Thread: Perfidious Albion Board: Oblivion / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Greetings to all the folks from Greater Britain and Hibernia - I am not staying up until 05.30 tomorrow morning to start your new thread as you pass into the New Year so here it is rather more than 12 hours early.

Enjoy.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
One of my Dad's favourite sayings! (Background story for another day and probably Another Place.)

Thank you, Wodders. And a Happy New Year to one and all - as midnight winds its way around the globe, let's hope for a merciful dawn.
 
Posted by birdsoftheair (# 15219) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by QLib:
One of my Dad's favourite sayings! (Background story for another day and probably Another Place.)

Thank you, Wodders. And a Happy New Year to one and all - as midnight winds its way around the globe, let's hope for a merciful dawn.

Amen to that!
adding my wishes for a more hopeful new year for all.
 
Posted by amber. (# 11142) on :
 
And a bloomin' happy New Year to all of you from me too.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Didn't recognise you at first with the new avatar, Amber.

Happy New Year to all the denizens of this thread, those who live here and all the expats.
 
Posted by Trisagion (# 5235) on :
 
Blwyddyn newydd dda, i chi i gyd, as we say around here

[ 31. December 2011, 19:31: Message edited by: Trisagion ]
 
Posted by Gwai (# 11076) on :
 
Please translate the Welsh, Trisagion.

Thanks,
Gwai
All Saints Host
 
Posted by Trisagion (# 5235) on :
 
Whoops. First hastily bollocking of 2012 - or, more accurately, the last of 2011.


Happy New Year to all.
 
Posted by Lucia (# 15201) on :
 
Happy New Year fellow Brits! Race you to 2012, at least I'll get there an hour before those of you back in Blighty. (OK I know some of you are already in the new year, yes I'm looking at you WW!)

[ 31. December 2011, 21:42: Message edited by: Lucia ]
 
Posted by blackbeard (# 10848) on :
 
And my best wishes for 2012 from the most perfidious (south) part of Albion.
And be it known that in Greenwich we have the One True Time. Just over one hour of 2011 left.
Surely nothing more can go wrong in just one hour?
May 2012 be a blessing to you.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Blimey, Wodders, that was quick ... [Big Grin]

We're not quite there yet although a few premature fireworks have been set off (it's about quarter to nine here), but as we're going out with friends to take in the New Year I'll pass round my virtual bottle of Famous Grouse* now and wish everyone back home all the best.

[Smile]

* or other beverages of choice, obviously
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Happy New Year and may God bless all who sail in her!

Only one mile from Greenwich here but spent most of the last X hours in the pub having desperate fun with the diverse local community.

My liver wants the party to end, my backbrain demands another pint, and the sensible bit of my head wibbles.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It rained all day yesterday - it was overcast during the morning walk and spitting a little then when we got home it got serious and rained non-stop until dusk - further south in the state there were floods. Today not a cloud in the sky, bright sunshine, glorious day. Being tropical and coastal such changes are always possible.

We were visited by a party of kids last night all dancing and singing and wishing us a happy new year - two fifteen year olds shepherding a younger gang around, going down to about aged 9 years. All boys, of course, as here girls aren't allowed out in the evening, and certainly not in the company of boys!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Quiet and peaceful New Year's Eve. Church bells started ringing changes at around half eleven then the fireworks broke out at midnight. The rowdy night I thought one of my neighbours was going to have took place elsewhere, the neighbour is moving out soon, and the new series of Sherlock is on tonight. [Yipee]

Heavy rain is forecast for today, but plenty of good things indoors to do instead, and the first is going to be potato cakes for breakfast. So a great start to the New Year so far, hope yours is good too!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
The New Year managed to come without me waiting up for it. When I woke up at 6.30 am, it was here! [Biased]

(But other people's lovely fireworks woke me on the dot of midnight, but not sure if that counts!

But happy New Year to all on this thread, and I too missed you Amber, as you've changed your avatar!! But delighted to see you, whatever you look like!
 
Posted by Jabber (# 9668) on :
 
We had a good evening out at a friends house, but were home by 11pm as the small one wasn't overly settled in an odd bedroom. I was all tucked up before midnight (as was the small one) but woken by fireworks too.

We are now just off for a (hopefully) refreshing walk.
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Just enjoying things getting back to 'normal' after a fortnight of over-indulgence. I've just put the washing on and done the ironing and am thinking of settling down either with a good book or some knitting. A nice cosy start to the New Year.

Hope everyone else's New Year's are off to a good start.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Some rather good fireworks on the other side of the valley at midnight, otherwise pretty quiet. Small numbers in churh this morning though.

I'v got a couple of booklets of Cornish phrases, so apologies to Morlader if it's wrong - Bledhen Nowyth Da - Happy New Year, as we've already had it in Welsh!
 
Posted by birdsoftheair (# 15219) on :
 
No fireworks here and a quiet night all round. When we lived in Stromness (look here if interested) we were awoken by the Hamnavoe ferry sounding its very loud horn repeatedly at midnight [Eek!]

Today, I actually tried to go to kirk but it was closed due to lack of interest. [Disappointed]

Right now I'm feeling very decadent as I'm eating Orkney icecream with Balileys! Ask nicely and I might find some to share.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Serves you right for living in Stromness, doesn't it? [Devil]

Yes please to Orkney ice-cream and Bailey's ... nom nom nom.

Enjoyable dinner last night with friends (although as the restaurant was very busy, we had a long wait for our food, but it was worth it).

I'm off to have a Sunday afternoon kip now before the carol service this evening.

sleepy piglet [Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Afternoon kip?

But you are but a young whippersnapper, you shouldn't be thinking about afternoon naps until you are at least, erm, 60!

Pete and I were wondering yesterday how we managed all those years of not having daytime naps 5 days a week as we were working. Mind you one of my colleagues papered over the glass panels in his office door and we swear he napped every afternoon, after lunch.

But as I was but 48 when I retired I suppose I really shouldn't say too much.

- - - -

Pete was nearly mowed down by a couple of Muslim girls on bikes this morning - they came round a downhill bend and there he was in the middle of the road and they were going too fast to go round him on the official side so had to pass by on the other side, shouting "Hi, uncle" as they went.

Early morning Qur'an class restarted this morning, as did most of the local schools so even the paper boys were around a bit earlier - and the 10th Standard kids only have two months left before the big exams!
 
Posted by Jabber (# 9668) on :
 
I would heartily recommend afternoon kips if possible, but that might have something to do with being pregnant and running round after a toddler...

It's a lovely day here, so I think we might have to take a trip out to the park, but I'll just have another cup of tea first.

Who else needs a cuppa?
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I'll join you in a cuppa!

Lovely day here too, but I don't think I am that far from you. Lousy day yesterday - only people I saw were similarly dripping wet dog walkers! [Frown]

Lots of people out today, feeding the already overfed ducks and gulls. Seems the sun is noticeably stronger now.

Or am I just an optimist? [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Lovely sunny day here too, but probably best not to do too much, as I go back to work tomorrow, which means getting up before dawn and travelling home in the dark for the next few days, with daylight really only at lunchtime. This break has been good: I didn't expect it to be as enjoyable as it was.

It really feels as if spring is on its way today - glorious sunshine and you almost expect to see flowers. I'm so grateful that this time, we haven't had a winter like the past two. I like winter but not when it comes to pavements covered with compacted ice, and a five-minute walk turns into a twenty-minute struggle to keep upright and not slip.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I hope we don't get snow and ice like the last two years! My new job is at an office which is approached down a very steep hill!

We were woken very early this morning by some odd noises - looked out of our window to see that a local pub at the bottom of the valley was going up in flames. Thankfully, no-one was living in it, buut the remains werer still steaming several hours later.
 
Posted by Morlader (# 16040) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
?..
I'v got a couple of booklets of Cornish phrases, so apologies to Morlader if it's wrong - Bledhen Nowyth Da - Happy New Year, as we've already had it in Welsh!

Well ! Good on you for trying. Writing Cornish raises hackles everywhere and I have to say you seem to have one of the more contentious spellings in your book. Have a look and see who the authors are.

In anycase, you have wished "Year New Good" in, I think, "Modern Cornish". "Lowen" is Happy ;-)
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Yes please Jabber - ginger and lemon tea would go down very well.

We got home from Heidelberg at lunchtime after an excellent overnight crossing and set to taking Christmas down - all is clear now.

Work tomorrow - first in my new job - eek!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I'm here because I am procrastinating.

Yesterday I removes the strings from 3 guitars and a mandolin and has spent time polishing the frets and oiling the fretboards. The other 3 guitars and the banjo will have to wait. What I need is a guitar roadie to do the boring stuff like instrument maintenance so that I can do the enjoyable stuff like playing.

All I need to do now is remove excess oil before restringing and retuning the instruments. So that's the afternoon, and some of the evening sorted.
 
Posted by Ethne Alba (# 5804) on :
 
Over 60?....no
Pregnant?....absolutely not
Chasing after a toddler?.....sadly not at the moment

Having an afternoon nap?
YES!

Now, would anyone like a chocolate, there are...oh...four left?


( crumbs the box was massive, where've they all gone!)
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
No chocolate for me, thanks - I've just had a small bar of chikki, the local version of peanut brittle but generally a bit chewier.

Kids back at school today [as mentioned above] so some long faces today as their exam results start trickling in - poor lambs. At least they were only school exams preparing for the big ones in March.

Our 25 year old neighbour boy's leave is up and he is off back to Dubai and work in the morning - it has been great having him around for a few weeks and we will miss him when he has gone but at least with the internet and SMSing he will never be far away.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
I'm here because I am procrastinating.

Me too. Though mine's a neuroscience assignment, which, from here, looks like a lot less fun than the work you're avoiding.

Anyone want a piece of my Wispa Gold? Quick, before I ....

Whoops,too late. [Disappointed] I am such a disappointment to myself.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
And a Happy NewYear from Bethnei, too!

We actually saw in 2012 In northern Spain, twice....we were on a ship keeping English time, tied up to a Spanish dockside, so we had 2 New Years. Spanish fireworks followed by French champagne and English New Year. Was good!

New Year's Day was passed on the Bay of Biscay, where I'm sure that one or two people blamed Not Feeling Too Well on the bumpiness of the ocean (which it was, very!). I like a stormy sea, me!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Well there was I thinking the excesses were over - and I arrived to the office this morning to find a box of (very classy and rather expensive) chocolates on my desk from one of my bosses.

Who wants to help me share the box?
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Happy new year folks! We are still in Englandshire, but will return north tomorrow (along with the gale force winds, hooray). Today I have discovered that nowhere in the bit of rural-ish Herefordshire that we are currently in sells pants, although of the few shops that were open several sell socks and tights which is no good, don't they realise people are overrun with socks this time of year but Santa isn't so good in the pants department? Have had to resort to the outlaws' washing machine (it's a bit cold to go commando).
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
Yesterday I removes the strings from 3 guitars and a mandolin and has spent time polishing the frets and oiling the fretboards. The other 3 guitars and the banjo will have to wait.

And I though we were overun with musical instruments! Though we'e actually passed the harp (3 octave) to a young friend who's learning, and Darllenwr's passsed two guitars to another friend as he had a new 6 string last year, and is currently awaiting a new 12 string. Oh, and I sold the mandolin (just a cheap one) as neither of us was using it.
 
Posted by angelica37 (# 8478) on :
 
Happy New Year to everyone, and it's back to reality tomorrow as I'm working and 3 out of the 4 schoolage offspring are going back. Still there are a few Christmas goodies left to eat and drink including two bottles of wine and a lot of cookies
 
Posted by cheesymarzipan (# 9442) on :
 
Was expecting a quiet day today, then a phone call from my friend to say 'will you come to Shopping Centre on the bus with me to pick up a buggy?' led to a fairly enjoyable day shopping with her (and small person) instead of lounging around at home. I forgot to go food shopping, which will annoy me tomorrow, but I did manage to get some new boots in the sale which I can wear to work and keep my feet warmer than shoes...
edit: how do you have cookies left? we made gingerbread ones, and they lasted less than 24 hours! Still got some christmas cake though. omnomnom.

[ 02. January 2012, 20:26: Message edited by: cheesymarzipan ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
For reasons I can't explain I don't have to go back to work until Wednesday; I haven't had two statutory holidays at New Year since I left Scotland.

Consequently, I've been a complete couch-piglet today and spent the whole day curled up in front of the Top Gear marathon on BBC Canada ... [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Somehow I got my left toe caught in my right trouser leg and tripped on the stairs yesterday, breaking my fall with my bad arm - it was a bit sore! It still is a bit sore so off to physio this afternoon but to the city this morning in search of little bits of not-that-complicated cable not available here.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Poor you, Wodders - if I didn't know you were TT I'd have said put more tonic in it ... [Big Grin]

Hope you haven't done any major damage.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:


Consequently, I've been a complete couch-piglet today and spent the whole day curled up in front of the Top Gear marathon on BBC Canada ... [Hot and Hormonal]

No need to blush about being a couch piglet - you deserve it. But Top Gear? Blush away!!

I am up earlier than expected - I set my alarm to continental time and forgot to re-adjust! Never mind, nice to have plenty of time for breakfast.

[Smile]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Wodders!
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
Dear Lord, Wod!
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
I was just thinking about Smudgie.
 
Posted by daisymay (# 1480) on :
 
Are we not having a Scots' one, like we usually have had? It's better as it doesn't get so big and it's easier to get about it's different area. Please give us one.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Oh Wodders, silly sausage, get well soon. This penchant for comedy falls is most unbecoming (seriously though, hope it is fixed soon).
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Bonne Année, tout le monde! (TR: Good Year Everybody)
Our visitors (with a very cat allergic but cat loving daughter) have just left. Lovely to see them - but lovely to be alone again. Said daughter decided to go down with a chest infection so was hacking and wheezing away all morning, inbetween cuddling cats. Yes, I know...but at 11 she's old enough to make her own decisions! (Somebody tell her parents, please...She is an over indulged only child.)
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
A wheezy and snotty happy new year from darkest Surrey, where I'm meant to be back at work but in fact am sitting at home wrapped in comfy cardies and drinking lemsips. Sadly, both Macarius and I have been ill the whole holiday - I think it's about 20 years since I've been so ill for so long. Macarius looked at me a little while ago and said, 'You look awful'. Thanks, I love you too.

Aaaargh! I couldn't even ring the old year out/new year in and missed it terribly.

It's been a complete washout and now it's January.

M.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'm sorry you feel so awful, M. - I hope you feel better soon.

I dashed to the city, got exactly what I wanted remarkably quickly and dashed back again - I was home by 1 p.m.! Very successful little trip. We went out into town this afternoon which means I have had almost no nap time today so I think an early night is indicated.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Now I'm going to have an early night but I've just watched 2 Wallace & Gromit stories, including the one with the villainous penguin - well, we all know about them on the Ship, don't we?

Goodnight.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Thanks for the kind wishes, WW. I know it's Only A Cold and that I'm Not Really Ill but I am still feeling pissed off and sorry for myself.

Have a nice early night; Wallace and Gromit are good!

M.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Wallace and Gromit are always good - get well soon!

First day back at work. I arrived without problems, then the weather turned up. Rain smashed against the windows, wind moaned through two sets of doors, puddles rushed across the car park, trees danced crazily. A colleague's partner phoned to say a tree had fallen blocking their road, another's phoned to say their gazebo was now a mangled heap of metal at the end of the garden. Needless to say public transport was seriously upset.

It seemed calmer at lunchtime so I went for a short walk, giving up on the umbrella after it had blown inside out twice in first few minutes. Amazingly, the sun came out. The place looked wonderful: sunlight on the wet road made it blaze with gold, leaves dripped with silver, the flooded lane had some beautiful reflections from the houses.

All in all, an interesting start to the new year... how was it for you? We have more of this to come, apparently.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
More roads turning into rivers, horizontal rain - oh, I hope not.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I'm hobbling in to grumble...

OK, so I know it's been a bad day on the trains, fare increases (mine is 6.2%, on a monthly ticket, 5.9% on a weekly ticket, and 5.75% on a day ticket. All worked out courtesy of my maths students today... their idea, who was I to stop them doing something so useful with a lesson on percentages!) bad weather affecting trains. It's back to work day for loads of us, and also it seemed on my line, loads of people who'd been away for Christmas/New Year returning home, who are, shall we say, less accustomed to travelling on trains.

So, pretty full train, and all spare seats full of luggage/coats/newspapers. And, us regulars taking no notice, but politely standing our ground, or rather insisting on a seat. Yes, I do want to sit down, I'm sorry it means you've either got to get up and let me sit by the window, and put your coat somewhere else, or you've got to move to the window seat so I can have the aisle seat, but tough. I didn't quite get to "Look, I work with teenagers with interesting behaviour issues, and they end up doing as they're asked... you don't stand a chance." but I was on the verge of it!

Then, ten minutes or so late, we reach our destination. To find a seriously overcrowded platform, (previous train out had been cancelled, and we were only two carriages instead of the usual three) and one couple utterly hellbent on getting on the train before anyone could get off. With three large suitcases... my shins bear the bruises, and my ears are ringing with all the names I got called for suggesting they needed to let us off the train first. Fortunately, a member of staff was nearby and dealt with them, but still....

Ouch. [Waterworks]

I was going to do things of a useful nature when I got home, but decided on a late afternoon/early evening nap instead.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisymay:
Are we not having a Scots' one, like we usually have had?

Here it is. [Smile]

I'm sorry to hear about all your gale-force fog and horizontal rain; if it's any comfort we're supposed to get about an inch and a half of rain tomorrow, when I'm going back to w*rk, so you have a fellow-sufferer.

M - I hope you feel better soon. If you want that lem-sip to not taste horrid, add extra lemon juice and Manuka honey (which is supposed to be more helpful than taking anti-biotics) and a smidgin of whisky.

I'm still getting through some foodie Christmas pressies - we were given a huge jar of home-made antipasto, which from what its creator said is made almost entirely from Things We Don't Like* but, inexplicably, tastes rather good spread on crackers. I also have some Cumberland rum butter, which is magic spread on toast - do help yourselves.

* like tuna-fish, anchovies ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I didn't know they made rum in Cumberland [Biased]

Off to the Dr today - blood will be drawn this morning then back for results this afternoon. Pete can't get his head around this get your results the same day idea but here it is just how things are done. The results also belong to the patient and not to the Dr, which seems a novel idea to me but everyone here expects it.

They are right, too.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
WW, it seems amazing to me as well to get your blood test results the same day! Hope they were OK.

I went back to work this morning and when a colleague wandered into my room and said 'What are you doing here?' (it was meant in a kindly way), I disgraced myself by bursting into tears. Tried to make it into a joke but not very well. Oh well.

I apologised to him and we had an interesting discussion about how the English always apologise for everything (he's Irish). I know that my default option is to apologise, whatever the situation. When I was a teenager and my father was teaching me to drive, it used to drive him barmy that I said 'sorry' all the time - in the end, I was saying, 'I'm sorry for saying sorry...'

Is it just me?

M.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My default is apology as well although I'm better since I did the assertiveness bit - well, a little bit better.

Blood tests were okay and we'll check again in 3 months but Dr concerned about my high pulse rate, something I have had since birth. He insists I carry on with a Beta Blocker, although he has changed the drug but never suggested exercise which is the only thing that has ever worked for me in the past - but then he is a smoker and possibly just a tad[!] overweight so...

Must get back on bicycle and get more exercise, even if it hasn't been recommended medically.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... The results also belong to the patient ...

Well, it's your blood ...

You must have the last surviving Smoking Doctor™ - he's such a rare breed you probably ought to preserve him in formaldehyde and put him in a museum. [Big Grin]

As my dad used to say, back to old clothes and porridge* for me today too, but as I only work 2½ hours on a Wednesday it was a nice, gentle transition from being off over Christmas and New Year.
* Not actual porridge you understand ... [Projectile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We like porage, we do - after Mrs E's operation in November 2010 I often made her porage for brekkie and she was a real fan.

There is a man perched most of the way up a palm on the other side of the field chopping bits off it - HWMBO and I both reckon he is welcome, it's not a job we'd do for a big clock - it looks VERY precarious.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Ooh, porage with banana for breakfast is the highlight of my day at work.

M.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Enough talk of porage please. My dog has been very ill..........

(and he cost me £50 at the Vet just now)

Another wet and windy day. Though funnily enough a windy day cheers me up even if it is wet. Its wet. gloomy and grey still days that get me down.

Coffee anyone? Hobnob biscuits, plus milk choc digestives (we don't like milk ones)
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Oh Nicodemia - I'm sorry about your poor pooch,hope he gets well soon, for his sake and that of your pocket!

Yes please coffee and many virtual biscuits please (the kind with no calories)

[Big Grin]

I have just had two interesting days in my new job - back to studying now - eek!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Hobnobs for me, please - I have the drink ready here beside me.

The palm over the way is down now, it looks like they are clearing the land ready for more building - hardly surprising as it was sold as building land. We'll still be sad as it was nice whilst our solitude lasted.

Pete a bit under the weather this morning so not sure if he will be up for a walk later.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Wet and windy day? Some very active gales last night having some fun banging the lids of wheelie bins up and down. Five trees blocking various roads round here and a few more on railway lines so going home will be an adventure again.

And speaking of fallen trees, tomorrow will be the last day of my Christmas tree. I shall miss it – I do like the sparkle of the decorations and the glow of the lights in amongst the dark green. Has everyone else taken their decorations down?
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Tomorrow is the day for us to take our decorations down...most of our neighbours have already done so. We still have a wreath on the front door...

Windy and feels very chilly here. The wind is in the wrong direction, so that rain is being driven into the church under the roof tiles.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I'll be taking them down on Saturday. I have a garland wrapped around the curtain pole that I'd like to keep, but Mr D says it's too Christmassy. Shame! (There are no curtains on the curtain pole though...)
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:


The palm over the way is down now, it looks like they are clearing the land ready for more building - hardly surprising as it was sold as building land. We'll still be sad as it was nice whilst our solitude lasted.

Awww - I'm sorry. That happened to us a few years ago, instead of fields we now face a housing estate. Ho hum, pig's bum.

Ariel - our decorations always come down before we go back to work, I can't face the job afterwards.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
Anyone for tea? Kettle's on. And a whole tin of Sainsbury's family assortment biscuit type efforts. I bought them 'cos the tin looked like a radio. Yes I'm sad...Get in there quick before I eat all the jammy dodgers!

Happy new year to everyone here. I hope the poorly arm wasn't too badly damaged in the fall, WW.

Our decorations will probably be coming down on Saturday - I know it should be tomorrow, but I'm going to work, and tired, and I can't be bothered. I'm such a slattern.

It's so windy here still. The recycling people ought to be coming today and people's bags of plastics and papers are blowing all over the place. Luckily people have been trying to weight them down, and rescuing wayward ones, with the result that I don't think anyone has their own recycling outside their house. Oh well, I don't suppose it matters.

This morning Child A opened the door to my sister & kids just as a huge gust of wind blew through the house - large enough to lift the loft hatch which then swung open, hitting Mr Jt9 very hard on the head. I was rather worried (it was a big bang) but he assures me he's ok. It didn't knock him out, and the resulting language demonstrated he still had the power of speech... [Biased]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Pete felt well enough and we did walk - I spent much of it peeling a stick to make a switch but why is it that when I threaten little kids with a switch all they do is laugh?

The good news when we got back is that I tried my right hand on the brake lever of my bike and I can manage to pull it okay - tomorrow I may actually get to ride for the first time since the beginning of last August! I may try a little ride around the block between the morning walk and breakfast.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
The wind is, at last, easing a bit, though a coworker's car was hit by debris on the motorway this morning and he needs a new windscreen. [Frown] It's not a good time for cars: friends had theirs written off just before Xmas, daughter's is having its CD player replaced (under warranty, I should hope), my team leader's car is just plain sick while ours wheezes and creaks as usual.

If we leave the window open for ten minutes the weather might still blow the Xmas decoraations down.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Our bedroom window is usually ajar, and I got home today to find it had blown fully open and the net curtain had blown outside the window. Thankfully, it hadn't been raining - or if it had, the wind had dried the curtain.

We'll be taking our Christmas tree down this evening. [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Tubifex Maximus (# 4874) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Our bedroom window is usually ajar, and I got home today to find it had blown fully open and the net curtain had blown outside the window. Thankfully, it hadn't been raining - or if it had, the wind had dried the curtain.

We'll be taking our Christmas tree down this evening. [Waterworks]

I slept all the way through the gale last night. When I got to school everyone was saying "Wasn't the wind terrible" and I said, "Nope, slept through it...I will admit the road was decorated with bins when I went to do my run this morning and my walk to the train was a lot slower than normal.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... after Mrs E's operation ...

Remind me never to come to you for post-operative care ... [Eek!]

Nicodemia - Poor wee dog. [Frown] Hope he feels better now.

I'm having an Age Crisis™ - as if the prospect of turning 50 next month wasn't bad enough, I had an e-mail from my nephew last night to say that he and his wife are expecting a baby in July, so I'm going to be Great-Auntie Piglet.

Haven't yet plucked up the courage to broach the subject of her forthcoming grannyhood with my big sister though ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A friend in UK had a SAGA brochure actually ON his 50th birthday!! He was NOT amused!

In March I'll be 63 - does that qualify as mid-60s?
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
A friend in UK had a SAGA brochure actually ON his 50th birthday!! He was NOT amused!

In March I'll be 63 - does that qualify as mid-60s?

Not even close, Wodders. I'll let you know when, OK?

SAGA?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Can you remember that far back?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tubifex Maximus:
I slept all the way through the gale last night. When I got to school everyone was saying "Wasn't the wind terrible" and I said, "Nope, slept through it...

Me too!

I am VERY thankful that our North Sea crossing was Sunday night, not any other night this week! (Visiting son in Heidelberg for New Year) It was choppy - but 'rock you to sleep' choppy - not 'shake you out of bed' choppy. We always have a window cabin so that I can check the sea.

[Smile]

Morning all, I have plenty of hot beverages and warm croissants.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Sod what any ****** doctor might say - I'd love a warm croissant - or several!

I am terrible as I like to put even more butter on them and then some really sharp marmalade.

Gosh, I love food!

- - - -

I didn't cycle before breakfast but I did do a circuit of the local block afterwards, only about 1.5 km but I managed it and showed to myself that I can brake ok although the wrist position isn't yet comfortable - if I cycle more it should be good physio for the wrist. I'll book the geared bike in for a full service and use the single speed for the time being.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by Tubifex Maximus:
I slept all the way through the gale last night. When I got to school everyone was saying "Wasn't the wind terrible" and I said, "Nope, slept through it...

Me too!
Me three!

What revoltingly clear consciences we must all have. Or we're going deaf. Or it's the drugs. [Biased]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I think it all depends how tired you are. One morning this year at Taizé (camping) I got up and everyone was talking about the thunderstorm overnight.

rouge: Was there a thunderstorm then?

(I think it was also quite a small thunderstorm compared to the one I had camped in a couple of years previously which literally went for about 8 hours and where the lightening was so bright it was like broad daylight inside the tent)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
MoT and service today. Got away with the minimum charges and nothing needing to be done - huge relief. Now I can start to plan for a holiday [Smile]

Decorations still up. I'll be packing them away tomorrow morning, but I'm keeping them up for Old Christmas Day. It's been a beautiful day - went for a walk today and it felt like spring with a deep blue sky, strong sunlight, clouds scudding across the sky and birds darting here and there. Really pretty.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
I slept through the Great Hurricane of 1987 - even though a tree fell across the road two doors down!
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Ooh, yes, Macarius and I slept through the Great Hurricane* too. I vaguely remember half waking and saying something like 'Bit windy tonight'. I wish I slept that well these days!

We had no electricity and had to sit in the car the next morning to put the radio on to find out what had happened.

*I imagine many countries would laugh at us calling it that

M.
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
We slept through it all in 1987 too. I remember idly thinking that there was quite a bit of debris on the road on my way to work the next morning, but hadn't a clue what people were talking about when I got there.

Same this time, too. I'm not really sure how bad it was here, but we did lose two branches - one quite large - from one of the trees in our garden, so I guess it must have been quite bad overnight.
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
Wandering in shivering to blag a cuppa and some biccies. I had my first day off since December 23 yesterday (OK, I got all 3 English Bank Holidays as leave too), so, of course, I had to fix a puncture, our boiler was misbehaving again, so the plumber was in for a fair chunk of the day, then he had to confer with the landlord, then he rang to apologise that the replacement boiler won't be able to be fitted till Tuesday...

So of course last night the old boiler died and we had no heating bar my little space heater. Have now borrowed another one from a friend, so 2 rooms vaguely warm. Current temperature in the bathroom is about 12°C. [Eek!] Where's the shivering smilie when you need it?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
... SAGA?

Saga is a travel company catering for over-50s. They used to use the hall of residence where I lived in Aberdeen during the long summer holiday, and some of my friends worked there as domestic staff. They referred to it as "Sex And Games for the Aged" ... [Snigger]

Talking of sleeping through silly weather, I was in Italy on a school trip in 1978 - in fact when the Pope died in 1978 - and I apparently slept through a terrific thunderstorm in Rome. I was quite annoyed to have missed it.

I spent this evening listening to two sorts of music I'd never normally choose to listen to - blue-grass and bagpipes. The local Presbyterian church was having a fund-raising concert and D. was asked to play, and the other acts were a local blue-grass band and the St. John's City Pipe Band. Much as I dislike bagpipes (especially indoors [Eek!] ) I got quite misty-eyed when they marched in playing Scotland the Brave, and even more so when they played Highland Cathedral, as the cathedral in question is St. Magnus.

almost homesick piglet [Tear]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Piglet travels down memory lane:
quote:
in fact when the Pope died in 1978
Which pope was that?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Piglet travels down memory lane:
quote:
in fact when the Pope died in 1978
Which pope was that?
Probably the Roman one, I don't think the one from Antioch died that year - neither did that nice Canadian Pope, whose name I forget.
 
Posted by Yam-uk (# 12791) on :
 
John Paul I ??
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
2 popes actually died in 1978. One was Paul the somethingth, and the other was John-Paul 1. JP1 died at the end of September, and I can be that specific because I heard the new on my radio while I was on my honeymoon!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I was on holiday in York with my parents and wondered why the flags on the convent were at half mast.

If anyone lives near Monmouth, or is going to be near on holiday, the Shire Hall is worth a visit. The courtroom is open, and you can do a sort of video tour of the trial of John Frosr, one of the Chartists involved in the Newport Rising. Very interesting, and extremely good value for the princely sum of £2.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It was John Paul I - he'd only been Pope for a few months. Was he the one Dan Brown bumped off in Angels and Demons (sort of)?

It was a very peculiar feeling being in Italy at that time - the whole country seemed to close, even the weather broke (we'd had a week of glorious weather before the thunderstorm). We were travelling round doing an opera that had been written for the school by Peter Maxwell Davies; the day the Pope died we were supposed to be on in Milan, but that show was cancelled. We did our last performance in Rome the night after the thunderstorm, but to a half-empty theatre and in a somewhat subdued mood. There was one member of our party who was a Roman Catholic (they're quite a rarity in Orkney) and he was allowed to go and file past the catafalque to pay his respects.
 
Posted by birdsoftheair (# 15219) on :
 
Gosh piglet, that experience is one to remember!
Nothing much to report at Birdsnest recently except for seemingly incessant rain and gloomy skies.

I really don't like this time of year and am desperate for the first hint of spring like snowdrops. We don't have any in our garden so I will have to scout around in other folk's to find any. Probably too early yet anyway. I used to have some made out of glass in a little vase that looked so real, but I can't find them and think they may not have survived all the house moves. [Frown]

edited for spelling.

[ 08. January 2012, 16:39: Message edited by: birdsoftheair ]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
We have our first snowdrops in the front garden! It's always lovely to see. So you can come and look at ours, birdsoftheair, but I'd rather you didn't look at the rest of the garden...

M.

[ 08. January 2012, 16:56: Message edited by: M. ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Odd sort of day, by half eleven it was bright sunshine and I wavered between taking the car out somewhere and going for a walk. I did the latter instead. Lovely blue skies and a real early spring feeling to the day, the trees and hedges almost seemed to glow in the light, the water sparkled, lots of birds around, and you could really feel that not only spring, but summer was just around the corner and that it would be glorious.

As I started to walk back the sky began to cloud over until we were back to the normal shades of pearl greys and the breeze dropped a couple of degrees of warmth, and everything started to look drab once more. We were back in January again as if it had never happened.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Have just had a skype session with my youngest child, from an alley in London. B4 is finishing a European trip, and after spending Christmas and New Year in the UK was calling from outside her hostel to send exciting news. What was this earth shattering information?

Apparently she rules at Beer Pong.

[Disappointed]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
BL, you must be so proud ... [Big Grin] What the blazes is Beer Pong? [Confused]

All this talk of spring and snowdrops and such is all very well, but here in God's Province™ we haven't really had winter yet.* Spring is scheduled for the second Tuesday in June, at about half-past two in the afternoon (if wet in vicarage).

* The foot of snow we had a few weeks ago doesn't count, as it went away.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We're off to get new identity cards today - not at all sure why I am asked to go as I'm fairly sure, being a mad foreigner, that I am not eligible, but I will take all my paperwork and see how soon they send me home again. On the form they spelt my name completely wrong [I don't recall ever being called Rose before] but they got the date of birth and gender correct.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
If they called you Rose, are you sure they got your gender right? [Big Grin]

I really must stop messing about here and go and turn that chicken stock into soup.

not quite motivated piglet [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
You might need to be identified as a friendly foreigner!!!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yup, that's me - the local friendly foreigner!

They did it, I now have a sort of Indian identity thingummybob - now that is SO cool!

Can you imagine the complexity of registering 1.2 BILLION people? They have quite a system going, it must be costing an absolute fortune. The finger-printing was inkless and the iris cam was painless - AND we were out by 9.30!

The bonus is that I am no longer known in their system as Rose - I am now known by my rather better known lifelong name, as known to the Special Branch in UK and India - though for rather different reasons.

...and I drove the jeep there today, first driving since the accident and I managed fine - this is good as we go away on Thursday and I want to be able to share the driving.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Rose burbled:
quote:
...and I drove the jeep there today, first driving since the accident and I managed fine - this is good as we go away on Thursday and I want to be able to share the driving.
[Eek!] I will be clutching my rosary for sure!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... Can you imagine the complexity of registering 1.2 BILLION people?

Especially when they all speak different languages. [Confused]

quote:
... known to the Special Branch ...
Do you really want to admit that? [Eek!]

Soup is now made - help yourselves.

industrious piglet
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma:
You might need to be identified as a friendly foreigner!!!

Given the three heads, naybe 'friendly alien'.

Re the driving: hope you're on good terms with St.Christopher, Pete.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:[QUOTE]... known to the Special Branch ...
Do you really want to admit that? [Eek!] ...
I'm quite proud of it really - here I am known because I am a three headed alien [three heads mean I can both eat more and talk more - and even at the same time] and in UK I was one of those nasty, subversive peace activist people and so, I am led to believe there was a file on me for that at one time. It must be a VERY boring read!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by QLib:
...Re the driving: hope you're on good terms with St.Christopher, Pete.

Thank you F(r)iend. [Razz]

[ 10. January 2012, 07:02: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
I would not be too worried if I was PeteC, HWMBO must also know this. I somehow suspect Wodders is going to have to put up a determined effort if he does not want to be chauffeured the whole way.

Jengie
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I would like some sympathy please. I have had a really nasty cold since Saturday...it started in my throat, went to my chest (yukky coughing) up to my nose and back to the chest (dry coughing) It is presently residing in my sinuses.I went to work yesterday but was wiped out by the end of the day, so today i've cancelled my lessons.
The trouble is that MrD also has caught a cold,but from a different source to mine, I suspect. His isn't so bad and he's accused me of "enjoying suffering" . I think he thinks that if he doesn't feel so bad then I mustn't feel bad...and I'm just malingering.
Please show me some sympathy so I don't feel the need to attack MrD with a blunt instrument ( or a mug of honey and lemon!)
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Poor you - sounds awful.

I'd retreat to my bed...
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Whether or not this will work depends on the savviness of Mr. Dormouse - but could be worth a try…

If it's a cold, it may not be worth going to the doctor's but if you take a trip to the pharmacy and look suitably sorry for yourself you should walk out with a satisfyingly large paper bag full of stuff. It is a stereotype that when you go into a French pharmacy for one thing you always come out with at least four things, but the stereotype is TRUE [Biased]

Then when Mr Dormouse says there's nothing wrong with you, you can point to all the stuff that the zealous pharmacist has kindly supplied you with - cough medicine, nasal rinse, maybe even some eardrops if you're lucky - and convince him that you're at death's door.

You're welcome. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Lots of sympathy from me, Dormouse - I am horrible when I have a cold and feel just so lousy. Pamper yourself and get well soon.

Much [fairly languid] activity chez nous as we get ready to go away tomorrow. I must remember to pack a couple of t-shirts as it can be cool up there in January and at night - daytime no problem.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Dormouse, ISTM that you have A Bad Cold, but Mr. D. has Man-flu (i.e. a slight cold) and he can't quite get his head round the fact that you feel worse than he does. There probably isn't much you can do except let it take its course, keep warm and take hot drinks with Manuka honey at regular intervals until it goes away.

There's something going round these parts called ILI which stands for Influenza-Like Illness. Presumably when a woman gets it it's a cold, and when a bloke gets it it's flu. [Devil]

We seem to have had a slight attack of winter here; it started snowing at about 8 o'clock this morning and carried on most of the day, so now we've got about six inches, but it's blowing about and some of the heaps left by the snow-plough are closer to a foot.

Not enough for a snow-day though ... [Frown]
 
Posted by justlooking (# 12079) on :
 
On the subject on cold remedies, I've found a Bad Cold responds to the whisky/honey/lemon juice/hot water treatment. You need generous amounts - a double whisky, tablespoon of honey, juice of a large lemon, all stirred together and topped up with hot water. A couple of aspirin helps as well.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Get well soon, Dormouse. Someone I know has had a cold since the middle of December, only starting to clear up now.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Good morning all - windy windy windy windy today. The cladding has blown off the front of our house, grrr - it just missed my car - phew!

In other news, Waterstone's is going to drop its apostrophe. :shock:

We need at 'Keep the endangered apostrophe' campaign. Mind you - apostrophes where they shouldn't be are far worse!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Very windy here too, though the SUN has come out! [Smile] Its been rather an endangered species round here lately.

Though I suspect this is the brighter but very much colder weather arriving which has been forecast.

Which I prefer.

I could[put the kettle on and get the hobnobs out if anyone is around?
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
BL, you must be so proud ... [Big Grin] What the blazes is Beer Pong? [Confused]
.

I now have it on good authority that Beer Pong is played by setting up 10 glasses half-full of beer at each end of a large table (billiard/ten pin bowling style). Then each player uses a bat and ping pong ball to see who can 'score' by getting a ping pong ball into one of their opponent's glasses. The object is to make the opponent have to drink all ten half-glasses first.

You hear it here first.... [Ultra confused]

[ 12. January 2012, 09:49: Message edited by: Banner Lady ]
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
Ahem: you heard it here first. I sincerely hope the ping pong balls have been washed before play. [Roll Eyes]

[ 12. January 2012, 09:53: Message edited by: Banner Lady ]
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
...In other news, Waterstone's is going to drop its apostrophe. :shock:

We need at 'Keep the endangered apostrophe' campaign. Mind you - apostrophes where they shouldn't be are far worse!

There's a pub near us called The Merchants House [sic] which has a Special's Board [also sic].

Drives me mad.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Good morning all - windy windy windy windy today. The cladding has blown off the front of our house, grrr - it just missed my car - phew!

