She came across a recipe using sweet potatoes and Jack Daniels and decided to make it to take to a potluck. Since she had had the Jack Daniels for years, she assumed that it had deteriorated. She put in several times the amount that the recipe called for. The dish was very well received, but afterwards people wondered why they felt woozy.

Moo
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
[Killing me]

Was, as is my habit, lying awake at 03.50, a while back, when a sharp, very brief 3.5 rocked the house. Not up there with Christchurch/Kaikoura experiences, but the second reminder in recent months that we live astride a major fault.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Hope all those nifty NZ bookshelf holders held!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
My morning has not been good. Not on the scale of GG's broken Tang jars but along those lines. I had planned on using five spice powder in a dish tonight so I bought another jar in grocery order.

Rathrer than put it in my handy pantry/storeroom only to get it out again, I left it on the kitchen bench.As i put a new liner in the rubbish bin, I bumped the jar off.

Tiny shards of thick glass all over the tiles and also on the carpet at end of lounge. Kitchen and lounge area here is all in one. The carpet had just been vacuumed a few minutes before.

Another vacuuming needed, the floor needs to be washed in kitchen and the whole area smells strongly of five spice powder. As do my clean warm clothes. I think a vast cloud of smelly powder must have risen in the air and settled on me and lounge furniture.

Why wasn't it the fresh star anise I also bougght? That was a packet, not a jar.
 
Posted by Dark Knight (# 9415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Curly:
Most unfortunately, Rexory and Dark Knight were late scratchings from lunch yesterday. However, Jugular and AdamPater were both in fine form.

mr curly

Very sorry to miss you, Curls.
I'm now in Darwin. Any shipmates up here?
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
There were. Timey wimey, maybe?
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clarence:
Hope all those nifty NZ bookshelf holders held!

Wasn't even enough for a stoned neon to catch a wave in a tropical tank, but a sharp (and unbelievably short: 1.5 seconds) reminder of those flexing mother earth biceps nevertheless
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
The dental trip passed uneventfully, though it needed both TP and I to wrangle all the parking, path and door navigating necessary for smooth access and egress. Mum sailed through it, and they nabbed me for a check up too as I had been ignoring the reminders. So they got two birds for the price of - well, I wish it were one - but it felt more like 5. I think my aged P was rather shocked at the price of dental care these days.

Though it was worth it to see the young receptionist being presented with a cheque. She had never had to deal with one before.

BL. Now feeling very old indeed.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
A sixteen-year-old (adopted) granddaughter came next day and helped clean up the mess. Nice kid and good company. I couldn't have got down to floor level.
If the pile had been darker (and without broken glass around it) it would have had just the shape and consistency of what the cow did.

Still waiting for the spinal surgery (winter: I suppose shortage of beds, nurses with winter colds etc) but scheduled to have right eyelid lifted on Monday (local anaesthetic) and waiting for appointments for my deteriorating right knee and a BCC on my neck.
2017 will have to have a special name or title.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
The Year of Medical Procedures, perhaps?
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
The Year of Medical Procedures, perhaps?

That would be about right. Was it this year I had the BCC on my lip done? I think it must be.
But if I need a new knee I don't think I'd want it too soon after the spinal job.

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
My section is awash! Another winter storm is passing over the country and news is coming in from other areas where it has been particularly bad with loss of power and flooding. So far it's not particularly cold here, but then I have arranged things so I don't have to go anywhere until after the weekend. Mushroom soup for lunch, a pile of books to read and a fluffy, if damp, cat to cuddle - who could ask for more?

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
{{{Galloping Granny}}} [Votive]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
My section is awash! Another winter storm is passing over the country and news is coming in from other areas where it has been particularly bad with loss of power and flooding. So far it's not particularly cold here, but then I have arranged things so I don't have to go anywhere until after the weekend. Mushroom soup for lunch, a pile of books to read and a fluffy, if damp, cat to cuddle - who could ask for more?

Huia

I saw the forecast of that coming over. I hope it passes quickly.

Mushroom soup sounds wonderful. I love it.

[ 20. July 2017, 23:19: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Cold here, but not wet. Snow nearby overnight. Just had to do an emergency school run with B1.1 and B1.2. Their mother had not realised that when one receives notice there will be a power outage, then the underground parking doors for one's apartment block will not open.

First world problems. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Snow last night not only in Canberra but also Berridale and Jindabyne which can be very cold but are usually too low for snow.

Notices are a nuisance here. Lift maintenace company is now in danger of being the boy who cried wolf. Carpet in the lift is to be replaced by good quality vinyl. Four attempts lately to do this and it still has not been done. It will mean the lift is out of use for most of the day. I did not even see the notice for last Monday's no-show.

I re-arranged a hairdresser visit on one of the days as I knew she would have trouble carrying a big suitcase up several floors.

It is now down for next Monday. Ho, hum. I'll believe it when I see it.

First world problems? Probably but luxury is having the hairdresser come to me. She works all over Sydney metropolitan area, is good at it and very popular. It takes at least six to eight weeks to arrange a first visit. Cleans up after cut and is pleasant to talk to.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Bought a jar of cranberry sauce to use with oven-roasted duck breasts (one of my more popular Saturday night suppers) and dropped it, thought immediately of others on this thread. Butter fingers! Splinters everywhere and wasted cranberry sauce spattered about. Now I shall have to do an orange sauce which is good with duck but I do it all the time, along with redcurrant.

Lothlorien, a hairdresser who makes home calls is a luxury! I go to a stylist, let me call her Tia, who is into punk spiky cuts right now and plays rap-rave music from Die Entwoord loudly in the salon. She still cuts my hair well though, and blessedly doesn't confide in me about her love life.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
If this reaches you in time, leave the orange out of consideration and instead just fry some onion and mushrooms - goes very well and most certainly not the inevitable orange.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
B1 still locked in to her carpark at school pickup time so Nan to the rescue again. She was getting some action from the body corporate last I heard. Not a bad day for her though, as she was notified via email of a promotion.

Visit today from B4 who is transitioning from one lot of meds to another. Pleased to report she has changed both her doctor and her psychologist this week. Her last doc did not think she even needed a transition plan (she does, as these meds can and sometimes do give her serious side effects) and her previous psych appointment ended up with the psychologist telling my daughter all her problems and then crying on B4's shoulder - quite literally. Not much help there.

Hoping it will be a quiet weekend. Without snow.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Oh my, that sounds horribly wrong, the crying psychologist! Does the psychologist need... a psychologist? [Frown] [Ultra confused]

Regarding the locked-in B1 car: I'm surprised that there are no manual ways to open the door! Seems a bit counterproductive! I suppose if the parking space is paid for, then in a sense the owners have a duty to provide access? Or perhaps not? Now, if there were a car fire or flooding, the fire brigade would need to be able to open the door as well, even w/o working leccie, wouldn't they?!

I hope all works out eventually - annoying not having a car if you need it!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
The right medical personnel for the particular patient can make a lot of difference in success of treatment. I speak not as a patient but an observer of a family member. After a move anew GP was found who suggested a particular medication. Amazing. Miles better than anything else ever used and it pursuaded gthe family member to continue with it. He was also recommended to a new psychologist who clicked with him. Much progress was made.

I hope B4 can have similar success. Parenting is often very hard, even when the child is an adult. Heartbreaking at times.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Bought a jar of cranberry sauce to use with oven-roasted duck breasts (one of my more popular Saturday night suppers) and dropped it, thought immediately of others on this thread. Butter fingers! Splinters everywhere and wasted cranberry sauce spattered about. Now I shall have to do an orange sauce which is good with duck but I do it all the time, along with redcurrant.

Lothlorien, a hairdresser who makes home calls is a luxury! I go to a stylist, let me call her Tia, who is into punk spiky cuts right now and plays rap-rave music from Die Entwoord loudly in the salon. She still cuts my hair well though, and blessedly doesn't confide in me about her love life.

What I spilt was terribly messy with glass and very fine powder, but at least not sticky like cranberry sauce or marmalade. I think I would have called for reinforcements to deal with that.

I found my home call hairdresser when looking for another person by name. The hairdreser was the first result. She lives fairly locally to me, does a good cut, is pleasant. Charges much what I would expect from a salon and the last time I went to a local salon I was allocated the apprentice.

Hairdressing apprentice rules and regulations have changed here and there is little education at TAFE required now. It was terrible. She was nervous, I do not know if I was the first client, had no real idea of what to do. The salon owner finished the job but I was never going back there. The other salons around here are exceedingly expensive, very uo market and not my style at all.

I was so pleased to find Patricia.

[ 21. July 2017, 10:30: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
BL - good that B4 has found better help. It sounds like the psychologist needs a holiday (and a lesson in therapeutic boundaries) and the doctor some re-training.

A noisy night due to wind and rain. People further south have been evacuated and people in low-lying areas of Christchurch were advise to go to evacuation centres if they were worried. So far today there has been 8.6mm of rainfall out of an expected 18.8. To give an idea our average yearly rainfall is 648mm, so this storm could have quite an impact. My own concern, as always with heavier than usual rainfall,is the river down the end of the street. It's tidal, and a higher than usual tide is expected after 2 pm today.

On the other hand I am enjoying my stack of library books and will defrost chicken soup for lunch.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Yesterday brought another experience of chaos.
At midday I broke a jumbo egg into a small pot and began to whip it with milk to scramble it.
In the next couple of hours I had a phone call from a friend, another from my son, and a third from Hutt hospital to say that they got over-booked and my eyelid job is postponed for three weeks (she was so apologetic I found myself reassuring her but I hope I'll be unavailable by then), a Skype call from my beloved Canadian mokopunas who I'd have liked to chat with for longer, and eventually my Friday meal on wheels person arrived – we've become good friends and always enjoy a good yarn. (I keep my dinner till evening)
At 2 pm I scrambled the egg and my lunch was finished by 3 pm.

My hair is cut at home by the wife of a former colleague. Years ago they asked if they could come and get some ideas from us about church fundraising (both Presbyterian) but when they arrived it was with a carton of Amway ("American Way"?) products. Torn between liking for the perpetrators and disgust at the sneaky dodge I bought two products and have continued to do so, and because she is a hairdresser working part time in a salon I started going to her home for my trim; now she comes here.

GG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
When we lived in Newfoundland a friend recommended a hairdresser who not only came to your house, but was also very cheap.

Unfortunately, she was also a bit rubbish ... [Disappointed]

A good hairdresser is worth his/her weight in gold. Or CHOCOLATE. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
Huia, hoping you're OK. Just reading about state of emergency in Cch. [Votive]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks Rexory, I just turned the news on to hear that people living alongside "my" river are being evacuated, so I went to the council website and my street wasn't amongst those listed. I walked down the drive and water is in the gutters, but not over the crown of the road, so I think I'm Ok.

This street doesn't have a history of flooding, but the quakes lifted the riverbed, so no one quite knows what the new normal is. (earthquakes - the gift that keeps giving). [Frown]

My landline isn't working, but I've charged up my cell phone and will hope for the best. I have a council emergency number and good neighbours.

Georgie-Porgy is yowling to go outside, but I've shut her in the back porch with her litter tray (which she hates).

Next high tide is about 2-3am. Prayers appreciated.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thinking of you this evening. Perhaps a night for gum boots and not slippers?
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Stay safe, Huia (and enclosed cat), that sounds a stressful night.

Yes, Piglet, there is nothing worse than coming out of a hair styling salon and wishing you could put on a cloak of invisibility while you hurry back home and resolve to stay indoors until it has Grown Out.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I saw some pictures of your river Huia. I hope all is well with you and your neighbours. It seems widespread. Not just the river but the storm.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Zappa, I have a teetotal friend who took a Cordon Bleu cooking course and decided that cooking with wine and liqueurs was 'sophisticated'. She plonks at least half a bottle of sweet sherry into desserts and makes an orange sauce that has enough unvolatilised Cointreau to knock out a grown man. She doesn't eat these dishes herself but serves them up to guests with the idea that 'some more of what you fancy can't go wrong'.

A while ago, a shippie told about a woman who never drank but somehow had a bottle of Jack Daniels. She came across a recipe using sweet potatoes and Jack Daniels and decided to make it to take to a potluck. Since she had had the Jack Daniels for years, she assumed that it had deteriorated. She put in several times the amount that the recipe called for. The dish was very well received, but afterwards people wondered why they felt woozy.

Moo

Checking some of previous page & had a thought that hadn't occurred to me earlier.
I don't know whether my teetotal Mum ever cooked with an alcoholic ingredient (where would she have got it?) but she did point out that cooking would remove the actual alcohol anyway.

GG
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Not if you cook with alcohol in a slow cooker - the alcohol doesn't evaporate off unless you take the lid off. I cooked a very boozy coq au vin to discover that.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
CK, I never thought of that! (It's always better to learn form someone else's experience).
[Big Grin]

I've just been filling bottles with water because I heard it was still OK to drink - with the implication that it soon might not be. Also filled the hand basin. I've had the heat pump off all day as it hasn't been that cold inside, but now I've turned it on to warm the house a bit more in case there is a power cut later, in which case the residual heat will be enough to keep us warm - along with extra blankets.

The rain has eased off and the water in the street is only in the gutters now. I think that as long as the high tide doesn't breach the riverbanks I will be OK.

There will be a massive cleaning up job to do throughout the eastern coast of the South Island.

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
About to try GeeD's suggestion of mushrooms and onions with my duck. Mushrooms are excellent at this time of year and we can even get locally grown black truffles at farmers' markets.

GG, Huia, Moo, Ck: alcohol volatilises at high temperatures. That is why some teetotal people and recovering alcoholics feel they can eat cooked dishes with small quantities of alcohol rendered harmless. It isn't always that simple though, because the lingering taste or smell of alcohol may trigger cravings, so many people in recovery avoid any dishes that have had alcohol added. And a large quantity of alcohol in a dish simmered on a low heat will remain strongly boozy.

Huia and Georgy-Porgy [Votive]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I'm always mindful of who will be eating anything I cook with alcohol. One year I made a Christmas cake for the AA group that uses the church as they were meeting on Christmas Day. Although I know from previous experience that all the alcohol in the cake evaporates, I used the teetotal version, that doesn't even have rum flavouring in it.

The rain has stopped and the water is slowly draining away. It will take several days as the river is tidal. It helped that this morning's high tide was a bit lower than the king tide yesterday. Georgie-Porgy is so happy to go outside again - she was going stir crazy.

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Glad to hear your weather's easing off a bit, Huia. Hope you and Georgie-Porgy are both OK.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
CK, I never thought of that! (It's always better to learn form someone else's experience).
[Big Grin]

I've just been filling bottles with water because I heard it was still OK to drink - with the implication that it soon might not be. Also filled the hand basin. I've had the heat pump off all day as it hasn't been that cold inside, but now I've turned it on to warm the house a bit more in case there is a power cut later, in which case the residual heat will be enough to keep us warm - along with extra blankets.

The rain has eased off and the water in the street is only in the gutters now. I think that as long as the high tide doesn't breach the riverbanks I will be OK.

There will be a massive cleaning up job to do throughout the eastern coast of the South Island.

Huia

I came here to check on Christchurch. ABC site has not been updated yet for overnight events. I am glad to hear of things your way, Huia, being better than when I went to bed.

A gtood ide to fill the water bottles, always handy. Do you keep a spare script of any mediacationmade up and available in case of evacuation? Hope Geiorgy Porgy can get outside for qa few minut3es.

Cold here today. 1 degree in innerwest Sydney so colder in many places.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
I'm always mindful of who will be eating anything I cook with alcohol. One year I made a Christmas cake for the AA group that uses the church as they were meeting on Christmas Day. Although I know from previous experience that all the alcohol in the cake evaporates, I used the teetotal version, that doesn't even have rum flavouring in it.

The rain has stopped and the water is slowly draining away. It will take several days as the river is tidal. It helped that this morning's high tide was a bit lower than the king tide yesterday. Georgie-Porgy is so happy to go outside again - she was going stir crazy.

Huia

t

Just saw this. Good for the cat!

I have friends who use juice instead of alcohol in fruit cake. I know which flavour I prefer.
[Eek!]

However, I do understand reluctance to use it for others.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary Louise
GG, Huia, Moo, Ck: alcohol volatilises at high temperatures.

The shippie who told that story did not specify at what point in the cooking process the Jack Daniels was added. If it was right at the end, there would have been alcohol remaining that did not volatilize. At any rate, the story was that some people got tipsy.

Moo
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Huia, I see from the Thanksgiving thread that the rain has stopped - I assume from that that you've come through OK youself????
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Wish we had some of that rain over here, Huia. It has been such a dry winter. Predictions are that rainfall in our area will decrease by up to 30% over the next ten years. TP is not a happy gardener.

Yesterday he spent all day chipping away at frozen soil to transplant some camellias. He was exhausted by the end of the afternoon.

I had to smile as I drove past the latest CanTurf sign this week. It said "Putin the seed and it will come up Trumps."

Still needs water, though...
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Banner Lady, we would have plenty to spare. Average rainfall here for July is 64mm and we had 140mm in two days, further inland it was even higher [Eek!]

GeeD, I an fine. There isn't even any water ponding anywhere on my section, although I'm not walking on the lawns to check their sogginess. About 100 metres upstream and 100 metres downstream there was significant flooding as the river breached it's banks. The upstream flooding has happened as before, but I think the downstream was partly due to the quakes lifting the riverbed. It was that lifting that made me more wary about flooding here. Also last night's high tide was significantly lower than expected.

The only on-going problem I have is that my landline phone is not functioning. The network here seems particularly sensitive to adverse events and last time I lost the best part of a month's use before it was sorted. I have topped up my cell phone in anticipation of the usual sterling service [Roll Eyes]

Huia
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Stay safe, Huia (and enclosed cat), that sounds a stressful night.

Yes, Piglet, there is nothing worse than coming out of a hair styling salon and wishing you could put on a cloak of invisibility while you hurry back home and resolve to stay indoors until it has Grown Out.

A couple of weeks before our younger daughters wedding, her then 4 y.o. niece reckoned she had mastered how to use scissors. No longer content with cutting paper , she took to own head of long brown hair. . And pleased with her work on that, she did the same for her 2 y.o. sister.

A professional had to be hired the day before the wedding to give them both very short but tidy pixie-cuts before they appeared as bridesmaids. .
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thanks for the good news about your position Huia. What a mess for the others though.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
... enclosed cat ...

That made me imagine getting him by mail-order: "Please find the enclosed cat ..."

[Killing me]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Piglet, that brings back such memories of cat carriers and trying to bribe, cajole and press-gang my little grey cat Axel {of beloved memory) into his carrier cage thingy for a trip to the vet. One enclosed cat for the vet who always glared at me as if I had not made the enclosure appealing enough for a cat.

GeeD, the duck with mushroom (fresh porcini) sauce was a success. I was the only one who slightly missed the tart/sweet taste of orange/cranberry but the duck didn't taste too fatty or rich.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Fresh porcini! We've not seen them on sale here at all. Truffles, yes, and from time to time we may get some given by a friend who cultivates them (is that the right word?) in the Blue Mountains. Glad you liked it.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I had one "enclosed cat" in a carry box, in a van I was driving break out, stand with his back paws on my knees and his front paws on the steering wheel, throw his head back and let out the longest and loudest meeeeoooow I've ever heard. Luckily we were on a country road that wasn't very busy so I was able to put him back in the box and tie the handles together.

After that I bought a cage next time I was in a city.

RIP Mr Mid [Tear]

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
We may need cat wrangling tips soon....in six weeks time we will be house sitting quite a menagerie. This includes several chickens; just as many ducks with an extremely vicious drake; a male turkey that thinks it is a chicken and roosts at night with all the chickens tucked underneath his wings; an adolescent as yet undesexed Scottish terrier that has just discovered it can kill chickens; a rescue cat that is extremely anti-social (spits, hisses and has worked out how to open the pantry door) and a tank full of delicate tropical fish that live on a table near the cat's bed. I have decided the owners are insane to expect them all to cohabit well. Sadly we are related to the owners.

I am not much of an animal person, so will be leaving TP to try to keep everything alive.

The plus side is homegrown eggs. Duck egg quiche is now in the oven and the smell of baked mushroom, leek, spinach, zucchini etc is wafting through the house. Just right for a wintry night.

Rain forecast for tomorrow - will believe it when we see it.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Banner Lady and TP - [Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!] That is all.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
BL, just do what you can. The menagerie is already in place and apparently functioning.

On another note altogether, my dad would have been 100 today. Dementia robbed him of some years, a cruel disease indeed.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Sympathy, Lothlorien. A distant cousin just popped up and 'discovered' me on Facebook. She didn't know my parents had died some years ago and just telling her brought up the sadness as if it happened yesterday. And Alzheimer's is cruel.

BL, that scenario would give me sleepless nights. Good luck to both of you.

Carried away with my mushroom sauce success, I made a mushroom risotto last night with the last of the fresh porcini and homemade stock from dried porcini with vegetables, good Parmesan added at the end. We sat down and ate it while watching a cookery competition on TV, My Kitchen Rules (Australia), in which two feisty young women ruined a risotto by dumping in rosemary, chillies and olives and cooking it far too early so it went dry and claggy. They sprinkled tiny mauve flowers all over the top. The same two women also made disastrous gnocchi for a starter, something I have never made well. It is notoriously difficult unless you have a certain knack for light dough and pastry.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thank you MaryLouise.

I find that the best risotto is the simplest. Yours sounds good. Porcini, wonderful. Only dried here although lots of other varieties of mushrooms are available.. One of the brands is something like 'fruits of the forest floor." I love the aroma when I have added some to a casserole.

MKR is not a programme I watch. I did see it some years ago but it degenerated into a scripted clash of personalities and the emphasis went from the foo.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Gnocchi are a sca, food in our opinions. Difficult to make, fiddly to cook well, and not all that pleasant to eat. There's a place we go to from time to time that may well have pumpkin gnocchi on the menu, usually in winter, and they're the only ones that really seem worth it.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Never saw the attraction in gnocchi.
Potato and flour can be made into so many other more delicious things than that, far more simply - IMHO.

Not that I bother with much cooking these days - TP rules the kitchen and for this I am thankful.

A smattering of rain overnight and a mild sunny morning. For this we are also thankful!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:

Not that I bother with much cooking these days - TP rules the kitchen and for this I am thankful.


Do you hire him out by any chance? I am so bored with my own cooking. I could trade some rain for his skills as tomorrow heavy rain is forecast yet again, [Roll Eyes] with snow to 300 metres.

Huia - expecting to develop webbed feet any day now.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Oh yes, what I'd give to be able to rent a chef. I have a limited repertoire, only do four or five dishes well and get bored with my own cooking. I like to experiment at times but these dishes tend to be one-off experiments.

Lothlorien, MKR isn't a great favourite because of the scripted conflict and silliness. It reminds me of those old Survivor series where you'd have 'contestants' pouting and sulking when forced to eat live flying ants in the middle of the Karoo as a test for going it alone in the desert. Immaculate make-up and hair, no sunburn, no dehydration, and it was obvious that just out of sight were all the air-conditioned vans, stylists, dieticians with bottled water, on-site medics with anti-nausea meds and sunbloc, script coaches and tabloid journalists along for the ride. Utterly unconvincing.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
The rain is gradually clearing and Metservice have two little suns in their graphics for the weekend weather [Yipee] . If they are wrong I'm going to sue them for breach of promise.

I have bacon hock soup in the slow cooker. Not quite my favourite, but it is the most comforting as Mum used to make vast quantities years ago. I'll share it with the friend who took the shelves out of the cylinder cupboard and put some back after the new and bigger cylinder was fitted.

Money is not the only currency. [Biased]

Huia
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Double posting - but this is such good news. The City Council have announced they are going to dredge part of the river near me making flooding less likely. The original river meanders and in the 1980s the Council decided to put in a cut to cope with the flooding. This has never been dredged since, but has silted up so the river doesn't flow as well as it used to. The effect of the earthquakes has made this even worse.

Apart from the flooding aspect, my hope is that it may encourage the native black scaup (the wee black diving ducks) to return to the area. I have missed then since the quakes.

Fingers and toes tightly crossed.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Lessening the effects of floods would be wonderful and I hope your little birds return too.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
The winter mopes hit me today....nothing definite, just wish I could either hibernate through the next two months or hit the fast forward button. TP tried to cheer me up with the fact that there is 25 more minutes daylight than there was four weeks ago. Glad the forecast is for a sunny and mild weekend. I suspect I may just need a good dose of Vitamin D.

BL. Flagging floppily about.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
S A D is a real thing, BL. Be kind to yourself!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Totally agree Rexory.

Today I caught the bus up to the shops and decided to walk home by the scenic route. What a drongo - it's called a wetlands area for a very good reason [Roll Eyes]

Huia -Not the brightest pebble in the beach.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
The winter mopes hit me today....nothing definite, just wish I could either hibernate through the next two months or hit the fast forward button. TP tried to cheer me up with the fact that there is 25 more minutes daylight than there was four weeks ago. Glad the forecast is for a sunny and mild weekend. I suspect I may just need a good dose of Vitamin D.

BL. Flagging floppily about.

Empathies, BL

and prayers
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yes, from me, too.

20 years ago I voluntarily abandoned the long summer days for a maximum winter night just 11 hours long - nary a regret!

[Votive] for all affected by S A D.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Sympathy, BL, and to all affected by S A D. My sister who grew up here and now lives in Vancouver says she will never get used to dark Pacific Northwest winters and believes she has thinner blood than anyone born in a northern hemisphere.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I suffered from mild SAD when I lived in New Hampshire. Someone advised me to be outdoors when the sun was at its highest even when it was overcast. I used to walk the dog for about forty-five minutes, and it made things much better.

Moo
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
My friend with advancing dementia lives in a 1930's small brick house which was built with the bottom half of the windows made of that opaque glass which used to be used in bathrooms here. He stays inside almost all the time with blinds down. He has finally decided to go outside for a time each day. He has various vitamin deficiencies, including Vitamin D.

He decided he would get some sun and occasionally sits on enclosed front verandah with a blind up. He did not believe me when I told him it was direct sun on his skin which stimulated Vitamin D production, but doctor also told him that. He now sort of believes it, but getting action is not as easy.

[ 29. July 2017, 21:32: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Are light-boxes of any use for those of you with SAD?

Having grown up at 59°N, the short winter days never really bothered me; it seemed to me that they were more than made up for by the long days of summer.

I was home in Orkney in June this year - the first time in nearly 30 years I'd been there at mid-summer - and I'd forgotten how much darkness there wasn't. [Smile]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I use one, though it's hard to remember to turn it on when I'm at work and there are fluorescents everywhere. It seems to help. I still need meds, though.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Are light-boxes of any use for those of you with SAD?

Having grown up at 59°N, the short winter days never really bothered me; it seemed to me that they were more than made up for by the long days of summer.

I was home in Orkney in June this year - the first time in nearly 30 years I'd been there at mid-summer - and I'd forgotten how much darkness there wasn't. [Smile]

At just next to 40° (about six kms away hence my tagline) I feel sheepish about even claiming SAD ... when I came back to NZ the first time and went to the Sides of the North from the outback (Wankydilla) I was worried about my propensity for seasonal depression (which is why I so get it, BL), and I remember Huia suggesting a lamp/sun box. It was just a touch milder up north and I was just okay. Here it's different again ... 0°C this morning, but beautiful sun through the day (about 14°C), and that helps me cope.

Which suggests if ever I do have to move* to the south or west side of these shaky isles the lamp solution will be a wise one.


*and that will be inevitable if I am ever to be a stipended priest again, as it will not, sadly, ever be possible to work with the man who errantly fired me.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I'm at 38.6 and SAD is definitely possible and disabling. My father had it at 34. Some people are just more sensitive. I turned down a job in New York just because of the latitude.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
I'm at 38.6 and SAD is definitely possible and disabling. My father had it at 34. Some people are just more sensitive. I turned down a job in New York just because of the latitude.

That's comforting in many ways. Actually I've just done some comparison and where I am is roughly equivalent to Boulder Colorado, and when I was near there about 18 months ago it was mighty cold and foggy - continental climate while this is maritime so a few differences, but I'll feel less ashamed of SAD!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Oh, maritime! In coastal California we used to get the "June gloom," which the weather geeks usually called a "marine layer." It effectively cut off sunshine from dawn to about 2 pm most days (which sucked when you wanted to go to the beach). Have you anything similar perhaps?
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I think it's more a west coast effect here, and the weather moves across from antarctica or at best Tasmania, and drops its moisture on the west side of the central ranges. Not pleasant. I last lived on the east side of NZ in '91.

Auckland has the misfortune of straddling both coasts (mind you at its narrowest its only about 15 kms wide there). Wellington sits on the Cook Strait which funnels weather between the islands and their mountains. Canterbury and the region I live, as well as the Malborough region, have the best sunshine hours ... head east of either island and a bit inland to avoid that wet wet wet.

Oh, and then there's Dunedin and the Deep South. [Help]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
That sounds complicated. I think I'll stick to our tornadoes.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Isn't Dunedin tiger country with all those Presbyterians settled there?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I lived in Dunedin for a couple of years in the late 90s - it was cold, and if you lived in a hill suburb, as I was, you could get snowed in for a couple of days unless you had an SUV. The people were friendly though, and being a University town meant there were far more bookshops than expected for the size of the city.

A couple of days ago I was complaining to a friend on my cell phone about how my landline sounds like there is an avalanche happening on it, and my wifi flicks out for a few minutes every now and then, and there was a knock on the door. Still talking on the phone, I answered the door, signalling to the caller that I would be available soon.

He waited patiently, then grinned and said he could solve my difficulties - he was from a new provider using fibre broadband [Yipee]

That instant was like Cinderella's Fairy Godmother turning up.

I am quite impressed with Pure Fibre. It's Christchurch based and the call centre is here too, but the most user-friendly aspect for me is that I can pay a bit extra and have a tech person come and do the final set up Vodaphone wouldn't do that because (they claimed) Anyone can do it [Roll Eyes]

'The trouble with making something fool proof is underestimating the ingenuity of fools' seems an apt quote - which I think comes from Douglas Adams. [Overused]

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Anyone can do it [Roll Eyes]


Yeah, I'm one of those who are not Anyone, too. [Ultra confused] [brick wall] [Help]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I feel your technophobic pain. We've just bought a tablet computer, and I was very disappointed to find that the only instructions were things like "charge before use", "do not immerse in water" and "do not drop".

That's a fat lot of good to someone who needs to have what an "app" is explained to her ... [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
A representative of my current phone and internet company turned up at my door at 6pm today (after dark). I told him he was too late, but he persisted in saying how wonderful his company's offer was. I told him the problem was that his company was a multi-national and I would rather the profits stayed in NZ. That was one point of view that his briefing obviously hadn't covered. I also said that no matter what whizz bang (technical term - Piglet please note [Biased] ) system they had developed, they were still the company that had ignored my needs in the past and nothing convinced me that their service had updated to match their technology, and I thanked him for his time.

Poor bloke, it can't be much fun wandering around on a cold, dark night trying to defend a company that isn't terribly popular, especially if, as I suspect, he is on commission.

Actually I might modify some of my points from tonight's discussion and use them with door-to-door callers canvassing votes for the General election in about 8 weeks time [Big Grin]

Huia
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Anyone can do it [Roll Eyes]


Yeah, I'm one of those who are not Anyone, too. [Ultra confused] [brick wall] [Help]
But you have teenagers. Not as useful as a 5 years old, I grant you, but they have their moments.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:

'The trouble with making something fool proof is underestimating the ingenuity of fools' seems an apt quote - which I think comes from Douglas Adams. [Overused]

Huia

I work for a technology company that writes enterprise software which is designed to be intuitive and foolproof. Unfortunately, though our own product is pretty good, the expectation is extended to all the third party software and equipment we use in the business and I am going to put that quote up somewhere at work to remind myself the next time someone says we shouldn't need training or change management. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... whizz bang (technical term - Piglet please note [Biased] ) ...

Duly noted. [Killing me]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
So I decided to sit outside with my book, in the sunny courtyard today, while I had a cuppa. Cue several hundred freaking loud screechy cockatoos who decided our nature strip was the perfect place for a clan gathering. The decibel levels rose steadily as more and more arrived until it drove me insane and inside.

If ever they do a remake of The Birds I know what bird they could use...sigh.

As for technology, we have not been able to log on to the internet for several days. An hour on the help line to the service provider had them checking the huge amount of traffic on our line. We have now been allocated a different Wi-fi channel and hey presto, we can connect. They also tweeked our modem remotely and all seems back to normal.

I would not have even thought of these solutions and if home users are expected to be able to manage such things themselves I will become an ex-computer user very quickly.

BL. Now SAD AND Incompetent!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Cockatoos would be the stuff of nightmares to me. They are not as numerous as a couple of years ago. They threw a fret work style candle holder from my balcony table, ripped out hyacinth plants and ate the bulbs. I hope they were ill, how did they know there were bulbs out of sight?

They swoop around the area downstairs and hang by their beaks from the wires across main road. Then they do acrobatics, swinging 360 degrees around the wire. The car dealership over the road is covered in an open mesh type of metal cladding. On cold days, they hang from this over the road. I think it must be warmer there from constant traffic. All the while, the screeching goes on.

I have several photos taken of them on balcony rail. I am away from them by about half an arm's length. The look in the the eye says,"what do you mean you will get the broom?. I dare you."

You have my sympathy.

[ 02. August 2017, 05:59: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
So I decided to sit outside with my book, in the sunny courtyard today, while I had a cuppa. Cue several hundred freaking loud screechy cockatoos who decided our nature strip was the perfect place for a clan gathering. The decibel levels rose steadily as more and more arrived until it drove me insane and inside. [...]

Sorry, BL, just Europeanly curious:

Would it be an option do scare them away by generously and forcefully dousing them with a hosepipe? Directed water jets full blast might just work? - Them beasties in such numbers certainly sound (sic!) ghastly!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Never thought of that. They are superb flyers, coming within a few centimetres of people, trees, buildings and so forth but rarely connecting. The noise of a flock is deafening.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Add in some honking ibis, squabbling sea gulls, meddling pigeons and there is an avian battleground. I was woken the other night by sea gulls having a violent argument downstairs. As noisy as mating koalas or a treeful of possums. I do not wear hearing aids to bed, so to be woken by the gulls is not a usual thing.

[ 02. August 2017, 12:19: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
It is also now magpie mating season. FYI Wesley J, magpies and cockatoos are neither small nor shy. They are insanely territorial so the air battles in our leafy neighbourhood have begun. Magpies are quiet and swoop viciously. They aim for the head and their long gimlet like beaks are best avoided as they will draw blood if they can.

Cockatoos screech and scold, and they are fearless clowns. If you aimed a hose at them they would likely fluff out their feathers and enjoy parrying with the spray. (It has been a very dry winter). They are the size of chooks so I reckon I would need a water cannon to shift them. Even then they would simply relocate to one of the huge trees nearby and continue to give an earful.

Having a tin roof is interesting too. The thumping and skittering about they do can be alarming, but at least it is only a few at a time. It could be worse - at least we don't have bats by the hundreds. I hate having to clean up the large bird droppings but they are not as acidic as bat droppings. That stuff can eat through the duco on a car.
[Eek!]

[ 02. August 2017, 13:46: Message edited by: Banner Lady ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Well, the election here has just become more interesting with the Labour Party dropping its leader in favour of Jacinda Ardern, the previous Deputy leader. It appears that money is now flowing into Labour Party coffers, they have more volunteers, and even the current PM is telling his party they will have to work harder to ensure a National Party victory. While the Maori Party, currently in coalition with National, have said that they are willing to work with Labour.

The election will be on September 23.

My bias: While I think Jacinda would make a brilliant PM, I don't think there is enough time to turn things around as Labour has been trailing in the polls, however I hope to be proven wrong.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Grandson, 12 last week, had orientation for introduction to next year of high school. Son took him yesterday afternoon. He saw hydrogen being made with reactions from sulphuric acid, did other experiments and dissected a heart. He was thrilled to win an enormous jar of marshmallows which he took to school to share today. How to win friends and influence people, both for him and high school.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Cockatoos would be the stuff of nightmares to me. They are not as numerous as a couple of years ago. They threw a fret work style candle holder from my balcony table, ripped out hyacinth plants and ate the bulbs. I hope they were ill, how did they know there were bulbs out of sight?

They swoop around the area downstairs and hang by their beaks from the wires across main road. Then they do acrobatics, swinging 360 degrees around the wire. The car dealership over the road is covered in an open mesh type of metal cladding. On cold days, they hang from this over the road. I think it must be warmer there from constant traffic. All the while, the screeching goes on.

I have several photos taken of them on balcony rail. I am away from them by about half an arm's length. The look in the the eye says,"what do you mean you will get the broom?. I dare you."

You have my sympathy.

The black cockatoos in Darwin were amazing. Total vandals, who would sweep in and smash a tree to smithereens by stripping bark, small branches, leaves and gumnuts, squawking like banshees, and then exit cheerfully ...

A major difference between the two countries if that NZ birds are (mainly) mellifluous but drab, while many Oz birds like rosellas, Major Mitchells, black and sulphur crested, et cetera are beautiful but raucous.

I'm sure there's a metaphor there somewhere.

There are many exceptions. Incidentally NZ's fantail (piwakawaka) is native to both countries - but less shy in NZ. The NZ riroriro, ubiquitous but hard to see, is the grey warbler in Australia, again native to both countries, same song (different accent?). The NZ magpie is imported though. Sadly the peewee never made here. Rosellas (eastern, not crimson) have arrived here in recent years ... swallows too, though recent decades more than years, and more likely to have got themselves here under their own windblown steam.

[ 03. August 2017, 08:29: Message edited by: Zappa ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
The black cockatoos I am thinking of are enormous. More than twice as big as a Major Mitchell or sulfur crested cockie. Very capable of the damage you describe. There is also a similar size white one , also very destructive.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Kea, the NZ Alpine parrot can be fairly raucous, and are the larrikins of NZ bird life. They are also well known for stripping windscreen wipers and any other rubber off cars.

Kaka make a fairly piercing shriek too, and I know they too can be destructive having watched one rip a tree apart on Ulva Island (a small island off Stewart Island).

I don't know if kakapo (the rare nocturnal parrot) make much noise apart from their booming, which they use to attract a mate and can be heard in the next valley. Apparently they make a bowl in the floor of the bush which magnifies the sound.

I like the dark green if the kea, with each feather outlined in dark brown and the surprising flash of orange under their wings when they fly.

I definitely have a soft spot for parrots, but I think that would probably change if I had them around me in large flocks causing havoc.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
The black cockatoos I am thinking of are enormous. More than twice as big as a Major Mitchell or sulfur crested cockie. Very capable of the damage you describe. There is also a similar size white one , also very destructive.

That's the ones ... and yess I'd forgotten those cheeky NZ parrots.

The Crow and Raven (almost indistinguishable) are other raucous Oz birds (let me add I love all these birds dearly, and mmiss them). The butcher bird is mellifluous but a brutal killer. The southern kookaburra is raucous, mephistophelean and a brutal killer. The northern kookaburra less raucous, but no less of a killer.

And so it goes on! I miss em ... though I'll be back amongst them praise be in a few weeks time.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Huia noted
quote:
Kea, the NZ Alpine parrot can be fairly raucous, and are the larrikins of NZ bird life. They are also well known for stripping windscreen wipers and any other rubber off cars.

My memories of the Milford Track walk include a reminder as we retired for the night at one of the lodges that if we used the toilets in the night we MUST NOT FORGET TO SHUT THE DOOR ON LEAVING. Well, someone must have forgotten, because the kea (pl) who wake earlier than humans, had draped all the surrounding landscape with toilet paper before breakfast.
Imagine, not just the cost, but the work and time wasted removing the litter.

I was looking for a post of Loth's that I was too busy to comment on at the time but no luck.
You suggested that NZ 'slip' might be Oz 'mudslide' (like the ones that entomb whole villages in some countries).
Not really: ours are all rocks and occur where cuttings have been made for main roads and have been stable for decades or even generations.
Climate change's exceptional rainfall, possibly exacerbated by tectonic earth movements, has recently caused huge rockfalls. In the capital alone some hilly suburban streets were blocked. as well as main exits from the city – State Highway 1 had three lanes blocked, while the immediate alternative, also up a gorge, was still unusable several days later, while a connecting route between SH1 and SH2 further north was also blocked, not sure for how long.
And the Manawatu Gorge, where SH2 crosses to the east coast, now has so many and such huge slips, that 'They' are scratching their collective head and trying to convince themselves that they will have to upgrade the alternative route now being followed, which will be over the hills, hence longer and windier and through a major wind farm.
The railway goes through the gorge on the other bank but was wisely laid through a number of tunnels, as I remember well from going to and from boarding school in the 40s in old carriages whose windows didn't shut properly, hence choking fumes and smuts in the eye.