In other news, Waterstone's is going to drop its apostrophe. :shock:

We need at 'Keep the endangered apostrophe' campaign. Mind you - apostrophes where they shouldn't be are far worse!

There are at least two such society's in Britain already:

There is Apostrophe Protection Society and the Association for the Annihilation of the Aberrant Apostrophe founded by Keith Waterhouse. The former is based in Boston, Lincs and looks at least halfway serious while the latter was based in a pub or restaurant of Mr Waterhouse's choosing and as he died in September 2009, the AAAA may have died with him.

ps, sorry about your house cladding but, let's face it, you had thought seriously about removing it, hadn't you? Not in January though.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
In other news, Waterstone's is going to drop its apostrophe. :shock:

Depressing, but people will probably still continue buying book's.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
In other news, Waterstone's is going to drop its apostrophe. :shock:

Depressing, but people will probably still continue buying book's.
arrrrgggghhhhhh!

Yes - and CD's, DVD's and banana's!


[Waterworks]
 
Posted by Gwai (# 11076) on :
 
Tell yourself that they are just changing their name to something about stones that are made to go in the water? [Biased]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Hello, again all, home a bit early this evening, so enough time to look at the Ship before bell ringing practice. The first time I've been able to ring since the Carol service before Christmas (still not quite better from my horrid cold).

Originally posted by Welease Woderick, ages ago
quote:
My default is apology as well although I'm better since I did the assertiveness bit - well, a little bit better.

I know it's a long while ago but I've been thinking about this recently. It was prompted by my comment that my default option is to say sorry. On reflection, I don't think it's anything to do with lack of assertiveness (I would confidently expect anyone who knows me to fall about laughing at that suggestion). I just think 'sorry' can mean anything from 'I apologise profusely for what I have done' through 'How terrible that should have happened to you' to 'Oops, we seem to have accidently brushed each other's sleeve'.

A sort of general, all purpose, sympathetic word.

Sorry*, that probably wasn't interesting to anyone but me.

M.

*I genuinely didn't realise I had written this until I previewed my post...
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
M, don't worry about it. The Irish default that I was preset with is also to say "sorry" in similar situations and I've been called on that a few times myself. Sometimes it elicits a puzzled reaction and "why are you apologizing for something that isn't your fault?" in instances where it's being used as a gesture of sympathetic listening as much as an apology. I guess it's just a cultural thing.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Wonders why computers are so b****y-minded, sometimes. One might almost suspect them of sentient thought....
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by M.:
... my default option is to say sorry ...

You're not Canadian* are you? [Devil]

Regarding the disappearing apostrophe in Waterstone's: why? Does it use up too much ink? Poor little thing, what harm had it ever done anyone?

[Frown]

Next time the post of Apostropher Royal comes up, I think I'll apply. [Big Grin]

* Canadian n. someone who apologises when you stand on his toe.

[ 13. January 2012, 02:25: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Originally posted by piglet:

quote:
Originally posted by M.:
... my default option is to say sorry ...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You're not Canadian* are you?


* Canadian n. someone who apologises when you stand on his toe.

(edited for the relevant bits)

A thing the British are also often accused of. I think it's a pleasant trait - it's just a nice way of seeking to defuse any possible irritation and help oil the wheels a bit.

M.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
It's the same in South Africa - 'I'm sorry' denotes sympathy, not guilt.

Good morning all - frosty and sunny today, proper winter at last!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
In other news, Waterstone's is going to drop its apostrophe. :shock:

Depressing, but people will probably still continue buying book's.
This made me laugh: apostrophe fallen on hard times.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Excellent, JtL! Thanks. [Smile]

Just about to venture out into the freezing cold for my book group. I chose the book, so I have to go.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
What book are you reading? It's my book group night this evening, it's a new group to me and I am a little nervous...I don't want to seem too thick, plus I've read the book on Kindle, so I won't be able to flip through it ( my uni trick!)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Freezing cold it may be but I haven't seen the stars so clearly for a long time as I did tonight. Normally cloud or light pollution drowns the constellations out, but tonight on the way home they were all out in fine display, and I could see some I hadn't seen for years, bright and clear as anything. Frost is going to have to be scraped off the cars tomorrow, but worth it for that.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Yes, the stars were great. My friends live on a hill above the river with not much in the way of street lighting on the other side, soI got a good look.

The book was Iain Banks' Whit; I was thinking of suggesting it for the ship book group, but I no longer have my own copy.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Very frosty here tonight, and the few stars that can still be seen (because of light pollution) are glittering brilliantly in the inky sky...
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I'll take your word for it, St E. Though it's too cold for me to look for myself.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Slushy, mucky sort of day here - it was snowing quite earnestly when I left for w*rk but by the time I came home it had turned to freezing rain and the water was cascading down the hill in front of our house.

Having been -13° yesterday morning, it's supposed to go up to +8° overnight tonight.

I think the Great Meteorologist™ is having a laugh ...
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Misty now - and not in a particularly picturesque way. The Beeb says only -4, What do they know?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
What an utterly beautiful morning. Bright sunshine, not a cloud in the sky, frost everywhere. Leaves in little silver fur coats, benches covered in diamond powder. Mists rising off the river, chimney smoke and steam that looks like chimney smoke. Puddles frozen into cracked ice, dogs chasing each other across the park full of the joy of the morning. Shadows stretching out across the grass, impossibly long. I hadn't realized my fingers had gone numb until I went to change the lens on my camera.

And yes I did have to spend 10 minutes scraping frost off my car, but at that hour and in that weather the trip to the supermarket is hardly busy at all so it was worth it.

[ 14. January 2012, 10:01: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Beautiful sunny & crisp morning here - just right for hacking back the honeysuckle that has taken over a fence - it'll recover in time for the summer when it makes the garden smell wonderful
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Same here - frosty and minus temperatures. I'm at the farm looking after Mum and the views are lovely.

[Smile]
 
Posted by mrs whibley (# 4798) on :
 
Is there a Society for the Promotion of Tasteful Website Design that we can report the Apostrophe Protection Society to?
[Or to whom we can report the APS for grammar pedants.]
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
Oh dear, that is bad, isn't it! Somehow I would have expected the APS to have a much classier website. [Disappointed]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
What an utterly beautiful morning ... I hadn't realized my fingers had gone numb until I went to change the lens on my camera ...

From rose-tinted to normal? [Smile] Love your descriptions.

I quite agree about the APS's web-site - what horrid colours and nasty fonts.

We had enough of a rise in temperature (and some rain) yesterday that quite a lot of the sn*w has gone, which is a Good Thing, as you never know when the next lot'll arrive ...

I've made raisin cake, which should be cooled off by the time you read this - help yourselves.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Warm raisin cake sounds lovely! [Smile]

Another gorgeously sunny morning again, though a heavy frost and still bitterly cold! Better like this than cold grey and damp!

Happy Sunday, everyone!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Don't you know what the Bible says about raisin cakes? [Big Grin]

Moo
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
[Killing me] [Overused]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Don't you know what the Bible says about raisin cakes? [Big Grin]

Moo

eeeek! does the same go for Chorley cakes?
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
Allow me to complete the Kerygmaniac invasion [Big Grin]

(after consulting Wiki)

So, Chorley cakes are kinda like Eccles cakes? I still daydream about the Eccles cake I had in Portsmouth.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
[Big Grin]

Yes - but Chorley cakes are much better.

Eccles cakes are made with thin flaky pastry and have a sugary coating on the top. Chorley cakes are made with short pastry and are dry on top. The filling is raisins or currants.

Chorley is in Lancashire and Eccles is in Greater Manchester.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
(sigh)

See, the priests knew what they were doing when they forbade raisin cakes. They knew the congregants would get way too distracted by the urge to gobble them up.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Don't you know what the Bible says about raisin cakes? [Big Grin]

I knew the Old Testament had some barmy dietary rules, but that's A Bit Much. [Eek!]

My Better Half loves my raisin cake, so I don't actually give a stuff what Hosea thought.

It's gone down to -10°C here tonight - **brrrrr**
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
[Big Grin]

Yes - but Chorley cakes are much better.

Better still if bought from the stall in the covered market in Chorley. (Daughter 1 lives in nearby Coppull.)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The gremlins have got into my TV set - I think they might be cold-weather gremlins, as this happened before during a cold spell. I missed the whole of the last episode of Sherlock last night thanks to no picture and staccato sound. I tried retuning, with the result that this morning I got a news broadcast from a Cubist announcer and the local news for High Wycombe to Chelmsford, which wasn't bad considering I live nowhere near either.

I really don't think digital telly is any kind of improvement - never had so many problems since the changeover.
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
When we had Sky and that happened regularly they told me to remove the Sky card and turn everything off for 10 minutes, then reconnect and turn back on. Might be worth you trying the turning off (at the mains) part - maybe disconnecting the aerial cable too (can't remember if that was a part of it).

Good luck!
 
Posted by Angloid (# 159) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by M.:
Originally posted by piglet:

quote:
Originally posted by M.:
... my default option is to say sorry ...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You're not Canadian* are you?


* Canadian n. someone who apologises when you stand on his toe.

(edited for the relevant bits)

A thing the British are also often accused of. I think it's a pleasant trait - it's just a nice way of seeking to defuse any possible irritation and help oil the wheels a bit.

M.

I know a woman (British) who apologises to lamp-posts if she bumps into them.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's still bl**dy cold here (-10°C as I type this - **brrrrrr**), although it was a gloriously sunny day.

Due to a 50%-off sale at Canadian Tire (I'm sorry - they really do spell it like that [Hot and Hormonal] ) we've become the proud possessors of a bread-making machine. D. has fancied trying it out for quite a while, and after asking the advice of a couple of friends with experience of them, we decided we'd go for it.

I'm going to mention this in the Recipe thread upstairs to invite advice; I don't want to upset the Hosts by turning this into a more foodie thread than it normally is ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Drifting Star:
When we had Sky and that happened regularly they told me to remove the Sky card and turn everything off for 10 minutes, then reconnect and turn back on. Might be worth you trying the turning off (at the mains) part - maybe disconnecting the aerial cable too (can't remember if that was a part of it).

Good luck!

Thanks. I did in fact try that for the best part of half an hour on Sunday with no great success. It took an hour and a half for it to settle down tonight - a combination of factors perhaps - but it got there in the end. In quite cold weather, the key for my car doesn't work well either so it may be something to do with physical location.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
It's still bl**dy cold here (-10°C as I type this - **brrrrrr**), although it was a gloriously sunny day.

And I thought cycling home from w*rk last night at -5° was bad.

If you don't like -10, think of it as +14. Farenheit always sounds warmer. Whisk(e)y helps too.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We had some colder nights whilst we were away - probably down to the mid-teens Celsius! [Eek!] Now we are back down near sea level and we are warmer again, I'm glad to say.

Four people away for nearly a week create a deal of laundry - the poor machine has done one load and will probably face several more tomorrow.

...and I did get to drive, although none at all today. Yesterday I drove the bad roads across the plateau and then the good road as far as the ghat road down the hill - my arm is still not fully fit and I didn't fancy 27 hairpin bends in the space of 9 km!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Drifting Star:
When we had Sky and that happened regularly they told me to remove the Sky card and turn everything off for 10 minutes, then reconnect and turn back on. Might be worth you trying the turning off (at the mains) part - maybe disconnecting the aerial cable too (can't remember if that was a part of it).

Good luck!

Thanks. I did in fact try that for the best part of half an hour on Sunday with no great success. It took an hour and a half for it to settle down tonight - a combination of factors perhaps - but it got there in the end. In quite cold weather, the key for my car doesn't work well either so it may be something to do with physical location.
There's a large holly in front of our Sky disk and we have to keep that trimmed. Snow doesn't help either and, as Sky apply schedule changes early in the morning, any channel hopping if you're watching the cricket then can mess things up, much as Ariel (sic) describes.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
We had some colder nights whilst we were away - probably down to the mid-teens Celsius! [Eek!]

You poor things. As I cycled into work this morning, the gears on my bike froze. And as for my hands ... [Frown]

eta: but the bit along the river bank was very pretty. [Smile]

[ 17. January 2012, 19:37: Message edited by: QLib ]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Ariel might have TV gremlins; we've got washing machine gremlins. It washed the sheets and (eventually) agreed to spin them after a fashion but has resolutely refused to tumble dry them, so they're hanging over the bath at the moment.

Bah, humbug.

M.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Busy day today: came home from w*rk, made chicken stock, chopped veggies to make soup, took minutes of the committee for which I'm the secretary, came home, typed up minutes (while I could still read my handwriting [Big Grin] ), turned veggies and stock into soup, which is cooking as I type. Should be ready for virtual tasting by the time you read this, along with a couple of virtual slices of freshly-baked bread ...

... as the bread-making machine absolutely rocks! D. met me at the door as I came in from w*rk proudly brandishing a slice of his very first loaf, and it was utterly yummy.

I was so complimentary about it he let me add the yeast to the machine for the second loaf.

[Yipee]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:


... as the bread-making machine absolutely rocks! D. met me at the door as I came in from w*rk proudly brandishing a slice of his very first loaf, and it was utterly yummy.


Yes, ours does too. I make a loaf every day - so we have fresh bread the day it's made, toast the day after and the birds get the leftovers on day three. Lots of different types of loaf too.

I worked out it costs 20p a loaf - brill!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
My garden is the end of the world - a thick mist has come down and there's nothing there. Usually I can see a rather large church in front of me, but I think it has been raptured.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...what? and not taken the choir?
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
They think we're far too worldly, I expect.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
... as the bread-making machine absolutely rocks!

Yes, ours does too. I make a loaf every day - so we have fresh bread the day it's made, toast the day after and the birds get the leftovers on day three.
The problem with breadmaker loaves is that they are not stuffed full of the preservatives like commercial bread. This is a GoodThing™, but has the side effect of going stale very quickly.

Don't let it go stale. Time it so that you eat the bread newly cooked and still warm.
#oneofthebestthingsintheworld
 
Posted by angelica37 (# 8478) on :
 
Breadmaker bread makes the best toast. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
... Don't let it go stale ...

I suspect it won't get the chance. [Big Grin]

We had some with the veggie soup for lunch today and it seemed just fine; we put the second loaf into the deep-freeze, so it'll be interesting to see how it does when we de-frost it.

These first two loaves were made with flour called "bread mix" which came with its own little packets of yeast and had quite a list of chemical-sounding ingredients which are presumably there to keep it fresh. So far they seem to have worked; in the unlikely event of it lasting beyond the toast stage, there's a pond with ducks just outside where I w*rk ... [Smile]

I really ought to stop messing about here and go and make potato salad for the pot-luck we're going to tomorrow night.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A breadmaker sounds tempting but with HWMBO and Pete being diabetic I'm not sure it would be a good thing; plus the power here is not hugely reliable; plus we can get really nice 7 grain bread for not a lot of money - about 30 pence a loaf.

All that dust on the trip back on Monday and Tuesday is making us all feel lousy and bunged up - slowly coming out of it but we'll be very glad when they have finished widening that road, not that we intend going that way again for a while.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
If the bread does go stale, slice it and let it dry thoroughly. Then convert it into bread crumbs.

Home-made breadcrumbs taste better than store-bought.

Moo
 
Posted by cheesymarzipan (# 9442) on :
 
much talk about bread which is funny because I've just had some eggy bread for lunch! Now I need more bread. Ah well, I was going shopping today anyway.
(No, we don't have a bread maker - our kitchen is small enough already without filling it with more Stuff)
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cheesymarzipan:
.. we don't have a bread maker - our kitchen is small enough already without filling it with more Stuff

Me too. But I am still tempted.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It rained in the night here, not enough to cool things down too much but just enough to make this morning humid and clammy. It is still grey and overcast but hopefully it will burn off before long and we can have some nice breezes.

Ah well, it's still a little warmer than life over there in UK-land - I don't think topless with the windows open would be on the cards over there, would it?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:

Ah well, it's still a little warmer than life over there in UK-land - I don't think topless with the windows open would be on the cards over there, would it?

We could give it a try. With the light on and curtains open this idea could brighten many a dull evening for passers by!

(On second thoughts - brrrrrrrrrrrrrr - I'll put the onesie back on!)
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cheesymarzipan:
... our kitchen is small enough already without filling it with more Stuff ...

So is ours. [Big Grin]

D's Breadmaking Adventures, Chapter 2: Candlemas Cookies
D. is getting quite brave; we've only had the machine for a few days and already he's adapting recipes ...

We'd had a recipe for these (a sort of cross between a sweet bread and a biscuit) for ages and he'd always wanted to try them. I was more impressed than he was, but he couldn't quite work out what wasn't right about them. We may have to try them out on some friends who know about that sort of thing.

PS Wodders, I doubt you'd be going topless here at the moment; we're supposed to get about 8 inches of sn*w tomorrow ... [Frown]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
... we're supposed to get about 8 inches of sn*w ...

I suppose if we average it out ...

The other side of our road has so little you can still see the ******* pavement. We have about a foot and a half.

When I got up I checked the University's web-site and was relieved to discover we had a sn*w-day. A couple of hours later D. dug out the car so I cleared a bit of space for it to go when he gets back.

Then the ******* plough came past, so now we've got a three-foot sn*w-bank in front of the pavement.

******* idiot, ******* sn*w. [Mad] [Mad] [Mad]

Sorry for all the asterisks. [Two face] I've made a beef casserole* - help yourselves.

* Well, what else does one do on a sn*w-day? [Smile]
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
I love snow. [Razz]

I was the only person who didn't want it to end last winter.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
You can come and dig us out any time you like, DS. [Big Grin]

If I'm honest, I liked snow when I was a kid - a snow-day was fun and the snow rarely lasted longer than a few days*. Here, once we get a real "weather-bomb" (say, about 2 feet of snow in the space of a day) and it freezes, it could be with us until Easter, which is a rather depressing thought.

It could be worse. Last winter I was working in a shop, where snow-days are but a dream; working at the university, when they get a snow-day so do I (and I still get paid for it [Yipee] ).

* except for that time in 1978 when the schools were closed for a week ... [Cool]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
None of the kids here get snow days, they are just not on the agenda - but then snow here is a bit of a rarity.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Finally took the plunge and joined Facebook, I've had enough requests now to make it worthwhile. But what a pain it is to get around and amend things! [brick wall] I suppose, like anything, once you're used to it, it's second nature.

Very windy here today - have had to close the windows because they keep blowing wide open. But so mild that I really feel Spring is on its way. The snowdrops are out now so it's only a matter of a few weeks before colour (a riot of yellow spring flowers everywhere) starts to return to the land.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
[Hot and Hormonal] I'm confined to the house, having put my coat in the washing machine before checking what the weather was doing. It's raining, lots, and the sky looks ominously slatey-grey.

Not that I really need to go out until tomorrow... so I might just as well enjoy my temporary confinement! There's cake, books, piano...

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Ariel - be warned and don't do what I do, I tend to friend Shipmates on facebook then forget their Shippie names.

I recommended the Ship to a well known Host the other day - said I thought it would suit them well.

Oooops!


[Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Giggles at Boogie.

One of my colleagues said yesterday I seemed to have the most eclectic set of friends on Facebook, and she enjoyed reading some of the bizarre conversations that arose on my status updates. I think it was a compliment..
 
Posted by amber. (# 11142) on :
 
Hi all

As it is National Hug Day, I thought I'd nip in and leave a nice cup of something for people (since, being British, we don't often do the hug thing )

I do read...just don't post much...

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thanks amber., I'm a great hugger so I shall make sure I hug a few people today.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Met up with Lord P at a rather nice pub at Beckhampton today - couldn't resist toffee apple bread and butter pudding -mmm! Passed him more clothes - I didn't realise just how many clothes he has, partly because most of them were in an amorphous layer on his bedroom floor [Eek!] . It was good to catch up and see that he's OK and that he had got his new phone (See Prayers of the faithful)We tried to go into Marlborough, but couldn't find 2 car park spaces, so we went our seperate ways.

I'm signed on to Facebook, Darllenwr isn't. It's the only way we find out what Lord P is doing! I've got a couple of Shipmate friends, mainly people I've met in real life, but there are a few in foreign parts. It can become very addictive. There are no proper instructions, so you just have to muddle through if you want tto do anything in particular.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I quite like Facebook...I like following links other people have posted and catching up with what people are up to.

But I only know people on board by their Ship names, so have No Idea if I "know" anyone on FB as well, if you see what I mean.
And I equally have no clue if I know anyone in RL who is also on The Ship (apart from those special few I met at a Ship Meet last May).

Thank you for the cuppa Amber - hope you have had a nice day too.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I quite enjoy Facebook - it's given me the chance to catch up with people I haven't seen since we all left school thirty-something years ago ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Still in sn*w-plough rant mode - someone was farting about with a plough at the top of the road at three o'clock this morning but despite there being no cars parked on our side of the road he didn't have the wit to shift the bank of sn*w in front of our house. Moron. [Mad]

Amber, I'll have a cup of tea and a virtual hug, and I've still got CAKE. [Smile]
 
Posted by amber. (# 11142) on :
 
Ooo, cake! Thanks!! [Smile]

I love Facebook. Very highly visual, which works for me, and it works really well as a fairly safe "circle of friends*" for someone like me for when I need to say something but need it to be amongst people who understand what I mean and can cope with the clumsiness. Wonderful stuff [Smile]

Shall be pondering the garden today. I may build up to actually doing something in it, too. [Biased]

*"Circle of Friends" is a model of a safe group for people with learning disabilities or autism... where people commit in an informal way to being gentle and wise friends, and benefit from a shared friendship and journey through life with the person at its centre too.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I'm finding the interface of Facebook a bit tricky to find my way around. I haven't yet quite got the hang of it - I hadn't expected it to be this complex and am at the stage where I'm still trying to memorize what I have to click on to get various options, as things seem to be not where I thought I'd last seen them.

Anyway - Chinese New Year this weekend! I was thinking about going to Birmingham for the occasion, but the photos of last year suggest I wouldn't get near the Chinese Quarter anyway for the crowds. It's the Year of the Dragon, so it should be a really colourful event.

I'm guessing the London event will be pretty spectacular with lots of colourful dragons snaking through the streets chasing the huge pearl-shaped lanterns on sticks, to the sound of drums and firecrackers...
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I can't be arsed with FB - I seem to have got myself two different accounts (without knowing how) but can't get to see any of my friends' pages from either account. I also get messages about updates but then can't find them when I look. So most of the time I give up. From time to time I go in, click random buttons, explode with frustration, say a few choice words and come back onboard The Ship.

I think I might go and make some soup.
ETA - anything other than do my quarterly tax return which I need to post off tomorrow!!!

[ 22. January 2012, 09:00: Message edited by: Dormouse ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Dormouse - as it's nearly -10°C here, I think a bowl of tax-return avoidance soup would go down very nicely. Would you like some home-made bread to go with it? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I'm finding the interface of Facebook a bit tricky [...] things seem to be not where I thought I'd last seen them.

They aren't. They are changing it all the time. A major rewrite every two years or so, a couple or more of big changes each year, and minor tinkering almost every week.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I discovered that my online declaration form was available so I declared in about 30 seconds and it was done! Thanks due to MrD for moral support.
The butternut squash soup was good...but homemade breadwould have added more deliciousness! I had some coconut milk left so I made a coconut cake as well and some honey spice biskits
I tried to make Hugh Fearley-Whittingstall's flatbread tonight. An unmitigated disaster. Sticky unworkable dough which just flobbed about. It went in the bin.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
D's breadmaking adventures continue apace: today he made a raisin and cinnamon loaf, which was v. nice (there's plenty left - help yourselves).

Back to normal after the faux long-weekend created by the sn*w-day on Friday. Why does one's bed (and one's teddy-bear [Smile] ) take on all the properties of super-glue at 7:30 on a Monday morning?

sleepy piglet [Snore]

[ 24. January 2012, 00:51: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
There's nothing like a warm teddy bear. Does yours get even softer and cuddlier when he's warm too?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Which reminds me that Pete's teddy is still up here in the office, Pete hasn't asked to see him at all since he arrived about 5 or 6 weeks ago but I still hug the teddy so he doesn't feel too upset - actually I think he'd rather stay up here with us and I'm not surprised, given the way he has been treated!
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
You suffer from selective amnesia, Weasel dear.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
You suffer from selective amnesia, Weasel dear.

He doesn't seem to be suffering. I think he's enjoying it.

Moo
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I could have done with a warm and cuddly teddy bear this weekend. The central heating died on Friday, and we have only just got it fixed now (Monday afternoon)

It has been VERY cold here. [Frown] [Frown] [Frown]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'm sorry about the heating Nicodemia and am glad it is now repaired.

We have an alienated Canadian Teddy and a small Christmas Koala from Aussie-land who might be looking for a new home after they go through counselling - I think they may prefer to be placed together.
 
Posted by kingsfold (# 1726) on :
 
Isn't there a small well-travelled moose somewhere in South Wales who might appreciate a visit?
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Of course, a teddy can be one of these
which makes WW's statement that Pete's teddy is still up here in the office a little bit [Eek!]

I'm not sure I can get my head round PeteC in one of those!!!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
Of course, a teddy can be one of these
which makes WW's statement that Pete's teddy is still up here in the office a little bit [Eek!]

I'm not sure I can get my head round PeteC in one of those!!!

Oh, I don't know, he might look rather chic!

[Projectile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
There are reasons why I always refer to them as teddy-bears. [Big Grin] And yes, the more you hug them the softer and more cuddly they become. [Smile]

For some reason as I was typing this the thread-title crept into my peripheral vision and I read it as Perfidious Albino ...

[Confused]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
In retrospect my response to Dormouse might have been better as:

quote:
To the pure all things are pure
Mind you, I suppose that could be taken as referring to our guest [Eek!]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
[Frown] Glum start to the day as I discover that I have well and truly ****ed up an entertainment booking that everyone has been looking forward to for months. We may have to cancel.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
You have my sympathies, Qlib. Lets hope you can rescue something. [Help] [Votive]

Dull grey day again, and I can look forward this morning to sitting for ages in an overheated hospital in a chair that has seen better days long ago to see the Consultant I should have seen 2 months ago, but clinic was cancelled.

Oh Joys! [Frown]
 
Posted by Pooks (# 11425) on :
 
Hi everybody. I am not a regular visitor to this thread, so I hope you will forgive my intrusion. The reason that I am here is because I saw something beautiful written about this little island of ours - by people who are of foreign origin. I felt pride and joy and thought how fortunate that I can live here. I thought you might enjoy it too.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Just off to choir now. I can't say I like Durufle's Requiem...
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
You have my sympathies, Qlib. Lets hope you can rescue something. [Help] [Votive]

Thanks - not as bad as I feared. It's going ahead and I just feel so [Yipee] All the other troubles suddenly seem very small.

Thanks for the links, Pooks.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
Just off to choir now. I can't say I like Durufle's Requiem...

You have my sympathy. I've never sung in it, but D. accompanied it a few times when we lived in Ireland and he says it's the hairiest organ part in the entire repertoire. I can vouch for this; it was even difficult to turn pages for ... [Eek!]

I'm just back from choir practice; among other things for Candlemas we're rehearsing the Nunc Dimittis from the Service for Trebles by Weelkes, which is gloriously Tudor and full of wonderful English cadences. [Big Grin]

Glad you got things sorted, Qlib - hope it goes according to plan.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
My journey home tonight took twice as long as it normally does. I left work a little early, saw it was sleeting and thought "this won't stick" WRONG!!! By the time I got to the Heads of the Valleys road, it was whiteout. I prayed my way home, and thankfully the roads got clearer the further down the valley I came. Darllenwr was quite srprised to see how much snow there was on the car! I'm hoping it'll all melt by the morning - either that, or that we have a good foot of the horrible sruff overnight.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Whoever's in the parking space next to me has just driven in from somewhere where there's snow. We've only had rain, so they're clearly not local.

Stars are as clear as anything again tonight - no sign of the Aurora Borealis though, so I'm giving up and going to watch my new Sherlock DVD instead. [Yipee]

Pooks - do come and post again, you're always welcome on this thread, don't feel like an intruder. I liked your link, thanks for posting it.
 
Posted by Pooks (# 11425) on :
 
Thanks Ariel! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
VICTORY!!!

Between us we have shamed Pete into reclaiming his teddies who, it must be said, were a little reluctant to leave their companions up here and the friendly environment we have created for them.

In other news I am thinking I might start a thread somewhere on unnatural practices - first on the list will be being bright and cheerful first thing in the morning!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Wodders - if you have traumatised teddies, I would recommend hug therapy, which is very beneficial for Small Bears.

St. G. - are you really likely to get a foot of sn*w? That's quite impressive - it would be enough to give us a sn*w-day ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
St Gwladys - there's snow at the Heads of the Valleys?! It's quite mild here and we're not that far further north.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
The 'tops' to the north of Newport (1200-1500 feet) were white this morning. There was snow around, but not down our way.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We saw our tenant again today, poking his head out of the hole in the tree. He seems very content.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Blimey, what a day!

So far today I have phoned an employment agency to find that the CV I sent when I "registered" online does not exist in their files... then been called by another, and found that the records they were using for my contact details were four years out of date despite me sending regular updates... then tried to get in touch with HR at a company to discover (in tones of "What a twat for even trying") that I cannot contact anyone without a name... even though there are no names on their website (so I got the bugger going, then rang off in mid-flow).

Got home to discover that some genius had decided that all my freshly-washed and stowed away flowerpots were waste put out for recycling - despite the fact that they were in the boxes the council told residents they could use for their own purposes two years ago as they were being replaced by wheelie bins... and the wheelie bin was out on the pavement... so all my pots are now in a bin lorry and to top it all off I open my credit card bill to discover two fraudulent transactions on it!

Bugger a cup of tea, pass the GIN!

AG
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Todays selection on what Britain is like outside London by those who are not British.

Jengie


[coding amended - WW]

[ 28. January 2012, 01:40: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
...and to top it all off I open my credit card bill to discover two fraudulent transactions on it!

The perfect end to a perfect day - what a horrible surprise! I hope you weren't stung for a lot. [Frown]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Thankfully, no snow today!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I got home from university an hour ago (a good day) - lots of white stuff on top of our hill - but none anywhere else!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Large GIN on its way, Sandemaniac - I think you need it.

D. said it was my turn to use the bread-making machine today [Smile] so there's raisin and cinnamon bread (which really came out rather well though I say it what shouldn't). Help yourselves.

We've got about 6 inches of snow in the forecast for Saturday - what the hell use is snow if you don't get a snow-day?

Hmph. [Frown]

disgruntled piglet
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Fortunately we are not far enough up the moor for snow, though the higher Pennine passes are closed. A good day for staying in with a single malt(the dregs left from Christmas 2010).

It'll soon be time for a new bottle or two. I fancy one of the Orcadian ones, probably Scapa.

(What sort of spell checker is this that doesn't recognise "Orcadian?")
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
We've got about 6 inches of snow in the forecast for Saturday - what the hell use is snow if you don't get a snow-day?

Ah, but if it's Saturday -

Build your own snowman, snowdog and/or snowwoman.

Roll all the snow on your lawn up into one really enormous snowball. Then you will have green grass and a dirty great frozen boulder in one corner, which will melt slowly over the coming weeks.

If you're feeling adventurous, carve the frozen boulder into an interesting sculpture and charge people to come and see it.

Take photos and tease people in milder climates with pictures of what a "real winter" looks like.

More if I can think of it...
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Our church annual panto (like) presentation ended today after 2 performances. Went really very much better than any of us thought it would. Exhausted now - and I only had a minor role - how on earth do the professionals do it? On reflection I guess that's their job which makes it a bit different. Popcorn or chocolate anyone - there's a bit left.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
... What sort of spell checker is this that doesn't recognise "Orcadian?" ...

One with no taste whatsoever. [Big Grin]

The sn*w could have been worse: D. dug out the sn*w-bank that the plough had left so he could get the car out, and I made the space a bit bigger. Then sundry ploughists came past (some from the council, some in their own lorries fitted with ploughs) and it's not too bad now. It really wouldn't have been sculptable - it was very heavy and wet when I was shovelling it.

I've now had my first go at making ordinary bread, which is baking in the machine as I write - once you read this it'll probably be ready for virtual tasting with jam or honey.

Marmite is also available for the clinically insane. [Devil]

Enigma - yes please to chocolate, but definitely no thanks to popcorn - horrid stuff.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Nice cold foggy morning, and fog getting thicker. Not really the weather for a day trip, but at least it isn't icy.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Another glorious day here in paradise - blue sky, sunshine and soft breezes - it's a pity I was awake half the night coughing!

I know I've said this before [with my memory it might have been as recent as yesterday] but one of the things I love about being here is that pretty much everyone takes religion seriously. A gang of lads walking along together could well be heading for temple or mosque or church - and the vast majority of folks respect other people's faith.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
HELP!!!

HWMBO
has just been in here singing to me!!
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
You sound peturbed, WW! [Big Grin] Here, have a cuppa, or would gin be better? Or earplugs? What was he serenading you with?

It's really jolly cold here, but at least it feels like January ought to. It's been far too mild lately. But, oh my, minieggs are on sale. [Two face] I'm really hoping MrJt9 is in soon to save me from myself.
 
Posted by mrs whibley (# 4798) on :
 
I wondered whether I could start a new spiritual discipline of eating mini eggs and creme eggs on alternate Sundays. Some people fast on Fridays all year round, don't they? [Snigger]
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
Ahhh - thank you for reminding me that I have a 6-pack* tucked away in the cupboard. (V good deal in Waitrose.)

*Creme eggs, that is. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Creme eggs? They're a bit like Marmite - you either love them or loathe 'em - personally, I can't stand them.
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
Creme eggs are an acquired taste - one which I, as a type-1 diabetic, do not propose to acquire!

Disgusting things!

E.T.A. If I wanted to tap-dance my way up one wall, across the ceiling and down the other, eating a creme egg might be a good idea. Otherwise, emphatically not.

[ 29. January 2012, 20:50: Message edited by: Darllenwr ]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Thanks for the GIN, it was a great help!

No, I wasn't stung for much - £40 all told, but it's a PITA filing in all the paperwork. Luckily, I was past getting mad when I opened the statement, and had to laugh.

AG
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I used to like creme eggs (about 30-odd years ago), but I doubt very much if I could eat one now - they're so sweet I can feel my teeth rotting just reading about them.

Jolly good music at the Cathedral today - in the morning Haydn's Missa Sancti Johannis de Deo (hummable tunes, beloved by the punters) and at Evensong lots of Byrd (beloved by me) - Responses, Second Service and Teach me, O Lord with me doing a spot of solo-singing.

Wodders, whether or not you need help may depend on what HWMBO was singing ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I used to like creme eggs (about 30-odd years ago), but I doubt very much if I could eat one now - they're so sweet I can feel my teeth rotting just reading about them.

Same here. Also, aren't they smaller than they used to be?

Bitterly cold tonight - can't get warm and I'm sitting in front of the fan heater. No snow though.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Same here. Also, aren't they smaller than they used to be?

Everything is, everything is [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
I'm not.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Killing me] Me neither, DS.

Mars bars are. I have a recipe for those squares made with melted Mars bars and Rice Krispies that calls for 3 Mars bars to however many ounces of Rice Krispies, but it worked far better with four.

This is a bummer: they come in packets of four, which would have left one for me ... [Razz]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Mars Bars aren't the same either. They made them softer and sweeter about 10 years ago so they'd appeal more to women. A proper Mars Bar is something you could sink your teeth into. On a cold day, you had to basically saw a chunk off it. The current version is more like Milky Way. (Yes, I do know it's supposed to be a take on that.)

Even nostalgia isn't the same as it used to be. [Frown]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I agree, I miss the old-style nostalgia so much!

A trip to the city this morning - I got off the bus when I got there, walked up the road from shop to shop then arrived at the next bus stand and caught the bus home having bought all that I required bar the diabetic marmalade* that was out of stock. My actual time in the city was under an hour!

*No, I didn't know that marmalade could be diabetic, either!
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Mars Bars aren't the same either. They made them softer and sweeter about 10 years ago so they'd appeal more to women. A proper Mars Bar is something you could sink your teeth into. On a cold day, you had to basically saw a chunk off it. The current version is more like Milky Way. (Yes, I do know it's supposed to be a take on that.)

Even nostalgia isn't the same as it used to be. [Frown]

Trouble is, the soft version is the only one our teeth can manage these days!
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
A sort of tangent on the Mars Bar - chopped up, melted and with a bit of milk added to keep it soft, it makes a great topping for a chocolate cake.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
A sort of tangent on the Mars Bar - chopped up, melted and with a bit of milk added to keep it soft, it makes a great topping for a chocolate cake.

<tamgent two>

If you like Mars Bar good and hard, put it in the fridge for half an hour, then take it out and cut it into slices. Excellent, and it lasts longer!

</tangent two>
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I've not had a Mars Bar for 20 years!

*
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Me too, Boogie!

Have just been into town to try and get money for A Certain Host and the machine didn't want to play - I think it had run out of ink. Hopefully it will give some tomorrow or rent won't be paid then he'll have to move into the woodshed!

As we all know there is always something nasty in a woodshed!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I don't usually post on the Ship at w*rk, but they've closed the University because of Inclement Weather™ (and I should have left half an hour ago anyway), but the weather's so inclement that D. phoned to say would I wait for a bit until it's not a complete white-out.

Me? Feel guilty? [Angel]

Hmph squared. [Mad]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chorister:
Trouble is, the soft version is the only one our teeth can manage these days!

Our teeth? This reminds me of the story of the three witches who shared one eye and one tooth between them.* I'll have you know I'm fine with a Mars Bar - provided it's been allowed to melt for a bit first, of course.

* Unless of course you're referring to the communal Ship of Fools Set of Teeth™.

In other news, still bitterly cold, still no snow.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Reminds me of the old story about the hell-fire preacher who was getting very eloquent on the subject of the wailing and gnashing of teeth in the afterlife...
...one person asked "But what if you haven't got any teeth?"

"Teeth will be provided" - came the response.

It's bitterly cold out there, and there is no cloud cover, so the stars that can be seen (Bethnei is in the middle of a lot of large towns and cities so suffers from light pollution) are twinkling away very frostily.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
... "Teeth will be provided" ...

[Killing me]
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... still no snow.

I've got lots - would you like some? [Big Grin]

D. eventually picked me up from w*rk about an hour later than usual; with the visibility being little more than the end of your nose, the traffic was somewhat mental. When we got home, we had to dig our way into the house - the 6 inches predicted by the Westher Channel turned out to be 2-foot drifts ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I do enjoy reading about everyone's winter travails - such an eloquent reminder of my previous life.

My eldest brother and his new[-ish] wife are thinking of moving from south Manchester down into northern Shropshire - I spent a winter down there once on a placement and that area can get really cold!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I do enjoy reading about everyone's winter travails - such an eloquent reminder of my previous life.

It's why we do it - we're sure you'll appreciate these evocative little reminders of the country of your birth.

Apparently it's warmer in Antarctica today, a fact the papers are making much of, but I remind myself it's summer down there so probably warmer than it usually is. Piglet - yes please, so long as it doesn't hang around and turn to ice on the pavements. A light dusting will be fine.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Hooray for hot water!

Our boiler has been dead (pump u/s)for almost a week but Keith, The Man Who Does Stuff fitted the replacement yesterday so we have hot water and central heating again. Just in time for a cold snap too. The dodgy electric heaters and the kettle on the landing can go away again. Mind you, it took a while to warm the house.

eta: we consoled ourselves by looking up the weather in Winnepeg! How the he** do people manage in -27?