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Birds are fascinating, and I acknowledge that we really are the interlopers in their landscape - but I'm not fond of 'em in huge numbers.

Living with a few kamikaze currawongs and claxon cockatoos nearby is fine - but great flocks of 'em is tiresome. Particularly as the spots of warm sunshine are rare at this time of year - so I resented the loss of it moreso than I might usually.

The leaden skies and icy winds are back today and I don't think it has got into double figures yet. Snow nearby again, and an icy caste to the clouds, but TP is happy because it has at last rained a bit.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
The 'immediate alternative' in my post above has had a further landslide calculated at another 100 tonnes.
GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Coldest day in Melbourne since 1970. Blizzards forecast for Rowen's area. BRRRR.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Very cold here in the Cape, but not nearly as bad as the chilly Antipodes. Woken by raucous hadedas (the African ibis) flying over the house. I do find them lovable birds though, even if they are annoying.
 
Posted by Rowen (# 1194) on :
 
Yeah, folk.... Quite Brrrrrrrrrrrr here. Staying warm is a top priority! Frosts stay around until lunch. The more it snows up the road, the colder it is here.
But we survive. And we like to complain!
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
It was 12° in my bedroom and felt chilly when I got up, though I'm as warmly dressed in bed as during the day, so that I don't freeze getting up in the night.
A lovely sunny day, with my solar night-light charging all day on te window-sill.
GG
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Middle of winter and I bought a new double-door fridge that purrs away and dominates the kitchen. It makes ice and dispenses chilled water etc, so hope I shall appreciate it more this summer.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Birds are fascinating, and I acknowledge that we really are the interlopers in their landscape - but I'm not fond of 'em in huge numbers.

The only real flocks we get here are starlings
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Sounds like the Nth Island is falling apart GG. A friend, more knowledgeable about history than I said that, during the war, the US who of course had troops stationed here before they went to fight in the Pacific, offered to put a road tunnel through the Manawatu Gorge, but the plan never came to anything.

I've taken to wearing a merino Beanie to bed, covered by a neck gaiter which I wear up over my neck and head so that only my face is exposed to the cold. It looks like the headwear of an old order of nuns, except both are striped, the beanie purple and black the neck gaiter in two different shades of turquoise. If I ever have a burglar he will probably die laughing.

Tonight's low is meant to be 6c, which is much warmer than it has been.

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... If I ever have a burglar he will probably die laughing ...

Serve him right. [Devil]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
SMH announces the death of Betty Cuthbert . She attended Ermington Primary School where my dad taught for many years. He taught her. A natural athlete, ungainly in style, she won four Olymic gold medals for sprinting over two Games.

Her family ran a small nursery which dad patronised well. We walked past it on our way to and from school. No punnets of seedlings like today. He would ask for a dozen petunias, or whatever. Mrs Cuthbert would take a trowel and a twist of newspaper, shovel some in from a concrete trench, and charge him a pittance. There could well be fifty seedlings in the pack.

I distinctly remember his excitement at her first gold medal. Dad was not a sports follower at all, but he actually used the telepohone to ring through a telegram to her. Her picture still hangs at the school, alongside the ubiquitous photo of a young Queen Elizabeth.

The nursery is still there, but specialises in camellias.

[ 06. August 2017, 22:46: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Speaking of camellias - my early flowering one is out, as are the blossom trees on the Port Hills. Having said that, the worst snowfall I have experienced in Christchurch was in late August, so I am not raising my hopes, well trying not to.

Georgie-Porgy Fat'n'Fluffy goes into durance vile (a.k.a the cattery) tomorrow, while I race around madly packing and cleaning the house so I can go to Wellington on Thursday. I thought it would be a simple birthday visit, but as I posted on the Aging Relatives thread, things have got a bit more complicated [Help]

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Camellias, clivias and horse magnolia out in sheltered gardens, no sign of apple or peach blossom yet.

Poor Georgie-Porgy. I hope your trip goes well, Huia.

Waiting for this afternoon's secret ballot in Parliament on the No Confidence Vote in President Zuma. Harder to unseat a corrupt tyrant than anyone would think possible.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
It sounds like a large minority were in favour, but not enough to oust him, despite it being a secret ballot. I wondered how secret a ballot would be in those circumstances. If it were here I think results would leak out, but I may be being cynical.

The mud is flying here in the election campaign, I'm hoping it gets people out to vote, but I'm not holding my breath.

Even if the result is other than what I might wish, I think it's important to get a representative result (my middle brother says I'm naïve, but so be it).

Huia
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
It sounds like a large minority were in favour, but not enough to oust him, despite it being a secret ballot. I wondered how secret a ballot would be in those circumstances. If it were here I think results would leak out, but I may be being cynical.

The mud is flying here in the election campaign, I'm hoping it gets people out to vote, but I'm not holding my breath.

Even if the result is other than what I might wish, I think it's important to get a representative result (my middle brother says I'm naïve, but so be it).

Huia

I'm sure people get out to vote, but it's so secret they don't get to know who they are voting for.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Well, it would seem the ballot in Parliament was secret enough, but President Zuma is still there.

And today is Women's Day in South Africa, too depressing to think about in the light of soaring rape statistics.

On a minor note, discovered that my favourite charcoal-grey sweater that I put on to go out to supper at a restaurant last night is FELTED with dog hairs from my small white half-Pomeranian rescue dog. How could I not notice before wearing it in public?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I found a book in the library about making toys for long haired cats by felting their fur. Maybe you could do the same with a dog's hair.

I'm off to Wellington before dawn tomorrow, I think the forecast suggests only one day without rain, but it may be a degree or two warmer.

Huia
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Best wishes for the birthday travels Huia.

To my shame I did not know of rape stats in SA, Mary Louise.

Heading back to an earlier conversation, the songs of the magpies around here cheer me up no end. But as BL wrote the time of attack is near, if not here, and they do seem to see me as a target. I even carried meat while riding my bike once to throw at them, but they did not care!

My doctor encourages me to get out in the sun in winter. He also encourages social activities, so he insisted my going to a 6 course degustation meal with each course accompanied by a gin from a local distillery on Saturday night with friends would be a good thing. And it was. Sunday morning was a write-off though!

[ 09. August 2017, 09:04: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Ineptitude runs rampant. And stupidity and other similar words. Both at Federal and NSW government levels. We already have a massive mess with new railway lines in the metropolitan area. Now there is more of the same. Trains don't fit stations, now they can't run on much of the Blue Mountains line as they are wrong size for existing tracks. One would think the premier would have some idea. After all, she was the Minister for Transpoort once. In that time, she was very concerned train guards wore long trousers so no one could see their knobbly knees with shorts.

[ 09. August 2017, 22:31: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:


My doctor encourages me to get out in the sun in winter. He also encourages social activities, so he insisted my going to a 6 course degustation meal with each course accompanied by a gin from a local distillery on Saturday night with friends would be a good thing. And it was. Sunday morning was a write-off though!

I daresay! I drink very little in the way of spirits except gin. I just don't like them. Two G&Ts one hot summer day was enough, more than enough for me. Then I checked the label for alcohol stats. That would explain it. Still, I enjoyed them.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Well, it would seem the ballot in Parliament was secret enough, but President Zuma is still there.

[Tear]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Lothlorien, you have no empathy for anyone who has a train journey ruined by the sight of knobbly knees?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
MaryLouise, guards on trains here have their own little cubicle with a door each side of the train. They stand in doorway to check platform and to press bell to alert driver to take off. A glimpse of knobbly knees would be momentary.

I was in one train where the guard seemed to have imbibed more than he should have. I think this is a sacking offence. He sang sea shanties through the intercom in train. When I reached my destination I could. see he had board shorts and an appallingly loud Hawaian shirt. I doubt he would have lasted much longer without Transit Police or similar stepping in.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
I was joking, Lothlorien. When I think of train journeys on which I've endured long delays, inedible food, dirty compartments etc, the last thing that would worry me is a glimpse of knobbly knees. Though drunken sea shanties could get annoying...

[ 10. August 2017, 09:29: Message edited by: MaryLouise ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I knew you were joking. I wrote to Our Glad when she was Transport Minister and said much as you have said. Actually received a reply, not pro forma letter. From a lackey. One would think her experience as minister should have been some help,but new lines etc are just one big muddle and mistake.
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
What is happening with the weather?? 28 deg here in the old steel city in the middle of winter.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Rowen's Victorian Alps has had very heavy snow falls and temperatures well below zero. All odd.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
A warm (relatively) day here too.

I was thinking of catching the bus to the snow for the day on Sunday. I drive to a town at the foot of the mountains and catch the bus from there.

Back to the last page and transport, I hear the Blue Mountains' stations are in need of transformation to fit the new trains. I guess it was cheaper to adjust the stations than the trains. Here's hoping this doesn't happen! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
We took Dog for his last trip to the vet this morning. He'd not been well for a few months now and had gone quite a long way downhill. Very little eaten or even drunk for much of the week. This morning, he could not really stand up and I had to help him out to his favourite places. Back onto a comfortable bed, but clearly not well. A quick phone call to Dlet to come back home and then the 3 of us took him up to the vet.

He's been a good dog for us, the best part of 17 yrs old which is great for a beagle. I don't think we'll bring another into our home.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
B4 is hoping she has a new owner for the Kelpie puppy she has been fostering. She has admitted that while "Oooh, PUPPIES!" is great in theory, the hard and sleep deprived reality of training one has made her look more seriously at any future fostering placements.

An admirable sign of more mature thinking IMHO. Hope it lasts!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
That is always hard, Gee D, especially when you had him for so long. My sympaqthies to all three of you.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thank you.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
That is so hard, GeeD, sympathy to you and your family. And 17 years is a long time, as Lothlorien said. Sad too to know you won't have a puppy in the house again. My Great Dane at eight years hasn't done well this winter and I wouldn't have such a large dog again, but I love his sweetness and affection, the stubborn nature not so much.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
We've both turned 70 this year (and 40 years marriage now as well) and although we're planning on stopping work (for me) or much cutting down (for Madame) we don't want to be tied down as much. A possibility is that we do some guide dog rearing but we'll have to investigate what that demands.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
We've both turned 70 this year (and 40 years marriage now as well) and although we're planning on stopping work (for me) or much cutting down (for Madame) we don't want to be tied down as much. A possibility is that we do some guide dog rearing but we'll have to investigate what that demands.

Ask Boogie.

GG
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Most certainly shall if we decide to go down that path. In the meantime, we're mourning Dog. Later today we'll tell the blue tongue. It and Dog had a strange relationship, mutual wariness of course, but tolerance and perhaps some friendship?
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Hope the blue tongue took it well.

So sorry to read... Growing up I saw a few dogs taken to the vet: both ours and grandma's. Always a sad experience. I dread the next trip for my parents.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
Hope the blue tongue took it well.

So sorry to read... Growing up I saw a few dogs taken to the vet: both ours and grandma's. Always a sad experience. I dread the next trip for my parents.

Thanks - it's hard to tell with blue tongues when they're out sunning themselves on a day like this. Very non-committal looks.

[ 13. August 2017, 07:50: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
I too am sorry for the loss of your four legged companion Gee D. Sounds like a good age for a mid-sized pooch. The lizards were moving about in our garden today - the first time we've seen any since autumn. Sign of Spring? I sincerely hope it is and look forward to the blue tongues emerging.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Please, what are blue tongues? We have blue-tongued geckoes.

At a bring-and-share lunch after church there was an enquiry as to how many pets' graves there were at the bottom of the garden – comparing with neighbours of our hostess.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Lizards, GG

Hide in the garden under rocks and leaf litter. The keep garden free of snails etc

Pictures and other links here if they can escape the attentiion of domestic pets they can live twenty years.

[ 13. August 2017, 11:01: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Sadly where we once lived, pre-wankydilla, our Rotty killed a few. I was gutted.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
PS .. at least the Barnaby Joyce affair is providing some alternative to Trumpastrophy
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Sadly where we once lived, pre-wankydilla, our Rotty killed a few. I was gutted.

I'm not sure how many blue tongues we have, but this time of year would see one sunning itself on the paving surrounding the pool. Whether it was always the same one (they have the potential for long lives) I don't know, but it seemed to have worked out that Dog could not get it if it stayed inside the fence.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Sadly where we once lived, pre-wankydilla, our Rotty killed a few. I was gutted.

I'm not sure how many blue tongues we have, but this time of year would see one sunning itself on the paving surrounding the pool. Whether it was always the same one (they have the potential for long lives) I don't know, but it seemed to have worked out that Dog could not get it if it stayed inside the fence.
You've had me Googling for the green tree gecko that we were shown at teachers' college 66 years ago – yes, I've remembered it correctly: 'The inside of its mouth and tongue are a deep shade of mauve. ' I remember it as a startlingly bright purple.
GG

[ 14. August 2017, 22:20: Message edited by: Galloping Granny ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Most of the lizards in the garden -- they love old garden walls and rocky places -- are small flat and brown, no monitors or plated lizards. Inside the house we have tiny grey and brown geckos that hang out near the ceiling beams and rafters. In the bathroom every now and again geckos fall down plop onto my stomach when I'm having a leisurely bath. I think the steam makes them sleepy.

A number of endangered dwarf chameleons too: I planted up restio reeds and grasses for them and they cope well with bird predations.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
That was interesting thanks GG, and I've now read about them. It would cause ecological havoc to import some but they sound good garden companions.
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
So sorry about the Dog Gee D. I know how much in love I am with my pooch and how much losing a pet can hurt.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thanks Clarence, much appreciated. May you and pooch both have many more long walkies ahead of you.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Gee D I've just surfaced after a long sleep, and catching up on the news. So Sorry to hear about Dog. Pets really do leave such a gap when they die.

My visit to Wellington went well. My oldest brother enjoyed his Black forest birthday cake. He and his cat seem to have settled in well to their new home.

My youngest brother, with whom I stayed, was great. On the Sunday, after visiting our brother, he drove to an amazing second-hand bookshop/café. He enjoyed the coffee, I enjoyed the books. I left him yesterday morning, having prepared tea in the crockpot. It was a curry and too spicy for me, but he will enjoy it.

I am so glad to be home. I collected Georgie-Porgy from the cattery. She came home very clean, but managed to get muddy paws within a few minutes of going outside.

Huia
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Computer frying and dying. Short posts until next week when hopefully new one will be in place.

So much to try to put on to USB sticks when it is working.
Sigh.
Technology. Its a love hate thing with me.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Black Forest cake is my favourite cake too. Mmmmm. I can taste it now.

Hurrah for nice birthdays and getaways, and boo for failing computers.

Quite a windy day down here on the border. Leaves, that are left, are swirling around and the wind is howling as it goes past. Nice to be indoors.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Huia, I'm glad the visit with your brothers went so well.

One of my small dogs went off to have her nails clipped and came back honking like a goose with kennel cough. My Great Dane is unwell and lethargic, the vet has suggested liver tests. Going around with a knot in my stomach.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thank you Huia, and like MaryLouise glad that your visit went well. A great welcome home I'd imagine
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
Will Baa-baa Barnaby barrack for Australia or New Zealand in the rugby test match tomorrow?

He is the Deputy Prime Minister of Australia (God help us!) but it now turns out has been a New Zealand Citizen since he was born - or so the NZ Prime Minster stated in parliament. IANL but on a plain reading of the Australian constitution this means that he was ineligible for election to the Australian parliament. But he has refused to stand down from being a Cabinet Minster, even though his case has been referred to the High Court for a definitive ruling on his eligibility. I think he will plead ignorance and perhaps stupidity since he was unable to correctly fill in the nomination form which he signed.

Barnaby joins no fewer than 5 other MPs whose doubtful eligibility has been sent to the High Court for decision ! At this rate only Pat Dobson (who is an aborigine and thus unquestionably Australian) will be the only parliamentarian left standing !
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
There's going to be hardly anyone left at this rate - the deputy leader of the Nationals and Nick Xenophon are in the frame now.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
It would be comical if it weren't saying something about the quality of those involved and of their staff. Not only saying something about their ability to give accurate information on forms, but also on the moral quality which they have, or rather may not have, for them to at least step down from office till the matter is sorted.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I don't really mind who he supports as far as sports go, as long as Australia doesn't send him home as it has with many other undesirable NZ citizens. [Biased]


A friend of mine, now in his 60s, was born in Australia, but has lived here since he was about 12. When he had to prove he was a long-term NZ resident (to claim a benefit because he was too sick to work) the young woman he dealt with in the Work and Income office suggested he use his passport to provide proof of when he arrived, and was incredulous when he said that a passport wasn't needed to travel between the two countries in those days.

Huia
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Today, we voted to call a new minister. It was a good meeting, and the new person looks excellent. Processes etc etc to follow, should start 1 December.

Not sure about his citizenship, hopefully it's Heaven.

mr curly
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Nunc's birthday today or tomorrow. If you ever get a chance to look in, Nunc, happy birthday
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... the young woman he dealt with in the Work and Income office suggested he use his passport to provide proof of when he arrived, and was incredulous when he said that a passport wasn't needed to travel between the two countries in those days.

Huia

Yes ... Mr Asia changed all that, not long before I first moved to Oz ... ironically there's very little need for a passport now, they don't get stamped, and about six zillion other devices have identified you by the time you are set free at the other end of a flight [Paranoid]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tukai:
Will Baa-baa Barnaby barrack for Australia or New Zealand in the rugby test match tomorrow?

Incidentally the verb "to barrack" was not something I often heard in NZ. I first encountered it in common parlance (apart from as a noun) in a Melbourne laundromat when some bloke said "whodyabarracakformate?" ... I had no idea what he was talking about. [Ultra confused]

My other great shock was to discover that Melbourne didn't come to a standstill when the Wallabies had a test match somewhere [Waterworks] (and they used to win some in those days)
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Sorry to hear about your dog, Gee D. I've never had a pet, but I always feel sad to hear about the death of other people's. A friend of ours has just lost his Golden Retriever, who we had never met but seen in pictures on Facebook, and almost saw him as a friend.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Mr Curly, I hope your new Minister is as good as ours.

Zappa, thanks. I wondered what the tipping point had been. I think I might have gone to High School with some of the people involved in that.

My landline phone has been restored [Yipee] it never worked clearly since the floods then it died altogether and I asked them to route the calls through my cell. That was a nightmare as I have to have my phone on loudspeaker, which shares the conversation with the whole world. Not ideal for travelling on the bus.

The nice man from Chorus was working in cold, muddly water to connect it all up.

Next month it will all be ditched anyway because I'm switching to fibre broadband. I was going to give up on having a landline at all, but my 3 days without it convinced me I need it.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have been gardening, as much as a smallish balcony allows for gardening. Two granddaughters gave me some more herbs for my birthday and I have planted the, Pizza thyme, lemon thyme which I already had, chives which I am not good at growing, vietnamese mint. It is hot in the sun on my sheltered balcony.

To my disgust I found cobbler's pegs,* already going to seed. This is not a paddock in the bush, but innercity. Where the heck did cobblers pegs come from. I pulled out plant carefully and placed it all in my rubbish bin.

* Fact sheet and pictures. Scroll down on pictures to see the rotten seeds which cling to clothing.

[ 22. August 2017, 01:38: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Curly:
Today, we voted to call a new minister. It was a good meeting, and the new person looks excellent. Processes etc etc to follow, should start 1 December.

Not sure about his citizenship, hopefully it's Heaven.

mr curly

We haven't voted yet but at this stage it's inevitable. The selection committee and Parish Council are happy after meeting with him. He's preaching for a call next Sunday but then he has a starting date.

I'll be there next Sunday as my long-awaited spinal surgery, for which I turned up at the hospital today, has been postponed again. My left eye is very scary-looking with a broken blood vessel which will take a few weeks to come right. Surgeon explained that to have me lying face down for 2-4 hours could make it much worse, even leave the eye blind.

We hear that the new minister is a very pleasant person and an excellent minister, but he comes from training in South Africa which tends to be theologically very conservative (this will be his fourth NZ parish); we've been enjoying splendid preaching for 18 months by an avowed Progressive, and everyone has thought very highly of him. Now we handful of theologically Progressive members are wondering how we'll handle the change. One says 'I want to be fed'. But the congregation is a very loving community of which I've been a part for 50 years, and at my age I can't imagine wanting to move. I'll see whether fortnightly sessions with the Ephesus group and occasional visits to our lay supply's wife's church will keep me happy.
I guess that a lot of people simply get on with trying to live as Jesus taught and don't fuss too much about theology.

GG

[ 22. August 2017, 04:20: Message edited by: Galloping Granny ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Lothlorien, I wonder if your cobblers' pegs are what we call blackjacks, or related?