[ 01. February 2012, 09:29: Message edited by: Sioni Sais ]
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
Ooooh, oooh, yes please Piglet. Can I have about 18 inches please, and can it last for a few weeks, and cling to the trees? I've counted the toilet rolls, and if there's more than 18 inches that will be fine too.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We've been shopping today! It was supposed to be shopping for trouser cloth for Pete but then turned into general cloth shopping - Pete has three trouser pieces, already with the tailor, and two hats - HWMBO has four shirt pieces including an amazing bright blue linen, and a I have just a solitary bit of cotton shirting and a new hat.

Compared to the others I am so restrained!

eta: today the ATM courteously deigned to give Pete some money so he is saved from the woodshed at least for a little while.

[ 01. February 2012, 10:59: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Oh frabjous day!! [Yipee] I visited Marks & Spencer on the Champs Elysées this lunchtime. (It opened just before Christmas but you had to queue to get in so I decided to wait.)

They have flipping everything. I went in there to buy some tea, I may have left with one or two extra things [Hot and Hormonal] - they have bacon, crumpets, biscuits, custard, in short everything a little exiled expat Brit could possibly wish for. [Smile] And the stuff is not that expensive - I was pleasantly surprised.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Mmmmmmmmmm! Crumpets!!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
There are sometimes advantages is being disabled.
Where I work, there is a leaking gutter just by the main entrance, and it was very icy yesterday - sufficiently so, that when I reported that I had nearly fallen on it, my boss went to get grit. I reported it to the centre manager today, and just before I left on a visit, she was expecting workmen to fix it within an hour. That guttering has been damaged and leaking for at least 18 months!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... Piglet - yes please, so long as it doesn't hang around and turn to ice on the pavements ...

Too late. [Frown] We now have Patches of Treachery™ and enormous heaps of snirt.*
quote:
Originally posted by La vie en rouge:
I visited Marks & Spencer on the Champs Elysées this lunchtime ...

I'm so jealous. There was an M&S here which closed shortly before we arrived - in fact we were talking about it in the pub after choir practice this evening - and I can't tell you how much I want one of their prawn and mayonnaise sandwiches. Right now.

deprived piglet

* snirt n. snow + dirt
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
The bit of their range I was most excited about was the bacon and sausages. I cooked a gigantic fry-up last night (when it was minus eight degrees, just the weather for a load of greasy fatty fried pork products). I can feel my arteries hardening as we speak, but I'm going to die really happy. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
What I forgot to say yesterday is that when we got to new posh shop in town the lift was out of service so we had HWMBO, various assistants and me running up and down two flights of stairs bringing stuff for Pete to see and wonder about - I think he quite enjoyed his role as the lord of all he surveyed. One of the salesmen was a little pushy for a while but I think he got the message that that might not be the best way to proceed.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
O the pleasure of a hot meal on a night as cold as this...! Went for a walk at lunchtime, sunny though it was my fingers and nose went numb pretty quickly. One of those days where once you get cold it takes a long time to get warm again. The air is sufficiently cold to smell cleaner than usual, no mean feat on a railway platform.

Here are some pictures of the cold weather across Europe - enjoy.

[ 02. February 2012, 18:21: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We had a dusting of snow on Tuesday - I needed it for the final shot for the January Treasure Hunt on 365, and was far more excited than the teenagers I was supposed to be teaching ICT at that moment, so when we had a break I dived out and got a few photographs.

But it's bitterly cold and I'm really not looking forward to catching a 5:30am tube, that's an outside end of the line tube, on Saturday morning.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We had some more sn*w this morning too; it was generally reckoned that we should have had a sn*w-day but didn't. [Frown]

It's -8°C here at the moment, and we've got some pretty spectacular icicles hanging from the roof chez Piglet.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
[Big Grin]

It's a lovely morning here.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
It's -8°C here at the moment, and we've got some pretty spectacular icicles hanging from the roof chez Piglet.

None here so far, but I still remember last year's vividly. I don't think I'll forget them in a hurry. They were like taloned goblin fingers that crept slowly over the edge of the roof while I was inside looking out, and then over my windows, forming bars that prevented me from fully opening the window. Most were about 2-3 feet long, but there was one monster by the drainpipe that was 8' long.

The fun part was going out underneath these things, as periodically they would fall off without warning and a long spear of solid ice would shatter noisily as it met the ground. Luckily nobody ever was underneath at exactly the time. The 8-foot-long one worried me a bit - but made a gloriously resounding crash when it finally did come down.
 
Posted by Aelred of Rievaulx (# 16860) on :
 
Lovely, sunny and frosty here. I am tired of being told about "that Siberian weather" that is coming our way - no forecast I can find says we will have worse than -3° at night and nothing under 0° in the day. Now I hardly call that a winter.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
You might. It's 17°F or -8°C here at the time of writing, which means it was colder when I left home this morning.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
In an inversion of the normal run of things, I see Stornoway is being described as a 'hot spot' - at a sweltering 5C. Embro is supposed to be 0C, but I don't believe it - we have cloud cover and no frost (unlike yesterday).
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
-7 to -8 here (the two sides of the max-min disagree by a degree). It felt savagely, finger burningly, cold last night going home, yet was only -2/3 by the same device. Make sense of that...

However it's hard enough underfoot to let me commute up the river again. This morning was cloudy, but the sun poked through the one streak of clear sky on the horizon and a burning dagger flashed down the Thames. I love that as a commuting route! [Yipee]

Hoping it stays cold until sunday - showing someone the joys of Port Meadow, and it'll be much nicer if it's still hard underfoot.

AG
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
-5 overnight and the bloody boiler's acting up again! It seems that once a hot water system starts to misbehave it will never be quite right again.

I expect it will be OK this evening, for a few hours anyway.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Holy COW it's cold. Once again -8° here this morning, and not going to be going over zero for at least the next week on current predictions. Add in the windchill and it apparently feels like -15°. Very bright and dry, so no ice or anything, but if anything does come down from the sky it'll definitely be snow.

In one way, I think it's more bearable than British cold, because it's drier, but when it's this brutal it hurts to breathe (which I feel is somewhat of a problem, what with breathing being a generally rather necessary activity [Roll Eyes] ).
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
Hoping it stays cold until sunday - showing someone the joys of Port Meadow, and it'll be much nicer if it's still hard underfoot.

Should do, though someone did mention a possible 4" of snow on Saturday.

I ike the idea of commuting up the river, and sailing into work. Or possibly, given the canal, barging into work.

Though in this weather, one might skate in...
 
Posted by ElaineC (# 12244) on :
 
It didn't feel quite so cold this morning but that was partly due to the fact that the wind had dropped and partly due to the fact that I was wearing, pretty much, two of everything!

Having been at work long enough to remove several layers of jumpers, the fire alarm went off and we had to evacuate the building. After standing around in the cold for around 20 minutes we were told there was a leak in the basement and they didn't know when we would be allowed back in. Fortunately we could go to the canteen in an adjacent building.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
[QUOTE]
I ike the idea of commuting up the river, and sailing into work. Or possibly, given the canal, barging into work. Though in this weather, one might skate in...

It's getting close - there was ice up the edges anywhere the water was still!

AG
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
A few years ago, someone I knew got their picture in the local paper when they decided to ski to work!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
-8 this morning going to work, -5 coming home. I had to go on a couple of visits, and it actually made it to -0.5 this afternoon - but not for long. I'm glad I'm in a really warm office next to a radiator!
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Though in this weather, one might skate in...

It's getting close - there was ice up the edges anywhere the water was still!
Although I've never yet managed to drag Sandemaniac to an ice rink...

Spent yesterday curled up with a miserable cold. Phoned in to tell work I wasn't fit to come in this morning either, and got told I sounded worse than yesterday so probably shouldn't be trying to come in anyway! Don't you just love bosses sometimes [Roll Eyes]

Feeling somewhat better, so about to put the kettle on. Tea/coffee/hot water/hot Ribena for anyone else?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Poor you, CK. Have some Lem-sip or similar made palatable with lemon juice, Manuka honey and a wee drop of whisky.

We're sort of bracing ourselves at the moment for the blizzard that was supposed to start a couple of hours ago but hasn't. As D. said, it can go on not snowing as long as it likes.

What's the use of a blizzard at the week-end? And anyway, where the **** are we going to put another foot of snow?
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Damned if I know where to put another foot of snow. I haven't had that problem in recent memory.

[Yipee]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Erm, I think the best place is on top of the last lot.

Yup, that's me, always trying to be helpful.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Snow is forecast here this afternoon, but only if we are high enough.

Previous experience has assured me we are High Enough for quite a lot of snow.

Being a weekend, the sledgers will be out in force once there's about a centimeter (half inch for our metrically-challenged friends! [Biased] )

I remember one snowy weekend the (then very small) grandsons came over, but all shops had sold out of sledges. So we dug out two big tins for roasting large turkeys in, and they went down the hill on those!

Ah, happy days!
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Frozen pipes.

Not happy - thought we'd got this problem sorted last winter...

Off to deal with them.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
No snow yet here, but I reckon it'll arrive earlier than expected - I'm guessing about lunchtime for this corner of the world.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Mad rush at the local shops this morning, as the snow started coming down at about 10 o'clock. I went out to stock up on milk and fresh fruit. Couldn't resist getting more bread, even though I have a (small) freezer full of the stuff because I'm supposed to be hosting a soup and rolls lunch tomorrow. I was guessing that that wouldn't happen, but it's stopped snowing now.

Not sure whether to be glad or sorry.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
No snow yet here, but I bought a snow shovel this morning so I'm well prepared.

Mr Boogs set off for Mexico today, I'm joining him on Thursday.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Pipes unfrozen, and heating going again. I learnt the defrosting lessons well!

Now off to keep warm, and recover from all this activity on a Saturday. I need to conserve my energy for the Six Nations Rugby later on...
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Snowing here in a half hearted fashion - enough to stop us going out, but not enough to cause major problems yet.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Here we go - I think: we've been getting snow in instalments of 5 flakes a time. Another of the council's cutbacks, I suppose.
 
Posted by Ceannaideach (# 12007) on :
 
The snow has started here, well I say snow it looks more like icing sugar at the moment. But either way I'm sat snug in front of an open fire. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Snowing here in a half hearted fashion - enough to stop us going out, but not enough to cause major problems yet.

Its doing so here, I am below the Sheffield snow line where it does not normally settle, but it seems to be having a go. Question is do I need to be on standby for church. Worship will happen, but if there is snow in the morning a number of people won't make it including some elders. It is Communion Sunday.

Jengie
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Do you need me to report in with the weather from here?

I'll spare you and just say that it is a lovely, moonlit, tropical evening. I don't think there will be any snow delays locally tomorrow.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Now, mind you, it can be just a tad coolish at dawn. Does that count as inclement weather? Those poor paperboys on their bikes all bundled up against the weather!

[Angel]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Do you need me to report in with the weather from here?

What, and spoil the fun of a mug of hot chocolate and a toasted teacake with melted butter soaking into it, while the snow falls gently down outside? The pleasure of mulled wine to come, a rich, satisfying winter casserole and one of those sponge puddings or substantial crumbles that are really best enjoyed on a cold winter's day?

It's not all bad, you know. [Razz]
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
Snow has turned to drizzle here - trouble is, we have been warned that the 'rain' might freeze on impact - not too healthy with the sort of gradients we have round hereabouts.

In consultation with the relevant Wardens, we have decided to cancel Morning Prayer in Brithdir tomorrow - I was due to Officiate and Preach - even if the rain should stay unfrozen and wash the snow away. One of the peculiar ironies of this parish is that St David's church in Brithdir is the most readily accessible of our buildings under ordinary conditions, with level access straight off the pavement. However, if it snows or freezes, St David's promptly becomes the most dangerous of our churches - all approaches involve dropping down steep gradients. Add to this a congregation who are mostly over 60 and nearly all of whom live outside the village and drive to church on Sunday. Cancelling the service tomorrow was a no-brainer.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Just wet where I am - but very cold so if it freezes it won't be pleasant. I chose a very good day to have my hair cut a lot shorter didn't I?? I know I shouldn't have accepted the offer of a lovely head massage which made all sensible thought depart. Methinks my ears will be cold in the coming days.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Erm, I think the best place is on top of the last lot.

Yup, that's me, always trying to be helpful.

Well always trying, anyway ... [Devil]

quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Mr Boogs set off for Mexico today, I'm joining him on Thursday ...

Leave a cold tap dripping in your house while you're away in case your cold snap continues - the last thing you want is to come back to a flood.

The blizzard really didn't add as much to the snow-heaps as we feared - D. did a spot of minor digging round the car and that was about it. Hope we don't get too much more overnight as we've got our Candlemas service tomorrow morning, and we don't want people not to be able to get there.

Domestic Goddess Piglet has been in action today - a couple of loads of laundry done, a pot of veggie soup made and a loaf merrily churning in the bread-machine. D. made a raisin, orange and cardamom loaf yesterday, which is v. nice with a thick layer of butter.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Well, that was fun - I'd say we have about 5" of so of the stuff. I see 100 vehicles have been stranded on the M40 - glad I didn't risk going out in the car yesterday afternoon. It all seems to be melting now, anyway.

Three very confused young cats next door exploring this winter wonderland: one climbed a fence to see if there was any more snow on the other side, one bolted for the shelter of underneath a car, and one shot into the leeway of a dustbin, a fence, and a tree in extremely rapid succession trying to get away from it, before streaking back to home.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Leave a cold tap dripping in your house while you're away in case your cold snap continues - the last thing you want is to come back to a flood.

Luckily the dog sitter will be around to look after the house.

Mr Boog got away just in time - lots of flights cancelled from Heathrow today. We are taking a team of ten to work with street kids in Ensenada, Mexico. Mr Boog gone ahead to prepare the way as he's the boss. The rest of us fly on Thursday.

My part is staff training for behaviour management.

Of course, we are finishing our trip with a small holiday in California.

[Smile]

[ 05. February 2012, 07:23: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Boogie - I reckon you had more than your fair share of snow up there, judging from the news reports!

How very sensible of you to go to Mexico at this time of the year! [Big Grin] And enjoy your break in California - soun ds a great idea! [Smile]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We've got about 5" here too.

It started snowing in Nottingham properly about 3pm, and I knew I was going to be in trouble getting home, but also I couldn't blag my way onto an earlier train when they didn't see there was a problem. 19:28 train out of Nottingham was fine, but you could see how much snow we'd been through when we arrived in the London snowstorm at 21:15. Tube was fine and running OK when I got on it and I was hoping I'd just make it, but the train I was on got stopped 5 stops from home because there was a derailed tube a couple of stops up. And it took a while for the information to filter through. The trains started shuttling back and forth from where we were and wrote off the final 5 stops! Nothing coming through from further east at all.

No buses, they'd been cancelled as too dangerous earlier, very exciting shared cab drive home from there, with me relaxing gradually and certainly when I reckoned I was now in walking distance from home, 2 miles out and before the last horrible hill up - with the cab driver helping the two cars in front of us to move so he could continue.

One of the couples who was also trying to get to where we are, at the end of the tube line, to collect a car to go on to somewhere on the mainline rail system, looked at the 45 minute queue for cabs and tried to go back in and get a mainline train from central London to find that the tubes weren't running in any more either.

I'll put some photos up later - from yesterday and today on 365 and Flickr
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Thanks Nicodemia! We have a computer there, so I'll be in touch.

[Smile]


Spot the dog!

Spot the car!
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
Several inches of snow today so took an executive decision that today was going to be spent in jammies watching Borgen on iplayer. I know Sunday mass is an obligation but...
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Well, Macarius and I had to leave to walk to church at about 7.15 for the 8 am service - Macarius was preaching and the car wasn't going anywhere (he was preaching at the 10.30 too but I came home... and he's meant to be doing evensong but I'm wondering if that will be cancelled).

It is melting just a little but I think it will freeze again as the evening draws in. Perhaps with any luck the trains won't be running tomorrow and I won't be able to get to work?

M.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
As usual in cold weather, TV reception has gone for the duration, no picture and only staccato sound. Hope this weather clears soon, I do resent paying the full whack for a licence fee when I'm only able to see television now and again.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
It's cold here too...we reached -14° on Friday night.Together with two other ladies I feed the Poor Cats(stray cats) of the village. I feel SO sorry for them in this weather and really, really hope they have somewhere relatively warm to hang out. I fed them pasta, mixed with cream, cheese and duck fat, plus two big tins of cat food. Most of the food was eaten, but what wasn't was frozen into a solid lump - this morning I found two of the cats licking the lump, trying to get something to eat!
It's a beautiful day now, all sunshine and blue, cloudless skies - but, of course, it's bitterly cold. I'll be snug in my study making birthday cards, I think.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Boogie, I didn't realise your dog was called Spot!

Pete and I have just got back from a walk in the evening cool down to a riverside temple and back - most enjoyable. There was a marriage halfway there so there was a slight delay whilst a photo of gang of kids was taken - Pete pushed on through giving me a great excuse to leave and follow him!
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
The estimate I heard was six inches here and that is below the snow line, people are snowed in above it but it is melting and main roads are moving. Yes Communion happened, no I was not called on to serve.

Jengie
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
No freezing rain overnight, but the temperature did fall low enough to put an icy crust on everything this morning. Spent quite a lot of time spreading rock salt over the steps down to the church this morning. St G effectively house-bound - it simply isn't viable getting her scooter out in this stuff. As it is, I had to do urgent running repairs to her scooter yesterday morning, when the drive belt broke its internal steel banding and stretched out of shape, leaving her stranded in town. Be thankful for mobile phones.

Temperatures are high enough for there to have been a significant thaw today and are forecast to stay comfortably above freezing overnight. All being well, St G will be able to get to work in the morning.

I hope she does - she rapidly succumbs to cabin fever when she can't get out and I can't cope with coming home to find her climbing the walls!
 
Posted by kingsfold (# 1726) on :
 
Hope you're all OK and surviving.
It seems somewhat paradoxical to me that north of the border seems to be positively balmy by comparison. No snow here, though we had rain yesterday, and it was a little icy this morning. Didn't stop anything though... (Of course further north may have copped it too - I don't know)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
We're surviving. I went out briefly to the shop at the corner of the road, partly to check what state the pavements were going to be in pre-dawn for the morning trip to work. Bits of them are fine and clear - a lot has melted today - but there are some potential ankle-twisters if it freezes over tonight.

Some kids were playing with the snow in the road this afternoon - "Let's build a snowman!" suggested one, quickly followed by another's, "No, let's make a Hello Kitty!"

Whatever it was they made, it didn't look a lot like either...
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Not a single flake in Stirling either - I took this picture in the garden earlier, it's not tropical or anything but is fairly mild.

Listening to the BBC news is interesting, it keeps talking about "large parts of the UK" being covered in snow, when what it means is "large parts of England". When I first moved here I wasn't convinced of the charge of London/England-centric national BBC, but I do notice it more these days.
 
Posted by angelica37 (# 8478) on :
 
Several inches of snow here, enough to close the container port and delay some trains and also make the garden look really pretty.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We're still freezing here, and no melt of snow except a bit of falling from roofs - not sure what's happening tomorrow - some pictures of Nottingham yesterday and here today.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Great pictures CK - I love the one with the girl in the orange coat [Smile]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I hate my computer! I was trying to watch "Call the Midwife" - actually saw about half of it as my computer wouldn't strem it properly [Mad]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
No change really in the weather here except the icicles are getting longer ... I spoke to my dad in Orkney yesterday and he said they'd just had rain but no snow.

We did a cracker of a Candlemas service this morning - the Dean told D. it was one of the best services we've ever done. [Yipee] Though I say it what shouldn't, I made a not at all bad job of the "mean"* solos in the Nunc dimittis from Weelkes' Service for Trebles.

That's Christmas really over now. [Big Grin]

* mean - a sort of second soprano/first alto line.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'm trying to sort out my flights to UK for May but it really is a maze - I may give in and go to a travel agent!

So many airlines, so many choices - it is quite bewildering.

Once I have firm dates and an itinerary I shall consider a possible Shipmeet whilst there - watch this space!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Gentle thaw in operation now, but it has left the paths like ice rinks, so I am housebound until snow clears.

Thank goodness for computers, books, central heating and Tesco deliveries!

All yesterday was really foggy, but didn't stop sledgers. Quite weird seeing ghostly parents watching ghostly sledgers!

But dog did a runner on me and then got lost and disorientated in fog. Luckily Mr.N came to rescue and found him.

Dog was not popular.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I'm trying to sort out my flights to UK for May but it really is a maze - I may give in and go to a travel agent!

So many airlines, so many choices - it is quite bewildering.

Once I have firm dates and an itinerary I shall consider a possible Shipmeet whilst there - watch this space!

You're coming to the UK. Yay.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
I just informed him that he will be the courier for pure chili powder this year.

[Devil]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Yay, I made it! Been out of communication for some weeks as I made the big move from New Zealand to England.

I'm living with my husband's Aunt and Uncle in Somerset and we're looking for jobs in Bristol/ Bath. Will be looking for a flat once we're closer to getting the job thing sorted.

Was *very* excited by the snow the other day but am also enjoying it being a bit milder so I can walk about without being wrapped up from head to toe. Maybe by next winter I might've toughened up a bit?

Cheers,
EJ
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Welcome to Blighty, EJ!
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Welcome, EJ! The snow is going, so make the most of it!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I'm trying to sort out my flights to UK for May but it really is a maze - I may give in and go to a travel agent!

I know, it's a real headache trying to book anything on the internet - too many provisos and contradictory special offers with attached conditions ("This flight only £2.50 but you must be at the airport for a 3.30am departure. Standing only, no seats. Baggage allowance nil. Sandwiches £10 each on board, please reserve 30 days before travel.")

Eleanor Jane - welcome to England, hope you have a great time here! I'm sure there'll be a bit more snow for you yet.
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Beautiful photos Curiosity.
I'm very relieved that we just have slush now. Roll on spring.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Ye gods and little fishes. I just checked the weather for tomorrow and the low is going to be somewhere between -12° or if we're lucky merely -9°.

Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.

(I played a concert this weekend (Mozart's Requiem [Yipee] ) in a church with rather, ahem, cursory heating. I had on five layers of clothing (yay for thermal running bottoms that fit under trousers) and was not warm. For Saturday's rehearsal I took a thermos because I am English and there is no problem I will not try to solve with tea. People thought this quite hilarious but were still quite happy when I pulled out the extra paper cups [Smile] )
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
All the best for your new life in Bristol, EJ, and good luck with the job-hunting. [Smile]

Wodders, do you have to go to England in May and not April, when we'll be over? [Frown]

It's warmed up to -3° but still feels jolly cold; it's been snowing in a half-hearted fashion all evening, enough to make the clear bits of road white again.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Maybe by next winter I might've toughened up a bit?

Don't try to be tough. Go native. It is British to complain about the winter temperature if it falls below +5°. That it is cold in winter should come as a shock every year.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
...Wodders, do you have to go to England in May and not April, when we'll be over? [Frown] ...

Give me your dates and I'll see BUT Pete is still here until mid-April.

Speaking of Pete, one of his favourite expressions is My Goodness - which in his case may be the ultimate oxymoron!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Welcome to the You Kay EJ!

Hope you feel very much at home here.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Telepath (# 3534) on :
 
I have just had an email about further delays to something that is an absolute priority to me. I'm now extremely worried and having trouble not losing my cool. [brick wall]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Thanks for the kind wishes all!

I've already tried tights under my jeans, but thermal running bottoms are a good idea if it gets really severe.

I'm afraid I'm never going to be Bristish enough to like actual tea (sorry!) but I've taken to herbal teas in a big way.

Hugely looking forward to getting settled and being able to join a choir and some other activities... going a bit mad cooped up in a small town in Somerset with not much to do but apply for a job once a day.

Sympathies, Telepath. Hope your messy thing sorts itself out quickly.

Cheers,
EJ
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:


I'm afraid I'm never going to be British enough to like actual tea (sorry!)

Give it time, give it time - it's an acquired taste but once acquired, totally addictive!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
There are only two ways to drink tea.

One is in from a china teapot poured into china cups, the tea can be fairly weak, and perfumed (but no perfume for me, thanks). A lace tablecloth helps.

The other is transport cafe tea. (It is pronounced transport KAFF.) Very strong served in a pint pot.

Anything between these two extremes is JustNotBritish™

[i]coding [/b]

[ 07. February 2012, 11:59: Message edited by: Balaam ]
 
Posted by Telepath (# 3534) on :
 
[Hot and Hormonal] I apologize for whacking my prayer request into completely the wrong thread this morning. [Hot and Hormonal]

I found my cool, thanks. But now I seem to have mislaid it again. [Hot and Hormonal]

Just pretend I'm not here.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
... thermal running bottoms are a good idea if it gets really severe ...

I can't imagine it being cold enough in Somerset to justify thermal anything, but I'm a very warm-blooded piglet.

If you've conquered herbal tea, it's but a small step to Earl Grey, which is Proper Tea.

Wodders - we should to be over from about 9th April for a couple of weeks, although if I'm honest whether we'd be able to fit in a ship-meet may be doubtful as we've got to do both ends of the country.

We bought a new TV today and I can't imagine anything more frustrating than trying to get the damn thing to work. You'd think that connecting a TV set, a DVD machine and a digital-box wouldn't be rocket science, but all I've managed is a blue screen.

Oh well, it'll match the air ... [Devil]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It's not a problem to me, Telepath - don't worry about it.

piglet, I can't make those dates at all, sorry - it's a shame but these things happen.

As we were out late last night at the village frolics we have foregone our walk this morning - it looks like being another lovely day. Spoke to friend in Birkenhead yesterday and Merseyrail had ground to a standstill because of frozen points. Should we send notification to all British transport agencies in early December warning that winter is due to arrive soon - it might remind them to be prepared!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
We bought a new TV today and I can't imagine anything more frustrating than trying to get the damn thing to work. You'd think that connecting a TV set, a DVD machine and a digital-box wouldn't be rocket science, but all I've managed is a blue screen.

Oh dear. Yes. I completely understand this.

You have consulted an almanac, haven't you? You need to find a propitious moment when the celestial forces are in proper alignment, otherwise no matter how often you try plugging in the equipment, it won't work.

After that you need to figure out what order you approach the plugs in and when you turn what device on (see almanac as above). These things are capricious, but you don't need me to tell you that.

Good luck. I've avoided buying any new equipment so far for this reason, the set-top box was hassle enough and I still remember the hours spent tuning the video when I first got it.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Grandchildren did something to my almost new TV and two channels dropped right out. First set said No Signal, then disappeared altogether. I was assured I would not miss those two channels and I agreed with people. But the set was new. I didn't want to have serviceman out. Eventually, after I had tried everything I knew, #1 son came over and did something with remote control, then did what I'd done before. All now works.

However, I'm in his good books, have managed several sorts of complicated technical manoeuvres and got other stuff going without his aid.

Piglet, don't forget to hold your head just in the right position and have tongue pointing out of mouth. All such things are part of getting TVs etc to work. [Biased]

[ 08. February 2012, 06:43: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I got so cross when I was waiting for a cab on Saturday night to get home when the queue was moaning about how unable Britain was to cope with the weather. It was bad, those conditions would have taken down countries that are used to snow - we had 6 inches in about 3 hours. I was amazed they kept the trains and tubes running as long as they did - I reckoned the points had frozen on the open section of track and that was everyone else's first thought. Driving conditions were atrocious. I got so fed up I pointed out to the moaning woman, that in Canada in these conditions they'd only be keeping the main roads open and that they'd be having to send a squad of ploughs and gritters down the carriage way every hour - and the Canadian in the room backed me up.

Did you know, that same weather coming through on Thursday took out the Swiss transport system and caused delays?

Did you know that areas in the States had no power for 3 weeks with the snow storms in October / November and real problems for a couple of days?

Countries that are used to these conditions take the snow warnings seriously and stay in, batten down the hatches and aren't out on the roads causing chaos. People don't do what my idiot colleague and various other people I was trying to get home with did - go out for their Saturday night out and expect the tube to still be running. They arrived in London as the snow started falling and didn't have the wit to turn around and go straight home.

And yes, I knew I was probably going to be in trouble on Friday when the forecasts were warning snow chaos, but was stuck with prepaid, prebooked tickets and a need to get stuff up to my daughter.

[ 08. February 2012, 07:04: Message edited by: Curiosity killed ... ]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Keith and His Boy spent all day in the house removing the recently repaired old boiler (only five years old mind you) and installing a new one. We therefore have hot water and central heating again!

This coincided with a meter reading: the meter reader was horrified to see the meter out-of-circuit so the work could be done, so there was a bit of a discussion between him, Keith and Mrs Sioni; we'll see what follows.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
I got so fed up I pointed out to the moaning woman, that in Canada in these conditions they'd only be keeping the main roads open and that they'd be having to send a squad of ploughs and gritters down the carriage way every hour - and the Canadian in the room backed me up.

Yes, but at least they would be doing that. There wasn't any sign of any gritters round our way, let alone snow ploughs. We just got snowed on, full stop (and look what happened on the M40). Luckily it's almost entirely melted and we haven't had any more to create further problems on top of it, but it's the basic lack of anything being done that annoys people. Every time this happens we get the same response from the powers that be: this isn't typical of our winters so we haven't thought it necessary to prepare for it. Then the country grinds to a halt.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I bet the gritters were out, just it will be one gritter whizzing up and down the roads, not the squads that take over all the carriage ways at once, ploughs followed by gritters, which the PtB do have a point, we don't warrant stocking up with. But it wasn't just the conditions, it's also all the idiots who won't take the snow warnings seriously are out too!
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
There is still lying snow outside here, crisp and slippy where it has semi-melted and then frozen over again. And it is cold....

EJ, Im a Brit by birth and Im very particular about my tea...and I drink it extremely weak with no milk...a lemon slice if I'm feeling decadent.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My brother has solar panels and it's great to see the metre going backwards at mid-day, even in the middle of winter!

Minus 4 here today, I've put warm water in the bird bath and a robin is sitting in it having a nice warm up.

[Smile]
 
Posted by daisymay (# 1480) on :
 
I was surprised to see lots of snow, often biggish bits, as I walked up the canal on my way yesterday. It seems to not melt there the way it's melted in most of our area in central London.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
I nearly posted this in Hell, but it's not worth it.

Sainsburys is being a smartarse for renaming Tiger Bread. It is now 'Giraffe Bread'. Some customer suggested this, based on the pattern. [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
I nearly posted this in Hell, but it's not worth it.

Sainsburys is being a smartarse for renaming Tiger Bread. It is now 'Giraffe Bread'. Some customer suggested this, based on the pattern. [Disappointed]

Awww. It's been all over the news, and has been highly acclaimed as formidable reaction to kiddo feedback. [Biased]
 
Posted by frin (# 9) on :
 
It's proper manipulation. They press released a cute reply to a child, were pleased to see the press release forwarded all over the place through social media, then renamed the product and claimed that this was the public's idea.

'frin
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
I nearly posted this in Hell, but it's not worth it.

Sainsburys is being a smartarse for renaming Tiger Bread. It is now 'Giraffe Bread'. Some customer suggested this, based on the pattern. [Disappointed]

Awww. It's been all over the news, and has been highly acclaimed as formidable reaction to kiddo feedback. [Biased]
Kiddo feedback my arse. Guardian reading, Radio 4 listening parents more like. I'll bet Lily* goes to Center Parcs (ie, Butlins for the middle-classes) for holiday.

*the name is the giveaway for parent ID.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
I agree. Just teasing. Sorry about that. [Smile]

I'm sure giraffe bread tastes just as lovely as tiger bread. Please carry on.
 
Posted by ElaineC (# 12244) on :
 
What's wrong with holidays in Centre Parcs?

Oh wait ...

... I'm middle class!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
I agree. Just teasing. Sorry about that. [Smile]

I'm sure giraffe bread tastes just as lovely as tiger bread. Please carry on.

It tastes the same 'cos it is the same. I find that the loaf loses its shape when cut so one gets a compacted slice four/five inches long but only an inch high. Pretty nasty really. Traditional bloomers keep their shape better.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
...Traditional bloomers keep their shape better.

Surely that depends on who is wearing them!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
You can still get tiger bread elsewhere and it's a lot nicer at M-------s. You can actually taste the tiger - I mean, sesame on the top, and I found the bread compulsively more-ish when fresh. I had the giraffe bread a while ago and wasn't impressed by it, it seemed fairly ordinary and a bit tasteless so haven't bought it since. Real tiger bread is great with most things - seems to bring out the flavour.

I think I might even get some tonight on the way home, now.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
You can still get tiger bread elsewhere and it's a lot nicer at M-------s.

I'll have to agree with Ariel that -orrison- Tiger bread is better than the S**nsb*ry's equivalent.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I didn't know you could make bread from tigers. Or giraffes for that matter. Do they work in bread-making machines?

Wodders - sorry about duff dates - we'll have to content ourselves with waving across the ether. [Smile]

TV is now sorted - my best friend and her husband (who have every electronic gadget known to man) came round and pointed out that the remote-control that came with it is un fat lot de bon on its own - you have to use the digi-box one as well.

Unfortunately, the new DVD machine will only work in black-and-white unless you connect it with the right sort of cable (which costs more than the machine did), so we're exchanging it for one that has the cable included ...

What a faff. [Help]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
...Unfortunately, the new DVD machine will only work in black-and-white unless you connect it with the right sort of cable (which costs more than the machine did), so we're exchanging it for one that has the cable included ...

What a faff. [Help]

Yes we needed a specific cable to connect the new camcorder to the TV, normally I buy cables two at a time as I always seem to lose them but this time I bought just the one as I didn't want to upset my bank manager too much - how can a little bit of wire cost so much?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I didn't know you could make bread from tigers. Or giraffes for that matter. Do they work in bread-making machines?

If you can put a tiger in your tank, you can put one in your bread-making machine.

Though it could be that the bread is made by tigers - you know, one of those "handmade by members of a tiger community in the wilds of Sumatra" types of bread. I must look more closely at the labels some time.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
<dog/house sitter sorted, sunhat packed, passport and tickets in bag - check>

We're off!

See you in sunny Mexico!

**waves**

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Though it could be that the bread is made by tigers - you know, one of those "handmade by members of a tiger community in the wilds of Sumatra" types of bread.

More likely "Produced in a rehabilitation centre which helps reintegrate disadvantaged tigers into society".

Vaguely apropos of which, I was given a small gift in SA - an item produced by some struggling fraction of society. It is embossed brass, about 3" long, shaped a bit like a teensy-weensy crozier and with a pendant bead on the end. I have absolutely no idea what it is - does anyone else?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Vaguely apropos of which, I was given a small gift in SA - an item produced by some struggling fraction of society. It is embossed brass, about 3" long, shaped a bit like a teensy-weensy crozier and with a pendant bead on the end. I have absolutely no idea what it is - does anyone else?

It's funny you should say that – I was sent something similar once for my birthday years ago, with a rather fancy bit of jade green knotwork at the end and a nice jade (or lookalike) drop hanging from it. To this day I have no idea what it is or does, and was obliged to write a thank-you email that went something like "thank you very much for the lovely jade thing." Mine is about 6" long and silver-coloured, btw. Taking the jade (or more likely, jadeite) into account, I'm guessing it's not from SA.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, I think it is a teensy-weensy crozier thing and with a pendant bead on the end!

I think Canadians must be designed a bit different from other folks - at supper tonight Pete informed us that his legs were aching from his head to his toes! [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
It's funny you should say that – I was sent something similar once for my birthday years ago

It'll be what archaeologists call A Ritual Object.


[coding]

[ 09. February 2012, 13:56: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Are you sure it is not a bookmark?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lily pad:
Are you sure it is not a bookmark?

It could be used as a bookmark, but why not straight and tapering, instead of curved and a bit fatter at the end? If I ever come across some old jewellery findings (which I know are somewhere), I'll make it into a brooch.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I did wonder if it was a bookmark but it seems a slightly odd one. I don't think I've ever had a metal one before with - hmm, now that I've managed to get it out of the drawer and look closely - a jade bead, the aforementioned fancy knotwork, a small jade frog (how could I have forgotten that?) and two long tassels.

I should really have asked what it was at the time but am perfectly content to accept the archaeologists' standard interpretation of a cultic object. As is clearly borne out by the frog.
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Something like this is what I thought of when I first read your description.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yes - apart from it being blue and frogless - that's it.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Similar but longer have been sold in $2 Shoppes (TM) for some time. I have two, both gifts, with enamel butterflies on hook. They don't work very well and I don't use bookmarks anyway, I remember page numbers.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
It's a bookmark--we used to sell them in the place I worked as a teenager. And no, they don't work very well. Though I've never tried to use one as a cultic object.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Just back from dinner with friends to celebrate my birthday (50th [Eek!] ) which is on Friday. Good food, good company and a little drink or two. [Smile]

It started sn*wing about half-way through dinner, and if it carries on like this we might get a sn*w-day, which would be quite nice ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It's Friday here so Happy Birthday piglet!
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Happy Birthday,piglet.

And happily a no-snow day here, as my car is in dock and the person due to give me a lift to w*rk can't get out of her drive in the event of significant snow.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We have snow, again - it's very pretty! but I want it to go away, I have to move an offspring's goods and chattels to Nottingham next week.

Happy Birthday piglet
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Just back from dinner with friends to celebrate my birthday (50th [Eek!] ) which is on Friday.

You'll find you don't look any older than you did the day before. As with 40, it's the start of another new decade, you're still alive, still able to move around and do all the things you did yesterday. Enjoy your birthday!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Cold, but no snow. Cloud down to the ground, mizzle and general dampness.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
For me I think the best thing about being in my 50s, if I can remember that far back, was feeling even less concerned with what other people thought of me than I had been in my 40s.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Happy Birthday, Piglet! 50 is just so 'in' now! [Big Grin]

Cold, cold, cold here, and anything that was snow/slush/water is now frozen solid. Hard work taking the dog out, I have to keep to the grass as otherwise I am likely to fall over. [Eek!]

Trying hard to think of something sensible/newsworthy to say, but the only "interesting" email I have received is one to say my library books will be overdue in three days time.

There must be more to life somewhere. [Help]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Snow! So pretty but of course it's the day we're hiring a car and driving for an hour or two. It doesn't look like *much* snow so hopefully we'll be okay.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Happy Happy birthday Piglet!

***Waves from sunny Mexico**

Husband not pleased as I'm tapping away on the computer at 6am - body clock not adjusted yet - hehe!

He came over last weekend to prepare stuff (we are doing charity work with street kids followed by a little holiday in Palm Springs, Grand Canyon, Las Vegas and San Diego)

Now I'm going to annoy him further by finding Chris Evans breakfast show on the computer.

[Big Grin]

[ 10. February 2012, 13:08: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Another inch of snow last night so had to dig the car out -- again

come Monday and it will be 33 degrees in Cape Town.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by shamwari:

come Monday and it will be 33 degrees in Cape Town.

So cooled down a bit since a couple of weeks ago.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
We had about 3-4" of snow here. Most of which melted, so the roads are mostly clear, though what's left of the slush is turning rapidly to ice. TV reception is now virtually non-existent except for fragments of subtitles appearing now and again. I bought a more expensive set-top box today, hoping it would be better, and it completely failed to find any channels at all. Ho hum. Roll on spring.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Hipy papy bthudy Piglit!

Hope you had a great one - as the shoe advert says "Act your shoe size, not your age"...which only works if you take your UK shoe size pre-metric. Although now I come to think of it my continental shoe size would be quite good too!

Still frozen slush here...had enough of it now.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
happy birthday Piglet! Hope you've had a good day. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Happy Birthday, piglet!!

I'm deeply miffed that the snow was as pathetic as it was.

We'd had the usual "What to do in snowy weather" e-mails and reminders, ("Don't even think of thinking you can't make it into work" being the general gist and "Living 30 miles away is no excuse", though my line manager is sympathetic to that one for me, as I've got the best attendance and punctuality record this year!!)and as it was only today left before 9 days mostly off, I'd girded my loins, and psyched myself up to battle through the snow, prepared to be Very Late, or lost in a snow drift, or stuck on a train unable to move anywhere...or even hopeful of no trains at all.