I'm not doing much planting this year, lost too much in the garden from drought.

My Great Dane home and a little subdued after medical tests, hopefully better. For now.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Loth, I think we have those too, the seed heads look familiar.

A friend who lives in a 9 storey apartment block here (one of the highest to survive the quakes) has complained about aphids in a rose bush she has growing on her balcony, which just shows that pests are good at surviving I guess. Thank goodness for a few frosts which will polish them off.

GG, how frustrating to have surgery put off yet again, even knowing it is the right decision. I hope your new Minister works out for you. I know when we had a variety of people preaching while the selection process was in place I considered how I would manage if someone was called who was like a couple of the people who filled in. I was very happy when this didn't happen.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Just had word from my son that step grandson 13 had a nasty stack from scooter on way to school this morning.. I don't think there are broken bones but shock and stress have given him at least two epileptic seizures in Casualty.

The epilepsy is fairly recently diagnosed and medicines are being trialled but not yet settled.

[ 23. August 2017, 02:04: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I know those seeds as "Farmers' friends", a norther rivers NSW term - because they stick close to farmers. Common-ish in NZ too.

Nothing like the burrs we used to suffer in wankydilla though.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have heard that term here too Zappa, but reserve it for my use about No. 8 fencing wire, usually used with a spinner.

I think cobblers' pegs is a term from west of the Divide, past Bathurst.

[ 23. August 2017, 07:39: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Poor step grandson 13! Here's to a quick recovery.

GG: sorry to read of the surgery postponement too. All the best with the new minister.

Hurrah for an excellent new minister Mr Curly.

A good day today. Even got some compliments on some work I did for a few people, which is always nice.

We had a glorious day yesterday, but the clouds, and wind!, returned today. In 3 months I'll be complaining about the heat.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Very happy day yesterday. I had left my Nordic walking poles at a bus stop, and they were taken with 15 minutes [Waterworks] . The shop where I'd bought them no longer sells them, but a trader had them for sale on Trade Me - they arrived yesterday, complete with the small clip that can be used to join them when not in use (which had been missing when I bought the originals). I walk so much faster using them [Yipee] and my body gets a better workout.

I also had a session with the physio that lessened pain from a back injury. I asked her to write the exercises down in a notebook so I could remember them, and made an appointment for a weeks time, just to keep me on track. It is so wonderful not to be in pain, especially as I am such a wuss.

Another sunny days in Paradise - but the wind is cold. The "Beasterly Easterly" as my Great uncle called it.


Huia
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
I know those seeds as "Farmers' friends", a norther rivers NSW term - because they stick close to farmers. Common-ish in NZ too.

Nothing like the burrs we used to suffer in wankydilla though.

From what you say they function like the foxtails we have in scads in the Sierras, and which I embroidered on my husband's stole after the freakazoids tried to drive us out of the church and excommunicated us. I figured they made a decent symbol for Christian stubbornness.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
LC, I am not sure about the Christian, but definitely agree about the stubbornness. [Big Grin]

They need individual unhooking by hand from clothing.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Sounds about right!
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
after the freakazoids tried to drive us out of the church and excommunicated us. I figured they made a decent symbol for Christian stubbornness.

Which reminds me ... we really should start a survivors' club [Tear]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
[Votive] for LC, Zappa and all ministers and people who have faced crazy congregations.

I am off to Darwin for 4 days for a work conference next month. I'm going to extend it to the weekend to give me 2 days to explore. And fly on the red eye Sunday night straight back to work! [Help]

Have any here been there? I see a 2 day tour to Kakadu exists, as does a one day to Litchfield, the waterfalls of which look amazing. Any suggestions? Thanks. I have 2 full days (the weekend).

[ 24. August 2017, 08:44: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Last night in chilly Adelaide. UCA conferences are interesting things....

I missed Middle's band playing in a band competition at The Metro theatre on Tuesday night. They came second and are through to the semi finals. Looks like they should be able to get the semi on 12 October, as the alternative is 15 October, the day before English and Music HSC papers. Phew.

I'm doing support crew for some friends who are doing the Oxfam trail walk starting tomorrow. I'll be doing 4 am , 8 am , 12 pm Saturday check points, cooking up a storm out of the back of a small camper van. Why did I say yes to that????

mr curly
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Ian Climacus wrote:
quote:
I am off to Darwin for 4 days for a work conference next month...Any suggestions?
Ian, Dangerous Deacon may be your man, as he is now almost four years into his ministry at the cathedral, and will also be current on any local events at the time you're there.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
after the freakazoids tried to drive us out of the church and excommunicated us. I figured they made a decent symbol for Christian stubbornness.

Which reminds me ... we really should start a survivors' club [Tear]
Can D. and I join too?

Although, TBH, the freakazoids rather did us a favour; we love it at our New Place.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Oh yeah, all things work together for good and all that.

I think a survivors' club is a great idea.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
In the meantime I'm part of a sort of rolling shipmeet at the moment ... staying with The Coot, Foaming, Clarence, catching up with Piers Plowman, Rexory ... embarcing Evensong with prayers as she attends to he unwell mother ... and probably more

Off in a few moments to the Western western isle to check out the scenery ...
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
A bit of turmoil chez moi at the moment.
After almost two years of searching for a new minister, the appointed Board and Parish Council, who are becoming very weary, have produced a candidate. He is South African, and currently at a parish not far from here and long known as the most conservative in the Presbytery. (No offence meant, MaryLouise, but SA theological training has proved to be like that; an old friend stuck loyally with his local Presbyterian church until the minister from SA preached on the theme that our life on earth is solely to prepare us for the Life to Come, then he fled.)
Well, the man Preached for a Call on Sunday and his sermon was the feeblest I've ever heard; the text was the story of the feeding of the 5000 and the boy with two loaves and five fishes; and all he did was re-tell the story. He may have referred to the small boy's example of generosity, but whether that led to others sharing or whether God multiplied the food (not something that I would expect) was not very clear. The big shock had been when we found ourselves repeating the old version of the Lord's Prayer, which we haven't used for decades; but some of us stubbornly recited the words we're used to.
We are a very united, loving congregation, but one or two seemed to like the man; half a dozen at least were as dismayed as I was. Someone spoke of the risk of the congregation shrinking without a minister; I don't think this has happened, but it will if there's a majority for this man. He came described by people we know as pleasant and with a warmth of manner – and it mustn't have been easy for him to be answering questions from a large circle of strangers. But after half a century here I think I'd have to go where I'd feel theologically comfortable, and that might be to the church where our wonderful Lay Supply's wife is the pastor.
Not all Shipmates would be theologically on my side, but 'thanks for listening'.

GG
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
That sounds dreadful GG - not just a sermon with which you had a very understandable theological question, but feeble as well. The Oz Presbyterians are a very conservative group indeed, so little chance of finding one here unless you look to the Uniting Church - organised along generally Presbyteran lines.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
GG, I'm so sorry to hear what you're going through. I do know that there are extremely conservative elements in South African denominations as well as some very antiquated ideas and practices. I hope that your congregation finds someone more suitable, if there is still time. And listening to inept or theologically unacceptable sermons week after week wearies the spirit.

Like others here, I've experienced my share of crazymaking church behaviour and although I've hung in there, I find myself much more wary and guarded when it comes to active participation. A pity.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
That sounds dreadful GG - not just a sermon with which you had a very understandable theological question, but feeble as well. The Oz Presbyterians are a very conservative group indeed, so little chance of finding one here unless you look to the Uniting Church - organised along generally Presbyterian lines.

I've happily worshiped with the Uniting Church of Australia (in a congregation who had obviously been Methodist) and the UCC in Canada, a much older union. In each country there exists a continuing Presbyterian church of ultra-conservative customs and beliefs.

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
GG, I am really sorry. Pleasant and having a warm manner wouldn't be sufficient for me either. We had several such people filling in while we were without a Minister, and it was only because I love the congregation that I could not just walk away.

I know it can be difficult finding the right person, but what was he thinking of to answer a call to a church with markedly different theology to his own? Being in the same city he must have an idea of how different the church is from the one he comes from, or is he hoping to 'convert' you all to a more traditional approach?

When we had our current Minister preach for a call, the congregational vote was taken straight after the service (one abstention, all the rest in favour). When will you know the result?

I know it would cause you pain if you felt you had to leave, and I hope it doesn't come to that, but I also know how painful it can be sitting through limp sermons.

At the very least I'm glad there is an alternative available, but it's a luke-warm kind of comfort.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
That sounds dreadful GG - not just a sermon with which you had a very understandable theological question, but feeble as well. The Oz Presbyterians are a very conservative group indeed, so little chance of finding one here unless you look to the Uniting Church - organised along generally Presbyterian lines.

I've happily worshiped with the Uniting Church of Australia (in a congregation who had obviously been Methodist) and the UCC in Canada, a much older union. In each country there exists a continuing Presbyterian church of ultra-conservative customs and beliefs.

GG

You would probably not be happy at the Presbyterian church relatively close to me, GG. Walking distance actually.
The church has changed quite bit from when Peter Cameron was the minister and was charged with heresy. it is very conservative now. There are many references on line to this trial.

[ 28. August 2017, 09:09: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
Our friend and erstwhile shipmate, FD, has a "significant" birthday today; and here in the Golden West we get to celebrate with him. Eat your hearts out, Easterners!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rexory:
Our friend and erstwhile shipmate, FD, has a "significant" birthday today; and here in the Golden West we get to celebrate with him. Eat your hearts out, Easterners!

Yes, a reminder from ancient history popped onto my screen just now.

Happy birthday and have a wonderful day over there.

[ 28. August 2017, 22:35: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I hope FD has a wonderful birthday, and makes a good recovery from the celebrations [Axe murder]

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I was unpacking my grocery order when I picked up a box of panko breadcrumbs. Not used often but I like to have them available.

The pack said the crumbs were made from at least 100% Australian ingredients. ???
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Now if they were really patriotic it would be at least 101% [Big Grin]

Lovely day here, despite rain being forecast 6.30pm and I'm in a sleeveless top (and trou) and haven't yet turned on any heating and the front door is still open -- Spring's here!

Ahem - just looked up the forecast for the next 3 days - fog and rain [Frown] Glad I don't have to travel.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
A happy birthday to Foaming Draft.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Curly:
Today, we voted to call a new minister. It was a good meeting, and the new person looks excellent. Processes etc etc to follow, should start 1 December.

Not sure about his citizenship, hopefully it's Heaven.

mr curly

Word is out on our appointment and people usually say something like "Oh, that's a good match." Our kids are excited because they know his kids through UCA youth camps and shared music interests - his son was able to come to Middle's big gig last week.

Meanwhile I've been asked to go on (yet) another UCA committee to be a "younger, mission focused voice." At 54, I am both flattered and horrified. And said no - it would be a conflict of interest with my current Synod employment

mr curly
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Happy birthday to Foaming Draught - hope he had several draughts! [Smile]

quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
... Spring's here ...

Goodness - isn't it a bit early? I only say this because there doesn't seem to be much sign of Autumn here - it was 27° this afternoon ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Piglet, today's weather tells me I was being overly optimistic. [Waterworks] The worst snowfall I've encountered in Christchurch was at the end of August, but we have had enough warm days for daffodils and the grass to star a growth spurt.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I had a bit of a helpful chat (lecture) on the phone yesterday from one who knows us – ordained but has avoided taken official role when she has husband, family, and chaplaincy to keep her busy. She was taking the service at a nearby church on Sunday but slipped back and to hide out in the kitchen during the discussion.
She gave it to me very kindly for ten minutes and left me thinking.
Some thoughts: that our candidate actually wanted to get away from his current evangelical parish and learn about other ways of thinking and doing church.
That although our present preacher is much liked, there is a wide range of actual belief in the parish.
That his response to a bit of a bombshell that I lobbed at him was to say 'We could have a chat over a coffee' rather than a more threatening 'discussion'.
This has left Granny rather looking forward to making friends with the new man – because I gather there won't be much opposition to appointing him 'for a five year term'.
Not that my lifetime's journey is likely to double back to beliefs that I left behind long ago.
And I don't think he'll mind being told that we ceased using the old form of the Lord's Prayer several decades ago, and please could we use the modern form (actually when I'm leading worship I use one of several such as Dorothy McRae-McMahon's).
GG

[ 30. August 2017, 00:00: Message edited by: Galloping Granny ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
GG, that sounds like there is space for accommodation, and goes some way to answering my question about 'what was he thinking of?'

Meanwhile on the political front things are interesting -as in that curse about living in interesting times. In international ratings NZ scores highly as a country with little corruption, but at election time all kinds of scandals pop up, and I wonder if we are just better at covering up than most places.

Huia
 
Posted by Dark Knight (# 9415) on :
 
Great to see FD, rexory, Clarence, Zappa, AdamPater and jugular for FD's birthday bash last night. Jimmy and Evensong were greatly missed.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Belated birthday wishes to FD. He may be especially blessed to know that this is my very first post from our new pc, which happily sprang into life a few minutes ago after dutifully uploading everything on the old back up drive. I was so pleased to see the SoF glyph pop up on the sidebar!

It is a relief to be back on-line again - just goes to show how much we rely on computer access for everything from recipes to managing accounts. We were in Officeworks today trying to purchase the pc, with poor TP having to beg on-line access to a store computer because the banking app on my phone would not open. Then, because he had lost his good glasses in the garden a few days ago, he couldn't see properly in his old glasses to put the correct pins in. It has been a comedy of errors, but we are finally back in the 21st century. I almost hooted with laughter when the checkout girl asked if we would like the receipt e-mailed to us and TP demanded a hard copy instead. I think he just needed the reassurance of something concrete to hang on to!

[Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Good that you're now all go BL.

I can sympathise with TP, I went grocery shopping with my reading glasses on today it was so frustrating and because I was later than usual the helpful shelf fillers weren't around to reach for things on the high shelf. (It's discrimination against short people).

Tomorrow I hope to be connected to fibre broadband. It's taken a while as I didn't want to face it until I had been to Wellington. Pure, the internet provider I'm using didoes offer a DIY option for connecting, but they also have experts who will do all that stuff for $75, and I figure my sanity is worth at least that, I think there may also be some issues with the computer itself, [Frown] but I will ask for clarification.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Huia said
quote:
I can sympathise with TP, I went grocery shopping with my reading glasses on today it was so frustrating and because I was later than usual the helpful shelf fillers weren't around to reach for things on the high shelf. (It's discrimination against short people).
In New World there is usually a staff member round when you can't reach the top shelf, but if not a taller customer will always oblige if asked nicely. Not so many staff in Countdown.
Then there's my trick for the Apple Tea: I hook it off the shelf with my cane and it lands right in my waiting trolley.
My party trick.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
My solution is to go with one of my 6'5" sons. Otherwise I ask a taller customer. I have never had a refusal and all have been happy to help out a shorty. Even 6' son can get most high things.

Not so easy at home however, and I notice my smoker has now been put on top shelf in my store room/pantry here. No way could I get that down,even with standing on sturdy, safe kitchen steps. I have a family of giants. Even both DILS are basically 6'. I am 5'3", not really all that short but too short for high cupboards and shelves.

[ 31. August 2017, 11:11: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
My solution is to go with one of my 6'5" sons. Otherwise I ask a taller customer. I have never had a refusal and all have been happy to help out a shorty. Even 6' son can get most high things.


I have the other problem, especially in shoe shops. Tall people tend to have larger feet so why are the size 12+ (continental 46+) shoes on the bottom shelf? So they don't look so big? Look Mr Shoe Retailer, you don't have so many large shoes anyway, so put them where we can see and reach them. At 6'2 and 60 years old I'm starting to creak a bit.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
In New World there is usually a staff member round when you can't reach the top shelf, but if not a taller customer will always oblige if asked nicely. Not so many staff in Countdown.
Then there's my trick for the Apple Tea: I hook it off the shelf with my cane and it lands right in my waiting trolley.
My party trick.

GG

This was a New World, I avoid CD as their staff tend to be less helpful. I just timed it badly.

Don't try your stick trick with the eggs though
[Biased]

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm glad to know I'm not the only shorty who isn't shy of asking someone less vertically challenged to reach something from a high shelf ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I am now connected to Fibre Broadband [Yipee] [Yipee]

The expert who connected it up for me also did some small adjustments that make life so much easier. He was brilliant - but he also works independently so I can call on him with other problems that come up, as the company I used to use have been sold, and my contact person, who was brilliant, is on her O.E (= Overseas Experience)term used in NZ for someone - usually a young person going overseas for the first time).

So if anyone meets a Kiwi called Sara, be especially helpful to her please [Smile] ).

Huia

[ 01. September 2017, 03:55: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Another shorty here. I have a small step-ladder in the garage and keep an eye out for tall shop assistants or gormless bearded hipsters who are never in a hurry because rushing is uncool.

Beginning of September, officially the first day of spring. Plenty of sunshine but freezing cold. I am going to cut an armful of spiky orange strelitzias and their long paddle leaves in the garden and take them round to brighten up an old age home nearby.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Another shorty here. I have a small step-ladder in the garage and keep an eye out for tall shop assistants or gormless bearded hipsters who are never in a hurry because rushing is uncool.

Beginning of September, officially the first day of spring. Plenty of sunshine but freezing cold. I am going to cut an armful of spiky orange strelitzias and their long paddle leaves in the garden and take them round to brighten up an old age home nearby.

My wonderful winter flowering kowhai still has a scattering of blossoms, having started in early June.
The 'common' kowhai are just preparing to be totally covered with flowers which will last a week or two and then that's it.
I'd never noticed in previous years, but the ground near the tree is speckled with the bright yellow seeds from last year – the pods must burst as spring comes.

GG
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
My solution is to go with one of my 6'5" sons. Otherwise I ask a taller customer. I have never had a refusal and all have been happy to help out a shorty.

When the university is in session there is usually a student around who will reach things down for me. I make myself useful to students by answering food questions, such as explaining the difference between baking powder and baking soda.

Moo
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
My solution is to go with one of my 6'5" sons. Otherwise I ask a taller customer. I have never had a refusal and all have been happy to help out a shorty.

When the university is in session there is usually a student around who will reach things down for me. I make myself useful to students by answering food questions, such as explaining the difference between baking powder and baking soda.

Moo

Not too many around who could do that.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Controlled burns are on this weekend. Perfect conditions for it. Cool and no wind. Such conditions are needed but no wind means that from early morning the smoke has been streaming to the city. Burning off is on in Central coast and Blue Mountains as well as further afield.

I have everything shut but smell of smoke is seeping in from somewhere.

This is often a case of damned if burning off is done or not done. I find the smoke affects my sinuses but put up with it knowing that a big fire would inflict far more smoke and actual damage than a controlled burn. There has been notice of the burns this weekend, so hopefully that will minimise complaints.

If anyone has seen a true bushfire, or fought against one as I have done, then complaining seems petty. The place we built in bush was always in danger because of location and was destroyed by fire some years after we sold it.

[ 01. September 2017, 22:42: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
friggin freezing in Perth this morning [Frown]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Big snow due to hit all of the Southeast bits of Australia. Air mass coming to Oz from the Antarctic has a temp of -29C, and gale force winds accompanying it.
So the most snow all year will fall just as all the gardens are about to host their Spring bulb shows. It figures. Wind and cloud is building over Canberra, and I expect everyone will be back to shivering by tomorrow.

BL. Still dreaming of palm trees.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Batten the hatches Banner Lady. Snow was forecast for Banks Peninsula too (the bit on the map that sticks out on the East Coast of the Sth Island).

It was so cold when we got to church this morning because a power cut had stuffed up the automatic setting of the heaters, that we had the service in the church lounge.

I am feeling particularly frustrated because my land-line phone has lost its dial tone. I have just transferred internet providers and I think that has something to do with it. Ironically the switch-over was meant to improve the phone service [Waterworks] [Mad] [Waterworks]

Huia - considering pigeon post or smoke signals to keep in touch.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I'll keep an eye out Huia. No pigeons please, I have just spent several hundred dollars on anti-pigeon works here. However, I will keep an eye out for smoke signals. They may be muddled with smoke from controlled burns, but I will watch. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I think you might have to burn rather a lot of stuff to get the smoke signals to me, Huia. Hope you get your phone fixed ASAP.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I have just remembered that the council are trying to lower smoke emissions here and billowing smoke invites a visit from some friendly council officers with free kindling and instructions on only burning dry wood in a clean air approved burner. Subsequent visits (I gather, are not as friendly [Biased] ).