I was 2 minutes later than usual. Snow's almost all gone.

I will now go and love and cherish my outside pipes, though. I do not want to sacrifice a second Saturday morning running to persuading them they do not wish to remain frozen.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
... we might get a sn*w-day ...

... then again we might just get some rain which was enough to create four-inch puddles but not really enough to displace much of the accumulated snow. Mind you, they're forecasting up to 45mm (about 1¾ inches in English) of rain on Sunday - that could facilitate some heap-diminution.

Thank you for all the birthday wishes. You're quite right - I don't really feel more than a day older than I did yesterday. D. and I are planning to carry out some research tomorrow at a restaurant we've been meaning to try for ages - will report back. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Glad you had a good day, Piglet. Relax and settle into your new decade.

Another very cold but bright day today. A bright orange sun in the sky this morning, with frost, snow, ice and mist everywhere, plumes of smoke and steam rising up from chimneys to greet the dawn. Everything white, silver, shades of coral and peach, a really pretty winter's morning. The birds have turned up the volume and are shouting away now - what a racket.

Went to Stratford on Avon yesterday hoping for pictures of snow-covered Tudor houses, but most of the snow had melted by the time I got there, so that will have to wait for another occasion.
 
Posted by daisymay (# 1480) on :
 
Most of our snow has gone, but on the "roofs" particularly not of homes, there is still lots of snow. I wonder what will be good or bad for the place by us that is being mended indoors and is very snowey on it's "roof"....
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
The heating was off all night and put it on this morning. Then discovered no water coming out of the cold tap!!

But all is well now.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A BIG storm moved in about 23.30 last night - it last a couple of hours but we must have been on the fringe as the pyrotechnics were a lot more visible than audible. We always welcome these storms and could do with some more. I was tempted to get out of bed to go and dance naked on the roof but fell asleep again instead [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and, if I'll permit myself a DP, when we got back from cycling to the village this afternoon, there was a medium sized snake in the front garden - at first we thought it might be a krait but then decided it was probably a young rat snake and thus harmless. Anyway, it made off through the hedge into the empty plot next door, but as that is where a family of mongoose live that might not have been a wise move.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Wow WW - impressive!

Glad your heating is back on Shamwari! - brrrrrrrrrrrr!

It's morning here in Mexico - sunny and bright. We are just about to set off for the project (shanty town on top of the hill) I will be chatting to the staff and getting to know the new members.

Then burritos for lunch!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
WW - hope you are writing a book about your adventures - if not why not!!
Just spent frustrating time trying to tax my car on line. System doesn't like me because my insurance and tax date are close - I bought the car from new so wouldn't that always be the case??? I must seek advice from the people I work with who look after said computer [Disappointed] system
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Then burritos for lunch!

I'm not sure why, if a burro is a donkey, a burrito isn't a smaller donkey.

Anyway, I expect you're hungry enough to eat a horse, so enjoy [Biased]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I was tempted to get out of bed to go and dance naked on the roof but fell asleep ...

I suppose we should be thankful for small mercies. [Big Grin]

Well, the research at the restaurant had to go on "hold" as there was a hockey game in the stadium downtown and we couldn't get parked within miles of the place. So D. said he'd heard that the food at a hotel with a spectacular harbour view (and a car park) had improved in recent months, so we tried that.

It hadn't. They were having a "Valentine's Day buffet" [Help] which was ordinary in the extreme (and that which was meant to be hot wasn't) and they had the worst pianist I've ever heard tinkling away on the ivories. He was so bad he was funny - we were in stitches for much of the time - and we also ran into some friends and ended up having quite an enjoyable evening. As the Terrible Pianist™ had buggered off (and the place was about to close) by the time we were paying our bill, D. sat down at the piano and started to play, and the girl at the desk was so impressed she asked him if he'd be interested in coming back, so he gave her his card.

As he said, three nights a week doing that, and he'd almost double his salary.

One for the book, I think. [Devil]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
On the tightest of schedules today. Two services then home. get changed and immediately off to airport heading for the tip of Africa.

Hope to catch up with the Ship as she sails past Robben Island.
 
Posted by Ann (# 94) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
... and they had the worst pianist I've ever heard tinkling away on the ivories. He was so bad he was funny - we were in stitches for much of the time ...

That takes me back. Many years ago, some friends and I would occasionally go to a certain pub whose entertainment was "The Kent Trio". This consisted of a (bad) pianist and a worse singer - I think the third of the trio had died - of advanced age. One of their repertoire was Tom Jones's "Delilah" - complete with dropping weights into the grand piano for no discernible reason apart from making a discordant noise.

All this was background music - not a concert - people carried on with their conversation regardless, pausing to applaud every time the music stopped.

One evening, we were talking about old children's programs and one of our group remembered a song or something from Children's Hour; when he'd got all the way through, we clapped him. The tables around us started clapping as well and the trio stopped what they were playing and took a bow!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Sunday morning here - we are off to Church, which is a very in-your-face Mexican Pentecostal.

[Eek!]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Then burritos for lunch!

I'm not sure why, if a burro is a donkey, a burrito isn't a smaller donkey.

Anyway, I expect you're hungry enough to eat a horse, so enjoy [Biased]

[Big Grin] Couldn't let this gem go without appreciation! Burritos are usually filled with mince, so it could well be minced donkey! (Unlikely, though)
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
... minced donkey ...

EJ, please tell me that isn't a Kiwi delicacy you've brought over. [Eek!]

Minor embarrassment at the end of the morning service today - it's nine years today since D. took up the post of organist, a fact the Dean announced to the congregation, just after announcing that it had been my 50th birthday on Friday.

Revenge is a dish best served cold - I told him that come his next Significant Birthday™ he should be Very Afraid* ...

[Devil]

* although as he's only a few months older than me, he's got quite a long wait.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Surely at that advanced age EVERY birthday is significant!
 
Posted by daviddrinkell (# 8854) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Then burritos for lunch!

I'm not sure why, if a burro is a donkey, a burrito isn't a smaller donkey.

Anyway, I expect you're hungry enough to eat a horse, so enjoy [Biased]

I, too, had wondered about that.....
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
... minced donkey ...

EJ, please tell me that isn't a Kiwi delicacy you've brought over. [Eek!]


No, no... we only mince possums (there are just too many of the buggers, gotta do something with them all!)
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
There were donkeys, on the beach - just like Blackpool!

It's morning here so we are having a quick coffee then off up the hill. We have 4 people building and fencing a playground, 4 people doing kids work and 2 doing staff training.

The temperature has dropped to 17 and it has clouded over.

Mr Boog has borrowed a bike and goes for a 20K ride each morining. He's cycling Seattle to Boston in the summer for the charity.

[Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
... The temperature has dropped to 17 ...

Goodness, that's nearly cool enough to be civilised. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
17C is darned near freezing!!

BRRRRRRR!!!

I think it is in the high 20s here at the moment, so a little cool, but we are managing by sitting watching the cricket.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
posted on wrong thread oops. arrived after long sleepless flight and knackered. Nights sleep helped
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Virtual quiche now available. It's surprising how quick it is to make with ready rolled pastry, ready sliced mushrooms and ready grated cheese!
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I missed this:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
minced donkey!

[Runs and hides]
 
Posted by Jabber (# 9668) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
I missed this:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
minced donkey!

[Runs and hides]
Is this linked to this excellent burrito stall?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Today I have booked flights to Blighty for May - my stay will be SHORT [just 14 nights] but when I have more idea of itinerary I will see if I have fit in a Shipmeet.

I managed to do it all on my own on the interwebby thing - I brought up pages for all the airlines I could think of that fly out of here and into London - and then remembered one more, Saudi Airlines, and they had the best price so I went for it - all bought and paid for and tickets printed!

I will arrive UK early 4th May and leave afternoon 18th May. The first weekend will be either in Bristol or the Forest of Dean depending where my friends are staying then I shall head north and south again to London/Surrey a day or two before I leave.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Just a note in case any Londoners are interested - a documentary called "A City Falls" will be screening somewhere in London on 22/2. It shows footage of the central city area of Christchurch during the large quake on the same date last year.

It doesn't seem like a year, but with over 10,000 aftershocks, some almost as big, but without loss of life, the time has been somewhat akin to being on a very long rollercoaster ride without the certainty of getting off in one piece.

Huia
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
It would be nice if you could fit a western ship meet in Wodders - wedon't all live within easy reach of London you know!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Just a note in case any Londoners are interested - a documentary called "A City Falls" will be screening somewhere in London on 22/2. It shows footage of the central city area of Christchurch during the large quake on the same date last year.

It's at the Ritzy in Brixton, costs £20 + booking fee and the first showing has sold out - link
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Quiet day in Cape Town. Weather perfect. Already getting browned off
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by shamwari:
Quiet day in Cape Town. Weather perfect. Already getting browned off

Have you been to the Botanic Gardens yet? Fantastic setting, and the elevation gives it that bit of freshness.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
It would be nice if you could fit a western ship meet in Wodders - we don't all live within easy reach of London you know!

If we're in the Forest Taurus might be a [very good] possibility! I'll e-mail my friends and see what is planned.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
To Kalk Bay and Fish Hoek and perhaps around the peninsular today along Chapmans Peak drive. Fantastic scenery
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
To Kalk Bay and Fish Hoek and perhaps around the peninsular today along Chapmans Peak drive. Fantastic scenery
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Why were you browned off, Shamwari? It sounds wonderful! Hope you're enjoying it more now.

M.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Just sunburn M!!

Had a marvelous Kobbeljou (cod) in Kalk Bay then walked the length of the catwalk in Fish Hoek. Shark warnings out but no sign of dem fish.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Are you going outside of CP? Stellenbosch is charming.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Originally posted by Shamwari:

quote:
Just sunburn M!!

Oh! I've never heard it used like that, only to mean cheesed off! [Hot and Hormonal]

M.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Hey hey all - I am up at the daycare centre waiting for the staff to arrive. The sun is out but a COLD wind is whistling round the hill!

The behaviour management training is being very well recieved, which pleases me a great deal.

[Smile]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
It would be nice if you could fit a western ship meet in Wodders - we don't all live within easy reach of London you know!

If we're in the Forest Taurus might be a [very good] possibility! I'll e-mail my friends and see what is planned.
Taurus would be great - there's a nice restaurant there and some nice shops, also a very good garden centre.It's nice and easy to get to from quite a big area, and also has a big car park. To paraphrase Darllenwr's father, all you want for a tourist attraction is a car park, toilet and tea bar!
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
It would be nice if you could fit a western ship meet in Wodders - we don't all live within easy reach of London you know!

If we're in the Forest Taurus might be a [very good] possibility! I'll e-mail my friends and see what is planned.
Taurus would be great - there's a nice restaurant there and some nice shops, also a very good garden centre.It's nice and easy to get to from quite a big area, and also has a big car park. To paraphrase Darllenwr's father, all you want for a tourist attraction is a car park, toilet and tea bar!
Where is that then? Pardon my ignorance!! I only know of it as a sign of the zodiac with which I am not interested. [Confused]
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
"Taurus" would, I think, be "Taurus Crafts" between Aylburton and Lydney on the southern fringe of the Forest of Dean. If you follow the old A48 east from Chepstow heading for Gloucester, you will find that Taurus is on your left just before the roundabout for Lydney / Lydney bypass. Very easily accessible, with a nice cafe, a large (free) car park and some very interesting things for sale (some of the foods are very interesting).

In other words, an excellent meeting place.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Sounds lovely - I would be up for that, date permitting.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
When are you heading north, Wodders?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I will be starting a Meet thread soon so as not to take over this thread. I think Taurus [or Bristol] will be 5th or 6th or 7th May and a northern meet [if it occurs] sometime between after that and before I fly to London about 16th. If there is a southern meet that will be 16th or 17th, probably at The India Club. I fly home here on 18th May - for a rest!

BUT I also have work to do whilst over and other friends to see so nothing is written in stone yet.

I will also be bringing this year's supply of chilli powder as Pete is not travelling via England this year, though he has offered to pay for it - I will start a thread for that somewhere as well.

- - - -

In other news the newly maintained roads round here are proving very quick for Pete on his twice daily perambulations - I think I shall have to plan some tougher routes [Snigger]

14 year old neighbour boy who broke his arm at Christmas and is only recently plaster free was trying to elicit sympathy last night as he now has a dressing on the big toe of his right foot - he still seemed to be able to run and cycle as well as ever!

[ 17. February 2012, 02:30: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Starting travels tomorrow. First to Cape winelands to visit friends who live in the middle of a vineyard near Robertson. Then along garden route to Sedgefield near Knysna. My sister has a house on the lagoon
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Ooh, India Club sounds great - look forward to meeting you then!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
All this talk of travels makes me yearn for somewhere warmer, sunnier, nicer, or just different! [Help]

Dank, grey, foggy here - you are not missing a thing, Boogie!
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Hope not 5th May, Wodders, as I have a wedding to go to.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
17th May is my birthday. A shipment with Wodders at the India Club would be a mighty fine way to celebrate it.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Would love a meet at the India Club too. My birthday is 16 May*, Yangtze!

M.

*One day and several years before yours...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Dates should be settled within the week - I doubt if a choice of dates will exist for most meets, sorry about that. London will be 16th or 17th May. I am told that whether or not we go to The Forest will be open to a democratic vote of those present so am hoping to subvert the process and canvass to ensure we do go as Taurus Crafts sounds better to me as a venue than the Watershed or the Arnolfini. I'll open the threads as soon as I have the dates.


[spelling - again! Of a two letter word!]

[ 18. February 2012, 02:18: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's just possible that our UK dates will be changed as well - we might be postponing our holiday until May, but I'm not sure exactly when. This may be just as well, as I've got application forms ready for a new passport which really need to be posted, or we won't be going anywhere ...

Just back from a v. jolly dinner party in the company of the church-wardens, the Dean (and their spouses) and a couple from the choir - good (if plain) food and good company.

I'm going to have to negotiate some time off on Monday as we've got the funeral of a much-loved retired archdeacon (lovely man, tended to preach for too long) which will require all the resources we can muster.

May he rest in peace and rise in glory. [Votive]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Reported conversation [in translation] between HWMBO and a local 7 year old:

HWMBO: How are things going?

7 year old: Ok but I prefer it at school.

HWMBO: Why is that?

7 year old: School is peaceful but as soon as I come home mum starts shouting at me!

Rather young to be so wise!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm not sure who that says more about - the wee boy or his mum. [Big Grin]

We were given a huge piece of baked ham (about 4½lbs) by my boss (she had more than she could use), and after dividing it up into bits and putting them in the freezer we've got enough to keep us in Piglet's Pancetta Pasta for a very long time indeed.

Our freezer's ridiculously well-stocked at the moment - she also gave us some smoked haddock (which is very hard to find here) for making kedgeree, and someone else gave us sundry bits of moose (which makes a very nice beef casserole, if you see what I mean) and some smoked salmon, so I'm going to be quite a busy piglet, culinarily speaking ... [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Why do you need a freezer? I thought you hardy folks just dug a hole down into the permafrost!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Killing me]

Not at all - they're forecasting the dizzying heights of +3° on Thursday.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Arrived in Sedgefield and housed opposite the lagoon. Great

If you want an unexpected story check Purgatory
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Huge funeral today went off very much according to plan - they all thought the music was wonderful. [Smile] The Archdeacon's widow even made a point of coming and thanking D. and saying how much he would have loved it.

The Fauré Requiem isn't my absolutely favourite thing, but the punters love it ...
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by shamwari:


If you want an unexpected story check Purgatory

Or not, as the case may be.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Huge funeral today went off very much according to plan - they all thought the music was wonderful. [Smile] The Archdeacon's widow even made a point of coming and thanking D. and saying how much he would have loved it.

The Fauré Requiem isn't my absolutely favourite thing, but the punters love it ...

Ooh, I'm a punter and I love it too!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Friend e-mails and says "if you are online let's Skype" so I go to Skype and no sign of the blighter! I haven't got him down as a friend in Skype so I remedy that and send him a message and so on - nothing! He may be a Senior Police Officer but that doesn't preclude him being a plonker!

[Mad]

My plans for UK are moving apace, everything is falling into line and I have all accommodation arranged except a choice of two places on Merseyside - and they are friends with one another as well as friends with me - who do I disappoint by staying with them? Who do I delight by staying elsewhere?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
How long are you going to be there? Maybe you could spread yourself out a bit - one night with one, one with the other ... [Big Grin]

I'm doing something I don't usually do - Shipping from my w*rk computer (I've already done an extra 2 hours), as D. has got stuck waiting for things to happen at the music festival where he's acting as an accompanist for some of the pupils of a friend, and they're running late. I hope it doesn't get too silly, as I've got to go to a meeting this evening and I'd like a bit of breathing time in between.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
<Boogie waves from Las Vegas>


[Smile]

Long Drive to San Diego today then flight home tomorrow - see you all soooon!
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Went to Knysna and Plettenberg Bay today. Friends have a super wooden house right on the beach. The waves were huge.

Back to Cape Town tomorrow (6 hour drive) and home early next Sat morning.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
My parents honeymoon was at Knysna.

Jengie
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Today I had bare arms. T-shirt weather in February, and its only a few days since the canal was frozen solid.

So that's summer 2012 over.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
In the 1970s in one of the kids' homes I worked in we had a boy from the town where my parents lived - a really nice lad who should not really have been there at all. After he and I had both left we became friends and stayed friends for a long time then we lost touch - a few years ago we got in touch again and then I lost his e-mail address in a crash and had no back up. This morning I got a message from him on Facebook - now married, 2 kids, well settled - I am ridiculously happy about this, he is such a nice guy. Being a friend on Facebook even a crash won't lose me his address.

The shock is that the photos show a guy in his early 50s - but then I was in my 20s back in the 70s and am in my 60s now! I doubt I've seen him since he passed 30.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's all relative, Wodders - yesterday I sent 40th birthday greetings to a Facebook friend who was David's head chorister when we moved to Belfast. We're none of us getting any younger ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Anybody in? /waves/

No...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I am now (**waves back**).

Messing about on the Ship while waiting for the chicken stock to cook; veggies are chopped up and in the fridge, so soup should materialise in the morning.

We've got a big music festival going on here at the moment and D. is playing for several of the competitors*, including my boss's daughter, who's in a class at some godless hour (for a Saturday), so it would be a Kind Gesture if there was a nice pot of soup waiting for him when he comes back, wouldn't it?

* This is a Good Thing, as it involves Remuneration. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I know this question has been asked before but why does anybody BUY soup, either tinned or in powder form - home made soup is so easy and needn't take much time - and it is so much tastier than the bought stuff!
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
I grew up with canned tomato soup and buttered toast as comfort food when I'm sick. So I'm still partial to it.

I get pretty fussy about soup (probably gone off it after eating it too much for lunch at work) and there's nothing like the smell of a boiling carcass to put me off the soup it's been made into. But then again, many canned or even fresh packaged soups are pretty revolting too. It's a pest 'cos soup is so very good for you!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
For supper tonight we had pakoda/pakora [vegetables in batter and deep fried] - mainly mushroom but HWMBO and Mrs E also peeled some large cloves of garlic and battered and fried them - YUMMY!!

Piglet, you have to give these a go some time - a simple and fairly thick gram flour and rice flour batter with a few pinches of spice. Were we to do them again I might add a few finely chopped herbs to the batter too.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
For supper tonight we had pakoda/pakora [vegetables in batter and deep fried] - mainly mushroom but HWMBO and Mrs E also peeled some large cloves of garlic and battered and fried them - YUMMY!!

Piglet, you have to give these a go some time - a simple and fairly thick gram flour and rice flour batter with a few pinches of spice. Were we to do them again I might add a few finely chopped herbs to the batter too.

Sounds good. Broccoli makes a good pakora, don't know what other spices go into it, but there are visible flakes of red chilli in the good ones.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Additional:

They were fried in a wok, but I don't know how authentic to Indian cooking that was.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I made soup for lunch today - lentil with vegetables and a bit of bacon. Delicious. Thought there was enough for two days, but we were rather greedy......
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
Additional:

They were fried in a wok, but I don't know how authentic to Indian cooking that was.

The thing we use is like a wok in shape, can't remember it's name here, so probably pretty authentic.

That soup sounds good, Nicodemia, except, being non-meat eaters, we'd leave out the bacon but when we make tomato fry [with onions and garlic and stuff] we make too much and whizz the excess to form a base for soup.


[wherever did I learn to spell so badly?]

[ 25. February 2012, 14:41: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Thali, isn't it? As far as I know, the nearest you can buy to a thali in most of the UK is a wok. (But there are areas where they are available)
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
Sounds like a karahi to me
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Do deep-fried garlic cloves have the same sort of sweetness you get when you roast them (as in chicken with 40 cloves)? I don't think I've ever actually deep-fried anything - we used to have an electric deep-fryer, but D. was always the one to operate it as I'm a wimp. [Hot and Hormonal]

EJ, I rather wish you hadn't mentioned tinned tomato soup - I think you might have given me a craving. In a general way, I much prefer home-made, but Heinz tomato soup ... mmmmm ... [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
No, definitely not a thali as that is basically a plate.

In North India it is indeed a karahi/karai/kadai but, and I have just consulted the kitchen staff about this [i.e. HWMBO and Mrs E], in Kerala it is called a cheena chutty - which means only that it is a Chinese pan! There has been trade between here and China for at least two thousand years, probably closer to three thousand, so there are a lot of Chinese influences in things, e.g. the famous fishing nets all over the place.


eta: yes, piglet, the garlic was wonderfully sweet and so flavoursome!

[ 26. February 2012, 03:35: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Back home to a proper cup of tea.

And a game of hunt-the-laptop!

Anyone else hide things when they go away and completely forget where? I remembered where the car keys were quite quickly - phew!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
Anyone else hide things when they go away and completely forget where?
Oh yes! Once put a whole lot of stuff (very non-edible) in the oven! Luckily I found it before I turned the oven on!

Welcome back, Boogie! [Smile] Have you found the lap top?
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Went to watch a Super 15 rugby match yesterday evening.

Sat high up in the gods. 50000 people there. We were too far away from the action.

Last week in Cape Town then home. Will be good to get back.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Ah well, my bad, a karahi it is. But the cheena for China is interesting, just because it's so similar to the English China.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by shamwari:
Went to watch a Super 15 rugby match yesterday evening.

Would you not mention rugby - we got stuffed again ... [Waterworks]

Welcome home Boogie - hope you had a good trip! When it comes to hiding things in Silly Places, my mum's strategy for stopping me and my dad from eating the grapes she'd bought for the cheese-board at a dinner party takes some beating - she put them in the tumble-dryer.

[Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
When it comes to hiding things in Silly Places, my mum's strategy for stopping me and my dad from eating the grapes she'd bought for the cheese-board at a dinner party takes some beating - she put them in the tumble-dryer.

[Ultra confused]

My mother once lost her pearls for about 10 years by hiding them in the chest freezer! Not sure if it would have done them any good...

I'm the 'finding things' genuis in my house. My lovely husband couldn't find the cheese on a cheeseboard labelled 'cheese' but I tend to have inklings where things might be.

On another note, I was extrememly excited to find the park where all the squirrels hang out yesterday. I guess they're not a big deal to you native Britons, but gosh I love their furry little selves! [Yipee]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Grey squirrels? Vermin...they have driven the native red squirrels almost to the point of distinction. Tree rats - shoot 'em, I say...

...but I'm glad you are entranced with them, EJ!

Where has the sun gone today?
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Went to the Waterfront this morning. Fascinating place.

A bit of advice to all travellers. Check your times and dates. I thought I was leaving Fri pm for overnight flight. Turns out the flight is a day time one and we get back to London 17.45 on Fridaay. About the time I thought I was going to leave CapeTown.!!!!

So check dates.
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
Grey squirrels? Vermin...they have driven the native red squirrels almost to the point of distinction. Tree rats - shoot 'em, I say...

...but I'm glad you are entranced with them, EJ!

It wasn't my grey squirrels that did it, so I'm not going to blame them for the sins of their ancestors... [Biased] I'm just going to enjoy them chasing one another up and down the trees at breakneck speed and doing the odd back-flip. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
almost to the point of distinction.

Would that be A- or B++? Or are such distinctions extinct?

[Biased]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:

On another note, I was extrememly excited to find the park where all the squirrels hang out yesterday. I guess they're not a big deal to you native Britons, but gosh I love their furry little selves!

I like them too.

Get a 'squirrel proof' nut feeder for the birds and watch them squirrels work it out - they are very clever and great to watch.

[Smile]

I've just taken the pooches for a walk - damp and drizzly out there. One of them has overeaten at the dogsitters, so he'll be on a strict diet (like me!)

quote:
Originally posted by shamwari:

A bit of advice to all travellers. Check your times and dates. I thought I was leaving Fri pm for overnight flight. Turns out the flight is a day time one and we get back to London 17.45 on Fridaay.

Phew! That would have been an annoying and wasted trip. Hope you have a good journey home.

I still have a touch of jet-lag today, snoozed most of the afternoon away. It's days like today which make me VERY pleased I'm a supply teacher and can pick and choose when I work.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
almost to the point of distinction.

Would that be A- or B++? Or are such distinctions extinct?

[Biased]

Oh dear - preview post clearly NOT my friend on this occasion...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
... I still have a touch of jet-lag today, snoozed most of the afternoon away ...

I always find jet-lag's much worse after travelling west-east. The flights from here are quite often overnight (leaving around midnight Canadian time and arriving early in the morning London time) and if I'm still awake when we hit the M25 it's a minor miracle. Then we get to D's parents' place in Essex and I wake up long enough to say hello and have a cup of tea, and the eyelids start to stick together ... I know you're supposed to stay up until the time you'd normally go to bed, but bugger that ...

... zzzzzz

... [Snore]

Regarding squirrels - my brain tells me they're vermin, but my eyes (and my heart) tell me they're cute. [Smile]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
I think there in something funny in the tap water. This morning I saw Darth Vader marching into the local primary school as I cycled past.

Any other shipmates in Oxford seen weird things? No, I'll rephrase that - anyone seen anything weirder than usual?

AG
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
We had a cat whose life's ambition was to catch a squirrel. One day there was a particularly stupid squirrel sitting right in the middle of our lawn munching on a nut and completely oblivious to anything going on round it. Enter the cat, who snuck silently up, right within pouncing distance - and suddenly realised just how big a squirrel is (he'd never actually got that close before). The cat stalked away again, wearing an expression that said "I never really wanted to catch one anyway". [Smile]

The only place I have ever seen a red squirrel is at Taizé - it was very early in the morning (I was up at 6:15, mark you, to go running) and I think they hide away once there's more people around.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The Best Dog In The World&trade, now long departed, nearly met his end chasing a squirrel in Arrowe Park many years ago. Squirrel sitting in the middle of the field fails to spot the approach of big lolloping German Shephard/Collie mix until nearly too late and then takes off for the trees - when it realised it wasn't going to make it it turned to fight and bit the offending pooch hard on the lip. Pooch then backed off and came back to me, bleeding quite nastily. I got him in the car and to the vet for a BIG jab of antibiotic but still he had a VERY sickly weekend and took a couple of weeks before he was back to his usual self - my mate the vet said squirrel bites are always dodgy as they are infected with all sorts.

- - - -

On a happier note, yesterday I was in charge of feeding Pete for both breakfast and lunch. For the latter HWMBO had left prepped around 20 - 30 cloves of garlic! I was making a Spanish style omelette so I thought "what the heck" and used all of them as well as potato and onion and mushrooms and all sorts.

It was okay!

As piglet says, you can never have too much garlic.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
I think there in something funny in the tap water. This morning I saw Darth Vader marching into the local primary school as I cycled past.

Phew! Apparently it's book week in school this week (we were talking to a very small and female Shrek in the queue for the pizza van). Obviously Darth was returning his copy of "How to Win Friends and Execute People".

AG
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
He gets about a bit, does Darth. (I know it's old news, but Sandemaniac's story reminded me of this, always worth a rerun).
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
We had a cat whose life's ambition was to catch a squirrel.

Our moggy stalked a squirrel up a tree. Cat gets on a thick branch, squirrel gets on thin branch. Cat goes to thin branch, squirrel goes to thinner branch. Eventually cat gets onto a very thin branch, squirrel jumps to another tree. Cat and squirrel stare at each other for a long time. Cat gives up.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... potato and onion and mushrooms and all sorts.

Presumably not liquorice ones. [Eek!]
quote:
As piglet says, you can never have too much garlic.
Did I say that? I thought it was you ... [Big Grin] I mostly agree though. [Smile]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Damn and blast. My e mail address book was hacked into and all manner of people got spam.

Hope to have sorted it now.

One day of the holiday left. Not looking forwad to arriving at the same time as M25 Friday rush hour
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
By shamwari
Damn and blast. My e mail address book was hacked into and all manner of people got spam.

Never post your email address online where a web robot can read it. And never use the same password for your email as you do for the rest of the web (I know this from having my email used for distributing hardcore gay porn [Hot and Hormonal] ).

If you pubicise you email address a form similar to shamwari AT emailprovider DOT com works as web robots ignore it.

[ 29. February 2012, 11:34: Message edited by: Balaam ]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Happy St. David's Day - Dydd Dewi Sant - tomorrow
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Further evidence surfaces of the distorting effect this place has on reality.

Today, while a hole in the ground was being dug in our road, they had temporary traffic lights put up. Leading up to some more temporary traffic lights... which are replacing the original set of temporary traffic lights on the bridge as wot have blown up!

Recursive temporary traffic lights... whatever next?

AG
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Happy St. David's Day - Dydd Dewi Sant - tomorrow

Same to you, St. G., and all our other Welsh chums. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Happy St David's Day indeed!

I have a cold, I am a lousy patient, I feel absolutely crap! It is all the fault of 14 year old neighbour boy who had a cold last week and has obviously passed it on with malicious intent - when I blamed him yesterday he just giggled. We were going out for the day today but I have managed to b****r up everybody's plans. I shall now go back to bed and feel magnificently sorry for myself - I'm very practiced at that.

Happily it promises to be a shortlived event and I should be back to being my usual sweet and lovely self in a day or two.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:

I have a cold, I am a lousy patient, I feel absolutely crap! ...

Happily it promises to be a shortlived event and I should be back to being my usual sweet and lovely self in a day or two.

I hope you're right about the short-lived thing! Husband and I have had nasty colds for a week now - mine turned into a sticky cough and his turned into a gummy nose. It's been quite a pest as we should be job hunting, flat hunting and exploring Bristol...
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Lots of red shirts etc and our team leader made about four dozen Welsh Cakes to mark St Davids day.

Praise be though, that the canteen isn't trying to make a big deal of it, as they usually do so badly that true Welshmen and women cry.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
Further evidence surfaces of the distorting effect this place has on reality.

Today, while a hole in the ground was being dug in our road, they had temporary traffic lights put up.

You have temporary lights? Luxury!

New lights are being put in near here. This means that both roads meeting the major road are closed. And there's no holes been made, just the old lights removed and the kerb lowered - no sign of any poles for new lights yet, but they've only been there four weeks.

So roads are closed with no work being done to the road surface at all.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Lots of red shirts etc and our team leader made about four dozen Welsh Cakes to mark St Davids day.


Just to prove that social workers aren't quite thoroughly hard bitten and cynical, one of my colleagues brought in a couple of packs of welshcakes and a bunch of daffodils.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Lots of sympathy to those of you with colds - I'm at the tail-end of a minor sniffle kept in check by Piglet's Patent Cold Remedy™ (lem-sip or similar made palatable with Manuka honey, lemon juice and a wee drop of whisky).

EJ, if you're anything like me, you'll probably pick up more colds than usual in the first wee while after moving to a new place with new bugs. I had several just after we moved to Belfast (and hardly any for the next 14 years) and another several when we moved to Newfoundland; I now seem to be down to about 1½ a year.

I made some red-pepper jelly yesterday; do help yourselves (there's some Philly cheese in the fridge and crackers in the box).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A full day of rest and lazing about and sleeping [a lot] yesterday and today I am loads better - but it looks like Pete is getting it now!

Off for haircuts soon.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Thanks Piglet - a good thought as I'm normally proudly resistant to colds. It's just your wretched new British bugs!

And on another matter... how come they're allowed to close the M5?! We were flabbergasted and appalled last night to be toddling off slowly down an A road (with lorries parked up all each side) 'cos they'd gone and closed the M5! We were sick and tired and it was late... just wanted to blat home down the motorway, but no.

(Normally English roads are much better than NZ roads. It is a bit disconcerting that they're not really lit at all, but otherwise...)
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
It takes me about 18 months to acclimatise to the germs in a new place - but I'm a pathetic asthmatic who works with children / teenagers. And for the first 18 months after I've moved I'm hanging on to that thought.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
After our trip to the village this morning both Pete and I answer to the name Shaun! It feels so much nicer when it is all lopped off - I'll probably have it done again just before I head for Blighty in May; I treated myself to the luxury of a professional shave at the same time - BLISS!

How much is a trim in a barber over there these days? Go on, let me know just so I can feel smug about paying less than a quid for a haircut AND a shave!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:


(Normally English roads are much better than NZ roads. It is a bit disconcerting that they're not really lit at all, but otherwise...)

There is nothing wrong with British roads, it's the volume of traffic that causes the chaos - one little bump and major disruption ensues. Our town was totally gridlocked yesterday, many journeys abandoned. My husband teaches piano on the other side of town - he had to cancel.

The disruption was due to a bump on the motorway, traffic was diverted, it was rush hour - so that was it, nothing moved!
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
So why was it called rush hour? - there wasn't much rushing going on, it seems!

[ 02. March 2012, 13:20: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That's a good point, BT - I never really thought about it before, but the slowest driving one ever does is during rush-hour, isn't it?

For those of you in need of comfort, there's cherry CAKE ready for virtual tasting - help yourselves. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I rarely seem to make cake these days since HWMBO became diabetic so a sample of yours is most welcome!

End of school year exams start on Monday, with the big ones, for Standards X, XI & XII a week later - lots of kids heading off to the temple this morning as we did our walk, hoping for Divine intervention, perhaps.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I love cherry cake, so thank you kindly Piglet!

I don't make cakes now, as Mr. N is diabetic. But my cherry cakes used to turn out more cherry layer cakes, with the cherries all lying on the bottom, leaving plain cake above!

It was amusing to see how various family members ate it a) neatly sliced with a bit of plain and a bit of cherry in each slice, b) eating cherries first and fiddling with plain cake afterwards or c) eating plain cake and saving cherries till last.

I'm sure it was all psychologically significant! [Eek!]
 
Posted by amber. (# 11142) on :
 
Ah yes, my cherry cakes have all the cherries at the bottom, even if I flour them first. That, and the jaunty angle of the cake, make them quite, er, distinctive.

Morning all. I have been very absent. I'm sort of here, but in a lurking way. All this ongoing folderol with the medical stuff means my brain is coping best with being vaguely intelligible in just one place, rather than lots of message boards at once, IFYSWIM. But reatment is still working, so I'm not complaining.

Been rushing about like a mad thing this week, with visits to Parliament, English Heritage, Riding for the Disabled and Dogs for the Disabled to set up autism guidance and training etc. Brilliant fun! [Yipee] but probably not quite what my specialists had in mind when suggesting I take life a bit easy... [Roll Eyes] (Can't do a thing with me...!)
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Lots of sympathy to those of you with colds - I'm at the tail-end of a minor sniffle kept in check by Piglet's Patent Cold Remedy™ (lem-sip or similar made palatable with Manuka honey, lemon juice and a wee drop of whisky).

I'd say that's three ingredients too many. Only the last one is essential.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I've been taking zinc diligently for two years now - NO colds NONE!, and I work with primary aged children who cough and sneeze all over the place.

I often get a 'tickle' - then it goes away after a few hours - another one fought off.

Go zinc!

[Smile]

[ 03. March 2012, 13:12: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Hi Amber - great to see you here, even if you cherry cakes are a little short of vertical!! [Biased]

You do seem to have been rather busy for someone who has been told to take it easy! When I read your post I thought at first that the dogs had autism. [Hot and Hormonal]

But, on the other hand, that could explain the way our dog is! [Smile]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
I've never actually had cherry cake, but it sounds good. Maybe I can have a go at making one when we've got a proper kitchen etc...

Also, British weather rocks! They keep saying it's going to rain then it doesn't. It's only rained about twice in the last month. In New Zealand it pretty much rains for about three months in winter/spring (at least it did in my part of it).

But your cold bugs suck. *Still* resting and getting ever so slowly better...
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by amber:
Ah yes, my cherry cakes have all the cherries at the bottom, even if I flour them first.

I'd turn the cake out of the cake tin when done, apply icing over what would normally be the bottom side of it, stick some extra large glace cherries on top in a pleasing pattern and tell people it's a cherry-upside-down cake.

There is actually a dodge for getting the cherries to distribute themselves throughout the cake mix so they don't all sink, but I can't remember what it is. It might be taking the cake tin out of the oven a few minutes after it's gone in and stirring the mixture, but I can't swear to it.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
How nice to hear from you, Amber!

Cherry cake = good, wherever the cherries are in the mixture!
Is there any left? I've just come back in from singing (among other things) Durufle's Requiem, and I'm Quite Pickish...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Hello Amber! **waves** [Smile] Good to see you back!

There's plenty of CAKE left, and the cherries are actually not too badly distributed - coating them in flour certainly helps. I used glacé cherries this time (the recipe calls for maraschino) but D. had been shopping at the Bulk Barn and brought a tub - his way of saying "it's time you made some CAKE".

There's also a pot of chilli con carne bubbling away on the stove, if anyone wants something a bit more savoury.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Oh dear - my pooch Callum has had a stroke in the night. He is OK, but it's another sign of how old they both are and that they're not far from the rainbow bridge :-(

When we got him the breeder said 'I want you to have this one' - I replied 'I can't afford another' She said 'No, I want you to HAVE him, he's got serious heart problems and will only live 18 months at the most' That was 12 years ago.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Poor little dog, glad he's OK, but hope he feels better very soon [Frown]

Snowing here, in amidst the heavy rain, but not settling. Bitterly cold, yet another Sunday when the weather puts you off going anywhere.
 
Posted by Qoheleth. (# 9265) on :
 
Snowing here too! [Cool]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
No sign of snow here [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
No snow here either [Smile]

Yesterday I was chatting with my father-in-law who was telling me that they were having a beautiful day (in Herefordshire), whilst we were stuck with grey and wet mizzly yuckiness. Today we have blue skies and sunshine, and on fb and here I am reading of snow down south. I am beginning to wonder if the UK has turned itself upside down overnight.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Well, the weather has prompted me to open a bottle of wine, have some hot buttered fruit scones with jam, and spend a very pleasant afternoon in the kitchen cooking a few things that will mean I don't have to cook anything for the next 2-3 days.

I wouldn't have done any of that if it had been warm and sunny, I'd have felt obliged to go out somewhere instead. The sky looks quite ominous in the east at the moment, so it might be time for another scone.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Votive] for Callum - poor wee dog.

It's been quite a nice day here - it was 5° and really quite spring-like at lunch-time. D. and I went to a downtown restaurant for lunch and had a nice walk along the street on the way to and from where we'd parked, which is something we haven't really done for a while.

Mind you., they're forecasting sn*w ane then freezing rain overnight - probably not quite enough to justify a sn*w-day.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
I don't know where all this snow is coming from... it's a bit chillier here but fine and certainly nowhere near snow (as far as I can tell from my limited experience).

I think we chose a good bit of England to live in, weather-wise. It was one of the key factors as I get a bit down with overcast grey skies.

Boogie... my sympathies for the dog situation. It's hard when they get older...
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Bright sunny day here...bit breezy, but as long as the sun is shining, I don't mind.

One of our Elderly cats who has been being treated for kidney disease is looking very sad and withdrawn. I love my cats, but don't enjoy this stage of their lives...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
[Votive] St Everild for your poor old cat.

Thanks all, for your sympathy for Callum. He was unable to walk for a while, but he seems to be back to normal now. Apparently strokes are nothing like as serious in dogs as in humans (Because they don't have a Cortex?)

Sunny and chilly here. Coffee/tea and newly baked bread on offer.

[Smile]

<edited for spelling - can't spell, never could!>

[ 05. March 2012, 13:48: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
... I'm at the tail-end of a minor sniffle ...

Unfortunately said minor sniffle has found a boomerang and come back with a vengeance. Is a computer virus when you communicate with people on the interweb and then get their colds (MENTIONING NO NAMES [Devil] )?

Tea, sympathy and GIN will all be appreciated.

snuffly piglet
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Sorry about your cold, piglet - everybody else here now has, or has had, the one I had last week!

A great day yesterday, we were whisked off to see the new Church of St Thomas at Malayatoor - a splendid Syro-Malabar Catholic church on the banks of the Periyar river. It is quite stunning inside. During Holy Week it will be packed out with pilgrims who will then head off to climb to the other church on top of the mountain and past the 12 Stations of the Cross.

We had lunch on the way back then I slept most of the afternoon [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
... I'm at the tail-end of a minor sniffle ...

Unfortunately said minor sniffle has found a boomerang and come back with a vengeance. Is a computer virus when you communicate with people on the interweb and then get their colds (MENTIONING NO NAMES [Devil] )?

Tea, sympathy and GIN will all be appreciated.

snuffly piglet

Ooops, hope that wasn't me! I'm still sinus-y but SO pleased to able to get out of the house and walk about without being too exhausted and sick.

Anyhoo, seeing as it's virtual, have some tea with a chaser of GIN from me! The sympathy is real. [Smile]

Cheers,
EJ
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Not sure I like the sound of tea with a gin chaser...gin goes better with tonic and a dash of bitters...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Plenty of tonic, ice and a slice of lemon in the GIN for me - thanks EJ. [Smile]

If the weather forecasters are right, I may well get the chance to sleep off some of my cold, as we're due to have a blizzard overnight and in the morning, which is expected to dump about a foot of sn*w on us; that should be enough to justify a sn*w-day. [Yipee]

It's now 10:45 p.m. and nothing's happened yet though ...
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Dear Piglet

Given that Canada is pretty near the Arctic, which means snow, ice etc. for quite a few months, do they actually go to work in the winter??

Just wondering!

A faithful reader.

[Two face]

[ 07. March 2012, 08:22: Message edited by: Nicodemia ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
amber - you inspired me to make a cherry cake! The cherries are evenly spaced, I used Delia'sadvice. (But didn't cook it as long - more like 40 mins)

[Smile]

I also have choc chip cake - I'll leave both on the side for you to help yourselves.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Could I have a bit of each, Boogie???

Lucky its virtual cake! But they sound delicious. Do the choc chips stay where they are supposed to?? [Biased]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Hehe - yes they did! Here is a photo of it - the cake tin liner didn't fit so the cake has frilly edges, I've glazed it with orangy stuff.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Hehe - yes they did! Here is a photo of it - the cake tin liner didn't fit so the cake has frilly edges, I've glazed it with orangy stuff.

[Smile]

Yum! That looks delicious! I propose a shipmeet at Boogie's house (though I guess it'd be prohibitively expensive to get there...)
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Dear Piglet

Given that Canada is pretty near the Arctic, which means snow, ice etc. for quite a few months, do they actually go to work in the winter?? ...

Dear Nicodemia,

Latitude of St. John's, Newfoundland: 47°N
Latitude of Manchester: 53°N

Who's close to the Arctic now? [Big Grin]

It's true that there are bits of Canada that are very close to the Arctic, but St. John's isn't one of them; we're actually about the same latitude as the north of France. The reason we don't get their weather is they've got the Gulf Stream and we've got the Labrador Current. We got about a foot of snow last night and yes, I did get a snow-day.

Was v. sad today to learn that a former choral scholar had taken his own life. May he rest in peace and rise in glory. [Votive]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Piglet, sorry to hear about your friend - may he rest in peace. [Votive]

On a lighter note, it's International Women's Day today. Some of us are wearing pink, and some have brought in pink cakes, to help us celebrate our inner (and outer) femininity. Enjoy the day, however you spend it - hope it's a good one for you!

Cake (OK, it's not particularly pink but it's one of our office favourites.)
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
quote:Eleanor Jane posted:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Hehe - yes they did! Here is a photo of it - the cake tin liner didn't fit so the cake has frilly edges, I've glazed it with orangy stuff.


Yum! That looks delicious! I propose a shipmeet at Boogie's house (though I guess it'd be prohibitively expensive to get there...)

I could get there - take a while, but I am sure there is a bus/tram/train or all three that would do it!!

Looks scrumptious, Boogie. Wish Mr. N could eat cake (he's diabetic) I love baking.
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
Day off today. Stayed in bed til eleven then since then I've been curled up on the sofa reading books. I should have more days off. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
Day off today. Stayed in bed til eleven then since then I've been curled up on the sofa reading books.

Marvellous!
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Opposite of a day off here - only just got back home.

Someone's given me Herman the German sourdough soul/friendship cake - we're on day 4(ish) now and he seems quite happy, but he didn't like travelling to me in a glass jar on day 1, and nearly exploded. I'm wondering how best to pass him on.

Does anyone else have Herman experience? I'm skeptical about his claim that he'll die if I put him in the fridge - are fridges usually fatal to sourdough? I'm guessing not.
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Gracious, I can't believe I can answer this, but yes, it needs to rest at room temperature and it doesn't like being shaken.

When you get to day ten, if you don't feel like bestowing your friends with all that pressure, you can divide it up and freeze in portions.

A quick search of the internet will give you tons of recipes. As I kept all five of my portions, I have tried out a variety of recipes - some great, some not so great.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I had to look up Herman the German on the interweb, but it seems to me that if putting him in the fridge is going to kill him, freezing him might not do him much good either.

Does anyone actually get to eat him? [Confused]

I think I'll stick with cherry-cake - much less responsibility.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Yes - you quarter him and then cook him (with added ingredients) on day 10 - then he gets eaten. Yeast doughs can be both fridged and frozen, so I don't see why sourdough can't be. It also seems odd that my recipe doesn't give him time to ferment after adding the final lot of flour, sugar and milk. I'm going to experiment on Herman. [Snigger]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Oh Gosh! I remember Hermann from my daughter's school days - probably the same Hermann!

We seemed to have an awful lot, and everybody around us had Hermann as well, so it was very difficult getting rid of him.

Though he's nice eaten - but not everyday for two or three weeks!

And then there was the ginger beer plant.........
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I kept my sourdough San Francsico culture in the fridge for months. It just slows them down. Take out and feed and it will spring back to life.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I kept my sourdough San Francsico culture in the fridge for months. It just slows them down. Take out and feed and it will spring back to life.

Just like worms! [Biased]

(I keep worms for the birds in the 'fridge)
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Herman the German is quite plesant. Ours lived on a window box in our front room, but wasn't easy to clean it off it when it erupted! The problem with these sorts of things is that you run out of people to give them to - it's a wonder that the planet hasn't been taken over by friendship cakes and ginger beer plants. In fact, it would be very inteesting to trace the ancestry of any particular batch. Is it like human ancestry, where we're all supposed to be connected within - is it 7? - a small number of relationships.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We had a lovely couple of nights in the mountains followed by a difficult journey back but we made it. I was put on breakfast duty this morning to make porage! I added some raisins and had mine with honey - the diabetics had an artificial substitute. Lucky them!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Welcome back, Wodders. I'll have a substitute for the porridge - any substitute ... [Eek!]

I know you're not going to believe this, but the temperature here reached +12°C this afternoon - beating the previous record high for this date by more than a degree.

Hasn't lasted though - it's now back to 0°. [Frown]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
Day off today. Stayed in bed til eleven then since then I've been curled up on the sofa reading books. I should have more days off. [Big Grin]

I am aiming for the same kind of thing today - not quite 11 and so far apart from getting drinks and being on the ship and Saturday Kitchen nothing much has happened. Lovely (though I will need to go shopping later to get provisions for the week).
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Welcome to retirement, where every day can be like that...

Though today I am up, showered, dressed and breakfasted and I have bought a new vacuum cleaner online (that counts as housework, doesn't it?)
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
...and I have bought a new vacuum cleaner online (that counts as housework, doesn't it?)

At least a week's worth!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
Day off today. Stayed in bed til eleven then since then I've been curled up on the sofa reading books.

Day off for me today - I'm avoiding all marking and uni work.

(Can't stay in bed 'till 11 - my body bounces out of bed at 8am without my permission [Roll Eyes] )

So far I have bathed one dog and chopped the worst of his matts off - the groomers are booked up for two weeks! Anyone needing work, set up as a dog groomer. Business is booming!

Fresh bread and Lancashire creamy cheese here for all who would like a little lunch.

[Smile]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
I'll add stilton and celery. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
No celery here, sadly - I hope to get some nice braised celery hearts somewhere whilst I am over in May.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Herman done good. Very tasty.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Lovely mild spring day. Also the National Trust places that closed for the winter have mostly reopened this weekend.

I was greeted at the gate of one place this morning by a friendly black cat, who led me along a steep woodland path. We paused at intervals to admire the view, then without warning he quite suddenly shot up a tree at about 80mph in pursuit of an equally speedy squirrel. Half a second later the squirrel had easily reached the topmost branches, with the closest thing to a grin on its face, while the cat philosophically shrugged, dived headfirst back off the tree to earth and rejoined me for a sedate walk as if nothing had happened.

I suppose cat owners are used to this kind of thing.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Lovely mild spring day. Also the National Trust places that closed for the winter have mostly reopened this weekend.

I was greeted at the gate of one place this morning by a friendly black cat, who led me along a steep woodland path. We paused at intervals to admire the view, then without warning he quite suddenly shot up a tree at about 80mph in pursuit of an equally speedy squirrel. Half a second later the squirrel had easily reached the topmost branches, with the closest thing to a grin on its face, while the cat philosophically shrugged, dived headfirst back off the tree to earth and rejoined me for a sedate walk as if nothing had happened.

I suppose cat owners are used to this kind of thing.

Nope. I think it depends on your cat, but ours never walked anywhere with us. She mostly lay about in sunbeams and occasionally rolled over displaying her tummy enticingly (but more fool you if you stroked it, 'cos then she'd pounce!).

Also, we didn't have squirrels in NZ and possums are far too much for any sane cat to tackle!

Sounds like a jolly nice day anyway.

We drove up to the Midlands to visit a sick relative. My first time driving in the UK - went just fine. We're heading out to a wildlife park tomorrow which should be a treat. [Smile]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Lovely day. Did nothing much all morning, cheered the Welsh rugby team to victory this afternoon!! Grand Slam anyone??? Then a bit of food shopping, visit to the parents and home to put not quite finishing touches to a talk for next Thursday to Ladies Meeting at church. There are 4 days left for final polishing yet, right??? Procrastination are us (or could it be waiting for a further word of revelation). Think it's the former to be honest - I know what I have to say - it's just concentrating to find the right words is the hard thing. How all you who do this week in week out manage I know not. [Overused]
 
Posted by Jahlove (# 10290) on :
 
Nice enough to put washing out on the line [Smile] Found my rubber resistance band - well pleased*


*easily pleased
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
... I have bought a new vacuum cleaner online (that counts as housework, doesn't it?)

Only if you actually use it ... [Big Grin]

We had such a lazy day today that we were woken at about quarter to lunchtime when my dad phoned, and pretended to be apologetic about getting us out of bed. Went for a spot of (not really successful) retail therapy in the afternoon.

EJ. did your driving experience include changing gear with the door-handle and going the wrong way around roundabouts, or do they drive on the correct (i.e. left) side in NZ?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Don't worry, piglet, NZ is a truly civilised country thus they drive on the left, as God intended and as we do here [at least vaguely].

We took sweets to church this morning as it is my burfday, not a significant but everyone seems to be making a bit of/far too much of a fuss. One little girl came back several times for more! I must brave the neighbourhood soon to dole out more sweets!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
We took sweets to church this morning as it is my burfday, not a significant but everyone seems to be making a bit of/far too much of a fuss.

Happy birthday! Hope the day is a good one. Lovely sunny morning here.

(And apparently I'm spending it defrosting the fridge. Great.)
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Happy Birthday, WW!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thanks, folks.

Ariel, one of the best inventions ever was frost free fridges and freezers!

Just had lunch which included both Garlic curry [with spinach, green coriander and carrot top] and Garlic and carrot pickle. I think I'd better avoid breathing over anybody for the rest of the day!
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
Just bought train tickets to Scotland for May. Can anyone explain why standard class was £72 each way and first class £65? Ah well that will be free wine and food for me [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Happy Garlicky Birthday! WW [Big Grin]

Train fares are a total mystery, but maybe the Second class return is an open return, ie come back when you like, but the 1st class specifies a date and train??

Just a thought, but enjoy the free wine! [Smile]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Happy Birthday Welease Woderick
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Happy Birthday, hope you had a lovely day.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
I think it depends on your cat, but ours never walked anywhere with us.

One of our past cats wouold follow us considerable distances - he once followed us up to my Dad's, so at least half a mile. Others have followed us along the back lane and had to be shoo'd home. As you say, depends on the cat.
We've also had retriever cats - they would bring back anything thrown for them.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Happy birthday Wodders - looking forward to meeting you at Taurus!
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Happy Birthday, Wodders.

A good gardening day. Planted strawberries and outed the Christmas hyacinths.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Happy birthday Wodders, sounds like it was a good day.

We went out to Doune Castle today, location for lots of scenes from 'Monty Python and the Holy Grail'. It was a really nice day, not especially warm but dry and not freezing, so we had a good wander about the place, lots to see there both in the castle and the grounds. I should award myself a proper day off more often!
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Happy B-day, WW! [Angel]
 
Posted by mrs whibley (# 4798) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by QLib:
Happy Birthday, Wodders.

A good gardening day. Planted strawberries and outed the Christmas hyacinths.

I'd have thought with hyacinths it was pretty obvious, and I have NO gaydar! [Biased]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Happy Birthday WW - just got in before the (UK) deadline I hope. Sounds like you had a great day!

On the subject of cats following you around in embarassing fashion -- I had a cat that followed me round when I was younger and trying out the knocking on doors evangelism route. She was very cute but when she started weeing on front lawns I felt the gospel was being compromised!!

P.S. I'm better now.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Many happy returns, Wodders - 29 is it? [Big Grin]

Enigma - glad to hear you're feeling better.

As it's Commonwealth Sunday, and to mark the 60th anniversary of Brenda's accession, we had a cracker of a Matins this morning. Te Deum by Howells, Zadok the Priest (OK, I know Handel was German, but he wrote it for the coronation of a British king), responses for the Accession of a Monarch by William McKie and wonderfully jingoistic hymns: Vaughan Williams' arrangement of the Old Hundredth, I vow to thee, my country, Cwm Rhondda with James O'Donnell's magic descant and Jerusalem. And, of course, God Save the Queen, O Canada and the Ode to Newfoundland.

And, as we were v. short of sopranos, I got temporarily promoted which was fun, especially in Zadok - it must be nearly 25 years since I last sang first soprano in that. [Eek!]

As might have been expected, there was much Decanal Grinning™.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
29?

OMG, NO!! I'd hate to be that age again! Fancy having all those years to go before Blessed Retirement?

No thanks, I'm quite happily 31 - or possibly even 31+ - reality has me at [31 x 2 +] - and I love every minute of it!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
29?

OMG, NO!! I'd hate to be that age again! Fancy having all those years to go before Blessed Retirement?

Hope you had a great birthday.

I'd like to be 39 and retired.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma:

On the subject of cats following you around in embarassing fashion -- I had a cat that followed me round when I was younger and trying out the knocking on doors evangelism route. She was very cute but when she started weeing on front lawns I felt the gospel was being compromised!!

P.S. I'm better now.

A cat sounds like a valuable evanglism tool to me- I'd actually talk to a door knocker who brought a cat along, instead of a quick 'no thanks' and shut the door as usual.

In other news, I patted a policeman's horse today. He (the horse) was huge- probably at least 18 hands. The policeman was fairly small, I'd've thought. [Smile]

And we had an amazing day at Slimbridge Wetlands yesterday - I think I've seen about a year's supply of ducks! (But that doesn't mean I'm not tempted to try out some of their other centres around the British isles).

Just bought some hot cross buns if anyone wants one...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Yes please, I'd love a HCB [Smile]


朋友家的小孩在塗鴉上色用的畫冊...

I just read this on 365 and Google translate translated it for me - amazing world we live in! (It means 'The children of a friend's house with graffiti colouring book ...' )
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma:
On the subject of cats following you around in embarassing fashion -- I had a cat that followed me round when I was younger and trying out the knocking on doors evangelism route. She was very cute but when she started weeing on front lawns I felt the gospel was being compromised!!

I read this rather too early this morning and was mystified by the idea of an evangelical cat going round knocking on doors (then - presumably if the message wasn't well received - weeing on the lawn before walking off).

I wonder what the cat's favourite Scripture passages might have been - perhaps a few quotes from Paw-l?
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma:
On the subject of cats following you around in embarassing fashion -- I had a cat that followed me round when I was younger and trying out the knocking on doors evangelism route. She was very cute but when she started weeing on front lawns I felt the gospel was being compromised!!

I read this rather too early this morning and was mystified by the idea of an evangelical cat going round knocking on doors (then - presumably if the message wasn't well received - weeing on the lawn before walking off).

[Killing me] [Killing me] [Killing me] Unfortunately it was the other way round - she was walking off while I was apologising for the behaviour!! Sorry for my cat and by the way can we talk about faith/Jesus etc -- not the best!!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
... I think I've seen about a year's supply of ducks ...

I see quite a few ducks every morning on my way in to w*rk - there's a pond just beside the car-park where D. drops me off, and we sometimes bring left-over bread for them and say hello.

Ducks rock. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I love ducks, I reckon it is pretty near impossible to see a duck on land and not smile.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
I used to work in a special school which kept chickens, ducks and goats. If the boys were 'acting out' outside the classroom block, the ducks would waddle over to watch, from what they judged to be a safe distance. Sometimes,they would seem to be discussing it amongst themselves: "Well, I never did in all my days..." etc. When the show was over, they waddled off again.

Pity they're so delicious.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by QLib:
I used to work in a special school which kept chickens, ducks and goats. If the boys were 'acting out' outside the classroom block, the ducks would waddle over to watch, from what they judged to be a safe distance. Sometimes,they would seem to be discussing it amongst themselves: "Well, I never did in all my days..." etc. When the show was over, they waddled off again.

Pity they're so delicious.

I'm quite happy admiring animals *and* eating them (grew up on a farm). There is a clear line in my mind, though, between animals that are food and animals that are pets.

For those wondering, it's about naming them, and how you treat them and how many of them there are. I could have pet ducks, or I could farm ducks for eating but I'd have to treat them and think about them differently from the start.

I still haven't forgiven my parents for killing our pet cow Mooseli and trying to make us eat her! We used to ride on her, there was only one of her and there was never any hint that she'd end up on the dinner table. Silly of them to think we wouldn't notice!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
There is a clear line in my mind, though, between animals that are food and animals that are pets.

For those wondering, it's about naming them, and how you treat them and how many of them there are. I could have pet ducks, or I could farm ducks for eating but I'd have to treat them and think about them differently from the start.

I heard of a family that bought three piglets to raise for meat. Just to make sure the kids remembered what they were for, the parents named them Breakfast, Lunch, and Supper. [Big Grin]

Moo
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
There was a major upset in our church about 18 months ago when, over tea, one of our teenagers (who keeps pet guinea pigs) learned that our Peruvian Lay Worker (who was at tea with them) had frequently eaten guinea pig and considered it good eating. Our teenager, who very much liked our Lay Worker, was severly torn about her feelings regarding said Lay Worker for several days.

Lord Pontivilian got to hear about this and promptly remarked (in said teenager's hearing) that he was going to keep guinea pigs when he had the opportunity and give them suitable names - yes, you've guessed it - "Breakfast, Lunch and Supper." For some reason, he failed to tell me what was the reaction to this ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
... three piglets ... named Breakfast, Lunch, and Supper ...

[Eek!]

D. has just brought me a cup of tea and a piece of cherry CAKE. I was going to offer some round, but if you're going to talk like that about me, I won't.

**flounce ... oink**

I've been Domestic Goddess Piglet today - I made a pot of veggie soup and a loaf.

[Cool]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Well done Dormouse - you goddess!!
I have cooked nothing at all - it being Tuesday (or it was when I was eating anyway). I have the pleasure still of my mother's cooking on a Tuesday evening.
It's lovely - but today was interesting because very green spinach which I really enjoyed was proclaimed by my Dad to be kind of black looking and strange and he'd never had it before and why was it a bit wet? He bought it apparently!! He's 85 and a little more (cough) discerning than he used to be.
I enjoyed the meal - so did he to be fair but I don't think he'll be hastening to the spinach department any time soon. [Biased]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
won't.

**flounce ... oink**


[Killing me]

That forms a great mental image [Smile]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
**flounce ... oink**

[Killing me]
That forms a great mental image [Smile]

Yes, and reminds me of the saying that one can eat every point of a pig except the squeak. Or, indeed, the oink.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Being a non-meat-eater of 30 years standing I find that a rather disturbing image!
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
You need to sit down, Wodders. [Biased]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by QLib:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
**flounce ... oink**

[Killing me]
That forms a great mental image [Smile]

Yes, and reminds me of the saying that one can eat every point of a pig except the squeak. Or, indeed, the oink.
Or as the sign in Yorkshire says

We sell owt baht squeak! (we sell all but the squeak).

Jengie
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma:
Well done Dormouse - you goddess! ...

I'm sure she is, but I'm not Dormouse, I'm Piglet. [Big Grin]
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderick:
I find that a rather disturbing image!

And we haven't even met ... [Biased]

It's been the sort of beautiful, v. sunny but v. cold (high of -4°) day here today, just the sort of weather I like (mainly because you don't have to shovel it).
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma:
Well done Dormouse - you goddess! ...

I'm sure she is, but I'm not Dormouse, I'm Piglet. [Big Grin]
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderick:
I find that a rather disturbing image!

And we haven't even met ... [Biased]

It's been the sort of beautiful, v. sunny but v. cold (high of -4°) day here today, just the sort of weather I like (mainly because you don't have to shovel it).


 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Oops - got myself stuck in a quotes loop! Piglet, you're quite right you're not Dormouse - sorry - multi-tasking at my strange age I shouldn't try. But you are a goddess, as is she! [Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Cool]

D. has just brought me a carton of blackberries - anyone want one? With ice-cream?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
How about Blackberry and Apple Crumble?
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Blackberries, in March [Disappointed] The blackberry is one of natures free gifts. They always taste better if you have foraged for them yourself. I'm looking forwards to this year's foraging season.

But today I'm tired. I had to be at the dentists at 9, which is too early when you work the 2 to 10 afternoon shift. I'm not used to being up before 10 (except in Sundays.)
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Hi All,

Some British- specific advice if you would...

What is considered a reasonable amount of work/ hoops to jump through when applying for a job?

I had no problem with a 30-40 min online personality test or with doing a 10 min presentation on a general topic.

I'm struggling with having to come up with a hypothetical project for the organisation and do a hypothetical trust application to a specific trust. To me that seems like a bit much to ask an applicant. (And I've only got three days to do it...)

Thoughts?

Cheers
EJ
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Qlib - Herman the German arrived in our office this week. I declined the honour.

quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
I'm struggling with having to come up with a hypothetical project for the organisation and do a hypothetical trust application to a specific trust. To me that seems like a bit much to ask an applicant. (And I've only got three days to do it...)

Three days is not enough time. I'd expect at least a week, more likely 10-14 days, and I think the short notice says something about the company you've applied to.

As for the hypothetical project and proposal - employers seem to ask for all sorts these days. In my time I've had to research and write marketing copy, do a detailed critical review of a project proposal including an assessment of usability and markets, write various damage-limitation letters for hypothetical scenarios, and draw up a tactful memo implementing unpopular personnel measures, all before the interview. I've always had at least a week to a fortnight to do it, though.

Interviewers here are faced with a lot more applicants than they used to be, so I guess it's one way of winnowing out the pool - see how people approach a particular task. I suspect they're not necessarily looking for all the right answers so much as the right frame of mind and approach. Good luck!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That makes me feel quite glad to be as far down the food-chain as I am; I've never had to do anything scarier than a typing test.

This evening we sang Evensong at the old people's home where we do a carol service at Christmas. They're inundated with people wanting to sing at them in December, but no-one thinks to do anything any other time, so we thought it would be nice to go up there and do a proper choral evensong, and I think they enjoyed it. We certainly did. Afterwards it was back to the house of a couple in the choir for seriously good Irish stew and soda bread and equally good craic.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
That makes me feel quite glad to be as far down the food-chain as I am; I've never had to do anything scarier than a typing test.

Wot no role play, no "live" phone conversations with someone posing as a particularly difficult caller? (Luckily I wasn't involved in that last.)

St Patrick's Day today. Apparently the parade in Birmingham took place last week - no idea if anything is happening within reasonable travelling distance locally, but have a great day anyway, everyone.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
That makes me feel quite glad to be as far down the food-chain as I am; I've never had to do anything scarier than a typing test.

Wot no role play, no "live" phone conversations with someone posing as a particularly difficult caller? (Luckily I wasn't involved in that last.)

[Killing me] I've done the role play! I had the whole board take on crazy personas for me to try and convince to do a certain thing within about 15 -20 min! It was actually quite fun, in a silly kind of way.

Struggling with this damn application, but at least now I've found a trust and invented a project. Just trying to fill in convincing yet concise details...

I don't have much time tomorrow due to church in the morning and my lovely (yes, really) mother in law coming to visit for Mothering Sunday.

Piglet - good idea about singing during the year. I expect those of them 'with it' enough to notice enjoyed it a great deal.

In other news, my mood was improved a great deal this morning by hearing that we got the flat we were going for! I love and love the location (on the river in Bristol, 10 min walk from town, in a quiet development with trees and cats). Hugely looking forward to having our own space again after about two+ months toddling about various places. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Congrats on the flat, EJ!

St Patrick is not much celebrated over here but Monday will be St Joseph and we will heading off to eat too much at one of the churches we attend regularly - they both have Alms Feasts, but not on the same day - tomorrow we got to the other church to check when their feast will be!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
... I expect those of them 'with it' enough to notice enjoyed it a great deal ...

Absolutely - while the Curate was intoning the final Collects (they were printed in the order of service) we realised that someone was saying them along with him. Nice to imagine that they were hearing something familiar that they may not have heard for a long time.

Health to enjoy your new flat - Bristol riverside is beyond cool.

[Cool]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
What a glorious morning! A flood of bright sunshine lighting up the world, a light gold mist layering the view with the silhouettes of hills, trees and even streetlamps looking pretty good. We've had frost overnight, which has left some pale fern-like patterns on car roofs, now glinting in the sun, and where it's evaporating in the sunlight, steam coming up around the cars as if they're all about to start off at once into the spring morning.

A good day for going somewhere, though rain is forecast. Is anyone going to see the parade in London this afternoon? If I lived nearer I'd like to go.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Ariel, you must live somewhere very North!

The raindrops glistened prettily along my clothes line this morning, but it is clearing up now, although showers are forecast. Will probably try to do more gardening later, as we still have shrubs to plant which we bought yesterday.

Spent some time rigging up a chicken wire "fence" of a very wobbly nature to try and keep the dog off the garden where said shrubs are planted. When he found it last night he retreated in a very puzzled huff.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Sunny and showers here but warm enough to have the heating off. I'm off to Mum's later with lots of lovely cup cakes - plenty spare if anyone fancies?

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We've been to a wedding today - we went to mass first, of course.

It was a Hindu wedding at a temple I've never been to before - not far away, perhaps 5 or 6 kms. Lovely to see some of the relatives one only sees at such events, less lovely to see some of the others but that's life. I am now in the embarrassing position of having completely forgotten the bride's name so will have to hunt for the invitation [Hot and Hormonal]

Anyway, the food was quite good so that's okay; it is, after all, the main thing most people remember.

Nephew person's mum was there so I suggested I talk to her about it being about time for her to start looking around for a bride for him, he is 24, but he didn't seem too keen on the idea yet. I assured him I was only trying to help but he didn't seem to believe me very much.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Wodders Matchmaking Services Ltd. not quite taking off then? [Big Grin]

Service for Young People this morning, so the choir didn't really have much to do except half a set of responses and the Britten Jubilate in C. Simnel CAKE afterwards.

Was a wee bit sad to learn that our oldest parishioner, a retired surgeon (he was really the father of surgery in Newfoundland) died this evening at the grand old age of 104. He was an amazing old boy; when he was 99 he had D. and me round to his house for the best roast beef I've ever tasted.

May he rest in peace and rise in glory. [Votive]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
104 - Wow! [Votive] for all who will miss him.

Today is one of those days with lots to do and little motivation to do it. Kick up the backside needed!

My dog Callum has been poorly over the weekend, making me very concerned. But he's bucked up today, so much so that I think he's fit to go to the groomers for a gentle wash and brush up.

My new job didn't work out [Frown] The school, and the way they dealt with behaviour just didn't wash with me. They were completely inconsistent, confusing children and staff alike. I have trained whole schools in behaviour management in my time and just couldn't stand to see it done so badly. Luckily they were very dilatory in drawing up my contract so I was able to leave with no problems.

I have another job now [Yipee] just two days a week at the wonderful school where I do my research.

What a relief! But now I MUST get down to that marking!

Coffee, tea, orange+lemon cake and croissants are all just there on the table for all in need.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Congratulations on the new job, Boogie! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Great about the new job, Boogie! [Smile]

And croissants would be very nice, thank you.

And now < sigh > I have to try and sort out the mess of notes and doodles I took at the rather trying and very argumentative committee meeting I went to yesterday.

There must be a better way of running organisations. And the fact that "we are all volunteers" doesn't wash with me as an excuse for doing a job in a sloppy, half-hearted manner. Am I the only one who thinks that if you take on a job, paid or unpaid, you do it as well as you can, and when you need to ( not tomorrow, or the next week)?

[Mad]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Yay for the job Boogie! I totally understand about the behaviour management and you were definitely right to leave.

Ah, volunteers, Nicodemia... great fun, eh? I try to look at it as character developing as we all get rubbed against each other and maybe rub off a few rough edges (or maybe just get irritated and rubbed raw!).

I had a good job interview yesterday, so I'm quite excited and hopeful...

It *was* a lovely day yesterday, wasn't it? So warm, I had one layer of clothing and a light coat and was even a bit too warm in the sun.

I'm all kind of in limbo waiting to be able to move into the flat and waiting to hear about the job. I should make a wee To Do list and do something today... Will start with a shower.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:


I had a good job interview yesterday, so I'm quite excited and hopeful...


Well done - fingers crossed for a good result.


[Votive]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
So glad about the job, Boogie - I'll have a croissant, please, filled with cheese and reheated so the cheese melts into the bread.

Our young friend working in UAE, or one of them, is fed up - he has chicken pox so is feeling terrible, is on his own in the hostel all day so is bored and can only eat bland food so is even more bored! I tried to reassure him on the phone that he will feel better in a week but it is a bit hollow under the circumstances.

Sleepy day today, I think I'm still reacting to eating so much yesterday!
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Our young friend ... is fed up ... and can only eat bland food so is even more bored!

When on a bland diet due to sickness I find a variety of fruit juices — orange, grapefruit, apple etc. — adds some variety to the blandness. You could suggest this to your young friend.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
... I have to try and sort out the mess of notes and doodles I took at the rather trying and very argumentative committee meeting I went to yesterday ...

Virtuous Piglet checking in ... [Angel]

I'm just home from a meeting of the committee for which I take the minutes and did them before I came on to the Ship.

Mind you, they pay me an honorarium, so I suppose I'm only doing my duty ...

quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
... So warm, I had one layer of clothing and a light coat and was even a bit too warm in the sun ...

Not here it bloody isn't. It sn*wed this afternoon - the phenomenon known locally as Sheila's Brush - a snowfall just after St. Patrick's Day. Mind you, it wasn't really that much, and if we get the 6° and rain they're offering us on Thursday maybe it won't last.

PS Hurrah for good job interview - hope the result is good too. [Smile]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
I seem to have a faster internet connection as promised by BT after a couple of re-boots of my hub. Now I am worried that I cannot keep up.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Sorry Piglet, it was another gorgeous day today! About 17 degrees C. I spent the day driving all over the South of England (from west to east then north a bit and back). Lovely countryside!

Also, I saw the whole bum of a uni student wearing semi-opaque wool tights with nothing over them, not even a gesture towards a tunic (and obviously nothing under them)! Call me old if you will, but what is the world coming to?! [Eek!]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
I think it's been a good day. First thing I heard when I put the radio on this morning was Nellie the Elephant, and then as I stopped on my way in to work to take a photo of the haze over the river a kingfisher went rocketing past. Hard to make a day that starts like that bad! After work I went for a wander with the camera, and met up with the Knotweed for a meal.

Now I'm (metaphorically...) buggered, and going to bed!

AG
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Night-night Sandemaniac! **waves**

I had quite a busy day too, although not a work day; I took the day off for the funeral of the late surgeon I mentioned further up the page. Very well attended (the nave was full), and we gave rousing renditions of the Old Hundredth, Jerusalem, He who would valiant be and Guide me, O thou great Jehovah (with the magic descant of course) and the Nunc dimittis from Sumsion in G.

Afterwards D. and I went for lunch to a restaurant called Aqua which we've been meaning to research for ages, and we think more research is needed. [Big Grin] We really couldn't fault it in any way at all - the food was v.v. good and the service attentive without being fawning.

And they do a cheeseboard! You may not think this so remarkable, but they're only the second restaurant we've been to here that does. We didn't sample it, because we were running out of time on the parking-meter, but we certainly will next time.

At least 9.999/10. [Yipee]

EJ, I don't blame you bragging about the weather. I've come to the conclusion that the only place on the planet that isn't having a heatwave at the moment is Newfoundland. It's apparently been in the high 20s Centigrade in Halifax, Fredericton, Ottawa and even Winnipeg in the last few days, which is Just Silly.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
No heatwave here, just the standard high 20s and low 30s Celsius.

Pete decided to turn our morning walk into a route march this morning, storming off ahead - neighbour boy [who walks with us] and I had to try and keep up - but Pete slowed a bit on the gradients, though he declined help.

HWMBO and I are off to the city again today - it's all go, innit?


edited to make sense

[ 23. March 2012, 02:15: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
No heatwave here, just the standard high 20s and low 30s Celsius.


Yer - right! <whispers to WW, remember - that temperature is what constitutes a heatwave over here in the Isles of Albion!>

Very pleasant day here - not sure what to do with it. I'm having Saturdays off university and school work. Should have made a plan!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
It sure is all go WW! We're moving out of our lodge/hotel thing into our lovely flat today! [Yipee] And, I got a job! [Yipee]

So we're going to hand over huge wodges of cash to the property manager and I won't get paid for at least another month so it's trying to set up a flat on a zero budget, but hey... Another beautiful day here and we're meeting our only local NZ aquaintance for lunch.

Hope everyone has a lovely weekend.

Cheers,
EJ
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Congratulations EJ - very well done!! [Smile]

And I hope your into-flat-move goes well - its a lovely day for it!

Weather wise, that is!

[ 24. March 2012, 09:01: Message edited by: Nicodemia ]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
[Yipee] Congratulations, EJ! Hope all goes well.

And, good morning all!! I don't seem to have been here much lately, but this has been the most manic half-term, ever, and this is my first weekend free of observation/inspection spectres haunting it. So, I shoved the work bag into the cupboard under the stairs and am determined not to think about work until Monday morning.

I had been intending to sleep as long as I could this morning but small next door neighbours are suddenly both very verbal and vocal in the early morning now, and two loud screams from them woke me at my normal weekday time.

Might well poddle off somewhere interesting later, but for now am just enjoying re-acquainting myself with my sofa, my own home, and a whole day with nothing to do!!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Congratulations EJ! What a relief for you.

What a beautiful morning - went out early before the shops had opened. Sunlight everywhere. The normally busy town car park had only one car in it, the birds were incredibly vocal in a way you don't hear later when it's normally busy.

The grass by the canal sparkled with dew. It seems to be the violet season: lots of little violets in the shadier grass, small purple ones and tiny white ones; daffodils also covered in drops of morning dew. Hedges full of life with blackbirds, sparrows, robins, bluetits and so on scampering everywhere, watching humans with curiosity, and trying to find breakfast. The water as still as a mirror, reflecting the boats beautifully, and hardly a soul to be seen.

Staying put for the moment - a whole day with nothing in particular to do - wonderful.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
And, I got a job! [Yipee]


Fantastic news - well done!


[Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Great news, EJ.

My garden is starting to look like a garden, and I have found a well-recommended builder who is cheap and honest. He quoted me £80 for a couple of jobs, which I was already quite pleased about, and then knocked it down £50 because it didn't take as long as he thought. The money situation is easing up a bit and so I am finally able to start ticking off items on my 'to do' list. Small steps, but it makes me feel more settled. Just hope I don't have to start job hunting - ominous noises at work.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
EJ - fantastic news - well done!!
This morning was spent cleaning and dossing around reading. This afternoon I concentrated my attention on how to engage a class of 11 year olds in Sunday School on John 12 where Jesus talks about Dying in order to Grow. Usual teacher is away! I have bought seeds and popcorn!!
Looking forward to a relaxing evening in front of TV - The Voice versus Britain's Got Talent. Who will get more viewers I wonder - I am aiming for both!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
EJ - bazillions of congratulations, and good luck with the flitting. [Yipee]

I'm just back in from belatedly celebrating a friend's birthday - dinner at the Peppermill, another v. nice St. John's eatery. Portobello mushroom salad to start, scallop and prawn fettucine and a berry-crumble sort of thing with ice-cream shared with D. for pudding, and the company of good friends. Couldn't beat it with a big stick.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
Congratulations EJ! That's wonderful news. Hoorah!

Weather is lovely here. Sunny & fairly warm, the daffodils are out and we have acquired a pair of very friendly sparrows in the back garden. They keep hopping down to sit on the windowsill & door handle. We've put food out which they don't want, so I can only assume they're coming to say hello.

I really must do some homework for my evening class and then potter into the garden to cut back dead stuff. Any minute now....
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Weather still lovely. Daffodils, blossom and tulips are everywhere now, sheep are in the fields, there are blue skies, fluffy white clouds and warmth. The boats are out on the river after the long winter - all sorts from little rowing boats and kayaks to narrowboats; and the ice cream vans have emerged from hibernation.

I don't know what it is about the sort of ice cream they sell - the sort straight out of a machine that swirls into a cone, with the option of half a stale Flake stuck into it - but it always seems so much more delicious than the shop-bought kind.
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
I have heard 2 ice cream vans this afternoon, but neither has turned into our road! [Waterworks] Despite the kids playing really noisily. They could make a packet from us.

It's a real shame, it's a good 30 seconds since I last ate anything unhealthy.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Our "other" church had its Alms Feast today so we went along and ate too much but all in a good cause, of course. They can feed about 200 people at a time in the parish hall and I think there were probably 5 or 6 sittings - that is a lot of people! It is also a heck of a lot of [fairly healthy] food.