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Good advice, Huia. I think your signals would have become garbled whern mixed in from smoke from RFS burnoffs.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Two lovely young men turned up and played with it for a while. They were intrigued because they hadn't come across whatever it was that wasn't working before, but they fixed it. [Big Grin]

It takes a bit of getting used to the speed of the broadband, but I am really happy. It was also a relief to know that the problem wasn't related to my technopeasant tendencies. [Cool]

It was also a source of relief that I didn't need a new phone. I priced the latest version of the one I have - over $250 (it has a loud speaker and ringer, as well as adjustable volume and tone and a remote cordless handset with a charging base). As the phone id connected to the internet I no longer am dependent on the copper wiring system that breaks down in heavy rainfall or the smallest aftershock. [Yipee]

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Good news all round for you, Huia.

[ 04. September 2017, 07:09: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Even better is the fact that being connected to fibre broadband means the quality of sound is better and it's louder I might even be able to hear my brother whose voice is fairly quiet due to Parkinson's. It would be good to be able to speak to him, letters and cards aren't the same as hearing a voice.

Huia
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
I hear fibres are good for you and healthy!

That's really good news, Huia! [Smile]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Good news, Huia.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
At our congregational meeting on Sunday we rejected the aforementioned candidate in a secret ballot 22 to 18.
Those on the Board of Selection (not its name but, whatever) who had met him 3-4 times had come to like him and approve of him,
while some of my dedicated Progressive friends were already deciding where they'd move to if he were chosen. I heard the warm acceptance from a Board member who'd begun by being unimpressed, and was thinking I'd give him a chance if he were selected. A shame that the people who are going to vote don't get a chance to get to know him first. But no go.
I think we've made it difficult by making possibly mutually exclusive requirements essential.
And I'm sure we made a mistake in spending big on restoring our church when we had the choice between returning it to its original state when we had to raise it to higher earthquake safety. The alternative (the better choice in my opinion) was to demolish it and replace with modern multi-purpose buildings. We are surrounded by people several generations away being comfortable in pointy-roofed churches.

GG

GG
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Big snow due to hit all of the Southeast bits of Australia. Air mass coming to Oz from the Antarctic has a temp of -29C, and gale force winds accompanying it.
So the most snow all year will fall just as all the gardens are about to host their Spring bulb shows. It figures. Wind and cloud is building over Canberra, and I expect everyone will be back to shivering by tomorrow.

BL. Still dreaming of palm trees.

I'm enjoying Brisbane now. Bigly. May the horrors stay south.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Bl**dy He**, it's cold.
Doubt it got into double figures today, but the windchill factor has made it feel like walking about in a cold room all day. Had to venture out to go to a Gov shopfront to renew a license and TP and I were clinging on to each other in the face of the antarctic blast ripping across the plaza, just to stay upright.

BL. Not going far from the fireplace tonight.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
The wind up here has been worse today than the last few days when it was strong. I sat on my balcony knitting rug for DIL's birthday which was some weeks ago. The rug is now big enough to cover my lap and legs and tuck in around the sides. Very cosy. I spread it out on the floor for the first time tonight and am pleased with my progress. Arthritis in my right hand has slowed progress.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Dammit, and there was I this morning, swimming happily in an outdoor pool, bathed in sunshine ... [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
At our congregational meeting on Sunday we rejected the aforementioned candidate in a secret ballot 22 to 18.

GG

Ouch - is it a simple majority vote? It must be difficult when the division is so nearly halfway. Do you have another Parish meeting to discuss this or is it up to the searchers (forgotten the proper name) to go back to the drawing board?

Beautiful sunny day here, but only 17c and a cold wind. I spent most of the day in my north west facing room fighting Georgie-Porgy for the chair in the sun. The manufacturer may call them Lazyboys but anyone with a feline knows they are actually Lazycats

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Huia, it appears it's a simple majority – but even if it had been 22-18 for him instead of against, I can't imagine he'd want to come if half the congregation didn't want him.
Back to the search, and I think some of our requirements must be mutually exclusive.

GG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Still cold here. I keep telling myself every morning that it has to warm up soon. I have begun crocheting cupcakes just to keep my hands warm! Dear Lord, I am finally doing nannacraft. [Razz]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have just come in from balcony where the sun has shifted for spring. What was in sun is now shady. The wind is vicious and strong and blowing off many hectares of snow several feet deep.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
... I have begun crocheting cupcakes ...

[Confused] [Confused] [Confused]

GG - it seems to me that it's not all that rare for congregations to be split when it comes to choosing a clergyman; at Our Old Place in Scotland, the present incumbent (the next-but-one after the one who was there in our time) seems to be loved and loathed in almost equal measure.

I must confess to not being very taken with him, but in fairness, he had a couple of hard acts to follow. His immediate predecessor was a veteran of the Iona Community and very popular, and his predecessor (who married us) was very traditional, very erudite and for the most part fairly popular as well. I wouldn't envy anyone having to fill the shoes of those two gentlemen.

[Votive] that your place finds the right chap/chapess* in due course.

* The parish church in Kirkwall (which had divisions of its own, having been formed from two previous churches) called one of the first lady ministers in the Church of Scotland back in the 1970s, which caused a further split between those who were happy with a lady, and those who weren't ...
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Best wishes to you and your parish GG.

I left Albury in single digits and arrived in Darwin at 35 degrees. A good conference. Especially as I won an award for my work in an analytics group. I was rather surprised. 2 more days exploring before back to Albury.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Lazycats sounds right, Huia. In winter my Great Dane reserves the sunniest sofa in the living room for his personal use.

GG, that sounds like a very tricky vote. I hope you have better luck with your next candidate.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
Best wishes to you and your parish GG.

I left Albury in single digits and arrived in Darwin at 35 degrees. A good conference. Especially as I won an award for my work in an analytics group. I was rather surprised. 2 more days exploring before back to Albury.

Congratulations on the award, Ian.

35? Zappa would be happy.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Congratulations, IC! [Yipee]
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
35? Zappa would be happy.

I was just thinking that. [Big Grin]
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
... my Great Dane reserves the sunniest sofa in the living room for his personal use ...

Well, Great Danes are rather ... large.

"Where does he sleep?"

"Wherever he likes" ...

 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Today the Christchurch Anglican Synod voted to restore the Christchurch Cathedral. It was a reasonably close vote, with 55% in favour of restoration.

My personal view is that it is their building and they can do what they like with it, but I object to any of my rates money going towards this. The Bishop has, in the past spoken of other needs in Christchurch following the quakes, especially homelessness and children's mental health, but she said in advance of the vote that she would support synod's decision.

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Congratulations, Ian!

Huia, I was just sitting in front of the TV the other evening watching a rather dire travel programme called Houses International about people relocating around the world from America, and saw images of a gaping Christchurch Cathedral three years after the earthquake. I was wondering when and how they would restore it.

Lothlorien, life with a Great Dane involves ongoing human compromises. I don't know if this is true of the breed but my dog is the most stubborn canine I've ever known (and that includes strong-willed Papillons, boxers, ridgebacks and even a tyrannical Yorkie!) If I sit down on a sofa, he likes to try and sit on my lap so I have to perch on narrow chairs to discourage this. I keep bedroom doors closed because he would love to claim one of the beds for himself. He does have a bed to lie on in my study, but he prefers his sofas.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Banner Lady:
[qb] ... I have begun crocheting cupcakes ...

[Confused] [Confused] [Confused]

Have an old stash of wool, lace and small pompoms and so when I saw these on Pinterest as fun playfood, decided I would give them a go. Did not cost anything except my time - and it must be nearly 35 years since I crocheted anything.

The four smallest grandchildren road tested them this morning. I can happily report that they are close to indestructible, survived being fed to various toy animals, being used as play hospital treats, and are great for no mess food fights. Nanna did good.
[Razz]

Congrats on the award Ian - we are both winners, although my win involves only my personal satisfaction at being able to create a pattern from a visual cue, and resurrect an almost forgotten skill. Glad you got some recognition from your peers!

[ 09. September 2017, 10:50: Message edited by: Banner Lady ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Tomorrow I leave Brisbane's pleasant climes, and leave too the wondrous comapany I have enjoyed here (eh, Clarence and FD? [Tear] ) and youse wonderful Westralians too (Dark Knight, The Coot [oh dear, I've lost track of his ship names], Rexory, Piers Ploughman, Jugular ... gosh, who else was there) ...

I'll be sad to return to the frozen wastes of Aotearoa, except of course that it is home, for now. But very sad. Besides it was 2°C, I am informed, at Scarily Close to 40° South, this morning. [Eek!]

I feel I've thawed out climactically this past week and socialy these past two weeks. After all that happened to me in 2016, and the love and joy I find here in the Western Isle, I am wondering if Aotearoa really is my home any more.

Or perhaps the whole "here on earth we have no lasting ..." pertains. [Waterworks]

It all kinda hurts. And confuses. And hurts.

[ 11. September 2017, 08:09: Message edited by: Zappa ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Scarily Close to 40° South


As someone who grew up scarily close to 60° North, that sounds positively tropical. [Big Grin]

Would a move to Warmer Climes™ be feasible?

{{{Zappa}}}

[ 11. September 2017, 22:39: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Oh Zappa - it might be time to 'shake the dust' from NZ 'off your feet' - depending on what's best for all of you.

I had an email recently from my brother whose been living happily in the USA for 20 years, about an old friend from Auckland who is visiting him, and I realised again the many factors keeping him there, and pulling him here.

I'm lucky in that Wellington is the only other place where I would sometimes like to be, and it's easy to do a quick visit (and realise that I could not live there again).

Huia
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Tomorrow I leave Brisbane's pleasant climes, and leave too the wondrous comapany I have enjoyed here (eh, Clarence and FD? [Tear] ) and youse wonderful Westralians too (Dark Knight, The Coot [oh dear, I've lost track of his ship names], Rexory, Piers Ploughman, Adampater, Jugular ... gosh, who else was there) ...


We'll miss you Z - but we miss kuruman too, and hope it won't be too long before we have you both visiting the West Island again.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Zappa [Votive]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Grateful to have the next four days at the coast where it is slightly warmer than here. All of 12 today with winds and frosts forecast over the next few days. It is a mission weekend, so will be working hard, but am looking forward to breathing sea air instead of all the pollen blowing about.

Just had a somewhat surprising email from my sister in Serbia, where she is busy putting together a gallery of aboriginal art for teaching purposes. An unexpected tangent to her retirement! [Confused]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Ta, y'all

I just have to suck it up for a few years.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Weird weather 3.20am and 19c [Eek!]

I woke up wondering if my internal temperature regulation was malfunctioning. Now, having opened both front and back doors ( leaving security screen doors closed), I'm going back to bed. I will probably wake up feeling cold.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Ye Gods - at 19 I have the doona/duvet well and truly wrapped around me and the fire/heater on
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
You really ought to pay us a visit, Zappa - it's 27° and feeling like 31 at the moment. [Big Grin]

You'll need to be quick though - it's supposed to go down to 20° on Sunday, probably because we're having an outdoor service that morning ... [Paranoid]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
You really should think of moving to Arizona, Zappa. It's now 38°C -- cooling down now that summer is coming to an end.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I think you've probably won, Pigwidgeon. I don't think we can match temperatures like that.

I certainly hope we can't! [Eek!]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I think you've probably won, Pigwidgeon. I don't think we can match temperatures like that.

I certainly hope we can't! [Eek!]

Two days ago Sydney max ranged from33-35, hottest September temperatures in almost twenty years. Yesterday there was snow in quite a few areas west of Sydney and at Barrington Tops, north a bit.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I think you've probably won, Pigwidgeon. I don't think we can match temperatures like that.

I certainly hope we can't! [Eek!]

Me too! It reached about 22c today, so I dug out my cooler clothes and my sandals and weeded a small stretch of garden where the low growing lavender is engulfed by a weed I had never seen before the quakes. I think it came from some soil used to replace the dirt that was dug out when the new driveway was laid.

I hope the weather stays fine so I can do some more weeding tomorrow.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
You really should think of moving to Arizona, Zappa. It's now 38°C -- cooling down now that summer is coming to an end.

Heavenly. Though today my pad reached 25°C which is about when I start to come alive.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Travel well Zappa. Alas, you can't look to an appointment in Sydney, but otherwise you'd be very welcome at St Sanity.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Ah, we immorallati pariahs ... I find it ironic that the NZ libruls and the OZ ultra-conservatives both have me blacklisted now ... except that the Sydney blacklisting is not personal and the NZ one was lifted by court order
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Definitely that. Then there's the need to have NT Greek to at least the standard taught at Moore College.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
There are some advantages to being fairly deaf. I did not wake during this. My place is in a security block, almost immediately to the right of the police car. Only a few metres away. I am up several storeys and there are electronic locks on heavy entrance doors. It appears to have been the result of an altercation between two men, but all the same, too close for comfort. Both McDs and the service station are open 24 hours. I can look straight into windows in fron of police car and those windows at end of the building on the right.

Axe attack
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
That is too close for comfort, Lothlorien.

Zappa [Votive]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Mary Louise, I have been here a few months over six years. It is usually faorly quiet for events such as this. Noise from main road and occasionally a driver is chased inton carpark by higghway patrol which is then parked so he cannot drive out. Some years ago a brick was thrown through McD's window, Otherwise noise from road but few disturbances like this one.

I have always felt secure here, right from first night when I slept on floor before actual moving took place the next day.

As police told us after we were broken into some twenty or so years ago, if someone is determined to get in they will. You can discourage them.
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
A reminder to those from the land of parliamentarians too pusillanimous to take a decision without a focus group. Do help the politicians with doing what we elect them to do - take a decision on same sex marriage - by returning your completed "opinion survey" form.

And, without comment on the subject of this so-called "survey", as a former statistician at the Bureau of Statistics it grates on me to see this once proud agency diverted from its proper work (at vast expense to the taxpayer) to run a "survey" that is statistically invalid and unrepresentative , as it is both voluntary and with an unstratified sample.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Definitely that. Then there's the need to have NT Greek to at least the standard taught at Moore College.

Oh, I have that, at least on paper! Well, in theory.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
My trip to Darwin. Went well. <5C when I left and 35C when I arrived! Even got an award at the conference!

Came home to a bout of sickness. Have been on the IV drip twice so far... Blood tests indicate I have some nasty infection. My new boss has seen me for all of 3 days and I run away to Darwin then get sick.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
That's no good Ian. I hope it clears soon.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
[Votive] Ian
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Today is the 124th anniversary of Women's Suffrage in NZ [Yipee] [Yipee]

I am going to visit my Electorate MP's office with a bunch of white camellias, the symbol of women's suffrage here, and also leave some on the Women's Suffrage Memorial in town.

If the weather holds I may also take a walk through the Kate Sheppard pathway in the Botanic Gardens, which is planted with camellias.

Huia

People throughout NZ were involved in the suffrage struggle, but a lot of the organisation of the petitions centred in Christchurch, which has a radical political history, despite its more sober present.

Huia.

[ 18. September 2017, 19:31: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
My paternal grandmother and a couple more of her family signed the petition. Not sure about the maternal side. I'd better check – surely 'Bossy bessie' would have been in there!

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
My form came today. I will post it Thurday when I go to audiologist which is neare local PO. I never realised how much I would miss the postbox which was over the road from my former home. FRom front door over to box and back again in under two minutes. None local at all to me here.

Tukai, I could tell you some stories of my time at Bureau of Stats. Part time, not census stuff. I could tell you some beauties from Hosehold Expenditure work were I not bound by oath to divulge nothing. Hair raising , some of them. I am sure you could guess some of them, Or similar.
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
Mine arrived today, as well. The whole thing is a ridiculous farce, but I'm not going to stand on a point of principle and not participate. The standard of public discourse has been predictably awful, so the sooner it's all over, the better. Not that the result will shut anyone up, whichever way it goes.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Ian, please tell me you weren't walking around Darwin bare foot ... there's some nasty diseases up there in God's best slice of earth (go figure)

[ 19. September 2017, 18:58: Message edited by: Zappa ]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
No, no; properly shod. Some influenza infection supposedly, but one that only knocked half my body around.

Sent off my vote... Fat lot of good I think it will do, though, sadly; hope I am wrong and it goes somewhere.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Re voting. A straw poll at family dinner at Chez Banner came out at exactly half those present thinking one way and half the other. I suspect that is fairly indicative of things in this country. We will see soon enough. But I reckon it will be close.

Meanwhile I hope everyone has some top plans for tonight, seeing as how the world will apparently end tomorrow. My prediction is that it will certainly end - for some. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
... I reckon it will be close ...

How close does it have to be? I mean, is it a simple majority*, or does it have to be two-thirds (or some more complicated fraction)?

And is voting compulsory, as it is in your general elections?

* in which case, the losers will be monstrously pissed off (see Brexit vote).
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
It is not an election, Piglet. It is a survey of public opinion. returning the form with a decision marked is a matter of personal choice. It is not a plebiscite and the government is under no compulsion of taking any notice of the results. It is a massive waste of money.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Oh ...

That does sound like a bit of a waste of money, if the government isn't bound to do anything about the results.

[Confused]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
And let's not forget our NZ contingent are voting tomorrow. I would say may you get the politicians you deserve - but that sounds more like a curse than anything else.

[Frown]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Oh ...

That does sound like a bit of a waste of money, if the government isn't bound to do anything about the results.

[Confused]

The Government could not get the legislation necessary to support the survey, and to make voting compulsory and the result binding through the Senate,as it does not have a majority there - and only the thinnest one in the House. So it's nothing better than any opinion poll,save that this one's being carried out at substantial public expense.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Election Day here, although many have already voted as rules have changed regarding early votes, which can now be counted before polls close. I will wander down to the shops to buy some cat food and pop in to the local Anglican Church Hall to vote while I'm out.

Preliminary results may come through fairly quickly this evening. I'm always conflicted whether to follow a blow-by-blow account, or just go to bed and be horribly/delightedly surprised in the morning. When I was a child Dad used to follow it results on the radio, filling in a page from the Evening Post as the count was announced, but now of course it's all bells and whistles and Political scientists, and of course it's less straightforward due to MMP.

Huia
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Happy Election Day, friends across the Tasman.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I have switched the TV off. I shall wake up in the morning and be angry or otherwise. My son has been busy door-knocking and today went to the Black Power (or was it Mongrel Mob?) pad to check that they'd voted. I'm proud of him. They had or were on their way.
Now my Dad's support in his day was the opposite to mine except for the first time I voted (eligible at age 21 but it was my 22nd birthday) when I didn't know any better. But I never told him.

I've wound my watch forward so I'd better be on my way to bed.

GG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Best wishes for wise voting, Kiwi friends.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Conversation with my 99 yr old mum:

Her: "I got a letter from the government."
Me: "Was that the same sex marriage survey?"
Her: "I don't know. I had to tick yes or no."
Me: "So what did you do?"
Her: "I filled it out and sent it back".
Me. "Did you tick yes, or no?"
Her. "I can't remember."

[Disappointed]
Damn, I hope I'm that smart one day.

[ 23. September 2017, 21:25: Message edited by: Banner Lady ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
Conversation with my 99 yr old mum:

Her: "I got a letter from the government."
Me: "Was that the same sex marriage survey?"
Her: "I don't know. I had to tick yes or no."
Me: "So what did you do?"
Her: "I filled it out and sent it back".
Me. "Did you tick yes, or no?"
Her. "I can't remember."


I love it.
May all your respondents be as smart.
Actually, would that make any difference?

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Any news yet, GG, on your postponed surgery?
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Every time I have visited my mother lately, she has been dressed in black. As an ex-government employee she has a fair number of black trousers and jackets. But she usually chooses to wear colourful blouses or stretch tops with them. Not this week. Just a black top with black jacket and black trousers.

When I came in she said:
'Notice what I'm wearing?'
'Yes...all in black today...it certainly sets of your necklace and brooch nicely.'
'There's a new woman at my table.'
'Oh, you mean Enid.' (Enid has been there a month now)
'Yes, that one. I think she is SO rude.'
'Why do you think that?'
'She told me she doesn't like people wearing black.'
'Oh.'
'So guess what I'll be wearing from now on...'

[Disappointed]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
BL,I hope I'm half as subversive as your mother when I'm 99!

My birthday today and heading off to the Cape Winelands with friends for a celebratory lunch. Brilliant spring sunshine, trees bright green and wildflowers out but an icy wind blowing and I don't think I can slip into sandals and a little cotton top without showing off goosebumps and chattering teeth.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Happy birthday MaryLouise. Spring weather is changeable. Enjoy the time.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Happy Birthday, MaryLouise, and hope lunch, and the day, is wonderful!