I might treat myself to an ice cream tomorrow, I haven't eaten anything properly unhealthy for ages!
 
Posted by Nanny Ogg (# 1176) on :
 
It must be Spring [Smile]

The sun has been shining, the clocks have gone forward and the cat has brought me a dead robin.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Poor robin. Nasty cat. [Frown]

It's not exactly spring here yet (I believe it's scheduled for the third Tuesday in June at 2:30 in the afternoon) but it was a lovely bright, sunny but cold day. There's a small, flat iceberg in the Narrows (the entrance to the fjord that is St. John's harbour), so we went up Signal Hill to have a look after lunch. When we looked out to the ocean, almost the entire horizon was occupied by a huge sheet of ice - no wonder it felt cold.

It's very early for icebergs - we don't usually get them this far south until at least May or even June.

[Confused]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
It's very early for icebergs - we don't usually get them this far south until at least May or even June.
That's Global Warming for you! They say the Arctic will be free of ice in the summer in a few years. Can't remember what number the few was - but it didn't seem very far away. [Frown]

Lovely warm days here - we sat out on the patio for lunch yesterday - and it seemed funny to be doing that with no leaves on the trees!

Still, plenty of time for March to surprise us yet! [Cool]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jemima the 9th:
I have heard 2 ice cream vans this afternoon, but neither has turned into our road! [Waterworks] Despite the kids playing really noisily. They could make a packet from us.

It's a real shame, it's a good 30 seconds since I last ate anything unhealthy.

They are butcher's vans, not ice-cream vans. That's what my parents told me anyway.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
They are butcher's vans, not ice-cream vans. That's what my parents told me anyway.

Cue to jump up and down clamouring "Can we have sausages for tonight??"

Still sunny. Curiously, although the crack of dawn commute was an hour earlier today, no problem getting out of bed. Though there were rather fewer people at the station this morning. I expect by Friday we will all feel a bit shattered.
 
Posted by Nanny Ogg (# 1176) on :
 
It's another sunny day and the man has come round to take me metal detecting [Smile] Probably only find fish hooks and ring pulls.

[ 26. March 2012, 12:02: Message edited by: Nanny Ogg ]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nanny Ogg:
It's another sunny day and the man has come round to take me metal detecting [Smile] Probably only find fish hooks and ring pulls.

And teaspoons. Where do our teaspoons go??
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Nanny Ogg:
It's another sunny day and the man has come round to take me metal detecting [Smile] Probably only find fish hooks and ring pulls.

And teaspoons. Where do our teaspoons go??
If you ever find the answer please post it as we have the same problem.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Silly boys! Teaspoons are in the same location as sock singletons.

Seriously though, I expect a lot of spoons end up in the rubbish with plate scrapings.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Silly boys! Teaspoons are in the same location as sock singletons.

I can assure you that is not the case. As sock singletons sometimes turn up in my washing machine (sans mate and doing a good impression of being one of my socks but I was only washing sheets at the time when I detected it, and the wash previous to it was towels). I just put them in the sock draw, where they await the next sort out, when they get paired with one of my left behind ones, whose true mate has gone off wandering.

No extra teaspoons have ever turned up.

Jengie
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Ballpoint pen lids, umbrellas, hats, gloves (especially left-hand gloves) and scarves will be in the same place. Along with a surprising number of seven-of-spades cards, unused sticking plasters, the password to your old Yahoo account you never use any more, and that money you were sure you loaded onto the Oyster card.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
No extra teaspoons have ever turned up.

Well, just recently the teaspoon with the pretty silver pattern on the handle, which I'd bought as a teenager, and used as my "default" teaspoon for years (through university and every job) turned up in the office kitchenette. I'd lost it seven years ago - never expected to see it again.
 
Posted by Nanny Ogg (# 1176) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nanny Ogg:
It's another sunny day and the man has come round to take me metal detecting [Smile] Probably only find fish hooks and ring pulls.

It's been a good afternoon - 3 fishing weight (one broken) and 2p. [Smile]

Fisherman are real litter bugs though, lots of carrier bags, bottle tops and food wrapping around. Why can't they look after the countryside?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
This morning I went to take more photos of neighbours' cows so they can be registered and insured and whilst doing that another neighbour appeared with his pet mongoose so I got to take some photos of that, too. They are cute little things but with ferociously sharp teeth - I made sure I was well out of biting range.

Tenth Standard exams all finished today, these are the equivalent of GCSE but taken at the end of Year 10, not 11 - the 15 year olds I saw later are all relieved it is over but the 9th Standard ones have more exams, starting tomorrow morning. The long vacation starts next weekend.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
... No extra teaspoons have ever turned up ...

A couple of years ago when the Choir was doing its turn running the Cathedral tea-room, it was suggested we take in posh teaspoons for serving the jam and cream with the scones. I brought in a set of little coffee-spoons that had belonged to my granny and one of them got lost - if they want them again they can whistle for them. [Frown]

On a happier note, I've been baking - help yourselves to CAKE. [Smile]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Ballpoint pen lids, umbrellas, hats, gloves (especially left-hand gloves) and scarves will be in the same place. Along with a surprising number of seven-of-spades cards, unused sticking plasters, the password to your old Yahoo account you never use any more, and that money you were sure you loaded onto the Oyster card.

They are all in the mini dresser thing with a drawer in the back of the chapel I attend - together with several pairs of spectacles. All with a claim contact me - if you can name you can claim!!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
If anyone in the UK has been watching "The Tube" on BBC2 - were you, like me, absolutely astounded at the amount and gobsmacking variety of the lost property there???

Feel sure your teaspoons have mysteriously migrated there.

Though we did once find my favourite knife, long and tearfully lost, in the compost when we spread it on the garden. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
If anyone in the UK has been watching "The Tube" on BBC2 - were you, like me, absolutely astounded at the amount and gobsmacking variety of the lost property there???

I missed the first 15 minutes but what a fascinating programme it was. Bringing a human face to the workers behind the scenes. Really interesting.

(The Down St tube station was very creepy, though.)
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nanny Ogg:
quote:
Originally posted by Nanny Ogg:
It's another sunny day and the man has come round to take me metal detecting [Smile] Probably only find fish hooks and ring pulls.

It's been a good afternoon - 3 fishing weight (one broken) and 2p. [Smile]

Fisherman are real litter bugs though, lots of carrier bags, bottle tops and food wrapping around. Why can't they look after the countryside?

Every now & then I help with a beach litter clean where we make a note of what we collect so that the organisation that runs it can use the information when lobbying. And yes, on the beach too the shore-based fishermen are responsible for most of what we pick up, with boat-based ones and whoever leaves 1" lengths of rope coming a close second.
 
Posted by Jahlove (# 10290) on :
 
After a lovely, warm, sunny day, the temperature dropped considerably last night so Maggi-Mittens came and slept on my head (taking up most of the pillow). This made her happy. When Maggi-Mittens is happy, she dribbles. Last night, she was so happy, she dribbled up my nose.

[Disappointed]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
We accidently invented a teaspoon finding machine - our cat had a magnetic cat door and she had a fairly large, strong magnet on her collar. Not only did she drag teaspoons about, but nails, chunks of rust and anything else small and metallic that she'd come across in her travels. [Smile]

Piglet - what kind of cake? We've just had sumptuous roast chicken so a bit of cake would round it off nicely.

Cheers,
EJ
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Raisin - there's plenty left, so help yourselves. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
ATMs here are all inside, rather than just a hole in the wall, and they are all air conditioned - it is a real shock to walk in somewhere and suddenly be faced with a rather chilly 22˚C! Thankfully I wasn't in there long.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Blazing sunlight down by the river, bouncing back up off the path, bringing the heat of midsummer with it. You'd hardly think it March, except that leaves are still in short supply and the ducklings and new waterfowl haven't emerged into the world yet. Blossom everywhere, the drone of a hundred bees at once working on it, people in shirtsleeves out in rowing boats and punts, tourists drifting around in summer clothes. Cows resting quietly in the shade of trees. This is as good as last spring, except that it's earlier this year - I wonder if that means a wet summer again?

What a contrast to only a couple of weeks ago - or indeed even the frost of this morning. Drought it may be but it's just lovely right now.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's been a nice day here today, and feels almost spring-like at +2°C.

However, the Weather Channel is promising nearly a foot of sn*w on Saturday. [Waterworks]

On a Saturday, when we won't even get a sn*w-day. [Mad]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
When my dad died in 2006 my brothers and I went through his books and I chose some to keep with the view of eventually shipping them over here. This year was the intended get them shipped year, they currently reside in the basement of the house of some friends. I have just received a quote for their shipment which is approximately a thousand quid more than I have any thought of spending!

I have a 30 kg weight allowance to and from UK this time and I usually travel pretty light so I think I will have room for about 20 kg of books so I reckon I'll sort my favourite 20 kg from the boxes and then take the rest to the Oxfam Bookshop just down the road from the house in Manchester. I can't remember exactly what is there but I really can't think there is anything beyond 20 kg for which I am absolutely desperate - or not £1000 desperate!
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Oh dear, I hate getting rid of books, though I usually only have to do so in small quantities - and family books are often hard to part with. If I have anything that I think might have special value I tend to take it either to Oxfam or to another local charity bookshop that has the necessary specialist knowledge.

Got to get rid of all my kids' old books over the summer - I don't have house room, and they say they're not bothered. It's not that I'm in a hurry to have grandchildren, but I'm just not looking forward to parting with so many old favourites.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Shipping things around the world is ridiculously expensive... it tends to be cheaper to buy more when you get there, but it is hard to give up one's favourite old things. We managed to get rid of about an eighth of our books - the rest are stored. And I bought four more for the flight over and now we have a shelf full.

I'm conscious now that everything we buy we may have to either abandon or pay the earth to shift back to NZ one day... or we may just stay. I am liking it so far! We'll see how I do in mid-late winter.

Ariel - your description sounds a lot like Bristol, but we don't have punts. Still, stunning weather and very pretty by the harbour here with ferries and barges toddling about, people cycling and ringing their bells, tourists looking at maps and taking photos etc. In fact there were decorative half-naked tourists today! Senior high school or Uni aged boys in their boxers playing in the fountain. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
This weather won't last much longer, though - there's already a drop in temperature.

How are people doing for fuel - our local garage has run out of diesel and the other one has queues to fill up with petrol. I've postponed filling up the car until the weekend, when hopefully it should be a bit quieter.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
...How are people doing for fuel - our local garage has run out of diesel and the other one has queues to fill up with petrol. I've postponed filling up the car until the weekend, when hopefully it should be a bit quieter.

I'm hoping to do the same, Ariel - on the way to work this morning, the motorway overhead signs were informing which of the services had run out of diesel. Hopefully I have enough unleaded to get me home [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Good luck. By the time I left for work this morning, our local garage had run out of everything (except air).

And we're not even having a fuel strike. [brick wall]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My son is due to drive home for the weekend from Oxford today. When he phoned he was running low on fuel and decided to fill up on the way.

Hope he manages it!

[Eek!]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Gggrrr - trying to connect my new navigation device to my Mac = apparently impossible.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
I filled up yesterday, even though all my local garage had by then was 'Super' diesel at 5p per litre extra. I should have filled up on Wednesday before things really got going, but the people who serviced (& MOT'd) my car stuck a locking fuel cap on it and didn't tell me where they'd left the keys and the instructions, because they thought they were in an 'obvious' place. [Roll Eyes]

Anyway, I don't use it all that often, so what I've got now should see me through the family visit at Easter. Then I'm lending it to friends who are off on honeymoon and will hopefully get it back (full) in time for the first weekend in May.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
No car at the moment - my feet have as much fuel as usual (i.e. not a great deal, but I need to get places so I walk there and back).

Gosh, imagine being so powerful that if you mention 'go and do this thing' everyone crowds around to do it! What if the PM said 'go and buy a pasty'? Greggs would stop complaining for a bit, I guess! (Being a bit facetious...)
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I shall be (virtually sight) singing (at very short notice) the St John Passion tonight in Ashbourne.
Small choir, one of their sopranos has gone sick...someone who calls themselves a friend mentioned that I might be available.
Prayers - please! But I am quite excited really... [Yipee]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
No car at the moment - my feet have as much fuel as usual (i.e. not a great deal, but I need to get places so I walk there and back).

Gosh, imagine being so powerful that if you mention 'go and do this thing' everyone crowds around to do it! What if the PM said 'go and buy a pasty'? Greggs would stop complaining for a bit, I guess! (Being a bit facetious...)

Brilliant thought EJ!
I ignored PM and waited until I really needed petrol yesterday. The quiet garage I frequent was busy and only had the expensive petrol which I had to buy cos otherwise I wouldn't have got to work today. I checked the pasties - none left!! Dunno what that tells me.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
I shall be (virtually sight) singing (at very short notice) the St John Passion tonight in Ashbourne.
Small choir, one of their sopranos has gone sick...someone who calls themselves a friend mentioned that I might be available.
Prayers - please! But I am quite excited really... [Yipee]

All the best. I was singing alto in the Messiah one year when the conductor realised his bass section seemed to have fallen apart. My son who is a very good bass singer was called in like you, at last moment. We had score and tape given to us. Car trip in saw cassette being played over and over and score being perused at red traffic lights. Fortunately he is very good at sight singing and also playing a keyboard instrument the same way. he frequently while still at school found himself called in to play at a funeral where he could do old hymns by sight which no one else could do.

Enjoy the experience.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Hope it went well, St. E. [Smile]

I can't quite get my head round the fuel crisis - are the tanker-drivers on strike or aren't they? And considering that they're paid £47,000 a year, if they are on strike, then why?

[Confused]

In other news, the sn*w that they've been giving us Weather Warnings about so far hasn't amounted to much - long may that continue.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Birthday cake with butter icing at 7 a.m. is not good for my system!

Little boy in the village was 5 earlier in the week but his mum translated the birthday to Saturday and we stopped in for cake and sweets on our morning walk. I think I may well have a nap soon.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
You also?

Two inch icing with glacé cherries [Eek!] My poor blood sugar!

I got a handshake when I gave him two cards. Then I said and and presented him with a seriously big tourist jeep. Now he was paying attention. When I said and again, I gave him a KinderJoy® Then I said and again and gave another to his mummy. His eyes followed that one too!

I do so love little VK! [Axe murder]

[ 31. March 2012, 04:57: Message edited by: PeteC ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I can't quite get my head round the fuel crisis - are the tanker-drivers on strike or aren't they?

No. They're only thinking about it. It hasn't even got beyond that, yet my garage has now been out of everything for two days.

quote:
And considering that they're paid £47,000 a year, if they are on strike, then why?
Terms and conditions.

Anyway, it looks like drivers from the Armed Forces will be starting training next week to learn how to drive tankers if needs be. Meanwhile, I'm rethinking my travel plans for the weekend.

Incidentally, speaking of snow, the papers are saying Easter will bring an Arctic Freeze - that'll be something to look forward to. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
...Incidentally, speaking of snow, the papers are saying Easter will bring an Arctic Freeze - that'll be something to look forward to. [Roll Eyes]

I'm so sorry [Two face]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
I'm so sorry
So am I, WW. Perfect early autumn day down here. 27° max in Sydney. Mornings and evenings are getting cooler and the air feels different. Autumn is on its way.

The downside is that rain is forecast or at least showers for next week. I think we have had enough for a while.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
An irrelevant aside:

It is Vishu, the big spring feast here, two weeks today so we have just been to buy some fireworks, an essential part of the feast, including one string of one thousand firecrackers! We thought we could string them round a certain wheelchair but someone, naming no names, isn't too keen on the idea.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:

Incidentally, speaking of snow, the papers are saying Easter will bring an Arctic Freeze - that'll be something to look forward to.

Yes - I hope it doesn't confuse the plants too much - my lettuce is growing nicely!

Bit of a lazy day here at BoogievilleMansions - or is that BoogievilleHovels since Mr Boogs has just said 'Don't spend anything until next Thursday'?


[Paranoid]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:


Bit of a lazy day here at BoogievilleMansions - or is that BoogievilleHovels since Mr Boogs has just said 'Don't spend anything until next Thursday'?


[Paranoid]

Yes, things are a bit like that around here - husband finally got paid, but it's only one medium income for the two of us, so it's down to essentials only until I finally start work then get paid!

Also, I saw a spotty little fawn in the bushes by the motorway today. It was amazing! [Eek!]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I'm so sorry [Two face]

You lie beautifully.

The sn*w did come to something after all - there was about 8" of the damn stuff on the steps outside the house today.

Spring? Yeah, right. [Disappointed]

On the bright side, I made Sandy's Spiced Winter Soup today and there's some left, and home-made bread. And CAKE - help yourselves. [Smile]

EJ, I know exactly how you feel. When I started my present job, I hoped to get my first salary two weeks later (they pay fortnightly over here, which seemed strange at first, but is actually quite nice). Unfortunately, they had forgotten to ask me for my SIN number (the equivalent of National Insurance) and being a brainless foreigner I hadn't realised, so I had to wait another two weeks before getting paid, which seemed like an eternity, especially as we'd started spending it ...

[Help]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I've always thought that having a SIN number suits some people better than others.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Palm Sunday today so the priest was wearing a gorgeous red chasuble complete with sequins! I thought of posting that in Eccles but decided I'd rather not!

Or perhaps I shall.

An e-mail from a close friend in UK this morning to say a mutual friend has "a highly suspect lymphoma" with consultant's appointment tomorrow so a bit of prayer and upholding for Sean wouldn't go amiss - I reckon he is probably late 40s, he may just be 50.

Off to take family photos this afternoon at a neighbour's place - it may end up being more than one family, who knows?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I meant to use the morning productively, as it was full of sunshine, although chilly.

Instead I ended up at a sunny table in the window of a cafe, with a cup of hot chocolate with whipped cream and Belgian chocolate sprinkles, and an Italian palmine biscuit, watching the world go by and listening idly to the sounds of cheerful chatter and classical music.

Life is hard sometimes.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Making the most of the last few hours of fine weather. I spent the first half of the afternoon reading in the garden (though wrapped up warm) and then a two-hour walk along the river banks.

Left hot cross buns to rise all day (my final experiment with Herman the sourdough) and have just put them in the oven.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I meant to use the morning productively, as it was full of sunshine, although chilly.

Instead I ended up at a sunny table in the window of a cafe, with a cup of hot chocolate with whipped cream and Belgian chocolate sprinkles, and an Italian palmine biscuit, watching the world go by and listening idly to the sounds of cheerful chatter and classical music.

Life is hard sometimes.

And that's not productive of serenity, relaxation, a feeling being at ease?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I've always thought that having a SIN number suits some people better than others.

[Devil]
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... a cup of hot chocolate with whipped cream and Belgian chocolate sprinkles ...

Not off it for Lent then, eh? [Big Grin]

It being Palm Sunday, we sang Hosanna to the son of David by Weelkes and the Passion of our Lord according to Matthew by Victoria this morning, and at Evensong instead of a sermon we had a meditation in readings and music (Farrant, Gibbons, Sheppard, Croce and sundry others).

Very nice too. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Not off it for Lent then, eh? [Big Grin]

No, I opted for going low-carb vegetarian-with-fish instead. It's a great way of forcing yourself to eat healthily.

Beautiful morning here today if chilly - snow forecast for Wednesday [Ultra confused] but I don't imagine what we get will be anything on the Piglet Scale.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Raining here at the moment, though not hard enough to fill our water butt up. Tomorrow though promises a downpour. [Frown]

And snow on Wednesday.

Can't wait to see all my plants shrivelled up in the east winds........ [Frown] [Frown] [Frown]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
snow on Wednesday.

Can't wait to see all my plants shrivelled up in the east winds........

Yep - very odd weather - the plants must be completely confused!

I've had two days off studying and am really struggling to wind up again.

MustgetofftheshipMustgetofftheshipMustgetofftheshipMustgetofftheshipMustgetofftheship ....
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
A white Easter isn't really news here, but over your side of the big pond ... [Confused]

Holy Week, which is usually our busiest time of the whole year, started in a very low-key sort of way tonight. We sing Compline with a couple of hymns but no sermon on the Monday, but when D. and I turned up the only other people there were the Dean, the Curate, one of the sopranos and the Dean's verger, who used to sing soprano in the choir before we came here. So we abandoned the hymns, the Curate sang the office and the rest of us provided the choral responses. It was really rather nice.

Who needs a congregation? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Morning All,

A greyish morning (might burn off later) with cute little birds tweeting in the trees. I can't see them well enought to tell, but I'd guess robins, goldfinches and tits of various sorts. I love little British birds. So CUTE! (NZ has lovely birds too, and a wider variety of types of bird, but less pretty colours, usually).

I'm all alone today as my husband is hanging out with family. His grandfather died overnight. Sad for the family (especially his wife who has been with him for around 50- 60 years), but he was in his mid-late 80s and had cancer so he was probably somewhat relieved to go. It'll be an odd week of limbo as they'll wait for my mother-in-law to fly back from NZ to have the funeral. (She can't get an earlier flight due to the holidays.)

Anyhoo, time for porridge, I guess, then finding an excuse to go for a longish walk around the city (while not spending money!) All this walking round the shops is very tempting, but we're still down to essentials only this month.

Cheers,
EJ
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
Just on my way out to here to discuss my next two tattoos. I want the date of my reception into the Catholic church on my wrist and a picture of Our Lady of Walsingham on my leg. I'm just hoping the artist can draw Our Lady from the statue I'm taking with me because I don't have a printer to print out any photos.

Exciting. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thanks, chive, now I know where to get a Prince Albert, if I ever want one - unlikely, I think. Enjoy your new adornments.

A visit to the Registration of Foreigners office this morning to discuss requesting permission to leave the country - in my case, as I am a Good Boyit's only a matter of asking and getting a stamp in my passport. Then this afternoon another orgy of shopping!
 
Posted by Jahlove (# 10290) on :
 
Had a couple of lovely BT engineers round today to instal BT Infinity™ *- and beyond! [Smile] The reason my net connection kept dropping when the phone rang (which rather negates an important principle of BB) is that there had been a *short* in the junction box, the wiring housing was a bit burnt and some contacts were corroded. All sorted - so I gave them the last of my birthday cake and a nice cup of TEA [Smile]

* which actually works out cheaper than the previous package I had with them.

[ 03. April 2012, 16:59: Message edited by: Jahlove ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Belatedly happy birthday, Jahlove! [Smile]

Domestic Goddess Piglet has been in action again - laundry (mostly) sorted, and beef casserole for tomorrow's lunch* in the slow-cooker ready to cook overnight.

* There will be left-overs, so help yourselves.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Off to the airport in a little while so ensure the airline A Certain Guest will be using as far as Bangalore are wheelchair aware and competent! As they are the national carrier they better had be!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Dilemma - do I leave my tulips out to the elements (freezing wind and snow) or pick them and put them in a vase?

[Confused]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
Boogie posted:

Dilemma - do I leave my tulips out to the elements (freezing wind and snow) or pick them and put them in a vase?

Pick them Boogie - mine have been ruined! It didn't help that the dustbin was blown over, across the patio, to rest gracefully squashing tulips, pansies and lots of grape hyacinths! [Frown]

Snow on the tops, but sleet here. Have you got snow Boogie?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I agree, pick them, they will brighten up your kitchen.

With all the snow about I wrote to my brothers, one in process of moving from Manchester to Shropshire and one just west of Glasgow, to say that they needn't concern themselves about us, we were okay. They seemed curiously unappreciative for the information! But then they say you can choose your friends but you can't your family.

Trip to the airport successfully accomplished, it was very busy there today, or perhaps it was just the time of day.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Yes - we have snow (snuggled next to the Pennines we get plenty of weather!)

I compromised and picked the ones which were bent right over - I'm keeping an eye on the others. They have been such good tulips, flowering year after year.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
What is this "snow" of which you speak? It's grey here, but not even particularly cold.

We (that's our allotment people) have lost our newly-planted-out runner beans to the frost though.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Perhaps as a judgement upon me we had a rainstorm about 5 p.m. which has knocked the temperatures down a bit and also prevented Pete and me having our usual early evening walk to the temple gates and back - oh well, hopefully we will get a walk in the morning.

I realised that this year is the centenary of my old school so I sent them a quick note of congratulations and have had a lovely note back from the Bursar - it's been snowing in Altrincham, poor things!
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
No snow of course, but man, it's freezing cold outside! I've gotten all un-acclimatised again (is that a word?) after arriving to literally freezing temperatures then it getting warmer over the past couple of months.

I spent the day buying a car today - just a cheap old one, but it was from a reliable guy and it goes well.

Am trying to decide whether to bravely venture out to sit in on a choir rehersal tonight to see if I'd like to join the choir or not. The cold is a factor... They're doing Handel next and I was in a choir that did pretty much exclusively Handel in NZ, so it bodes well in that respect.

Anyhoo, keep warm all (except WW who can continue boasting if he likes! [Smile] )
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Pretty cold in the Valleys - I had a visit to make on the Gurnos mid morning, and there was quite a blizzard happening. Thankfully, it didn't stick.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
... except WW who can continue boasting ...

Don't encourage him, EJ. [Devil]

We still have snow lying about, but we had quite heavy rain last night and into today, which didn't freeze as predicted, so now it's flowing merrily down the hill. However, we've also got big chunks of ice in the harbour, which are making it feel somewhat brrrrr.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Vishu, the big Spring festival, is still 9 days away but already we are getting sporadic attacks of firecrackers at odd hours - we are trying to hold ours back for the actual day though we may have our arms twisted to set some off on Easter Day - but not at 3 a.m. as one of the churches we go to will do it! They will be loud enough to wake us some 3 kms away! [Fr] Paul, the parish priest is a real firework fiend!
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
I vote for the 1000 string of firecrackers. Heck, I'll even buy you another set for Vishu!

HWMBO and I will set them off at midnight. No need for you to get out of bed, Wodders.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
double post to add:

Of course, he may very well be a little startled - Perhaps I will just sing a little song I learnt in my youth.

Spirit of God in the still running Wodders
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think we may store that big box of fireworks under your bed after all!

Sleep well, Pete.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
... Spirit of God in the still running Wodders

[Killing me] [Killing me]

Maundy Thursday service (foot-washing, Eucharist and stripping of the altars while we sang the Allegri Miserere) dispatched without mishap.

No work tomorrow except ecclesiastical laundry (surplices) and some pre-Easter cooking; a couple in the choir has everyone round for breakfast on Easter morning and my contribution will be a pot of kedgeree.

If I had the choice, I'd rather have Easter Monday as a holiday than Good Friday, as it would allow recovery from having had a service at 6 in the morning on Easter Sunday ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I found the foot washing last night quite moving - but the sermon/homily/whatever was FAR too long!

We have canvassed the local churches, both Latin Catholic and Syro-Malabar, and found one that has an 8 a.m. mass on Sunday morning so will be heading to St Joseph Cottolengo on Easter morning for a Latin rite service - I have only been there once before, last year when some guy in purple was visiting - it is the only church in the area that actually has a RAMP for wheelchairs! Sadly we have to cross quite a lot of gravel to get to the ramp so will probably drag Pete backwards as that's the best way with gravel.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A Quiz:

Who is daft enough to be leaning over a bucket, hand washing a brand new shirt to get the starch out, and turn the shower/tap control the wrong way and thus soak their own back with cold water?

Answers on a postcard, please, to the usual address.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
A Quiz:

Who is daft enough to be leaning over a bucket, hand washing a brand new shirt to get the starch out, and turn the shower/tap control the wrong way and thus soak their own back with cold water?

Answers on a postcard, please, to the usual address.

Haha! _ Now go sit on the porch to dry out!
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Good Friday greetings to you all. What are you plans?

Hopefully I'll get to Faure's Requim tonight at the Cathedral.

Amazingly, it's a beautiful sunny day today, after a freezy cold rainy week. And I'm now insured to drive my new (old) car. Time for an outing!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Well, my plan to get to Oxford for Tenebrae has fallen through. I could either get there an hour early, well before the shops opened, or else arrive slightly late. It's not available locally.

I should probably do some practical things like sending Easter cards instead. It's a beautiful sunny day - hadn't expected that.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Your mention of Tenebrae made me think of Tannochbrae and I thought you were channeling Barbara Mullen for a minute.

Actually most people reading this will be far too young to remember and will dismiss this post as the ravings of an old fogey - they might not be far wrong!
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Well, my plan to get to Oxford for Tenebrae has fallen through. I could either get there an hour early, well before the shops opened, or else arrive slightly late. It's not available locally.

I should probably do some practical things like sending Easter cards instead. It's a beautiful sunny day - hadn't expected that.

Can you get to Neath by 7:00? We've got one! It's been a very thought provoking and moving week - worship inter-denominationally (is that a word?).
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Now go sit on the porch to dry out!

Porch? Surely not being an American you mean veranda. A porch is something you you sit IN not on.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yes indeed, Balaam, we call it the verandah, though we add an "h" at the end. Our Canadian guest calls it a porch but then he probably doesn't know any better.


eta: in architectural drawings here such things are referred to as Sit Outs - but ours is a verandah.

[ 06. April 2012, 16:05: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Mother-in-law is over for Easter, bearing Caramelised Onion Chutney [Big Grin]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... Actually most people reading this will be far too young to remember and will dismiss this post as the ravings of an old fogey ...

Sadly not. [pan-loaf accent ON]
quote:
"Dr. Cameron, I've got the most terrible heartburn"
"Stop your havering, woman, and get your t*ts out o' ma porridge!"

[/pan-loaf accent OFF]

Having had plans that involved banking some sleep (wouldn't that be nice?) I ended up being Domestic Goddess Piglet again today. Surplices washed, bed-linen changed, chicken carcass turned into stock, chicken stock turned into soup and a loaf whirring away merrily in the bread-making machine. Kedgeree and smoked-salmon pâté on hold until tomorrow as shops closed and vital ingredients like rice and curry powder* absent from larder.

EJ, health to drive your new/old car. What sort did you get?

* sorry, WW - you probably don't approve of curry-powder ... [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Jahlove (# 10290) on :
 
oooh! they never used such language in Dr Finlay's Bookcase, i'll have you know, Madame Porcelet!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm not sure that quote really came from the show ... [Devil]

Loaf just out of bread-machine, and it looks like my best effort yet, with no sunken top. As D. put it, [cue King of Swamp Castle voice] "but the third one ... STAYED OOP!"

[Big Grin]

[ 07. April 2012, 02:27: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
...* sorry, WW - you probably don't approve of curry-powder ... [Hot and Hormonal]

One of the big companies hereabouts is actually called Eastern Curry Powders so I suppose I can't complain - what they sell, however, is a variety of Masala Powders - and masala just means mixture so I suppose they are, really.

Did you know Barbara Mullen was actually born in Boston, Massachusetts?

Balaam, Caramelised Onion Chutney sounds to be of the Gods! Yummy!
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
I've spent the afternoon making Coronation Chicken for a family get together next week. If I never post again it might be the cooking. [Biased]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... Did you know Barbara Mullen was actually born in Boston, Massachusetts? ...

Not Morningside then? Say it isn't so! [Confused]

Kedgeree now made but I'm not very convinced about it. The fish I used was some that was given to my boss (and passed on to me) as "smoked haddock" which rather surprised me, as I've never been able to find smoked haddock here. Having cooked it, I think it's kippers, which are quite a different breed. I added some smoked salmon as well, and it's edible, but not exactly delectable.

[Disappointed]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Hope you're all enjoying your Easter weekends despite the weather! What is everybody up to?

Went to see the Dickens exhibition at the Museum of London yesterday. On later to the Faberge Egg Hunt - the eggs are large artworks, each individually painted by a famous artist or designer, and were to be found all over London, but are now gathered together on display in Covent Garden this weekend before being sold for charity. The styles are very diverse and interesting - I just wish they did "mini-eggs" that you could buy, some are so pretty it'd be lovely to have a souvenir.

Other than that, watching "Cranford" on DVD, which I missed the first time round. Haven't enjoyed a costume drama so much in a long time - delightful.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I lived in Knutsford, on which Cranford is based, from age 17 to leaving home to follow my career and my parents lived there until the early 80s - it hadn't changed much then! Many locals raved about Cranford but I am ashamed to say I have never read it.

Mass at a slightly unfamiliar church this morning - the other day they told us mass was at 8 so we got there at 7.34 and it had already started [Mad] - but it was a good service and it is a lovely, modern church - very spacious and airy - and I was sitting right under a fan, which was wonderful!

Next door to the outlaws for [far too much] lunch and then a relaxing afternoon watching the cricket. There is thunder about so I think they'll be rain before morning.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I've just woken up from the effects off too much lunch. The Malbec that accompanied it didn't help with the soporific effects, neither did the single malt.

But if you are going to break the Lenten fast you might as well do it in style.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I think they'll be rain before morning.

Here too. The skies are greying up. I'm glad I'm on the right side of the Pennines though, the wrong side is going to get the brunt of it.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
No rain yet but quite a few fire crackers going off - they are for sale everywhere ready for Vishu next Saturday. True to form [Fr] Paul, the priest at the very old church we sometimes go to, set loads off during Vigil Mass during the night - they woke me at 03.15 and we live 3 kms away!

We have set off a few today and scared the cat away for a while but she has returned to tend to her kittens.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
It's been damp or dampish most of the morning here, and grey and overcast all afternoon.

But, it stayed dry (if a little windy) last night for the Lighting of the New Fire, and all went off well then (i.e. I didn't set myself or anything else on fire exempt the Paschal Candle, which not only lit but stayed lit) so that was a success...

And now I am very tired, awaiting my Dear One to come home so that we can Eat Chocolate and drink wine together!

We have so much chocolate that you are welcome to some, if anyone is feeling deprived? Might find some wine and a spare glass too...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
The skies are greying up. I'm glad I'm on the right side of the Pennines though, the wrong side is going to get the brunt of it.

As usual! [Biased]
 
Posted by daisymay (# 1480) on :
 
We went to Kew Gardens today and just twice it showered only a tiny bit being wettish. It was lovely there, and the whole family enjoyed it. It's always beautiful there, and plenty of walking as well as going into special places/buildings.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
When we left the house at 5:30 [Eek!] for the First Eucharist and New Fire, the weather was typical St. John's - you couldn't see the end of your nose - but by the time we were coming home after Evensong there was the remains of a cracking sunset.

Though I say it what shouldn't, we did ourselves proud with the music today. Schubert in G, Rise up, my love, my fair one by Healey Willan, This joyful Eastertide and the Hallelujah Chorus as the Gospel acclamation resulted not only in much Decanal Grinning™ but a fair bit of Episcopal Grinning™ too.* [Yipee]

Having got up at such a Godless hour, I spent the afternoon stretched on the sofa in the company of Quite Large Bear.

[Snore]

PS Has anything odd happened to the area telephone codes in the UK? We couldn't get through to phone home this afternoon and the automated voice said "check your area code", although we were using the same codes we've been using for the last 8 years.

[Confused]

* The Bishop (BLESS HIM) always starts his Easter sermon by saying how wonderful the music, and particularly the Hallelujah Chorus, is.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I sometimes have a problem getting connections to UK and get funny messages like that then try again a while later and everything is fine.

- - - -

I can't keep on staying up to watch the end of the cricket - going to bed at nearly midnight and getting up at 05.50 does not agree with me - I think I may go and have a little nap now.

[Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...that little 2 hours did me the world of good - and now Mrs E is back and its her birthday today! Happy Birthday Mrs E!

Yesterday at Mass the priest went around doing the Asperges - those sprinklers send out quite a bit, don't they?
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Yesterday at Mass the priest went around doing the Asperges - those sprinklers send out quite a bit, don't they?

Funnily enough, I've just started a thread about this in Ecclesiantics.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Well, its now Bank Holiday Monday, and its pouring with rain and doesn't look like stopping, at least this side of noon!

At least we don't get hosepipe bans up here!
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
That's a shame as we are about to venture to your side of the hills to visit our daughter. (We see her as taking culture to the dark side [Biased] )

At least the caramelised onion chutney tasted as good as it sounds.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Happy Birthday, Mrs E!

I am finally in holiday mode. I've been off work since 30th March, and don't go back until 16th April, but what with decorating the sitting room, and Holy Week, the last nine days have felt very full and busy.

[Yipee] for a lazy week!
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Well, its now Bank Holiday Monday, and its pouring with rain and doesn't look like stopping, at least this side of noon!

At least we don't get hosepipe bans up here!

I'm just wondering what one does on a wet Bank Holiday? Everything is shut, as far as I can tell, and I don't fancy wandering about a wood or some standing stones in the rain (although otherwise that'd be lovely).

(PS, Piglet, my car's an old Vauxhall Corsa. So far so good...)
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
...I'm just wondering what one does on a wet Bank Holiday?...

My choice would be sleep!
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
...I'm just wondering what one does on a wet Bank Holiday?...

My choice would be sleep!
I need to get out of the house for a few hours every day or I'll go stir crazy... you wouldn't like me when I'm crazy! [Ultra confused]

I think I might just have to rug up and trudge about in the rain a bit (then maybe reward myself with a warm dry pub (if they're open today... I assume they are...).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The Watershed or the Arnolfini with the papers and order a coffee will be nice if they're not too crowded.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
I'm just wondering what one does on a wet Bank Holiday? Everything is shut, as far as I can tell, and I don't fancy wandering about a wood or some standing stones in the rain (although otherwise that'd be lovely).

Not sure where you are but the main shops and restaurants are open round here. Otherwise I'm afraid it's probably going to have to be indoor pursuits like TV or a good book.

(Though on a day like today you can usually be pretty sure tourist attractions won't be crowded...)
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I'm surprised that National Trust properties are closed today EJ. Perhaps you could find a tea room and take the papers or read a book?
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Happy birthday Mrs E - I hope you are being spoiled.

A good day for painting today - nothing arty, just a door. I'm glad I was depending on some non-gardening weather to get this done.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
Happy birthday Mrs E - I hope you are being spoiled...

She came back for the weekend with her family this morning, despite being told she didn't have to - and she wouldn't let me wash up or anything - but then you know what she is like! We told a neighbour's daughter she was 105 today and she just laughed!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Fancy that - no respect for the aged these days. I hope she has a good day.

Have spent the afternoon making the chocolate cake from Hell. Not because it's difficult, but because it requires (among other things) 2 large bars of melted dark chocolate, plus cocoa powder, plus several ounces of brown sugar and golden caster sugar, plus half a pound of butter. That's before the icing goes on, which will involve double cream and another large bar of melted dark chocolate...

Sometimes you just have to, you know?

It'd better work because I'm taking it to the office tomorrow.

Incidentally, has anyone ever made a chocolate cake with beer or Guinness? I don't want the recipe, but I do want to know what people thought of it if they did. I'm in two minds about making one next time, but don't know how beery it might taste.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Sounds gorgeous!

I ended my sugar fast yesterday - so you are welcome to send a piece over.

Post haste!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:

I didn't set myself or anything else on fire exempt the Paschal Candle, which not only lit but stayed lit) so that was a success...


Darllenwr led the Lighting of the Paschal candle service on Saturday. He now realises it's not a good idea to say "damn" when the alter candles won't light when wearing a radio mike.

Easter Sunday was bright, it wasn't too cold up on the mountain at 7am. Unfortunately, it's hammered it down today.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... Have spent the afternoon making the chocolate cake from Hell.... .

Death by chocolate is nothing compared to that, Ariel
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Spent the day at our daughters over the hills in hotpot-land, the rain never abated. What's more, Chorley market was closed, so no Chorley cakes to bring back across to the civilised side.

But they do have a miniature schnauzer pup which has a shoelace fetish. Here he is.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
What a cute wee dog. [Smile]

Just back from supper with friends from the choir - thought it was going to be roast lamb but it turned out to be roast beef. Very rare - a good vet could have brought it back to life - but v. nice all the same.