BL: your mum sounds like a right stirrer. [Smile]

[ 28. September 2017, 08:19: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Happy birthday indeed
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Happy Birthday MaryLouise.

I wore sandals today, but really would have been more comfortable in shoes. Every year I wear sandals too early, as if by doing so I can speed up the approach of summer [Roll Eyes] but the chill wind always reminds me of my foolishness.

I am enjoying spring though an finally being able to do some very basic gardening.

BL I knew a subversive 90 year old who was chucked out of a very poorly run care home for objecting to honey sandwiches (only) for her evening meal. She apparently told the proprietor where he could stick them [Eek!] . The place was closed down soon after. I was very grateful to her for her stirring as I had a less vocal relative there who suffered in silence.

At the time I remember hoping that, if I live to that age, I will be as feisty as she was.

Huia
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:

BL I knew a subversive 90 year old who was chucked out of a very poorly run care home for objecting to honey sandwiches (only) for her evening meal. She apparently told the proprietor where he could stick them [Eek!] . The place was closed down soon after. I was very grateful to her for her stirring as I had a less vocal relative there who suffered in silence.
Huia

She sounds as if she could have been the inspiration for
Mrs. Caldicot's Cabbage War.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
... She sounds as if she could have been the inspiration for Mrs. Caldicot's Cabbage War.

Or possibly Diana in Waiting for God.

Good for her, I say - go Banner Granny! [Overused]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Heh. I like 'Banner Granny'. She is a formidable force indeed. As she likes to remind me - you don't live to be this old without a good deal of stubbornness. My kids have never called her nanna - or gran - she has always been "The Big G".

It figures.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Many thanks for birthday wishes!

These feisty old women make me think of this famous poem:
Jenny Joseph reading Warning
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
HB ML!!!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
HB ML!!!

What she said! Sorry - meant to post greetings yesterday and got side-tracked looking for links to long-defunct TV shows ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Hope you had a good one! [Smile]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
First day of daylight savings I feel out-of-sorts. Don't get me wrong - it is nice to have daylight extend into the evening, but it seems to throw off my internal clock.

And a Public Holiday tomorrow! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
Yes, indeed, Ian - long weekends are a thing of beauty. How on Earth is it already October, though?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
First day of daylight savings I feel out-of-sorts. Don't get me wrong - it is nice to have daylight extend into the evening, but it seems to throw off my internal clock.

And a Public Holiday tomorrow! [Yipee]

Yes. I have no need to be up early but did have a shock when I looked at clock this morning. 8:45 am. I do like the longer evenings but it takes me a while to get used to it.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I sometimes find that my body-clock feels as if it's a week or two ahead of the clock-changing, especially the winter one. A couple of weeks before the clocks go back I start thinking I'm really looking forward to that extra hour in bed on a Sunday morning. In fact this morning I woke at around six (I usually get up about 7:30 on a Sunday to be at the Cathedral in time) and couldn't get my head round how dark it still was.

It doesn't work quite so well in the summer though ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
We put our clocks forward last weekend and I've felt slightly disorientated ever since. It's getting better, but I find it takes about a fortnight usually for me to feel in sync with the rest of the country.

I like daylight saving, it's just the beginning and end I have problems with.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
It's really time I moved to QLD or NT again ... I loathe daylight saving!
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
It's really time I moved to QLD or NT again ... I loathe daylight saving!

Move to Arizona -- you'd love our climate, and we don't observe DST!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
We put our clocks forward last weekend and I've felt slightly disorientated ever since. It's getting better, but I find it takes about a fortnight usually for me to feel in sync with the rest of the country.

I like daylight saving, it's just the beginning and end I have problems with.

Huia

My thoughts too, Huia. Particularly as I needed to be up really early to be ready when son calls to collect me today fro trip well up the mountains. Not all that far really, but plans mean an early arrival there.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
It's really time I moved to QLD or NT again ... I loathe daylight saving!

Come to WA! The DS curse has long been banned here!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
It's really time I moved to QLD or NT again ... I loathe daylight saving!

Move to Arizona -- you'd love our climate, and we don't observe DST!
Neither does Saskatchewan ... [Devil]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
It's really time I moved to QLD or NT again ... I loathe daylight saving!

Move to Arizona -- you'd love our climate, and we don't observe DST!
Neither does Saskatchewan ... [Devil]
I don't think Zappa would like the climate of Saskatchewan.
[Razz]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Any news yet, GG, on your postponed surgery?

This Thursday, 5 October.
And the surgeon's gone off on more sabbatical. I googled the. new one, and he sounds excellent.
A cousin who's a retired nurse plans to look after me when I leave the hospital.

GG
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
It's really time I moved to QLD or NT again ... I loathe daylight saving!

Move to Arizona -- you'd love our climate, and we don't observe DST!
Neither does Saskatchewan ... [Devil]
I don't think Zappa would like the climate of Saskatchewan.
[Razz]

Funnily enough we looked at doing an exchange there, once ...

Meanwhile one of my 7291 daughters dropped in from Melbourne for a couple of hours today
[Axe murder] [Yipee] [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Just for the record, I love daylight saving. So great having long light evenings in this part of the world. Very much over the cold short days of winter, and the October long weekend heralds a sigh of relief from me. My sister in Queensland detests DS, so she is in the right place. Although even the Atherton tablelands have been terribly hot over the last month.

There are many times I would have happily traded places with her.

BL. Welcoming warmth and later light gladly.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
I don't think Zappa would like the climate of Saskatchewan.
[Razz]

I know. [Devil] [Two face] [Devil]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
I notice Jugular's sense of humour has finally gotten up the nose of the powers that be. I can only think that if he is offending the church hierarchy so much then he must be going in the right direction. He may not be following C of E protocols, but he is most certainly following in the footsteps of that blasphemous rabbi named Yeshua...
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
I don't think Zappa would like the climate of Saskatchewan.
[Razz]

I know. [Devil] [Two face] [Devil]
Piglet! ( and I say this with the greatest respect, because you are a Host [Overused] ) you are a stirrer!
.
.
.
It must be why you fit so well into this
thread [Razz]

Huia
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
I notice Jugular's sense of humour has finally gotten up the nose of the powers that be. I can only think that if he is offending the church hierarchy so much then he must be going in the right direction. He may not be following C of E protocols, but he is most certainly following in the footsteps of that blasphemous rabbi named Yeshua...

[Overused]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Piglet! ( and I say this with the greatest respect, because you are a Host [Overused] ) you are a stirrer!
.
.
.
It must be why you fit so well into this
thread [Razz]

I aim to please ... [Snigger]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rexory:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
It's really time I moved to QLD or NT again ... I loathe daylight saving!

Come to WA! The DS curse has long been banned here!
It's tempting. When Fr Jugular becomes AB.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
quote:
Originally posted by rexory:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
It's really time I moved to QLD or NT again ... I loathe daylight saving!

Come to WA! The DS curse has long been banned here!
It's tempting. When Fr Jugular becomes AB.
Why am I envisioning flying pigs?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Galloping Granny, I do not know if you are up to reading here yet after surgery, but hope things went well and that you make a quick recovery.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Absolutely. {{GG}} [Votive]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by rexory:
Why am I envisioning flying pigs?

Dammit, I told you to stay away from the weed
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
quote:
Originally posted by rexory:
Why am I envisioning flying pigs?

Dammit, I told you to stay away from the weed
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Well that was a game
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Not quite as comprehensive stuffing as the ABs did a couple of weeks ago, but I should imagine it was rather, um, exciting.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Well that was a game

Were the after-match celebrations up to those in Taranaki after winning the Log of Wood* [Big Grin]

I don't watch TV much, but I was at a friend's place last night and was struck by one of the spectators whom I think may have been a Springbok in post-apartheid South Africa. He quoted Danie Craven (sp?) as saying that there would never be a black man in the Springboks. The man then went on to say, "I forgive, but I don't forget".

*For those who don't follow NZ Provincial rugby (i.e most of the world) Canterbury was defeated by Taranaki in a match for the Ranfurly Shield, a local trophy. I don't really follow rugby, but I think it's good when trophies are shared around, instead of one side always winning [Razz]

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Oh, rugby, she said vaguely. By all accounts it was a nail-biter.

I always enjoy seeing how multiracial the crowd at Newlands have become, given that for so many decades South African rugby was white as the driven snow.

GG [Votive]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Whiter than that, I'd say. I was amongst those demonstrating against the rugby tour in 1971. Not arrested fortunately. But it's still the game played in Heaven.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
WoW! I just hit ten thousand posts!!! It's taken me 15 years to the month.

I remember when Mousethief, being the Ship's most prolific poster did that, and I was in awe, but he of course didn't take so long.

Today I'm thinking of my late father as it would have been his birthday and, coincidently, making his favourite soup. It's wet and windy out, so perfect soup making weather.

Thinking of GG too and hoping her recovery is going well.

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Happy 10,000th post, Huia! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Well done Huia. I lurked for a long time after joining.

Yes, GG. Hope all is going well with you and your recovery.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
So Jugs' predicament in the West has now gone National, and A Certain Diocese in the East also made the National news, it now being common knowledge that they donated a million shekels to the No campaign. Gosh it's interesting, ain't it. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I can't help thinking they could have found a better use for their $1,000,000.*

Excuse my ignorance (not being from Down Under), but what happened to Jugular?

* Feeding the poor, paying their organists decent salaries ... [Devil]

[ 12. October 2017, 00:34: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Piglet try [deleted]this online news site[/URL]

[link that outs Jugular deleted pending further consideration]

[ 12. October 2017, 21:33: Message edited by: Alan Cresswell ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
On a less serious note; here we are in NZ waiting for Winston Peters, Leader of NZ First to announce which Party he will give his support to (and thus enable to form a government), and the vote that is attracting a fair amount of dissention between flatmates, couples and friends is "Which bird should win the vote for Bird of the Year?" The showy Kereru (NZ Wood Pidgeon), without a brain to bless itself with, the night calling owl like Ruru or morepork, with it's haunting cry, the Kea, an intelligent Alpine Parrot or???

Just to declare my bias I would support the Papango, the Black Scaup, a diving duck that looks like the plastic bathtub ducks, except that it's black, but for some reason ducks traditionally don't do well in these competitions.

The serious reason for this yearly competition is to raise interest in, and support for NZ birds, many of which are on the endangered list.

Anyway all of the above birds are more interesting than politicians, and in the Kea's case arguably more intelligent. [Razz]

Huia - not in the running, extinct birds don't count [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
You can hear Jugular speaking on the ABC Religion and Ethics program [deleted]here.[/URL]

[deleted link outing Jugular pending consideration]

[ 12. October 2017, 21:34: Message edited by: Alan Cresswell ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thank you for the links, BA and BL. I sincerely hope the Diocesan court finds in Jugular's favour.

[ 12. October 2017, 19:26: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Alan Cresswell (# 31) on :
 
I've deleted the two links that identify the real life person behind the Shipmate known to us as Jugular. I've kept a copy of the links, so they can be put back if I hear from Jugular to say he's OK with being outed.

Alan
Ship of Fools Admin
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
My spinal operation went well. Six days in hospital, then handed over to a cousin – my age but a retired nurse who is looking after me most professionally and we're having a lot of fun.
Stopped at my place tom make sure I could send a few notes of reassurance, now back to my temporary abode. My greetings to all shipmates.
GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Good to hear from you, GG. Take care.

[ 13. October 2017, 00:44: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Glad to hear it, GG. [Smile]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Great news GG - and best wishes to your cousin trying to keep you in line.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Wonderful news GG. Look after yourself.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Good to hear this, GG [Votive]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Great news, GG!
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Great, GG!
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
The HSC approacheth at Chez Curly.

Middle is doing OK, starts on Monday. Somewhat buoyed by his band progressing through semi-finals of a big band competition on Thursday night. I think if they win the national final on 17 December they get to go to Germany. I assume as they're all under 18, chaperones will be required. [Yipee]

mr curly
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Well done Middle. And god luck getting the chaperone gig Mr Curly!

Ah...the HSC. Final Year 12 exams. It was long ago...I remember thinking my life depended on those results. So much pressure. All the best for those sitting them.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
It is a totally glorious day here.

It's also the day we may have our post election government announced. [Roll Eyes]

Oh well at least I will have a lovely walk.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Enjoy the walk, Huia. Pleasant day here so far unlike yesterday where there was a chilly stiff breeze all day.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Lovely here too: 17° and sunny. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
you mean that pale whitish thing that sometimes appears in the northern skies? [Biased]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
NZ has just had a change of government. I am stunned, happy, but stunned [Yipee]

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
NZ has just had a change of government. I am stunned, happy, but stunned [Yipee]

Huia

Much our reaction.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
NZ has just had a change of government. I am stunned, happy, but stunned [Yipee]

Huia

I have just read about this on the BBC website. Best wishes to NZ and the new government.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
And the new NZ PM is only 37! An amazingly young age to gain such high office - jolly good luck, and best wishes, to her.

Why, she's young enough to be my daughter IYSWIM, in which case I would be so PROUD...

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Gosh - that is young, although not as young as the bloke who's just become Chancellor of Austria. [Eek!]

Best of luck to Ms. Ardern. [Smile]

[ 19. October 2017, 20:35: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Yes, I was expecting another party to form government. Shows how much I know...

All the best to Jacinda and her team, and her Greens and NZ First colleagues.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm assuming that NZ First isn't anything like the odious Britain First, which is a very unpleasant off-shoot of the (equally unpleasant) British National Party.
 
Posted by Galilit (# 16470) on :
 
A lot of the "young" politicians are actually people who have been involved in The Party for many years,they just started in their youth.
A friend of mine who became an MP at 23 had been active in the party since age 11 and Jacinda Ardern, PM has been active since she was 17 ie 20 years involvement.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
Yes, I was expecting another party to form government. Shows how much I know...

All the best to Jacinda and her team, and her Greens and NZ First colleagues.

Ian, no one knew for certain. Winston, who is NZ's longest serving politician, was originally in the National Party, and left to form New Zealand First. In the past NZ First have supported a National-led government and a Labour-led government at different times, and this time he wouldn't make even an indication until all votes had been counted (Special votes always favour Labour and the Greens, and the Greens amassed enough to have one extra MP over their election night total).

Piglet, I don't think I can make a fair comment about Winston Peters and NZ First and where they rank as opposed to other nationalist type groups. He is tougher on defence and law and order issues than Labour or the Greens, they favour cutting immigration (as do Labour), but Labour support an increase in refugees. I have seen him compared to Australia's Pauline Hansen ( which probably doesn't shed much light for you, sorry).

One thing that a European - born New Zealander pointed out to me was in a time when various countries in Europe have moved to the right, NZ has moved to the left.

Interesting and challenging times ahead for the new government, and for us all. [Votive]

Huia
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Interesting and challenging times ahead for NZ, yes, Huia. Something quite unexpected.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Winston's place on a right left spectrum is wherever Winston decided will give Winston the most glory. I fear this will end in tears ... and I'm a hardened lefty.

(Except on the two issues of abortion and euthanasia* ... and I note Victoria has just legalised the latter. Oh well. That's politics. Just done abort or euthanize me, you buggers).

* Not ultra conservative, either, on abortion. More cautious on euthanasia, though, for the reasons Paul Keating pointed out before the vote )
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Winston's place on a right left spectrum is wherever Winston decided will give Winston the most glory. [...snip][/URL] )

I agree. In my opinion, his Nearest equivalent in Australian politics would be Nick Xenophon rather than Pauline Hanson.
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
Is it just me that hopes Nick Xenophon comes a cropper in his bid for a seat in the SA parliament?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
Winston's place on a right left spectrum is wherever Winston decided will give Winston the most glory. I fear this will end in tears ... and I'm a hardened lefty.

Yes, that worries me too. There's a reason opponents often refer to the party as "Winston First."

Huia
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kittyville:
Is it just me that hopes Nick Xenophon comes a cropper in his bid for a seat in the SA parliament?

No!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
There's getting to be quite a crowd of us then.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
While I disagree with the man on some things, and respect him for others, the bouncing around is a bit odd.

Off to Orange for 2 days for work this week. Last time I was there for a shipmeet where I was picked up on the way at a petrol station on the M4, and had a rollicking good time with many shipmates. Fun days.

Saw a local production of Les Miserables Friday. Very good singing. The head of Environmental Sciences played a pimp and when I saw him afterwards I told him when he comes requesting data I won't look at him the same way!

I hear NZ's PM has said capitalism has been bad for NZ citing homelessness and poverty. I'll nail my colours to the mast and [Overused]
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
Church fete here yesterday in nice sunshine after a couple of days of drizzle. As seems to happen at every church we every belong to , the bookish Marama and I were fingered to run the bookstall. It went well, with several hundred books sold. That may be good news for the would-be authors out there, although admittedly we selling second-hand stock cheaply.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tukai:
Church fete here yesterday in nice sunshine after a couple of days of drizzle. As seems to happen at every church we every belong to , the bookish Marama and I were fingered to run the bookstall. It went well, with several hundred books sold. That may be good news for the would-be authors out there, although admittedly we selling second-hand stock cheaply.

I'm sure I'm not the only one who has found a book at a used book sale and subsequently looked for more (new) books by the same author.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Absolutely, and conversely, if you find that you really didn't enjoy a book, it can always go back into the book-stall next year ...

[Devil]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
I hear NZ's PM has said capitalism has been bad for NZ citing homelessness and poverty. I'll nail my colours to the mast and [Overused]

I'm definitely with her, it's NZ First I have some doubts about.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I'm recovering brilliantly from surgery in the care of a cousin – we are contemporaries and are having a great time.
Her two cats are Felix (black, white paws) and Frodo (whom I address as Fat n' Fluffy for obvious reasons).
Brown sugar 'nectar' is hung in the tree outside the window for the tuis, who come in great numbers; I've even seen a couple of bellbirds.
More another time.

GG
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Sounds like a lovely place to heal, GG, a birdwatcher's recovery!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Hi GG. I've been thinking of you and wondering. Good to hear that your recovery is going well. I envy you the bird life, Fat'n fluffies are the best - more to cuddle.

Yesterday, being Labour Day, the traditional day for spring planting, I planted some sweet peas to train up a short fence in my back yard. I also have some seeds so I can have a progression of colour through summer [Yipee]

Huia
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Colour is wonderful.

Great news GG; wonderful to hear from you.

The not-so-soothing sound of magpie babies screeching for mum or dad to bring them something delicious fills my days currently. I do get some lovely parrots in the large tree outside my window at work - noisy buggers, but beautiful in colour and sound. Anyone I speak to on the phone or Skype asks me if I keep birds in my office!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Sweetpeas are one of my favourite flowere. Beautiful colours and perfume.

Ian, at Wollombi we had lots of baby currawongs and magpies still screeching at the mother to bring them food and now! Many of them could fly at that stage and were bigger than the parent bird.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
New Zealanders have had another chance to vote - and it's official - Kea, the very intelligent and playful Alpine Parrot have won this year's Bird of the Year. The vote raises awareness of native birds and $10,000 for the Forest and Bird Society. [Yipee]

It edged out the kereru (bush pigeon) and the Kakapo - the very rare, flightless night parrot.

I didn't vote, because I can never choose between them, but I will make a donation to Forest and Bird because they do good work.

Some people get really into supporting their chosen bird - making videos and competing with friends over lobbying for votes. (actually I think a lot of us are slightly barmy, but it's fun and the birds benefit).

Huia
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
I love the fact that NZers take the bird thing to heart (though why I'm surprised, given you are all Kiwis after all, I don't know).

This week in Oz it's Birds in Backyards week. There's even a survey app to do 20 minutes of bird spotting. Rather fun, even if it is just counting the number of currawongs and satin bower birds trying to eat my dog's food each morning.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Birds in my back yard right now? Sparrows and blackbirds. Occasional thrush. Like me, imports, all.

But nearby, all day yesterday, I heard over and again the incomparable song of the riroriro. [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
There's been some sort of disease affecting the birds here, and we were advised by the City to remove our bird-feeders back in August. We took ours down before we went on holiday, and heard that we could put it back up after we returned, but sadly, the birds haven't come back.

We used to get hosts of grackles, mourning doves, cowbirds and a few sparrows and goldfinches, but since the summer, nothing at all.

I miss them. [Frown]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
[Frown] - that is very sad.

Had to google grackles - beautiful bird. Have to google its sound when I get home.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Well, picked up the fleet car to drive to Orange.

I drive a hatchback.

This car, tank, is a Landcruiser. My goodness. I felt so high...and large. Managed to reverse into my carport so I consider that a success.