Beautiful day here - it got up to 9°C and sunny. Socks have been shed, toenails have been painted.

Cue late winter storm ...

Happy birthday, Mrs. E. - and I don't believe WW when he says you're 105 ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Cute dog indeed!

I phoned my bank a little while ago, so about 4 a.m. in Skelmersdale, and the person on the end of the phone said it was raining and cold there so when I tried to brighten her day by telling of the weather here she didn't seem cheered at all. There is no pleasing some people.

The reality is that if Mrs E were 105 then I would be, erm, a hundred and, erm, mumble mumble - and she finds being here infinitely more restful than being at home with her loopy sister.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Love the pup! Did he get his shoelace, or was he just being intelligent and wanted to undo the lace to get to the shoe???

Hope the cake was successful, sounds absolutely wonderful!

Ceaseless rain yesterday means we are well wetted [Smile] in the garden, rainwater butts overflowing, all ponds filled.

Sorry about you drought-ridden folk in the South East [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
It just hailed! And no-one made me any chocolate cake (sounds delicious though) or brought me any adorable schnauzers to play with. Instead I have my husband's cold to entertain me. Thankfully our massive bouts of a few weeks ago seem to have innoculated us to British bugs (touch wood) so I've only got it mildly.

A surprising amount of things were open on a Bank Holiday (inluding the National Trust places, but we thought the insidey ones would be swarmed). I love the cafe at Arnolfini (mmm... rubarb crumble slice!) but we ended up at the movies. The new Aardman thing about pirates - quite cute and very entertaining (I didn't get bored in the middle which I quite often do). As the Aardman folk are just down the road, I feel we should be supporting them. [Smile]

PS- I'm in Bristol, Ariel. And very nice it is too.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Rhubarb Crumble - yum-yum!! I think I prefer it with custard but will have cream or ice cream as well or instead of if necessary.

Bit of a panic this afternoon when I realised I hadn't paid a bill due on Thursday but I managed to pay over the internetty thing so that's okay.

My hands were really throbbing a bit earlier after we bagged just over a kilo of chilli powder and, inevitably, got some on my skin - a bit of coconut oil got it off and calmed things down a bit - now I just hope folks turn up to take it off my hands!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
The dog/house sitter is sorted, we're off to visit our eldest son in Heidelberg.

[Big Grin]

(eta - see you when I get there, I'm taking the notebook, of course!)

[ 10. April 2012, 14:49: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The cake looks and tastes as it should - an intense, rich dark chocolate experience. I thought for a while it was going to be a non-starter as most people prefer milk chocolate and it sat there untouched almost all day - but shortly before I went home a couple of slices went, which was reassuring.

Funny old day with sudden heavy April showers and warm sunshine. On the way home, some beautiful scenes as we were caught between downpours and strong sunshine, with a double rainbow, and a single one nearby. If you can imagine green fields with a few trees in blossom, some old farm buildings, the deep dark rainclouds behind, golden light and the rainbow configuration in front, you will have it.

[ 10. April 2012, 18:35: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
It's been lovely and sunny today. Why couldn't it have been like this yesterday???

Incidently, we have a cat with a shoelace fetish.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
It's been lovely and sunny today. Why couldn't it have been like this yesterday???

Because it was a Bank Holiday and it's traditional.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Big Grin]

I'm reminded of an episode of the excellent Chelmsford 123 where they were having a drought and the Roman governor tried everything including rain-dances, and finally brought the rain by declaring it to be a Bank Holiday.

It was another lovely day here today, and got up to 14°C (the average at this time of year is 5°). [Yipee]

Didn't take advantage though - I think the early start on Sunday has caught up with me and all I wanted to do when I got home from w*rk was sleep ...

[Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Sleep is good, I am a great fan.

A quiet day today, we have decided not to go into town at all but I may stroll to a local supermarket later for a few things - nothing too strenuous, you understand.

We tried a new recipe at lunch for cauliflower cooked with garlic - it was nice but we think it can be improved so will be experimenting a bit to see if our ideas work, if they do I'll post it on the recipe thread in Heaven.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
We tried a new recipe at lunch for cauliflower cooked with garlic - it was nice but we think it can be improved so will be experimenting a bit

Do your experiments include paprika? Paprika works with cauliflower if you don't overdo it.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
We tried a new recipe at lunch for cauliflower cooked with garlic - it was nice but we think it can be improved so will be experimenting a bit

Do your experiments include paprika? Paprika works with cauliflower if you don't overdo it.
Paprika works period. Mrs S rarely uses chili without a little paprika. It 'rounds out' a lot of things.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I agree, I love paprika but the only time I brought any back here it went mouldy! I was most offended as it was expensive smoked paprika from, strangely enough, Taurus Crafts, where we are having my first Shipmeet.

If I bring some back this time I shall keep it in the fridge.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
<waves> from Heidelberg - we had a nice walk by the river and a Weisbeer (of course!) Great to see my eldest again [Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
IMHO the nicest way to cook cauliflower is as per the blessèd Delia in the original Cookery Course: sautéed with onion, garlic and crushed coriander seeds and finished off with butter - it keeps its texture and is about as yummy as cauliflower can be.
 
Posted by FooloftheShip (# 15579) on :
 
I heard this, and I thought of you, Piglet:

"the warmest and driest place in the UK today will be Norn Irn".

Not every day you hear that......
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
<waves> to Boogie [Smile] Heidelberg is a lovely city - have a great time!

Did you feel anything of the earthquake, WW?

If you have a really young, tight cauliflower, I feel that a good bit of the best butter is the finest accompaniment!
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
I'm new here and there doesn't seem to be a thread for those from Africa and in fact nobody else from my corner of the world. Although my climate has more in common with the Antipodes, I've spent more time in the UK so if nobody minds I will just hang out here as an honorary Brit.

Bright hot autumn morning here in the mountains of the Overberg, South Africa, just back from the local market with a large yellow Strandveld pumpkin and some organic butternut. The church bells of the local Dutch Reformed Church have been 'fixed' and now only toll an hour late.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Mary LA

have friends living in the shadow of the Overberg and we were there 4 weeks ago.

Near Robertson? In a vineyard?

Great part of the world.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Hi Shamwari -- I'm closer to Grabouw than the Breede River, but know Robertson well.

Wine-growing country and the grapes have just been picked, apples and pears also in abundance.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Mary, I'm an ex-pat Brit and there is at least one other so we are used to non-residents joining in and I even dare to say welcome on behalf of the group! And if you want to talk about food this is a pretty good place - although recipes belong in Heaven.

We've just had lunch and whilst we were out this morning Mrs E experimented further with the other half on the cauliflower - she used garlic paste AND whole garlic and some peas that were lurking in the fridge and a tad more water and cooked it a little longer and it was SUPERB!!!!! Really, really YUMMY!! If we can replicate it then I'll post it.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Waves at Mary from the east side of the Arabian Sea

Did you see me?

[Yipee]
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Thanks for the welcome WW and Pete C east of the Arabian Sea! India, she asked tentatively? The Maldives are West...

I am not a Brit expat (just for clarification), was born in Zimbabwe and now travel for work between Angola, Namibia and Mozambique, though I call the Overberg in South Africa home, for now.

My recipes might belong in Heaven but I'm less sure about my cooking, though Purgatory may not be ready for unspiritual indigestion.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Great.

Another Zimbabwean.

We are destined to take over the world.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
You first, Shamwari.

I seem to have spent decades living down and unlearning our jolly headmistress's expectations and hopes for us. No glass ceilings girls! You just smash through them with your hockey stick and keep going. Onwards and upwards!

Maimed us for life.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by shamwari:
Great.

Another Zimbabwean.

We are destined to take over the world.

Your cricketers may have a little way to go yet [Big Grin]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
They have already taken over the England team (Flower), and the Indian team (Fletcher)

Matter of time before they take over the rest
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
A bit of local news:

The Big Bang

I was just on my way to get a takeaway when I heard this - a couple of quick, massive explosions. Like those (now banned) mortar fireworks going off. No idea what it was, no smoke, no police sirens on the trail any time shortly after either so I'm guessing it wasn't local after all. Did anyone else hear it?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Hello Mary LA! **waves** I may well be the Other Expat that Wodders was talking about - I'm Scottish, lived in Northern Ireland for 15 years and now live in Newfoundland. We get about, us lot! I've never been to South Africa, but I appreciate it regularly through the excellent medium that is Two Oceans Sauvignon Blanc ... [Biased]

Fool of the Ship - did you seriously put the words "driest" and "Norn Irn" in the same sentence? Shum mishtake shurely?

I'm playing hookey at the moment - I ought to be at the Cathedral AGM, but after w*rk in the morning, my regular stint volunteering in the Cathedral office in the afternoon and early supper with friends at a Chinese restaurant I thought "bugger it". I haven't been entirely idle - I'm actually taking a break from some light envelope-stuffing for the Cemetery Committee ...
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
A bit of local news:

The Big Bang

I was just on my way to get a takeaway when I heard this - a couple of quick, massive explosions. Like those (now banned) mortar fireworks going off. No idea what it was, no smoke, no police sirens on the trail any time shortly after either so I'm guessing it wasn't local after all. Did anyone else hear it?

Here that would be called a lead=up to Vishu, celebrated tomorrow, but some kids (5-99) just can't wait to let off their fireworks! [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
He is only a bit disgruntled because he nearly spilt his tea this morning when we let off a megabomb - it was only a little bit loud.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Hi Elspeth/piglet, some good Cape wines making their way overseas.

Bright and breezy Friday 13th here, no loud bangs or fireworks but my Great Dane puppy caught a turtledove. He was persuaded to release it, no harm done except for a few lost tail feathers. Very gentle mouth for a Great Dane. I wonder if he has some kind of bird dog in him, lurcher perhaps.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Sonic boom from RAF jets, apparently. Interesting that it was heard all the way from Birmingham to Swindon at the same time, when the jets started in Lincolnshire.

Though I suppose they might have broken the sound barrier over our area...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I wonder what the cost to the taxpayer [and I still pay UK tax] was for that little sortie of two fighter jets?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Sonic boom from RAF jets, apparently. Interesting that it was heard all the way from Birmingham to Swindon at the same time, when the jets started in Lincolnshire.

Though I suppose they might have broken the sound barrier over our area...

Yes, it isn't just a matter of 'breaking the sound barrier', but one of travelling at a speed above that of sound. If the plane travels 80 miles at Mach 1+, people along the whole flight path will hear the boom.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I wonder what the cost to the taxpayer [and I still pay UK tax] was for that little sortie of two fighter jets?

Well, yes. Especially as the helicopter pilot had accidentally broadcast a distress signal on the "help, I'm being hijacked" frequency instead of the normal one. He must be so embarrassed, poor man.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Morning All,

How are we doing? I've got a lurking cold/cough which is a nusiance, stealing my energy. I had some nice (thawed) frozen berries on my porridge this morning to give me vitamin C. I do love how cheap and available berries of various sorts are in the UK. Especially rasberries in summer, nom!

Another thought... I wonder if I'm going to manage to adjust to the more polite/ communicative style of the Brits in public areas. People say 'sorry', 'excuse me' etc. a lot more in places like supermarkets and are a lot more chatty with strangers. I still get a bit taken aback when a perfectly nice stranger passes a comment on something. It's nice, but odd to my self-contained NZ soul.

Cheers,
EJ
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
I arrived early in work this morning, and at 8:15 there were but two of us rattling around an office for 25 people. I thought for a moment that it was Saturday but no, it is Friday 13th, so I'm going to be careful not to walk under any black cats today.

Cool but fine today.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Another thought... I wonder if I'm going to manage to adjust to the more polite/ communicative style of the Brits in public areas. People say 'sorry', 'excuse me' etc. a lot more in places like supermarkets and are a lot more chatty with strangers. I still get a bit taken aback when a perfectly nice stranger passes a comment on something. It's nice, but odd to my self-contained NZ soul.

That really varies depending on which part of the country you're in. I was quite taken aback by someone saying "Good morning to me" after I'd moved out of Oxford. (Yes, I was lost for a response.) Not what I was used to at all.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
On the saying good morning thing I embarrassed myself this morning by saying Namaskaram [Hindu and Christian greeting] to the 14 year old neighbour who walks with us - I quickly recovered myself, remembering he is Muslim, and said Salaam Aleikum instead. One of the few drawbacks of living in a multifaith society!

The good news of the day is that our friend M will be back from Dubai on leave in less than 2 weeks, it will be so good to see him.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Another thought... I wonder if I'm going to manage to adjust to the more polite/ communicative style of the Brits in public areas. People say 'sorry', 'excuse me' etc. a lot more in places like supermarkets and are a lot more chatty with strangers. I still get a bit taken aback when a perfectly nice stranger passes a comment on something. It's nice, but odd to my self-contained NZ soul.

That really varies depending on which part of the country you're in. I was quite taken aback by someone saying "Good morning to me" after I'd moved out of Oxford. (Yes, I was lost for a response.) Not what I was used to at all.
True, that. One reason I didn't want to move to London is that people are more likely to swear at you than say hello. (Exaggerating, but they're not friendly. I didn't feel safe/ relaxed/ comfortable, especially as a 'foreigner' who was probably a damntourist. I've stayed in London four times over 10+ years, in case anyone was wondering.)
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I quickly recovered myself, remembering he is Muslim, and said Salaam Aleikum instead ...

Would "hello" and a friendly wave have done? Or, presuming he knows you're English, "toodle-pip, old chap!"

[Devil]
 
Posted by daisymay (# 1480) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
On the saying good morning thing I embarrassed myself this morning by saying Namaskaram

We say "Namaste" to each other, bending with our hands together. Some of our family used to have our head down and placed their hand on it.
 
Posted by Morlader (# 16040) on :
 
Speaking to strangers also depends on context. There's a protocol in trains, particularly commuter trains.

At one period I was commuting on the 1720 Waterloo - Guildford. We, that is our group of middle aged (not me, I was 28 or so) sat in the same four-each side compartment. We had a convention that noone spoke, not even "good evening". When the group was six, we could inflict that discipline on the two interlopers (train was always full) by coughing over any attempt at conversation, holding a broadsheet newspaper in front of an offender. But one Friday evening on arrival in Guildford, one of the group SAID "I shalln't be with you on Monday, I retire today. Goodbye." We were too surprised to even wish him all the best. After that the group couldn't inflict its will on *three* interlopers and it broke up.

So, you actually need to read the signs carefully.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Morlader:
...But one Friday evening on arrival in Guildford, one of the group SAID "I shalln't be with you on Monday, I retire today. Goodbye." ...

I hope he giggled all the way home haven't created such a disturbance.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Today is the big Spring festival here, it's called Vishu - Pete always stays at least this long as there is so much food available.

Anyway, lots of people out and about going to the temple this morning as we were doing our morning walk including lots of kids going there in little groups. One lad, now 11 years old, possibly thinks himself too big to just come up and hug me as he always used to do so he resorted to subterfuge and had a mock fight with me and at one point had his arms round me and picked his feet off the floor so I had no choice but to hold on to him - so he got his hug! All this completely unacceptable in modern day Britain where kids don't get touched but quite normal behaviour here - and the society is the better for it.

Vishu asamsakal - Happy Vishu

[ 14. April 2012, 03:26: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Quite right Wodders - hugs should be the norm rather than the exception. And happy Vishu to you too.

The head of the theological college where D. does a bit of teaching was retiring today, and we were invited to the celebrations. As our car was in being serviced I walked along from w*rk (it's about half a mile along the road) and met up with D. just as I got there. It was a nice do; it's a tiny faculty, but being Anglicans, of course there was lots of food. [Big Grin]

My contribution (crackers with cream cheese and red pepper jelly) went down very well once people realised what it was.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Talking of crackers, did you know that a 1,000 cracker string of firecrackers is about 3 metres long? Well, it is because we measured it just before we set it off.

It made a LOT of noise.

Fireworks here are openly on sale all over the place with no age limit on purchase apart from common sense The little Mega Bombs are quite fun, too - and VERY loud. We'll let off a load more after dark.

We were a bit worried on Thursday when we passed some lads selling some firecrackers from a wayside stall with a leaf fire burning only a couple of metres away!

[Eek!]

Needless to say we all ate far too much at lunch and I, for one, will not be needing any supper - I may still have a little but I won't need it.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Super-looking spread in your picture - couldn't identify anything other than the rice and what looked like a poppadom, though.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Gosh, let me see if I can remember:

There were three different sorts of banana chip - plain, salted and cooked with raw sugar.

There was chick pea and potato in a fried coconut sauce.

There was bottle gourd with yoghurt.

There was a variety of green bean.

There was bittergourd with onion.

There were two shallot dishes, one raw and one cooked.

There was fresh garlic pickle and fresh ginger pickle.

There was mango cooked in yoghurt.

There was sambar [in the thing with the lid] and rasam, the red stuff in little bowls, a sort of peppery tomato soup drunk with the meal.

There was a cabbage dish and another greens dish - and that is about all I remember.

Apart from the payasam we had for pudding which was a special dal payasam made with jaggery [raw sugar] but no milk.

We like food.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Gosh, let me see if I can remember:

There were three different sorts of banana chip - plain, salted and cooked with raw sugar.

There was chick pea and potato in a fried coconut sauce.

There was bottle gourd with yoghurt.

There was a variety of green bean.

There was bittergourd with onion.

There were two shallot dishes, one raw and one cooked.

There was fresh garlic pickle and fresh ginger pickle.

There was mango cooked in yoghurt.

There was sambar [in the thing with the lid] and rasam, the red stuff in little bowls, a sort of peppery tomato soup drunk with the meal.

There was a cabbage dish and another greens dish - and that is about all I remember.

Apart from the payasam we had for pudding which was a special dal payasam made with jaggery [raw sugar] but no milk.

We like food.

And a Parti----.....dge in a Pear Tree!!!!!!!! Glad you didn't go hungry. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I don't think he'll be going hungry for quite a while...

It sounds like a delicious feast and all good stuff. I wouldn't mind trying the chickpea and potato in fried coconut, in particular.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That sounds like quite a feast, Wodders.

It was a really nice day here today - not hugely warm, but not really cold either, so we took a run down to Witless Bay and had lunch in the Irish Loop Coffee House - first time this year (it's open from St. Patrick's Day to some time in the autumn). V. good turkey soup, a cheese sandwich between us and some cinnamon-and-raisin bread pudding.

Yum²
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I don't think he'll be going hungry for quite a while...

It sounds like a delicious feast and all good stuff. I wouldn't mind trying the chickpea and potato in fried coconut, in particular.

Make your booking now!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yeah, if enough people get their bookings for next winter soon enough then we won't have room for Pete!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
That Vishnu feast sounds delicious - we get raw jaggery out here, inexpensive and good quality, great for SE Asian dishes.

Autumn settling in here, the pin oaks' foliage turning red and the local wild pear (Dombeya) trees in flower. Wild guinea fowl pecking in the back garden.
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
It is currently sunny and warm(ish) in the Lake District, with my brother's partner having eaten her breakfast on the patio! Brother and I sat inside, which was warmer [Razz] A great improvement on yesterday, when Sandemaniac and I were snowed on when out walking. (OK, we were around 450m / 1485 feet at the time...)

Wodders - 3 metres of firecrackers [Eek!] When I think of the problems in just getting a few for November 5th round here...

Must get round to doing something today besides going online.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
All this Titanic stuff is getting a bit out of hand. Television, news, radio, films, magazines, memorial voyages, special exhibitions at sea-life centres, commemorations around the world, and a whole range of merchandise, and now even the National Trust have started sending notifications asking if people are remembering it.

The National Gallery, on the other hand, have just sent me a notification that it's Leonardo da Vinci's birthday. A quick search reveals that he's on Facebook, and is now 520...

quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:
Must get round to doing something today besides going online.

Me too.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Big spread about Newfoundland in the Guardian Travel Section yesterday (only got around to reading it today (Sunday))

I tried to imagine our Piglet living there - no problem in the pic of clapboard houses in vibrant colours, but by golly, it looked a big bleak up the by the cliffs. [Eek!]

Especially as the Guardian Man was trying to find icebergs. [Help]

(All to do with the Titanic, with which I am getting heartily fed up)

Are you sure you are OK there, Piglet??
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My lovely dog Callum died suddenly but not unexpectedly yesterday evening at 8pm. he was twelve - a good age considering his lifelong heart condition.

He will be sorely missed by us all, not least his brother who is refusing food and wandering round the house looking confused.

Play well at the Rainbow bridge my boy.

[Tear]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:
Must get round to doing something today besides going online.

Me too.
I have finished a 4,000 word assignment, got rid of (nearly) all my dandelions and cleared a couple of eyesores (dead shrubs). Where's a smug smilie when you need one?

Sorry to hear about your dog, Boogie. 12 is a good age, but it's still a heartbreak, I know.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Boogie, I'm so sorry to hear about Callum - what a cute wee dog. RIP in doggy-heaven. [Tear]

quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
...Are you sure you are OK there, Piglet??

I am indeed, Nicodemia. We live in a "jelly-bean-row" house - we have a picture of it on the computer but because I'm a technopeasant I don't know how to reproduce it here. I must have a look at the Grauniad web-site to see what they said.

It was a beautiful day today, and we went for a drive up Signal Hill between church and lunch to see if there was any ice; there was a flat iceberg out beyond the Narrows and a more conventional-shaped one off Cape Spear, and quite a few "bergy bits" (smaller lumps of ice). They've been very early this year - we wouldn't normally expect any until at least May or even June - maybe they put in an appearance to coincide with the Titanic memorials. If it's any consolation, our airwaves have been clogged up with them as well. Just be glad you don't live in Belfast - I understand from friends there that they've had it up to here ...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We've had some Titanic-y stuff out here as well but not too much - mind you I rarely watch the television machine except for cricket so I may be misjudging horribly.
 
Posted by Sir Pellinore (ret'd) (# 12163) on :
 
Murray Rose, archetypal Australian swimmer and all round good guy, just died.

He was, I find, born in Nairn, which is a long, long way from Bondi.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murray_Rose

Great Scot!
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Sympathy Boogie, a lovely pic of Callum.

Monday and endless editing ahead -- Feast of St Bernadette Soubirous of Lourdes, a date I remember because I read Franz Werfel's Song of Bernadette at an impressionable age.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Sorry about wee Callum, Boogie - I know how it is when a four-footed family member dies.

I've got all tearful now! [Hot and Hormonal]

Nice sunny day here, but how long for - or should that be for how long?

Dreaded committee meeting this morning - there's always one person (usually the same one) who says "yes, but....." just as you think you've got it all wrapped up! [Frown]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Thank you all.

Pets are so much part of the family aren't they?

Gavin is doing better this morning, but he howls whenever we leave him alone.

[Frown]
 
Posted by Sir Pellinore (ret'd) (# 12163) on :
 
My apologies and sympathy, Boogie. I had not read your post about your dog.

We would miss our cat Gigi.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
...Dreaded committee meeting this morning - there's always one person (usually the same one) who says "yes, but....." just as you think you've got it all wrapped up! [Frown]

An elderly Friend once said to me that the ideal committee, Quaker or otherwise, has just three members with one off sick and one away on holiday. [Bitter] experience has shown that he definitely had a point!

Pete is now in an hotel in Bangalore for a few hours awaiting his flight to Frankfurt and then on into the wide blue yonder.

Now that he has gone I thought I'd get some chance to sleep in but a couple of local lads want me to cycle with them in the morning so they can practice their English!
 
Posted by amber. (# 11142) on :
 
Boogie, heck re the loss of your dog [Frown] Sad news indeed.

Committees - ah yes, to be avoided at all costs wherever possible.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It looks as if we may be heading to Blighty sooner than we thought. My mum (who's 84) has developed pneumonia and is being treated with diamorphine, and isn't expected to live much longer, so we're kind of waiting for a phone call.

I don't really know what my emotions are at the moment; she's been suffering a form of dementia that started almost 20 years ago and for the last 10 years she's been in the geriatric ward of the local hospital, where she's completely bed-ridden. As far as we can tell, she hasn't really known any of us for many years, so in a sense we've already lost her, and she hasn't really had what you'd call "quality of life" for all that time.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and it is still a difficult time, piglet, with all sorts of conflicting emotions. I pray that you all weather the storm and come out with good memories of how she used to be.

A cycle ride first thing this morning with the two lads for whom I was a good excuse to stop and rest their legs. In the process I was telling them some of the history of the area and explaining some of the enormous global significance of the area - something they hadn't been taught in schools at all! I sometimes wonder what they do teach them.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
[Votive] Piglet and mommy piglet.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Prayers for you all Piglet. I had something very similar with my Dad who hadn't known me for many years. He too was bedridden after being a very active walker most of his life I mean around 10 miles every day, often more.

He had Alzheimers, but dementia of any sort is very hard on the family. In many ways it was a release and to me, he was not the father I had known but a quite different person altogether.

Again, prayers for you all.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
[Votive] For Piglet and her mother
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Piglet, I'm so sorry to hear your news. Take care. [Votive]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Piglet - Thinking of you at this difficult time. [Votive]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
[Votive] For you and your mother, Piglet
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I am so sorry to hear this, Piglet. It is difficult when you are far away. (I have the tee-shirt...)

Take care and travel safely when you need to.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
If we are in UK at the same time, piglet, possibly we can meet up.

- - - -

These local lads are either going to get me fit or completely wear me out! Cycling with them twice a day is probably, on balance, good for me but at the moment I am a bit sore - I have hardly sat on a bike saddle since my accident 8 months ago; I think a quick application of arnica cream to my nether regions might help.

What I particularly like is that the mum of one of them, he is 13 next month, is quite strict about where he can go and about not going on main roads, even if accompanied by a mad foreigner - very wise given the way folks drive around here. They only have two more weeks of it then I will be off on my travels for 16 days or so and shortly after that they will be back to school.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
[Frown] [Votive] Piglet
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
[Votive] For piglet and piglet's mum.

I've got some banana and apricot loaf in the oven, it'll be ready in about half an hour? Anyone interested?

It's so much quicker cooking on my own, with decent equipment... it's fun doing it at work with the students, but somewhat slow.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Mmmm.... banana and apricot loaf sound yummy. Yes please.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I think a piece of virtual banana and apricot loaf sounds just right. Anyone want a cup of tea with that?

Thank you all for your kind thoughts and prayers. I spoke to my sister again today - she's going up to Orkney tomorrow (possibly with my brother as well) to be there for my dad.

It was the most glorious day here today; 20°* [Yipee]

* that's plus 20° Celsius, Wodders ...
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Cold, wet and miserable here today. Could do with a bit of 20C. (Can't seem to get the little degree sign in these message boxes, how do you do it Piglet?)

Anything left from the Apricot and Banana cake?? Would cheer up the morning nicely! [Smile]
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Banana and apricot loaf sounds great, even the virtual kind.

Windy autumn weather here in the Overberg mountains and I must unpack winter clothes -- all I have is the clothing I wear in Angola on the steamy tropical coast there. It reminds me of travelling down from Nairobi to Mombasa in Kenya with family when I was young. We would stop halfway and take off sweaters, cardigans, socks etc and put on sandals, T-shirts and shorts.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
20˚C is just about bearable without a fleece and gloves - anything below that is regarded as cold here.

Nicodemia, I cheat on the ˚ sign by copying and pasting from MSWord.

We have just spent the morning shopping in the city but we resisted buying anything at all clothing related - HWMBO saw some shirting that he liked but it was 67% polyester so would be very hot - we try to get only pure cotton, if we can.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Nicodemia, here is how you do the degree sign. I have left spaces so you can see how to do it. Close the spaces and you will have the degree sign.

& deg ;

Moo
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
° ° ° ° °

So it does!

13°C here - and that's indoors!

Cup of tea, yes please!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
°

Wonderful! You learn something every day!

Rain seems to have stopped and I have hung my washing out. I am probably being over optimistic!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thanks° Moo°, you're° a° star°!!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
We're getting several °s of weather all together at the moment. It said in the Metro this morning to expect torrential rain, thunderstorms and hail the size of marbles. I'm actually still expecting them – only had the torrential rain so far, and at this rate some localized flooding looks a possibility.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and we are keenly waiting for the rain here - not long now.

The find of the day on our trip to the city today was Paprika! - it is not usually available down here but in the catering suppliers we found a 1lb jar of it - that is quite a lot of paprika! Anyway it cost less than 3 quid so we went for it and we are keeping it in the fridge so it doesn't go mouldy - one less thing for me to look for in UK.

A teaspoon of paprika in mushroom fry is exceedingly good!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... A teaspoon of paprika in mushroom fry is exceedingly good!

At that rate it's going to take you quite a while to use up your lb!

Mum died peacefully last night - Dad phoned at about 4 a.m. our time to let us know. Heaven will be improved as a result. May she rest in peace and rise in glory.

David's just off to the travel agents' to see what we can do about flights - we're hoping to be able to get away on Thursday night.

I may need some virtual GIN, although we usually have real GIN on aeroplanes ...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Holding you all in the Light, piglet [Votive]

As for the paprika, I'm sure that once Mrs E and HWMBO get a taste for it then it will go remarkably quickly.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Oh Piglet, so sad - I'm thinking of you
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Piglet, may she rest in peace and rise in glory.


[Votive] prayers for you
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I am sorry to hear this news, Piglet.

Look after yourself.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Piglet, thinking of you at this time. (hug)
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Holding you in the light, piglet, and handing you a virtual gin and tonic. Not sure that real alcohol and air travel go well together.
 
Posted by amber. (# 11142) on :
 
Piglet, heck hecky heck heck...much love and prayers...
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Just caught up on the news... sympathy and every blessing to you and your family Piglet.

Sympathy to Boogie and her family too (pets are people too).

I've been chockablock with a family funeral on Monday (my husband's grandfather, sad for him but I didn't really know him) then starting my new job. I'm currently driving 2 1/2 hours there and 2 1/2 hours back 'cos I happen to live ages away from the office that's managing me. Once I'm suitably inducted I can work from home and from a couple of more local counties, which will be much more managable. I'm seriously sleep deprived after getting up before six and getting home around eight...

AND it damnwell POUNDED with rain for almost all the time I've been driving over the past couple of days. [Roll Eyes]

Anyhoo, pass the GIN over here!

[ 18. April 2012, 20:12: Message edited by: Eleanor Jane ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Best of luck with the new job, EJ.

D. managed to get an almost incredibly good price for the transatlantic bit, so we're heading over (via Toronto - no matter that it's about 2000 miles in the wrong feckin' direction [Mad] ) on Friday, arriving at Heathrow at silly o'clock on Saturday morning, then hopefully get a cheapie flight from Stansted to Edinburgh on Saturday night and drive up to the ferry on Sunday. The funeral's expected to be on Tuesday and we'll be back in Newfoundland on Friday evening ...

Jet-lag here we come. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
[Votive] For the travel piglet, that looks a tough journey at any time, let alone one for a funeral.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
[Votive] for piglet - especially for the jet lag coming the wrong way.

I only get jet lag travelling east.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Absolutely, Balaam. I find jet-lag is far worse going east, but because we're over there for such a short time, the old body-clocks won't really have time to adjust. We'll almost be meeting ourselves going the other way ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Wishing you safe and restful travelling, piglet and DD - I use an OTC travel med. that induces drowsiness and I sleep most of the way wherever and it makes a HUGE difference - and no hangover [Biased]

I am sure these early morning cycle rides are doing me good but I do hate getting up that early! Once I have been up a little while I am fine, it is the initial getting out of bed that is the problem.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I am sure these early morning cycle rides are doing me good but I do hate getting up that early! Once I have been up a little while I am fine, it is the initial getting out of bed that is the problem.

I guess we can all relate to that.
 
Posted by Jenny Ann (# 3131) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Absolutely, Balaam. I find jet-lag is far worse going east, but because we're over there for such a short time, the old body-clocks won't really have time to adjust. We'll almost be meeting ourselves going the other way ... [Big Grin]

Really sorry for your loss piglet - hope your travels are not as bad as you fear.

Interestingly, I find my Jet lag much worse when going west, so my trip to Austin for 3 nights might be a bit of a challenge...

WW - could you PM me with the name of the OTC med you use? I'm aiming to sleep my way around the world and back.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Just caught up with all this this.

[Votive] for you and your family, Piglet, and for a safe and easy journey.

Though easy doesn't seem the word for travelling from Newfoundland to Orkney!

It might be quicker to do as the Vikings did and go by boat like this [Biased]
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
Oh piglet [Votive] [Votive] One for the funeral, one for the amount of travelling to get there.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
[Votive] Piglet [Votive]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I don't fancy the North Atlantic in one of those, Nicodemia - but the Vikings obviously braved it - they somehow made it from Norway - Orkney - Shetland - the Faroes - Iceland - Greenland - Newfoundland. [Eek!]

Now that's a cruise I wouldn't mind doing ... [Big Grin]

Bookings all sorted now - I should be packing at the moment but I'm messing about on here. Probably won't be posting much over the next week or so, so I'll see you when I get back.

Thank you all again for your prayers and support - I'm quite overwhelmed with all the good-will flying around in the ether.
 
Posted by kingsfold (# 1726) on :
 
[Votive] from here as well piglet.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Prayers for piglet and David. [Votive]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Travelling mercies for Piglet and David - and warm hugs and prayers at this sad time.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My current not-so-little shadow amongst the local kids is a bit of a computer wizard - yesterday he took part in a quiz type thing locally, which he won. Tomorrow is the District Competition in the city so he is off there early in the morning with his dad to have a go at the next level up.

Go Ashiq!

Still no news on the elderly neighbour run over earlier in the week - I saw B, his grandson, tonight and they are still waiting for word but I reckon at the moment no news might well be good news.

Lots of thunder rumbling about locally but not much rain as yet - perhaps 5 minutes earlier this evening. It is nice to know it's on the way but we'd appreciate some now, please.


eta: Ashiq heading to the city means I get a lie in until 06.30 instead of my alarm going off at 05.50!

[ 20. April 2012, 15:10: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, we did get some rain last night but not enough to move me to go and dance naked on the roof - something I only ever do in the dark of night, in case you are of a nervous disposition!

I have to absent myself today as we have some bureaucrats coming and it is better for HWMBO to see them alone. I shall go off to the city to see if I can get something we forgot the other day.

I will NOT buy a new camera,
I will NOT buy a new camera,
I will NOT buy a new camera,
I will NOT buy a new camera,
I will NOT buy a new camera,
etc.

HWMBO says I have enough and in the current personal financial climate I think he is probably right.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Those bureaucrats? [Yipee]
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
[Votive] safe travel for piglet and David

Hoping Wodders' elderly neighbour is on the way to recovery.

We're also waiting for rain out here, plenty of black clouds that keep blowing over the valley. Off to join a smallish protest march against fracking in the Karoo, then to taste local goats cheeses in the wine-growing valley of Franschhoek and lunch with friends.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Speaking of cameras, I've just remembered it's Shakespeare's Birthday Celebrations this weekend, which means Stratford (upon Avon) will be photogenic, but even more crowded than usual, and it'll probably be too late to sneak in to a parking space anywhere by the time I arrive.

On the other hand, it's supposed to rain heavily at intervals. Now I know from past experience of going anywhere locally that if I don't go, it'll be sunny and I'll regret it, but if I do go, it won't be and I'll regret it.

Decision postponed until tomorrow. I have quite a lot of other things I need to be indecisive about.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
We've had rain and hailstones today - together with bright sunlight!! Is it only in Britain that it is normal to wear a heavy duty raincoat, a scarf and sunglasses??
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma:
We've had rain and hailstones today - together with bright sunlight!! Is it only in Britain that it is normal to wear a heavy duty raincoat, a scarf and sunglasses??

I'm afraid to disappoint - we've had the same sort of weird weather over on the Continent since about Easter. Similar gear is not unknown at the moment here either!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary LA:
then to taste local goats cheeses in the wine-growing valley of Franschhoek and lunch with friends.

Just discovered one of our local wine merchants is stocking wines from Chamonix. Had a very memorable lunch there on my birthday earlier this year, complete with parrot and thunderstorm.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Just trying to catch up after a week spent near Tunbridge Wells. Lord P slept over for the week as he could get to work in not very much more time than from Horsham, and that was good. Caught up with family, went to Brighton, Canterbury and some very nice NT properties. Pity about the weather! It seemed strange to think that we'd had breakfast near the Kent/Sussex border and lunch in Caerphilly!
Thankfully, the cats haven't learned too many new swear words whilst they've been in the cattery.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Just spent most of evening on the phone catching up with people going through hard times. [Tear]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The bureaucrats didn't appear yesterday so I spent a day out quite unnecessarily and will probably have to be out for the day again tomorrow!

unprintable words, unprintable words

What is wrong with a little basic courtesy and a phone call to say "we are running late, etc."?

Later this coming week I have to go and request permission to leave the country for my trip to UK - this is merely a formality, I hope, but a time-consuming one as it will take at least one, and possibly two, half-days.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Heck, Wodders, they'll be so pleased they'll probably drive you to the airport then and there!

[Big Grin]

In other news: ARRRRGGGGGGH [Mad] [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
...In other news: ARRRRGGGGGGH [Mad] [Waterworks]

[Killing me]

Pete, I am so sorry.

[Killing me]


It is getting a tad warm here but then a storm* brews up and we get a little bitty downpour and the temperature drops again. It is all rather good.

*NOT a snowstorm!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
Just discovered one of our local wine merchants is stocking wines from Chamonix. Had a very memorable lunch there on my birthday earlier this year, complete with parrot and thunderstorm.
Firenze - what did the parrot taste like? I'd have thought a bit stringy unless braised for a very long time! [Big Grin]

Heavy rain here but no hail and no thunder - so far! We really don't need all this rain - surely it can't be too difficult to send some dahn sarf via the canal system. Or something?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
You have it in the form of parrot cake.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Chamonix plus parrot!

It was autumnal and rainy in Franschhoek, mountains hidden behind cloud and oak trees losing their leaves, vineyards ditto. I often eat at Mon Plaisir at Chamonix, good provincial French food such as navarin of lamb, boeuf bourgignon, coq au vin, but yesterday we went off to Moreson's Bread & Wine, mostly known for charcuterie, tried boerenkaas (hard farm cheeses) and various goats cheeses wrapped in vineleaves or ashes.

The Overberg, like the Drakenstein valley, is a mix of First and Third World, so drove back behind an unroadworthy and overloaded bus carrying mourners to an Aids funeral in Worcester.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Just back from a friend's wedding in Shropshire, with our overnight stay, in the very nice hotel hosting the wedding and reception, paid for by the cake Mrs Sioni produced.

Very good do. Civil ceremony so the absence of hymns was noticeable. God Bless E & H for their marriage.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Dammit! Just watching the weather and it's going to rain tomorrow again. I am so sick of driving in the rain! I'm off to the coast of Hamshire tomorrow which will probably take about 3 hours in the morning. The rest of the week will be a bit more humane, thankfully. Looking forward to more working from home.

I can offer some delicious baked macaroni cheese with chunks of chicken in it. My lovely husband is very good at cheese sauce!
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Hailstones this afternoon - and so much rain that the drains couldn't cope with it...not nice driving in it.
Now north of Derby on a clergy conference which starts tomorrow.
There must be a collective noun for a gathering of clergy, but I can't think of one just now...

Have as good a week as possible, people.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
...There must be a collective noun for a gathering of clergy, but I can't think of one just now...

...and if you could, would it be printable?
 
Posted by kiwimacahau (# 12142) on :
 
Surely a communion of vicars and a fulmination of bishops?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
As clergy are members of the cloth wouldn't Bale be appropriate?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by kiwimacahau:
Surely a communion of vicars and a fulmination of bishops?

It's a bunch. Everyone on the radio seems to have one collective noun only - 'bunch'

[Mad]

I'm getting all GOW over it!
 