[ 25. October 2017, 05:17: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
A long drive, Ian. Will you be by yourself? Orange should be lovely when you finally arrive. I guess you will cut across country somewhere.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Zappa, I am deeply envious.

The most interesting birds around here are down by the river, but as there is going to be some dredging done soon they may take off for other places. We have a pair of putakitaki, the Paradise shelduck that come every spring and nest on our church roof, the NZ version of the wild geese.

I'm sure they weren't as common when I was a child, I remember one of my brothers getting very excited when he saw one, "Look," he said, "A paralysed duck." The same brother once pointed out a "Magna carta tree."

Huia
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
3 people with me. We'll go up the Hume, cut across to just north of Cootamundra, stop at Young, through Cowra then to Orange. 5 to 6 hours estimating, without stops.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Love Orange and Mudgee, not so keen on Bathurst.

Better to have the tank so everyone has plenty of room.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
In Austin, Texas, many people consider grackles a menace.

Moo
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I can't remember ever doing this before but I have taken my hearing aids out because of too much noise. The whole place here is having all tiled surfaces pressure cleaned. We were warned it would be noisy and possibly messy. I have put a draught excluder snake against my front door to catch any errant drips from sliding underneath.

There is a constant medium to high level whirring noise, bangs as equipment is moved and occasionally the motor noise steps up considerably for several minutes. This will go on all morning.

The tiles looked clean after mopping but really, there was ingrained dirt which needed the pressure. This type of cleaning has not been done here while i have been here, nearly seven years.

We can come and go, but no way am I using a walking stick on the wet tiles. That is asking for trouble.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Love Orange and Mudgee, not so keen on Bathurst.


Agreed. I had three and a half happy (but bloody cold) years in Orange. Didn't often get to Mudgee, though I did a dokko on it a couple of years later ("Lizards and Clay").

Though I half liked Bathurst.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Barnaby Joyce is out on his ear, along with all but two of those also in Parliament but holding dual citizenship. I wonder what the odds are on his losing the by-election forced by this judgment?
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
He'll be back, I fear as Windsor has announced he's not contesting [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Such a shame on both counts! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Well as long as he doesn't move over here, we have enough dingbats in politics.

We had a small quake around 5 this morning, that was shallow and on this side of town. I thought Georgie-Porgy was scratching around at the end of the bed, but I realised she was outside. Then I became convinced that someone else was in the house, so I got up, had a look around and made a cup of tea. The possibility of a quake never occurred to me until a friend visited at half past nine [Roll Eyes]

Actually I was quite relieved to discover it was a quake because that explained the sense of disquiet I had experienced.

The joys of living on the Ring of Fire.

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Eek!]

Glad to hear you and G-P are both OK.
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
Barnaby has been well described as a kiwi disguised as a beetroot.

(The story given out is that the treatment for some skin trouble has turned his skin red; certainly it's distinctive.)
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I doubt it is shame and embarrassment.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Given that it is due to a medical condition, that seems a bit cruel.

Madame measured the rain yesterday and it was more than for the previous couple of months. The garden already looks better, coming back to life. Even the lawn's showing an improvement.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We had hoped that our grass had had its last cut of the season, but after the 2½-plus inches of rain we had earlier in the week, it's taken a spurt.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Wow! That's a bit of rain. We had a little bit, with some wind, which has blown some (to me) unknown flower everywhere on the ground. Some even got in under my front and rear doors and left a carpet of leaves for me to wake up to.

So Qld is off to an election next month... Haven't been following politics up there recently; need to rectify that!

[ 29. October 2017, 03:28: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
The temperature here yesterday was verging on mildly warm for Zappa - 26c [Eek!] Apparently a foehn wind is affecting a large part of the South Island. The fat'n'fluffy one is stretched out, belly down on a piece of shaded concrete. She has an upcoming appointment for a tummy trim at the vets.

Fortunately the nights are cooler and I sleep with the doors open (there are security screen doors in place making this relatively safe, but if someone was determined to break in they'd go for the windows anyway.)

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have been somewhat distracted for almost a week, since last Friday. Son with back poroblems has had extreme pain for many months and muscle spasms which contorted his body and which did not respond to any treatment. He had fourth major back operation last Friday and said he could feel his muscles gradually beginning to react and improve. Then yesterday, the surgeon told him that discs further up his spine had been affected by the spasms. Last night another lengthy surgical procedure with lengthy general anaesthetic.

He is walking slowly this morning. Surgeon has excellent manner , but more than that a very good reputation for fixing problems others can’t.

Hopefully this is the startt of a brighter future.

I am planning on doing some complex lace knitting as a way of relaxing today.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Lothlorien, that sounds like such an ordeal. Prayers for your son's healing and for all who care for him [Votive]

Buried in work, hoping to take a few days off at the end of the month.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thank you Mary Louise. He has been in agony for months, has an awful mix of drugs which he hates so he exerts his mind and works over the pain a lot of the time. Agony of a different type for those of us who watch, unable to do anything to help.

Now there may be a glimmer of hope, I am having trouble concentrating and could fall asleep even just after breakfast.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Votive] Lothlorien and family.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Best wishes for your son Loth, backs are so tricky, and watching someone you love in pain is really difficult.

We have a temperature of 26c here today again and Georgie-Porgy and I are both melting. I've left buckets of water dotted around the section for the various cats that pass through. Often on days like this I see cats I've never seen before as the buckets act as waterholes for the neighbourhood.

This morning I went into the garden around 7am and managed a couple of hours work before it got too hot. I have cleared one of the 1 metre square raised gardens and am going to a plant sale tomorrow where I hope to get some vegetable seedlings to plant. it's a fund-raiser for the local community gardens, so I hope we can be of mutual benefit.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks all. This is now the fourth and fifth operation after he fell down fire escape stairs at work several years ago. The first operation was never really successful and the others have been trying to fix things from that. Not counting the two ankle reconstructions from same fall.

We all feel optimistic that recovery may go well and be the start of a new season of life.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
[Votive] Lothlorien and son. Sorry to hear. Here's to a good recovery!

Yeterday I put my sheets in the wash. Then left for work. Without hanging them. Is this what happens when you hit 40?

Washed them this morning again. Started to rain. I can't win.

Oh well. Weekend is here! Here's to more gardening, Huia, and less work Mary Louise! [Smile]

[ 03. November 2017, 07:33: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
My son returned home from hospital after two operations on his back in under a week. He says this surgery has been life changing and miraculous. He is still on pain meds but the nerve pain is gone, he is walking properly if slowly. He ha a schedule set up for drugs, sit up, stand up, sleep etc but it is so good to hear him optimistic at last. He was facing life almost crippled and in constant massive pain. He is on strict bedrest for at least the next two weeks so that the surgery is not compromised.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Loth I am so happy for him. Ongoing prayers for full recovery ( aim for the top I say).

I am exhausted. I went to the plant sale only to find I had the wrong day - it's on Tuesday. So I came back and have cleared about 90% of the other raised garden. It's so hot I can only work in the evening and early morning. Georgie-Porgy is annoyed because she used to hide in the long grass which is no longer there. Once I have planted the vegetables I'll have to rig up nets to stop her and assorted neighbourhood cats from getting into the garden. Fortunately when I first set up the gardens I put a pole in each corner so it's easy to drape the nets (or shade cloth if needed) over them without squashing plants.

Bubble bath time now [Yipee]

Huia
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
So glad to hear of your son - I remember how appalled I was to read of the fall so many years ago. Holding him in the Light for swift recovery.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
What Pete said - prayers continuing to ascend. [Votive]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I spent 24 hours in Huia's fair town (ending this time yesterday) having driven down from Auckland. As an occasional visitor I have to say its going from strength to strength, and I reckon it will be Aotearoa's showcase city soon (with Auckland being seriously broken).

Back home at Scarily Close to 40°S (but at least north of it) once more ... sadly nowhere near 40°C! After leaving the vehicle in Huia's town I flew back to the Megalopolis, walked from the Airport to One Tree Hill, retrieved my car, then drove back here today.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Barnabas Aus, hope you are OK. If it’s not fire, it’s tempest. Looked frightening and was bad enough down here.

[ 06. November 2017, 07:29: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Thanks Loth. A bit of water through the garage. We only had about 15mm in the gauge but it fell in about 5 minutes, so the drains just didn't cope.

Most of the damage was in the main street and the other side of town. Our church is on nearly the highest point in town only two doors from the hall that lost its roof, but when I went to check we only had a few branches down from the big trees and the acacia near the front fence had been snapped off at ground level. A bit of water under the front door into the porch and no structural damage at all. We were blessed.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Awful mess at Toukley too.

Am glad to hear you escaped this storm, mostly.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
For our NZ cousins...

Thought of you when I saw this.


Wow Barnabas. That is a lot of rain.


Still adjusting to the new manager. I think she worked from home today. Wouldn't know. No email. Very different from the previous one.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Ian re the maps that leave NZ out. It's actually a Very. Cunning. Plan. So when North Korea (or any other country) declares war on the rest of the world, no one will be able to bomb New Zealand because they won't be able to find us. [Big Grin]

I am getting a bit blasé about severe weather warnings. We've had a couple recently, and while other parts of the country have had snow [Eek!]
hail, heavy rain and strong wind resulting in power cuts, Christchurch has had moderate wind and a sprinkling of rain that fell overnight. I would actually welcome some rain as I'm trying to establish a vegetable garden.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
So I've landed in Melbourne for a week. Guess what? It's damp and miserable. [Disappointed]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Sympathy, Zappa!

We've had a couple of days rain to break the worst drought in a century and I felt I could even take a bath in defiance of water restrictions (just an inch or so, but it felt luxurious).

News, fake news, rumours and speculation flying back and forth about Zimbabwe. Called my Shona aunt in Harare who said, 'Yes, a military coup and arrests, usudaro (don't even go there), I need your chicken and mango casserole recipe. And the Logan's Cup cricket match at Harare Sports Club is going fine. We do coups better than Kenya.'

#tearshairout

I do understand that most of my family and friends in Zimbabwe and Kenya (and here in South Africa) have gone through so many dramas and crises that they would rather discuss the weather or cricket than tanks in the street. Now we wait to see what strong-arm dictator has replaced the previous dictator and what South Africa might do to make things worse, or better.

[ 16. November 2017, 04:56: Message edited by: MaryLouise ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's all a bit puzzling to this foreigner: the military have arrested Mugabe and his missus, and taken over the government and the television stations, but they say it's not a military coup.

If that isn't a military coup, then what is?

[Confused]

Not that I think getting rid of Mugabe is a bad thing, you understand ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Such good news of my son. Surgeon is very happy with the results of those two big operations in four days on son’s back. All dressings have been removed and he can get back to hydrotherapy which has been impssible for months.

I saw him Sunday night at birthday pizza for another son . My immediate impression was that he had his height back. 6’5” but has been compressed and contorted for months.

Even better than that is that his medication will slowly be decreased. He has had a horrible cocktail of fentanyl,tramadol, endone, all opioid derivatives, lyrica and endep, an antidepressant but used also for pain. Meditation, pain clinics and techniques as well and only slight relief from all of this.

He is overjoyed at the drop, but it will take him a while. However, progress. We are all overjoyed too.

[ 16. November 2017, 20:41: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
That is such good news Loth. I hope he will soon be pain-free.

We've just had a moderate wobble here, probably not enough to do any damage. Georgie-Porgy isn't the least bit worried and I didn't even feel it.

I am busy sorting out a vegetable garden for summer. Because I have left in a bit later than usual I have planted some seedlings as well as sowing seeds. If all goes well that will give me a progression of harvesting times rather than everything happening at once. I've concentrated on leafy vegetables as they never seem to come down in price the way carrots do, also plants like mizuma (it's related to mustard and I think it's from Japan) allow ongoing harvesting of the outside leaves rather than digging up the whole plant. In the past I have managed to keep the plants viable for most of the year.

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That does indeed sound like the best kind of news, Loth. Prayers continuing to ascend for his rapid recovery, and (gradual) freedom from all the pain-killing drugs.

[Votive]
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Lothlorien, that is wonderful news.

Piglet, when is a coup not a coup? We're all sitting waiting to hear what happens next. I can't say army tactics make me hopeful for the restoration of democracy.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
We are all very grateful that things definitely seem to be improving. It has been such a long time. He hates people fussin but I said about a month ago that he would always be my firstborn. I could tell by his voice that he was touched.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Lothlorien, that is wonderful news.

Piglet, when is a coup not a coup? We're all sitting waiting to hear what happens next. I can't say army tactics make me hopeful for the restoration of democracy.

Yeah ... hearts in mouths ... news I'm seeing so far is not entirely discouraging but armies and democracies are like ... oh well, you get the point. Mind you, they could go sort out Trump next, though Jacinda may have him sorted ...

I was in Ghana when the army ousted Nkrumah. Good fun.

Glad our family are across the border in Zamb.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
(from Zappa's link)
quote:
Ardern added that Trump didn’t appear to be offended by her comments
Probably because either (a) he didn't understand them; or (b) he doesn't believe that there were any protests against him.

Well done Ms. Ardern! [Smile]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
She rocks!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I suspect at the moment that your country and mine (well, my adopted one anyway*) are the only ones on the planet with prime ministers who rock. [Big Grin]

* The least said about my country of birth, the better ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I was so proud of Jacinda Ardern's reply. I wish I had a quick mind to answer people like that instead of thinking of the response at 3 a.m.

I've also read the maiden speech of Kiritapu Allan, a school drop out at 16, now a qualified lawyer and an M.P. I know that the maiden speech may give an overly optimistic impression, but I will follow her progress with interest.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I do not understand coups. First Mugabe is ousted, then in full beautiful regalia he's taken out to present degrees or something. All I know about Zimbabwe is so sad, from the breadbasket of Africa to basket case as I read somewhere. And I think there are white Zimbabweans whose families have lived there for as long as mine have lived in New Zealand, probably much longer.
Great to have my lovely daughter and precious mokos here. On Monday we head for Matarangi, a two-day trip; we'll be back on the 29th, and they leave on 3 December. After that I have to sort out the differences between the tall dark willowy lady who's been dying to get her scalpel on to the 50-year-old Thing on my shin, and the chances of that being too close to my next orthopaedic adventure, the right knee which has disintegrated after taking all my weight for as long as the left leg was in trouble. The leg is crooked and painful and I depend on my walking frame till it's all repaired, trying not to put enough weight on the frame to affect the right shoulder. Plastic surgery takes place at Hutt Hospital, which is actually in a different DHB (District Health Board) So they have access to my files but not to forthcoming appointments.
Meanwhile the helpful cousin who took me under her wing until the family arrived now has her own problems and I'll have to figure out some other arrangement when the next surgery takes place.
But oh, those kids being here makes up for a lot of discomfort. They give me such loving hugs and kisses at bed time. They and their mother are real treasures.

GG
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Good to see you back and recovering GG. Matarangi with the mokos* sounds like a good plan.

I hope you manage to sort things out between the DHBs, it always seems a bit strange to me that the two Boards don't merge, when they are interdependent in some ways, but it's probably more complicated than I understand.

*mokos = mokopuna, grandchildren

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Welcome back indeed, GG. Hope everything sorts itself out for your other knee (and the Thing). [Votive]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
GG, we're glad that you're back and seem to be doing well. Just keep off the dance floor a little bit longer and you'll be right.
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
Great to see you again GG. [Votive]

Enjoy the time with daughter and mokos!
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
We are all very grateful that things definitely seem to be improving. It has been such a long time. He hates people fussin but I said about a month ago that he would always be my firstborn. I could tell by his voice that he was touched.

I did note his good news while putting up with my own pain and frustration.
I really do rejoice with his positive outcomes. Whatever else is troubling me, I know with your son what it is to wake up and find the long-standing pain has been dealt with.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks GG. I hope all goes well with future arrangements and ops for you. I read your comments about leaning this way, walking that way, transferring stress to shoulders with some understanding of the problems. I would also add hanging on to walking stick handle like grim death at times. Makes arthritis play up in my hands.

Son starts hysrotherapy again next week and medication has been decreased. Wonderful news to all of us, especially him. He hated it. The start of a lengthy roaad to progress after years.

Enjoy your family time.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
With my strong connections with Zambia I have a great interest in Zimbabawe ... I think so far the army are doing an uncharacteristically genius job of maintaining normality - hence the full regalia outing - while preparing regime chnage. Sentimentally I hope Morgan Tsvangerai can step in, but really don't know enough. Hopefully in any case Zimbabwe's peaceful coup may stop Zambian leadership from eying corrupt practices.

Meanwhile I had a pleasant day riding horses at Mt Macedon in almost pleasant temperatures.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
(PS) ... though I forgot to remember that I'm in OZ, and sitting on an ants' nest is a Not Good Idea™
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
(PS) ... though I forgot to remember that I'm in OZ, and sitting on an ants' nest is a Not Good Idea™

[Snigger]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
(PS) ... sitting on an ants' nest is a Not Good Idea™

[Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
With my strong connections with Zambia I have a great interest in Zimbabawe ... I think so far the army are doing an uncharacteristically genius job of maintaining normality - hence the full regalia outing - while preparing regime chnage. Sentimentally I hope Morgan Tsvangerai can step in, but really don't know enough. Hopefully in any case Zimbabwe's peaceful coup may stop Zambian leadership from eying corrupt practices.

Reading this after this evening's news of Mugabe carrying on as usual. Can't wait to see how the generals and population handle that.
GG
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
(PS) ... sitting on an ants' nest is a Not Good Idea™

[Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!]
I imagine that Zappa is referring to bull ants or bulldog ants. Bulldog is a better name as they bite hard and hang on. Extremely painful bite, with the pain and irritation lasting for some days. The traditional remedy is to crush some indigenous bracken and rub that into the bite. In Cuddlepot and Snugglepie, the ants kill cruel Mrs Snake when an nest or 2 of the ants cover her and bite at once. I'd imagine (having been bitten by only 1 ant on the 3 occasions I've been bitten) that you'd be wishing for death if even a half dozen bit.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
about ten bites as far as I can see, and yes, jack jumpers which are a form of bull ant ... still painful and swollen (you'll keep, Fr Rexory ... [Big Grin] ... You should have been a bishop with such compassion!*).

I saw the last few minutes of Mugabe's ramble, and fear this may yet turn nasty. [Tear]

* Actually, apart from sharing my owies here (okay, and FB too) because I'm a narcissist, I truly wasn't expecting much sympathy ...
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Jumping, biting ants!!! And they call Australia The Lucky Country???

Commiserations Zappa.

Today, if we're really lucky we might get some rain, so I'm going to plant some peas and a yellow rose named Friesia, which was Dad's favourite . I really should know better than to plant water guzzling roses, but I think I might have worked out a way to harvest the water from my shower and bath, which would make rose growing more defensible.

Huia
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
(PS) ... sitting on an ants' nest is a Not Good Idea™

[Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!]
I imagine that Zappa is referring to bull ants or bulldog ants. Bulldog is a better name as they bite hard and hang on. Extremely painful bite, with the pain and irritation lasting for some days. The traditional remedy is to crush some indigenous bracken and rub that into the bite. In Cuddlepot and Snugglepie, the ants kill cruel Mrs Snake when an nest or 2 of the ants cover her and bite at once. I'd imagine (having been bitten by only 1 ant on the 3 occasions I've been bitten) that you'd be wishing for death if even a half dozen bit.
I mentioned that one to Zappa, elsewhere. We were shown it at the beach when I was a child by an old man. His sight could not have been good , because, as he rubbed the split bracken stem on the non existent bite to show us what to do, an ant fell off the leaf further up and bit him.
 
Posted by rexory (# 4708) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
you'll keep, Fr Rexory ... [Big Grin] ... You should have been a bishop with such compassion!*).

...

[Big Grin] [Two face]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
the angry welts have mostly gone now ... I'll have to find something else to whinge about.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Is it spring yet in Scarily Close? If not ... [Devil]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Definitely spring [Yipee] All my leafy green veges are growing well and the seeds I planted are beginning to come through. November is drier than usual here, but we are getting more sea fog than usual and we hateses it Hobbits. I would rather have a few centimetres of rain (so would the garden), instead we get this cold, clammy, sun blocking stuff.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Is it spring yet in Scarily Close? If not ... [Devil]

Actually it was a civilised 25C today, so maybe at last ... on the other hand it was a very pleasant low 30s after the first few torrid days in Melbourne ... but at least there's signs of hope [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
These days I can cope with 25°, as long as there's not too much humidity. That was the killer in Newfoundland - if the temperature got much above 22° it tended to be 'orribly 'umid, which made it feel far hotter. Here, for the most part, it doesn't seem quite so bad (most of the time) and at least Château Piglet has good and efficient air-con. [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Not that I wish to gloat (well, maybe I do), but Scotland appears to have stuffed Oz at rugby. It's not often we stuff anyone , so I'm relishing the moment. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
It was a fine moment!
 
Posted by Dark Knight (# 9415) on :
 
I legitimately forget rugby is a thing most of the time.

Is there a cup happening now or something?
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Autumn Internationals. [Smile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
A really nasty accident in the Blue Mountains today. One man killed, one with multiple fractures in both legs and other injuries. The third had various fractures and injuries.

An amazing response by all emergency personnel. I would think there will probably be bravery awards for the work done. I have walked those tracks but not for a long time. Apparently that track has about 90,000 visitors annually and the three workers were surveying its safety.

[ 29. November 2017, 06:44: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
We were in the Blue Mountains at the start of last week celebrating our wedding anniversary (25th!). We walked a fair bit around Wentworth Falls, although obviously not on closed section of track where the accident happened. We remember walking past 2 younger looking NPS workers on the track at some stage - may have been the survivors?

[Votive]

mr curly
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Congratulations, Mr. and Mrs. Curly! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
On Sunday I had my first apricot of the season [Axe murder] I'd forgotten how wonderful they are.

My vegetable garden is thriving and the sweet peas are beginning to flower. On the other hand, soaring temperature may mean restrictions on water usage are imposed. I am only hand-watering (except for accidently leaving a hose running overnight [Hot and Hormonal] ) and am trying to water only on the odd days in the month (people with even numbers on their letter boxes water on the even days).

I am hanging out for some rain, but there is none forecast until December 12 - I'm not holding my breath as the rain forecast for November didn't eventuate [Waterworks]

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I'd given no thought for 8 weeks to my minimal garden, but when I remembered that my mandarin tree in a pot needed a bucket of water a day I disentangled the hose and gave it a good wetting. Then I looked at the two azaleas in the shade, also in pots, that had been covered in flowers when I left and they were totally droopy with dead flowers of course. After one soaking they were already reviving. Each was a gift from the church when a parent died. (Now three soakings – they'll live to bloom again!) My renga-renga lilies are in full bloom but a bit dry; my hebe hulkeana has saved one rather sad spray to cheer me up.

A helpful friend from the church took me to the dentist on Monday. Today a cousin drove me to the hospital to have an iron infusion. Her parents divorced many years ago; now she is keeping an eye on her mother and also her father (he's my first cousin so she's once removed) who is doing his best to stay in his own home but I had a very cheerful but extremely rambling conversation with him yesterday. And she's looking for full-time job. The plastic surgery's been postponed till Friday, and as my son's staff after having their end-of year luncheon and farewelling his HoD at the relevant time I'll find someone from church to chauffeur me.

I can't get excited about Christmas. I just hope I can survive it quietly sitting in a corner. Last year DiL went into hospital at 4 am on Christmas Day and the teens and I had strawberries and ice cream (my dessert contribution) for Christmas dinner. Son cooked the ham the next day. Better luck this year.

GG
GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Hugs to you GG. Take it quietly, perhaps have something easy but special to eat. For me that would be prawns followed by fresh summer fruit and a glass of something I fancied, whatever that was.

Can I say to you that with some good food and attention, books and music, you will probably be recovering, just as your plants are and unfolding new growth.

[ 06. December 2017, 06:27: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I've been so totally looked after for those two months. My 'carer' after surgery cooked wonderful dinners – a treat for her to have someone to cook for – and my daughter when she came anticipated my every need. The children were equally helpful; the 11-year-old when we went anywhere was at the car door to see me safely into my seat, folded my 'walker' and stowed is in the boot, then had it ready for me promptly when we arrived. I was so totally spoiled and surrounded by love, once I'd learned to accept it.

GG
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
The last few words are the important ones. accepting the help of concern or whatever they offer. Different things from different family members.
Even when I think it is interference, I know it is because of concern.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Welcome back GG. [Yipee]

Your words about accepting help resonated as I had a long phone conversation with my nephew last night.
He is upset that his only surviving grandmother is resistant to accepting help, to the extent of refusing to use her walker, then falling over multiple times.

I was walking back through town from a meeting on Tuesday evening at dusk and looked up from navigating a particularly bumpy stretch of footpath to see the new library. It's some months since I had seen it from that viewpoint, and I didn't realise what it was at first, then I realised [Axe murder] [Yipee] [Axe murder]

Completion date is late next year and I am so excited. I have been waiting for this since it was announced the old library would be demolished due to earthquake damage - and I am not a patient person.

Huia
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Good to see you back, GG - take care of yourself and enjoy the pampering that your family and friends are offering - it'll do you the world of good.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Clarence (# 9491) on :
 
Go well GG.

Canberra and Sydney shipmates who love Bach, I highly recommend getting a ticket to the ACO’s Christmas Orotorio. FD and I went last night in Brisbane: it was awe inspiring. As always, the ACO does things with a twist and having a “choir of soloists” in the Choir of London made it even more special.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Forecast temperature maximum here today is 33c [Eek!]

I want to shift to somewhere cooler where it actually rains. November rainfall in Christchurch was 1mm, and December is no better.

Christchurch is fortunate in that the water supply comes from acquifers, (sp?) rather than rainfall, but other places are having difficulties with the quality their drinking water.

Huia
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
I'd expected to have a few days in hospital after having a long-standing Thing removed from my shin, but the surgeon decided it would be safe to remove the two BCCs on my neck and just take a specimen from the other. So back home, with a weekend upon me and not a lot of food in the house. And although I have driven to the Medical Centre, and so could take myself to Countdown and the cafe where I often have my Sunday lunch, when a neighbour, finding me home, brought me a magnificent fresh fruit salad (about 8 fruits in season!) and then several pottles of leek soup, and when I was was just considering whom I should ask for help with shopping, she came back to say she was going to Countdown , and if I gave her a list and some cash she could do some for me.
My right knee will be replaced 'in the New Year' – I can't wait, as the kids say when they know they have to wait!
GG
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
You'll be dangerous in 2018!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
GG, if all goes to plan we may meet again next year if St Andrews host the Progressive Spirituality gathering [Yipee] .

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
GG, if all goes to plan we may meet again next year if St Andrews host the Progressive Spirituality gathering [Yipee] .

Huia

I've decided to sign up for retrogressive spirituality [Biased]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
There's a lot of it about Zappa, it shouldn't be any problem finding a place to sign up. [Razz]

The weather has improved vastly (from my point of view), but I would have wished the coldest day in weeks on the fun outdoor day at school where the had the water slide and other shivery activities.

I have put this morning aside for baking, and am having difficulty starting, but I bought some cherries yesterday, cheap because their best before date is today, and I will reward myself with them and the apricots, which were a bit on the pricey side. Thank goodness for he Christmas Club at my supermarket.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
[Big Grin]

actually there is a serious element to my thoughts on this, as I do believe one task of spirituality is to conserve/preserve ancient narratives, and I therfore find that much that is self-flagged as "progressive" is rather ephemeral. But I doubt I'm a card carrying conservative, either.

Sadly it's plummeted from a most pleasant 27-30 ... I rate that in my mild range ... at Scarily Close To to a disturbing sub-20C [Waterworks] and while I haven't reached back to the thermals cupboard I am up to three layers again!
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
[Big Grin]

Sadly it's plummeted from a most pleasant 27-30 ... I rate that in my mild range ... at Scarily Close To to a disturbing sub-20C [Waterworks] and while I haven't reached back to the thermals cupboard I am up to three layers again!

It was 38c here when I was last outside 2 hours ago
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
I need to have a rant!!

I have been playing the organ at our church for the last 12 years. This church I belonged to until I was 24 and then came back to it when I was 54 after 30 years absence in another part of NSW.

Last June I received a request from another church, with pipe organ, to come and play whenever possible. An opportunity I took with great enthusiasm.

Circumstances at both churches have changed. The former have had an offer from another organist to fill in as required. I have offered to relinquish my part on the roster which is every three month for this new person, to let me be available to play the pipe, and to date this has not been acknowledged.

The one with the pipe have offered me, from January 2018, all funerals and weddings (paid, which is not a motive and both few and far between) and at least three Sundays a month, not paid.

My dilemma is I feel loyal to the former as there are some folk there I have known for many years and would be disappointed to see me leave. Also this church does very little outreach/community work. The church is locked form Sunday to Sunday with the hall let out on infrequent occasions. The minster is very egocentric, a nice guy as a person but hopeless as a minister. He has hardly spoken to me since I have been elsewhere! I have not lost sleep! On the whole the congregation sees the building as a sacred space that cannot be used for anything other than worship. It has to 'look nice'. No food or drink in the church and heaven help anyone who moves a chair an inch out of place.

The other congregation is the antithesis. They run a coffee shop 3 days a week at the back of the church, I volunteer twice a month, and have morning tea in the church following Sunday service. Their halls are let out permanently to community groups and they are very proactive in social justice issues. The minister has been a moderator in the UCA and is a pleasure to listen to his sermons which are more teachings. It is a much smaller congregation but one in which I feel very much at home.

What do I do? Go with my gut which says play the pipe and get involved with community events etc or stay and be bored by outdated ideas and sermons?

Rant over.

Any thoughts much appreciated
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dennis the Menace:
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
[Big Grin]

Sadly it's plummeted from a most pleasant 27-30 ... I rate that in my mild range ... at Scarily Close To to a disturbing sub-20C [Waterworks] and while I haven't reached back to the thermals cupboard I am up to three layers again!

It was 38c here when I was last outside 2 hours ago
It hit that here about 11:00 am. Tomorrow looks ok and then most of next week is back with the heat. I had everything closed but there is a breeze outside so have opened balcony door and wet everything out there.

[ 14. December 2017, 03:27: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Zappa, I don't entirely disagree with you about spirituality. I have heard some hideous language that I'm sure makes the Baby Jesus cry, but I have heard some that helps me gain a clearer understanding of what is being conveyed, which has been helpful.

I hope the temperature in your neck of the woods goes up to your comfort zone - being cold is miserable.

Dennis, when I felt caught between two places I followed my heart and it changed my life. Your post sounds as though you know where you want to be. I made a complete break, but as there are people you still feel connected to you may handle it differently.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dennis the Menace:

Any thoughts much appreciated

I'm hearing the active place calling your heart ...

(the other has echoes of a cathedral I once knew)
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Dennis the Menace, none too sure that it's for me to tell you what I ink is the answer - but in any event you seem to have made the decision for yourself.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
The mokopuna have gone, but the ice cream in the freezer is Goody Goody Gumdrops – don't they have it in Canada?
GG
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
There are times I forget I'm not in the big city anymore.

And then the local paper produces this as I know where I am. I do love the Murray for a chilling dip. 42C supposedly today.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
We had a couple of 40+ deg days last week, and predicted for today and tomorrow, before the cool change keeps temps in the mid-20s for a couple of days, then 34 Saturday and 37 Sunday. Don't relish the 5pm Family Eucharist on Christmas Eve. Christmas Day is predicted for a comfortable 23 and then mid-20's right through to the New Year. It will be a restful and comfortable Christmastide.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Barnabas Aus:
We had a couple of 40+ deg days last week ...

[Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
Most pleasant ... wish i was there.

Do any of you recall the predicting the ocker purple threads I've run from time to time? For those of you who are anglicanny minded it's tempting to speculate again, as some strategic rural vacancies are up and running: Canberra/Goulburn, I think, Gippsland following + Kay's elevation, Grafton (not sure why Macneil's stepped down as she's only about sixty), and Bunbury ... there may be other.

Any suggestions and/or rumours?
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
The Newcastle diocesan synod was told a few weeks ago they had to elect a bishop or be in competition with multiple other vacancies. I thought North Queensland might also be coming up shortly, but Bishop Bill is still a couple of years below retirement age there.

Bishop John Stead may be a candidate for Canberra/Goulburn, having been a senior priest there before taking up the assistant bishop's post in Bathurst prior to becoming diocesan in Willochra. He was a candidate for Newcastle.

Bishop Garry Weatherill is another possibility there, but I understand he is very happy in Ballarat.

Underlying health issues seem to be behind Bishop Sarah's resignation, although my direct source has now departed that diocese.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
+ Peter Stuart would be likely for Newcastle, wouldn't he?

I had heard + Gary Ballarat hadn't been well, but haven't heard more and am a bit out of touch.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
The mokopuna have gone, but the ice cream in the freezer is Goody Goody Gumdrops – don't they have it in Canada?
GG

You might want to hang onto that to bribe the NZ ones. Tip-Top are having difficulty keeping up with the demand and there may even be a shortage looming.

Huia [Help]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
We saw + Garry last year when he was in Sydney for a deaconing. He is very hefty, to put it as politely as possible, and very flushed in his face. + Peter Stuart was very comfortable elected to Newcastle a fortnight or 3 weeks ago, and this is the announcement.

No stories yet on either Gippsland or Grafton.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
I have not read the Royal Commission report thoroughly, but the new Bishop seems to have emerged very well, nearly as well as + Greg. Given comments made over the years by some people, Michael Eliiot also came out well.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
We saw + Garry last year when he was in Sydney for a deaconing. He is very hefty, to put it as politely as possible, and very flushed in his face. + Peter Stuart was very comfortable elected to Newcastle a fortnight or 3 weeks ago, and this is the announcement.

No stories yet on either Gippsland or Grafton.

Shows how out of touch I am.

Yup, + Ballarat is not a picture of health.
[Tear]
 
Posted by bib (# 13074) on :
 
I remember when Peter Stuart wqs ordained - it feels lke only a moment in time ago. Looking at his photo he appears to be still a young man. I hope he has grown up a bit since my earlier interactions with him.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Bib, he is more pastoral in approach than when he arrived, but there is still some growing to do. I think the Royal Commission has humanised his approach significantly. It will be an interesting ride.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I've known him a little bit over the years ... he struck me as being fairly ambitious and keen to be seen in the right circles in early, Tasmanian days, but he wouldn't be the first successful leader to demonstrate that trait. I'm glad he didn't get Newcastle when +Greg did, as it has given him a long and volatile apprenticeship. Watch this space, I guess ... it is a tough time to be a leader over a crumbling institution, and in the next ten years the best he could achieve is to ensure that the institution, or his part of it, becomes a vehicle of grace, love, light, rather than self-preservation. There will be much heartache for him if he is a decent human being.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
PS ... I'm guessing the Dean of Brisbane and + Venables, both erstwhile sojourners in Grafton, will appear on that list, though I think the latter would be better off continuing an episcopal apprenticeship in Brisbane for a year or two, then heading back up to the pointy end of QLD.

Apologies to those who have better things to concern them (like the weather [Biased] )
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Is that the same Peter Stuart who came from NZ? If so I remember hearing about him when he was Vicar of Eastbourne, just over the hill from the valley where I was brought up. A friend at Teachers' College spoke warmly of him. But that was in the dim, distant past

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
No a different one ... quite different! I liked the Eastbourne one (not that I don't like this one) though I knew his wife a little more than I knew him. This Newcastle one has a tenuous NZ connection as his wife's parents were kiwis, but I'm not sure where she was born (could work it out I guess). Wairarapa way ... + Newcastle's father in law was head of St John's College / College of the Southern Cross in Auckland for a while.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
No more pumpkin scones.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Goodness, that's a blast from the past. Wasn't it her late husband whom another M.P called a "Bible Bashing B...? (too rude for All Saints). I always liked that phrase for the way it rolls off the tongue. I think he came from Dannevirke.

I've never had pumpkin scones, but I have made pumpkin muffins which were lovely and spicy.

Huia
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Yes it was her husband, and it was Gough who called him that. Gough was not attacking religious belief, but in the parade of that belief as a means of vote-garnering. Hoh B-P was like the pharisee, loud at prayer, thanking God for not making him like that sinner over there.
 
Posted by simontoad (# 18096) on :
 
I was never a fan of Lady Flo, but I'll doff my hat at a life well lived.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
That should of course been Joh. Too late to use the edit function, but fits into the season.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Gee D, I heard from a young bird that in the first storm yesterday afternoon that several of the shops on your side of the line were flooded. Then more damage that side from second storm. Young bird reported that local pizza place in the group was flooded and then swamped by orders after second storm.

Hope you avoided damage.

We have just in time had work done on drains here. Last time in such storms the basement car park was flooded. We had holding tanks enlarged, pipes replaced, more drains added. Cost us a small fortune but hopefully it worked last night. I have not been out to investigate. There is also a ventilation tower which we recapped to cover the grating used but which let water in. New cap is much bigger and stands proud of the grating but covering it so rain does not get in.

[ 20. December 2017, 20:57: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
good God - I thought she died years ago

RIP
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
It's so good to hear gossip from the other side of the world, that I don't have to worry about or feel I should be doing something!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Yes it was her husband, and it was Gough who called him that. Gough was not attacking religious belief, but in the parade of that belief as a means of vote-garnering. Hoh B-P was like the pharisee, loud at prayer, thanking God for not making him like that sinner over there.

Yes, that was my impression. One of my strongest hopes at the time was that he wouldn't return home and bring his politics with him.

The phrase actually remained in my head long after the details surrounding it.

Huia
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I remember picketing him when he came back to address the Lutheran Church in Palmerston North ... somewhere around 1981
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
He seemed to have little trouble keeping his beliefs and his politics and corrupt ways quite separate
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Thank you for your enquiry Lothlorien. We had a blackout for about an hour but it was over before I got home. We still went out to dinner.

I really don't understand your first paragraph.

[ 21. December 2017, 07:23: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Young fledging of my family works aat Crust and passed on news of damage on your side and also of flooding at cofee shop and pizza place.
 
Posted by Nunc Dimittis (# 848) on :
 
Hello everyone. My, has it been a long time since I came by the Ship, and I see a new ship is about to be launched. That's exciting.

Happy Festive Season to you all.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thank you, Nunc. Greetings to you down south from here.

I was just re reading a hell thread you started.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Welcome back. I was thinking of you the other day, along with Mad Tea Woman, Ecumaniac, Ultra-Crepidarian, Sir Pellinore and LATA. Hope all is well.

[ 23. December 2017, 04:25: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
And Cusanus.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
and a myriad more [Tear]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Yes indeed. Clarence calls in from time to time, so that's a bit of a link to FD. Still quite a few who have disappeared.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Festive Greetings to you all!

39-40 degree Christmas Eve predicted for us, with the family service scheduled for 5pm when the town church will be a furnace. Could be interesting.

Fortunately, I don't have to robe until Midnight Mass, when the cool change should have arrived. Then we have temperate days right through to the New Year.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Roll on the southerly! 37 forecast for down here. You could perhaps follow Fr Gwylim’s example of a few years ago.. vestments including heavy brocade cope, (no chasuble, this is Sydney,). As he processed down centr aisle his feet, clad in Teva leather sandals , could be seen poking out.

[ 23. December 2017, 10:08: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Embarrassing moment in church one Christmas. This is a long time ago when I could be classed as yoof. Yoof activities for practically every night in week leading up to Christmas saw me getting to bed around 2:00 am. Even later on Christmas Eve where we spent hours swinmming in pool at Palm Beach. After a few hours sleep, I was up at church, St Marks Ermington, for the Christmas service at 8:00am. No breakfast, next to no sleep for a week,and teh start of a very hot day. It was over 30° then. We stood for first hymn, and I fainted, knocking my head on seat of pew as I fell.

A doctor in congregation ran me home what was really only a few minutes walk away. Strong words from him about common sense, food, heat etc.
 
Posted by Mr Curly (# 5518) on :
 
Chaos reigns at Chez Curly. All but me are busy all week with kids program at church - 86 primary aged children + 60 leaders and crew. New minister is on deck and doing great work in the midst of it all, big musical Christmas Eve service tonight.

Middle has emerged from the HSC unscathed and will be going to Sydney Uni next year to do Arts/social work.

While Mrs C has done all the necessary planning, the younger members seem oblivious to the fact that we fly to Rome on Christmas night. Packing? Tidying up the house? Bah, humbug. Tomorrow is going to be a very long day ..

mr curly
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Well done to Middle, in what was a very good year for school - highest ranking non-selective boys' school, second highest ranking non-selective overall.
 
Posted by Ultracrepidarian (# 9679) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Welcome back. I was thinking of you the other day, along with Mad Tea Woman, Ecumaniac, Ultra-Crepidarian, Sir Pellinore and LATA. Hope all is well.

And here's me just l