Posted by Morlader (# 16040) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
As clergy are members of the cloth wouldn't Bale be appropriate?

And a synod a baleful ? Yep, seems right.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Another day without the bureaucrats - I imagine they will come Thursday afternoon when we are out at a temple festival!
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Another day without the bureaucrats - I imagine they will come Thursday afternoon when we are out at a temple festival!

Deja vu all over again?
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
...There must be a collective noun for a gathering of clergy, but I can't think of one just now...

...and if you could, would it be printable?
No. [Mad]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
A justification of clergy??
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
An Oversight of Bishops?

- - - -

BIG and beautiful storm last night knocked out the power until this morning - in the dry season dust accumulates in the transformers and when it rains it causes shorts. The electricity line men do an amazing job to get everything back to normal so quickly.

Went to see the man about permission to leave the country this morning but he's on leave today so left papers with a colleague of his and will call him tomorrow.

And the best news of the week is that our friend M, who has been working in The Gulf for several months, got back early this morning - he is being spoilt by his mum at the moment but should be receiving visitors later today. He's not been well whilst over there so I think she is aiming to feed him up, as mums do.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Just been out spending money on behalf of the business - because it is tax deductible it feels very different from our usual spending. The printer died so we now have a printer/scanner/copier laser thingy that only prints in black but scans [flatbed] in colour, which is nice as our previous scanner died some years ago. I haven't looked up the price in UK but we paid less than a hundred quid for it.

[Yipee]

Now I have to work out how to use it [Ultra confused]

I am sure it is so easy a 5 year old could understand it - but I am 63!
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
You mean it was around the same price as this?

Jengie
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A little more than that and a bit faster and greater dpi, I think, but a Panasonic rather than HP - not that I reckon there is much to choose between them. Ours is off-white rather than the current universal black.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Raining heavily today.

I was woken up around midnight by the sound of banging and crashing. Thinking someone was breaking into a car, I looked out of the window to see an enormous, very sleek fox taking a bag of rubbish apart, banging the tins in it around and extricating bones from somewhere. We looked at each other. It was quite an intimidating size – about the size of a Labrador, and I didn't fancy going down to scare it off, so I swore at it from the safety of my flat, banged the window shut and went back to bed.

Curiously enough when I got up this morning, the door of one of the cars was wide open, in the rain, and nobody to be seen. Perhaps it was the fox after all...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Perhaps he wanted somewhere dry to enjoy the bones.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I did wonder whether, not content with rifling through our bins, he'd then intended to drive off somewhere after his dinner.

(It could just be, of course, that not having the ignition key was what foxed him. )
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I am trying to imagine what car a fox might drive...

The new printer doesn't work [Mad] Power is getting to it okay but it won't switch on so I think The Man will have to come and see to it. This is particularly annoying as today is results day for the equivalent of GCSEs so we are expecting a visitor or several coming to get their marks. I can get their results but can't print them a copy.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Not a fox, but -- woke up and saw a mongoose drinking from the stone bird bath. Odd time of year for it to come into a domestic garden. There are very shy cobras right at the back of the garden and I hope the mongoose leaves them undisturbed.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
I am trying to imagine what car a fox might drive...

Isn't there a small VW hatchback called a FOX?

The Vulpine Mrs. S
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
We can get electrical equipment that doesn't work for less than £100 in the UK too, Welease Woderwick. I think you are on firmer ground with the weather and Kerala cuisine.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thank you for your, erm, support and encouragement mld! The man is coming to fix the machine tomorrow.

This afternoon I had one of the most yucky experiences of my life - as we gave kids their results today several came back with sweets to thank us - moonlitdoor knows my fondness for a particular Indian sweet, the ladoo or laddoo or laddu - yummy isn't in it. Anyway we had a number of the little beauties on a plate under a fly cover so I just lifted the cover, grabbed one and popped it in my mouth only to find that it was covered in ants! I had ants in my mouth, ants on my face - horrible!

I wonder how many I swallowed.

[ 26. April 2012, 14:05: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I posted this earlier on the Trans-Tasman thread and have only just noticed - so I've taken it out of there and here it is, FWIW:

quote:
Good results for local kids so far today - everybody has passed their exams - Ashiq, my cycling partner has got C in Chemistry and Maths but has done very well otherwise - one of his friends, name now forgotten, got 7 passes at A+, one A and 2 at B+!!!

Now the competition begins for places for the next level, here called Plus one and Plus Two.

Didn't go elephant spotting this afternoon as it rained somewhat more than somewhat but the fun bit of the day was early morning when two lads and I went for a cycle ride on a route they didn't really know - strange as they both grew up here. They both seemed impressed with my local knowledge which I find a bit odd - when I move somewhere new the best way to get to know the area is either walking or cycling - and HWMBO grew up round here, too, so he has shown me loads.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary LA:
Not a fox, but -- woke up and saw a mongoose drinking from the stone bird bath. Odd time of year for it to come into a domestic garden. There are very shy cobras right at the back of the garden and I hope the mongoose leaves them undisturbed.

Good Lord above! You hope the cobras stay undisturbed!! [Eek!]

(Remember I am orginally from New Zealand, we didn't have any snakes, let alone highly venomous ones...I do hope I never see a wild snake in the UK.)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I just lifted the cover, grabbed one and popped it in my mouth only to find that it was covered in ants! I had ants in my mouth, ants on my face - horrible!

I wonder how many I swallowed.

[Eek!] [Eek!]

Oh how horrible. Hope you're not suffering any ill effects. That would put me off desserts for a while.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, it did put me off laddu for about 30 minutes so that is quite an achievement for the ants!

Quite a lot of rain last night so tonight we think will be the annual Night if the Flying Ants when thousands will come and batter themselves to death against the tube light on the verandah - we sometimes have fun and go out with a mozzie bat and zap a few hundred to death.

I'm a bit with Eleanor Jane on the cobras - generally I don't mind snakes [most of the ones we see here are harmless Rat Snakes] but even though I know cobras are generally only aggressive when they feel threatened we have so many kids in the neighbourhood that I'm not sure I'd be happy to take the risk - but then we have a pretty high population density.

my dad loathed snakes - he could hardly bear even talking about them!
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
(Remember I am orginally from New Zealand, we didn't have any snakes, let alone highly venomous ones...I do hope I never see a wild snake in the UK.)

The chances of seeing a wild snake are almost zero, even in winter, when they are at their most sluggish, an adder will flee if it knows you're around.

Heathland, especially in coastal areas, is where you'll find them, and even then it's difficult, they're good at hiding. But you are much more likely to die of wasp stings than adder bites. Deaths by adder are about 12 every century. (I was bitten in Lincolnshire in the 1970s - serves me right for walking barefoot - its no more than a bit of swelling for a few weeks unless you have an allergic reaction.)

As far as I know we only have 5 species of snake wild in the UK, adders, grass snakes ans smooth snakes are native, whilst corn snakes and rat snakes have been seen, due to pets escaping and breeding.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Eleanor Jane wrote: Good Lord above! You hope the cobras stay undisturbed!! [Eek!] (Remember I am originally from New Zealand, we didn't have any snakes, let alone highly venomous ones...I do hope I never see a wild snake in the UK.)

That comment I made was far too cryptic -- out here in the Overberg it is very dry and there are Cape cobras everywhere, coming down from the mountains to drink water and eat eggs because many people keep poultry. So the snakes are part of the given, there are always snakes around. The safety lies in knowing where the snakes are and cobras do not like encounters with humans or dogs so for them to lurk in a thicket at the back of the garden is a win-win situation. Cobras are very shy and will only attack if cornered or trodden on.

The snakes I do fear (and I'm sure shamwari will know about this) are the green mambas that nest in trees and are bad-tempered unpredictable snakes. We don't get puffadders here, but they are as feared.

Edited for pre-caffeine typos

[ 27. April 2012, 06:14: Message edited by: Mary LA ]
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I take it you won't be wanting these when you come over, Wodders.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, yes, as I am already pretty strongly allergic to chocolate the combination doesn't really appeal - but thanks for the offer! Perhaps offer them to one of our many chocoholics - I can think of several.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Mambas – black or green – are things to be wary of. I'm happy to say I never saw any live ones; most snakes are more inclined to avoid humans than seek them out. I can remember the excitement once when one of the gardeners killed a snake and we all stood round on the verandah looking at it from a safe distance, just in case it wasn't properly dead. I don't know what species it was. It looked for all the world like a long black shoelace – quite unexciting, though the smaller snakes can pack a pretty powerful venom and some of the really tiny ones can kill you in seconds.

All I've seen here has been a slow worm a few years ago. They're really beautiful (or the females are) – a lovely gleaming copper colour snake, but harmless.

Anyway – still raining. The fields have turned into small lakes, the sky looks like a bruise, the trees are full of blossom and when the wind and rain get going, it looks like a spring snowstorm as the petals shower across the car park. Passing cars going through the puddles can drench you from head to foot: welcome to the English spring.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We [very] occasionally see Kraits here and generally they are only small but are pretty unpleasant - we are on slightly higher ground and they prefer the damper bits so we are okay but HWMBO's friend killed one a year or two ago but then he farms down by the river and has little kids...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Oooh!! A double post!

Having the printer die on us then bought the new printer and it still doesn't work after two men came to see it today but another man is coming from the city to fix it tomorrow - and having reported the washing machine has a problem but the man is coming back with the new part tomorrow - on top of all that the soda machine, which is very old and owes us nothing, has packed up and we will have to buy a new one tomorrow!

And all this is in the week before I go away on what is likely to be a moderately expensive jaunt round UK.

[Roll Eyes]

Ah well, at least I got my permission to leave the country this morning plus I got some more stuff given to me to give to certain friends over there so there is good news as well as bad.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:


Anyway – still raining. The fields have turned into small lakes, the sky looks like a bruise, the trees are full of blossom and when the wind and rain get going, it looks like a spring snowstorm as the petals shower across the car park. Passing cars going through the puddles can drench you from head to foot: welcome to the English spring.

Yup, raining pretty thoroughly here now. It has been fine for most of the day, so I'm counting my blessings. Plus I don't actually need to go outside today, so that helps too. I would *like* to celebrate Friday with a pub and my husband but if it's too nasty, there's already pizza delivery!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
My train home was cancelled this evening, so I got a bus to Oxford. I was surprised and delighted to find a genuine Moroccan crafts market in Broad St, the white tents looking a little dejected with no lighting on a dark rainy day, beneath the walls of a 12th-century college.

The tents were full of beautifully carved boxes, North African musical instruments, lamps, jewellery, scarves and sandals, brightly decorated Moroccan pottery, and salesmen in robes talking to each other in Arabic, some looking every inch as if they'd stepped straight out of the Arabian Nights. One asked if I wanted to exchange my camera for one of his tagines (no deal).

I felt rather sorry for them - it was such a miserable day. First time I've seen a Moroccan market over here before - the usual thing is French markets with people who come over from Normandy on the ferry, and occasionally Italian or German. A lovely touch of sunshine, despite the weather.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
my dad loathed snakes - he could hardly bear even talking about them!

He was obviously a very Wise and Good Man. **shudder**

We're back. The travelling to Orkney went wonderfully - we even managed Edinburgh to the hotel in Caithness where we stayed before catching the ferry next morning in 4¾ hours, which was almost indecent. The funeral went very well - the east-end chapel at St. Magnus Cathedral was well-filled, and it was nice to see so many friends and relations (some of whom I probably hadn't seen for the best part of 40 years [Eek!] ).

Plans went a bit pear-shaped after that - the ferry we were supposed to get at noon on Thursday from Orkney couldn't go until 5 p.m. because of windy weather, which meant we'd miss the plane connection in Edinburgh. D. managed after a lot of faffing about to get it all sorted, and we hot-tailed it from the ferry, staying at my sister's in Edinburgh for about 3½ hours' sleep before getting a morning flight from Edinburgh to Heathrow. That was a bit late in leaving, so we had a hell of a scramble to get from Terminal 5 to Terminal 3 to catch the flight to Halifax and then home.

You do seem to have been having silly weather - we had a short but quite impressive hail-shower in Colchester last Sunday, although it wasn't too bad most of the rest of the time.

I think I'll go and do quite a lot of sleeping now ... [Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It's good to have you back, piglet and DD, and I'm glad it went as well as these things can.

Sleep well.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Deary me, Piglet, the latter half of your journey sounds exhausting just reading about it!

Sleep well...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I've just been looking at the website for the left luggage people at Waterloo and saw that the same company does overseas shipping so thought I might as well ask for a quote for the books to get over here - amazingly quick service brought me a reply within an hour and a quote on the acceptable side of acceptable!

I can't accept the quote yet as I need to be over there and see the stuff but it certainly looks promising.

[Yipee]

The man has been to look at the printer and it is a switch complaint, the first he has ever found on these machines in the 5 years he's been doing the job - apparently Panasonic have a good reputation for reliability - he'll be back Monday with the bits.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Glad it all went OK, piglet, even if the last bit of travelling stuff sounds horrid. Sleep well!!

This has been a most horrible lurgy that's kept me confined to bed or sofa for the last four days. Worst thing has been the aching limbs and muscles. I'm really glad I did a major shop just before it set in, though less pleased that I'd bought a week's train ticket, which has only been used for one day.

I'm feeling a bit better today, though, and have got as far as changing my sheets and duvet cover, in slow stages, with a sit down and rest between each bit. I shall continue to languish on the sofa for the rest of the day, though.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I hope you feel better soon, Japes.

As I leave here in under 5 days I think I might think about what I am taking - I may even do something but that might be a bit drastic for a weekend.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Look after yourself Japes. Old movies,a favourite magazine, hot chocklit and Campbell's tomato-and-rice soup (very difficult to find now) with slightly burned,buttered toast is the best cure I've found to that kind of lurgy.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Air it easy Japes & I hope you feel better very soon.

Today in town I wondered if I was seeing things.... a man out shopping with a lovely white duck at his heels. I only noticed it when it quacked.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:
Glad it all went OK, piglet, even if the last bit of travelling stuff sounds horrid. Sleep well!!

This has been a most horrible lurgy that's kept me confined to bed or sofa for the last four days. Worst thing has been the aching limbs and muscles. I'm really glad I did a major shop just before it set in, though less pleased that I'd bought a week's train ticket, which has only been used for one day.

I'm feeling a bit better today, though, and have got as far as changing my sheets and duvet cover, in slow stages, with a sit down and rest between each bit. I shall continue to languish on the sofa for the rest of the day, though.

Still holding you and yours in prayer Piglet.
Sorry to hear that you've been sick Japes - take it easy as you recover. I've spent the morning changing bed and washing stuff and generally cleaning. My most favourite activities --- NOT - and takes me probably twice as long as most people. Not happy - especially when the person I'm paying to help me has not turned up for weeks!! Just off to do a bit of shopping then coffee with a friend for a mutual set of hugs for various reasons - mostly associated with supporting elderly realatives.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Work on sorting out what to take nicely interrupted by neighbour calling in to get some photos copied on to a disc - but I must do it soon.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Make re you bring some warm c.lothes Wodders - there's been an icy wind today.
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
My train home was cancelled this evening, so I got a bus to Oxford. I was surprised and delighted to find a genuine Moroccan crafts market in Broad St, the white tents looking a little dejected with no lighting on a dark rainy day, beneath the walls of a 12th-century college.

Wish I'd known about that, especially as it ended today. Just mentioned it to Sandemaniac, apparently because I usually let him know about markets in town (there was a Chocolate Fair last month...), he'd assumed that I knew about the Moroccans when he saw it on Wed & Thurs. No, I usually need be in town myself to have any knowledge of such events. [Roll Eyes] (OK, sometimes I find them on the City Council website too.)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:
...there was a Chocolate Fair last month...

I wish I'd known about that...!

I never thought of looking on the City Council's website, but now that you've mentioned it, it seems the Moroccans are doing a tour of a few cities in England and will be coming back at Christmas, though not to anywhere within reasonable travelling distance of us.

It was lovely. Broad St is an odd sort of setting but in a way it worked well, having Balliol's ancient spires and turrets overlooking the neat rows of white tents beneath, full of exotic Eastern goods. The complete lack of lighting in the tents seemed to add to the almost medieval feel of it, though if they'd actually lit some of those Eastern lanterns they'd have created a very attractive atmosphere. Health and Safety probably wouldn't have permitted it, though.

I wonder what will be next - probably just back to the usual farmers' market and grunge market in Gloucester Green for the foreseeable.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
I came across a set of teepees in park as we were out after shopping today. It was a pop up restaurant selling British inspired tapas i.e. chips n curry sauce, onion bahjis, mini burgers... all fairy lights and fake ivy inside. Nice rose wine... I love Bristol!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Japes, that sounds like a nasty dose of Proper Flu™* that you've had. Hope you feel better soon.

I've been a v. lazy piglet today. I fell asleep on the sofa last night and woke up late, then went to bed and (luckily) slept really well, but I've done the square-root of bugger-all today. I've just put a laundry-load in, but that doesn't really count, as it'll look after itself as long as I remember to transfer it to the tumble-dryer before I go to bed.

I've got a lesson to read in the morning and a bit of solo-ing to do at Evensong tomorrow, so I hope the sleep-goblin doesn't hit at the wrong time ...

* as opposed to Man-Flu, which is a different beast altogether. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Stormy and dreadful weather here today. If the water boards DARE to complain of lack of water ........ I'll, I'll, I'll ... write a strongly worded letter! Here is a tip from me to them - Collect the stuff!!

(Rant over - hehe!)

I will go to Church today, we are preparing for our 40th anniversary (Spring Chickens, yes I know!)

I have coffee and warm croissants for anyone who's in need.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
This is like being back in February. It's stormy, wet and windy here too. Part of the motorway is closed, and a tree's fallen on the railway line. It's not the weather for going far, but should be good for rain photos if nothing else.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I've been to an engagement function solo - the carpenter was threatening to come today so HWMBO stayed to see him but he didn't appear - GRRRRR!!!!!

Anyway it was a fun time and [shock! horror!] I ate too much as well as taking rather a lot of photos. The Groom-to-be has a PC at home so I was able to donwload my camera straight on to his machine before I left so no trauma about having to remember to get everything printed before I go away on Thursday.
 
Posted by Miffy (# 1438) on :
 
Three words: Wet, wet, wet! Where is an umbrella smiilie when you need one?
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Not just wet but gale force winds as well. I didn't go to church this morning as I felt it could be dangerous - my scooter isn't necessarily the most stable and the wind was so strong, it could have been blown over.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Last time I looked on the local travel sites they said there was a tree on the southbound railway line, overhead cable problems on the northbound railway line, part of the motorway was closed, but the back roads were mostly OK apart from the floods, fallen trees and fallen power cables.

Rain is smashing against the windows, puddles are scudding across the car park, the trees are losing a lot of the new spring leaves and smaller branches, and going shopping has been an adventure. At least three of the places I went to had leaking roofs, so people were looking at dripping shelves while skirting round strategically placed buckets.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A family we know from church have been camping out with married daughter and family overnight as their roof leaks so badly.

No rain so far today but we are expecting it later - just been on a cycle ride with neighbour and we hurried back as it looked so threatening but that band seems to have skirted us.

The problem with harvesting it on a large scale is capital investment and a financially unenthusiastic government - given the will and the investment there shouldn't be a problem in UK.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
It looks as if I will need to visit the church cellar to check flood levels. Not that I am expecting anything if the pumps are working.

Jengie
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
High wind and heavy rain here too. A tree came down across the entry road to our car park, the whole site was deemed unsafe, so the meeting was cancelled. I think more than a few people were relieved.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I've just been chatting with my friends in Chorlton [Manchester] and they say the weather is foul there as well. I hope it clears up by next weekend!
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Very localised flooding here.... the rain came in between the wall and the *new* flat roof because the roofer removed one of the pipes diverting the rainwater away from the wall. The rain came in through light fittings (eek) and I had puddles on the floor (vinyl thankfully). Replacing the pipe seems to have resolved the problem, and the wall & ceiling seem to be drying out now.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I hope the weather clears up for the Chorlton meet too. But it is Manchester!

Even here on the drier side of the hills it is very wet. The local council has cancelled all the local football matches as the pitches are either waterlogged or flooded. At least the council puts football pitches rather than housing on the flood plain.

Actually I want the dry weather to come a the weekend before the meet as I have bought a new bike and will be riding it home. Not fun if it hails like it has done the last two days.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Miffy:
Where is an umbrella smiilie when you need one?

Inside out somewhere.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Goodness, you have been having Interesting Weather - rather too interesting by the sound of things. It wasn't a bad day here at all, although it's much colder than it was and they're even forecasting a spot of sn*w overnight. [Eek!]

I suppose the socks will have to go back on ... [Frown]

First Lesson, Byrd Four-part Mass and Prevent us, O Lord in the morning, Responses and Short Service by Ayleward and Morley's Out of the deep (with solo piglet) at Evensong all dispatched safely.

I love Tudor music (I may have said that before). [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Miffy (# 1438) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
quote:
Originally posted by Miffy:
Where is an umbrella smilie when you need one?

Inside out somewhere.
Ah well. It's beginning to brighten up, in our part of the UK anyway.

Here's a suitably weather themed link to cheer you all up.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGLZqDXau98

[instant UBB sulking atm]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I had a "surreal or what" moment in work today.
I went to visit a gentleman and his wife, one of the cases that had been allocated to me. As I was going through the forms, getting their details, the wife asked me if I was from Merthyr.
The conversation then went something like this:
St. G: No, I'm from B**d
Mrs D.: I had an aunty and uncle live in B**d
St. G: Where abouts?
Mrs D.: B**n St.
St. G: Oh, my grandparents lived there
Mrs.D: What were their names?
St. G.: Will anmd Liz Evans
Mrs D.: Yes, and your mother was Betty - I am your 2nd cousin and I was one of your mother's bridesmaids!
She hadn't seen me for about 40 years - I can't even remember meeting her - but reckoned that as soon as I said where I was from, she knew who I was.
As I say, surreal or what? Darllenwr's mother used to reckon that there were only 300 real people in the world, and everyone else is a cardboard cut out. The more incidents like that happen, the more I believe her!
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
My mother is legendary for chatting to complete strangers and finding out either that they are related or she knows someone who is related to them.

The key is that you have to chat to anyone and everyone about anything and everything, in order for this to happen. Which is why it never happens to me.... (except online [Biased] )
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chorister:
My mother is legendary for chatting to complete strangers and finding out either that they are related or she knows someone who is related to them.

This is very much a rural thing, isn't it? In deepest rural Herefordshire no introduction is complete until you have worked out who you know, or might know, that the other person also knows are might know.

Great story, St.Gwladys. [Smile]

[ 30. April 2012, 19:39: Message edited by: QLib ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Having grown up in Orkney, I'm very aware that everyone's related to everyone else. As D (who was an incomer) says, you have to be careful what you say about someone, as the person you're saying it to is quite likely to reply, "he's my cousin".

There's a corollary to the Mummy Chorister scenario: I was stopped in the street by someone I took to be a complete stranger, who said, "hello Piglet, how are you getting on? How are your mum and dad and the piglet siblings?" I answered politely and tried not to look too puzzled ... I think it turned out to be a cousin of my dad's that I hadn't seen for years.

I also once had an entire conversation with someone I thought was a bloke I'd been in school with, but who actually turned out to be a different acquaintance altogether ...

Senior moment, methinks. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Once upon a time, in the Good Old Days we used to get proper air tickets in a little booklet thingy that I would receive then check then lock away in a little tin in my drawer that exactly the right size. Now we have PROGRESS and we print our own tickets on any odd bit of paper we have lying around.

Now then, somewhere in this office is a folder containing all my air tickets and bus tickets for my forthcoming trip [I leave in under 48 hours] but I have no idea where that little folder is.

I blame Smudgie, I think she slipped in overnight sometime and moved it just to confuse me!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
More likely someone from the decluttering thread. Boogie perhaps? SHe's just done a stationery cupboard. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Good idea - I'll blame Boogie!

Anyway SOMEBODY [probably me] had moved that pile of papers to another place and there they were under a load of other paper.

AND I know where my residential permit papers are so all I have to do now is work out what I might like to pack.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
The Jackson 5 were right then [Big Grin]

In my experience no matter how carefully you file things away for a trip there's always something goes missing leading to last minute searching.

[Even with spellcheck and preview post typos can slip through.]

[ 01. May 2012, 09:25: Message edited by: Balaam ]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
It's so stressful keeping track of those damn bits of paper and your passport. I haven't yet, but I do dread turning up to board a plane and not being able to 'cos I don't have the right paperwork with me.

Talking of planes, I'm thinking of a couple of days in Edinburgh over the bank holiday weekend via Easyjet. Are they as bad as rumored? Any suggestions for getting there and back smoothly?

Cheers,
EJ
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A friend of mine once drove from Manchester to Liverpool to cath a flight somewhere and realised she had picked up the wrong passport - she doesn't look anything like her partner! She went back home and flew out the next day instead - and it was only for a weekend away.

She was NOT amused - but we all were!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:

Talking of planes, I'm thinking of a couple of days in Edinburgh over the bank holiday weekend via Easyjet. Are they as bad as rumored? Any suggestions for getting there and back smoothly?

Cheers,
EJ

Where are you coming from? Short-haul is tolerable. Bring your own drinks/ snacks of course.

And warm clothes. We've not had the rains, but it's been wretchedly cold - and the immediate forecast is still only just in double figures. And Princes St is under tram works and the buses are all over the place and the town is just a guddle.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
But Edinburgh, even when cold and grey and awash with traffic cones and men in fluorescent jackets is wonderful; the impression that the city is a palimpset of architecture, history, literature, ideas, art.

I've never flown in to it, but arriving by train, walking up out of Waverley station and seeing the castle and the Scott monument never fails to give me a rush of pure pleasure, even in the pissing rain.

Enjoy your trip, Eleanor Jane!
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:

Talking of planes, I'm thinking of a couple of days in Edinburgh over the bank holiday weekend via Easyjet. Are they as bad as rumored? Any suggestions for getting there and back smoothly?

Cheers,
EJ

Where are you coming from? Short-haul is tolerable. Bring your own drinks/ snacks of course.

And warm clothes. We've not had the rains, but it's been wretchedly cold - and the immediate forecast is still only just in double figures. And Princes St is under tram works and the buses are all over the place and the town is just a guddle.

and remember your passport, even though it is an internal flight (same applies to going across to the Channel Isles even by boat, but strangely not to The Island (of Wight that is).
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
My favourite thing in Edinburgh is Arthur's Seat, it's wonderful to have a proper hill in a city where you can see for miles across the town and far beyond. I won't go as far as North East Quine as I much prefer it up there on a nice day rather than a rainy one.
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
Although Arthur's Seat is good (You always need at least one serious hill to take you out of yourself), for every-day climbability, I prefer Calton Hill. You get some pretty amazing views from there too, and don't exhaust yourself in the process.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We flew with Easyjet from Stansted to Edinburgh last week and it was fine. OK, you have to buy anything that you might want to eat, but it's not really a very long flight; you'd be as well having a cup of coffee at the airport while you're waiting to board. As long as you've got something halfway decent to read (or the Telegraph crossword) you'll be grand. And yes - you do need photographic ID, which doesn't have to be a passport, but it might as well be. I love Edinburgh - it's just so civilised. Have a great trip!

Wodders - I completely understand. I'm always checking and re-checking our travel documents when we're going away, especially our Canadian Permanent Residence cards. I think they've finally taken effect: the immigration lady at Halifax looked at them and said "welcome home".

We've arrived, eh? [Yipee]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
...the immigration lady at Halifax looked at them and said "welcome home"...

BRILLIANT!!

That really is excellent, must have made you feel very chuffed.

I am now, as soon as I have finished this post, going to pack my bag so that if I find I need anything I can go and get it today as whatever I may need will cost ten times as much in UK.

[ 02. May 2012, 03:32: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Bag packed, apart from umbrella, some flags still drying and cable ties to close it off. Forms prepared and printed off for the shipping service to ship books over here. Cabin baggage nearly ready for packing though book for flight not yet selected.

I think I need a lie down next.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
And you wonder why I want to pack Saturday for a Monday departure.

Fusspots unite!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
You start worrying about packing three or four WEEKS before you leave!

Anyway, I have had a little sleep and can now face the next bit - LUNCH!
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Thanks for the tips all, but we've decided money and energy would be better conserved by a wee jaunt to Winchester (why Winchester? My English mother-in-law suggested it as a nice old city with plenty to do...).

We should get organised to do a bit of Edinburgh next bank holiday when our finances should be a bit more stable and I should be more settled into my new job. Then Venice, Austria, more of France... etc etc! We just need to keep enough money and energy from our day to day lives to fit in regular trips.

Hope everyone's keeping dry today - it's not raining here at the moment! [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Beautiful, fabulous sunny day here - I spoke to friends in Bristol last night and then looked at weather forecast for Friday, when I arrive, and I was NOT encouraged!

I am packing a waterproof and a fleece.

[ 02. May 2012, 09:28: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Don't forget your earmuffs. You know, the ones you take to Munnar to wear at night. In bed.

[Killing me]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:


I am packing a waterproof and a fleece.

Oh yes - both will be needed!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
We flew with Easyjet from Stansted to Edinburgh last week and it was fine. [Yipee]

Glad to hear it - my baby boy will be piloting for them this time next year!

[Smile]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Just triple your life insurance
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Don't forget your earmuffs. You know, the ones you take to Munnar to wear at night. In bed.

[Killing me]

Thanks Pete - that reminded me to pack my waterproof hat with the fleecy ear flaps!
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
You start worrying about packing three or four WEEKS before you leave!

Oh dear God - Pete I think you may be my mother! [Help]
 
Posted by Jenny Ann (# 3131) on :
 
Nothing wrong with starting packing early. Just a problem when you forget what you've already packed, so take it all out of the case and start again. oops. For me the question is always 'have I packed any pants'? and you can't ignore a thought like that.

Early packing also means you don't have any last minute panics. Honest.

J
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My essentials are:

- Passport
- Tickets
- Credit Card; and possibly
- Toothbrush

Anything else I can get on arrival if necessary but I prefer to take a fair bit to UK as new stuff is SO expensive.

Packed weight of main bag - under 15 kilos including all the chilli powder, black pepper, tea, etc. May be heavier on the way back with a couple of hundred CDs and a few books.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
... my baby boy will be piloting for them this time next year! [Smile]

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. On board this morning will be Captain Boogie ... [Cool]

Wodders, for reasons I can't explain, the thing I'm most likely to forget to pack is night-clothes, so have you packed your pyjamas?

And, of course, a teddy-bear. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It's raining again. Yesterday we had a dry day, which felt unnatural after what we're now used to, but localized flooding warnings are back on, so things are back to normal.

WW, they were saying on the radio this morning that we can expect it to turn colder with "wintry showers" at the weekend so the fleece and waterproofs will probably come in useful. If you have winter clothing I suggest you pack some, the temperatures may rise a bit after the weekend but there doesn't seem to be a forecast for warm weather any time soon.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
The Weasel is circling the chicken coop, now.

Beware! Beware!

And have fun!
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Sounds like successful packing, all those chilli powders, tea and black pepper tucked in. I always arrive at Heathrow to find leaked peri-peri sauce or Mrs Balls' Chutney sloshing around socks and white tops. And then have to buy extra suitcases or carrier bags for all the books I bring back.

Raining here, heavy winter rains, very welcome. Autumn is so brief here, gone before we notice the trees changing colour. I'm making slow-roasted pork belly with steamed baby fennel for supper tonight.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
hello distant friends! question- I watch the occasional BBC program,and it seems a lot of houses and pubs have these little metal jobbies hanging on posts or hearths. I'd guess a 3-4 inch diameter, roundish but with different details. all seem metal (bronze?) what the heck are they? they look really nifty. are they like saint metals?
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
They're horse brasses . I'm guessing that link will tell you more than you ever want to know!

They are decorations for the harnesses of heavy horses, now probably very collectable. I suspect their prevalence in pubs is because of the connection with dray horses, but I don't know.

I think some of the designs are probably significant in some way, whereas other are simply souvenirs of particular places or even awards. Like I said, I would imagine that link will have it all!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary LA:
I always arrive at Heathrow to find leaked peri-peri sauce or Mrs Balls' Chutney sloshing around socks and white tops.

A long time ago when my husband and I were moving to Belfast for a few years, I packed my herbs and spices by wrapping them in my husband's extra underwear. Unfortunately the lid of the curry powder came off. It turns out that curry stains don't come out. He wore curried underwear until it wore out.

Moo
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
He wore curried underwear until it wore out.

Moo

Brain bleach please!

(PS - did that not sting ??)
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Thanks for the tips all, but we've decided money and energy would be better conserved by a wee jaunt to Winchester (why Winchester? My English mother-in-law suggested it as a nice old city with plenty to do...).
EJ, your MiL is so right. Winchester is wonderful. In those heady days when Mr. S and I used to entertain visiting Americans, a trip to the Cathedral would impress the best-travelled. And the city itself is fabulous just to wander around.

The Envious Mrs. S
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
I've just been here for lunch and had the best food I've ever eaten. Rabbit with pickled ginger, grey mullet with cockles and raspberry souffle with white chocolate ice cream. Now going to lie on the sofa and smile [Big Grin]
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
thanks, Birdie!
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
quote:
Thanks for the tips all, but we've decided money and energy would be better conserved by a wee jaunt to Winchester (why Winchester? My English mother-in-law suggested it as a nice old city with plenty to do...).
EJ, your MiL is so right. Winchester is wonderful. In those heady days when Mr. S and I used to entertain visiting Americans, a trip to the Cathedral would impress the best-travelled. And the city itself is fabulous just to wander around.

The Envious Mrs. S

Indeed, Winchester is a Nice Day Out, with plenty of opportunities for cake. And, sometimes, shipmeets, but not this weekend alas.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Chive, that sounds deliciously expensive. **sigh**

Re transporting interesting substances: we once managed to get a mixed case fo wine from Lay & Wheeler's in Colchester to Belfast on the plane using the sock-wrapping method. These days we confine ourselves to jars of Tiptree jam and canisters of Bisto ...
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
quote:
Thanks for the tips all, but we've decided money and energy would be better conserved by a wee jaunt to Winchester (why Winchester? My English mother-in-law suggested it as a nice old city with plenty to do...).
EJ, your MiL is so right. Winchester is wonderful. In those heady days when Mr. S and I used to entertain visiting Americans, a trip to the Cathedral would impress the best-travelled. And the city itself is fabulous just to wander around.

The Envious Mrs. S

Indeed, Winchester is a Nice Day Out, with plenty of opportunities for cake. And, sometimes, shipmeets, but not this weekend alas.
Ooh, we like cake! Cake is one of my favourite things.

Seeing as we're not going far, I doubt we'll need to pack any foodstuffs in our underthings. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
I've just been here for lunch and had the best food I've ever eaten. Rabbit with pickled ginger, grey mullet with cockles and raspberry souffle with white chocolate ice cream.

The lunch menu sounds great. £17.50 for two courses is quite affordable, too. There's nothing like a good meal to cheer things up!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I didn't actually get the length of reading menus - I saw the Michelin star and thought "expensive". Must have another look - might be Worth A Detour the next time we're down that way - D's sister lives in Kent, and is usually game for Eating Out.

Virtuous Piglet has been in action this evening - we've got the Cathedral spring sale (aka the Fête Worse Than Death) on Saturday. Carrot-loaves and tablet now ready for virtual tasting. If you want Piglet's Potato Salad you'll have to wait until tomorrow. [Smile]

I need GIN. Actually, I've got an excuse to have some: I woke up last night with the most frightful cramp in my leg (the sort that makes you cry out in agony and wake up your Better Half [Eek!] ), and apparently a glass of tonic water before you go to bed helps prevent it.

Tonic water without GIN is, of course, an Abomination Before The Lord™ ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I didn't actually get the length of reading menus - I saw the Michelin star and thought "expensive". Must have another look - might be Worth A Detour the next time we're down that way - D's sister lives in Kent, and is usually game for Eating Out.

One of the side effects of the recession is that many more places are now offering a fixed price menu which is affordable and good value. Choices are usually restricted, in order to persuade you to go for the more expensive a la carte, but some places can still offer a pretty good deal and Chive's restaurant would be do-able, if you go for the set price lunch menu and choose the wine carefully. Everything on their wine list looks like good stuff so if you go for a glass of the lowest priced it should still be good.

"We can open on a Monday lunch time for private hire if you can guarantee an £850 minimum spend."

Easy. Lunch for two off the a la carte, with aperitifs, digestifs and a bottle of the 1996 Chateaux Margaux at £680 a bottle (yes) should do it.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
I have a cold and sound at the moment like Darth Vador. Chose to have a day off work to protect the innocent.
Why is that throwing panic in the way of elderly parents who think it must be something to do with my eating habits?? It's probably germs from the spluttering gentleman I met at the communal microwave in the open plan air virused office. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... Lunch for two off the a la carte, with aperitifs, digestifs and a bottle of the 1996 Chateaux Margaux at £680 a bottle (yes) should do it.

Jolly good. Are you paying? [Big Grin]

Enigma, get yourself some lem-sip, Manuka honey, lemon juice and cooking whisky; heat, mix, drink, then go to bed.

Hope you feel better soon. [Smile]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Piglet,
Better than that - I booked a holiday
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Hope you're mended in time to enjoy it. Anywhere nice?

Potato salad for the turkey-and-salad suppers now made, tablet bagged up, aprons ironed (honestly!) and carrot-loaves labelled.

I'd better go to bed now and get some sleep - it's going to be a long day tomorrow ...

Night-night. [Snore]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Jolly good. Are you paying? [Big Grin]

Think you might have to wait until I win the lottery, sorry! Though do let me know if you win it first.

I worked out last night that if there are 8 glasses to a bottle each one would then cost £85. It would be do-able if we ordered 1 glass and found 17 people willing to cough up £5 each and bring their own straws to share said glass.

Unexpectedly interesting day today going off the beaten track locally. Sometimes it pays to do this: I've come home with a lovely new bedspread and cushion, a Moroccan lantern and a piece of African art, as made in China. Now I just need one of those beautiful Persian rugs, in dark red and black and cream, at a price that doesn't break the bank.

[ 05. May 2012, 14:56: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Mrs Sioni had a long working day, Elder Daughter ditto and I couldn't be arsed so we had an Indian takeaway. Very nice, nom nom nom etc, then I got something in my eye and rubbed it before washing my hands thoroughly.

Owww! I'd ask for prayer, but time and tears are the only cure.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
if you go for a glass of the lowest priced it should still be good.

Second lowest price brand for wines always works for me, never had a bad one doing that. And the price is still reasonable.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Poor you, SS - "ow" sounds about right. [Eek!]

Well, that's the Fête Worse Than Death over for another six months. Morning coffee wasn't too taxing, just busy enough not to get boring. I seemed to spend most of my time being given condolences from people in the congregation who I haven't had a chance to speak to since I came back after the funeral; it was nice of them all to bother.

Acquired a hefty tome by Hilary Mantel about Henry VIII, a set of storage jars and a rather appealing panda* without spending very many dollars.


* I tried to resist him, but D. couldn't ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Very nice, nom nom nom etc, then I got something in my eye and rubbed it before washing my hands thoroughly.

Ouch. Yes. I did that once while cutting chillies, absentmindedly rubbed my eye and immediately wished I hadn't. It takes a while but it does wear off. Hope you're OK now.

I don't know if this is true or not but apparently birds can eat chillies with no effect - they don't feel the heat.

Odd sort of day today - set off to go to Birmingham but the train was so congested I couldn't get on it when it came, so I went to Stratford upon Avon instead. Where I found that something I'd wanted was reduced to half price, so I am now the happy owner of two beautiful new Oriental rugs. (Well, made in Belgium, but who's to know?)

How are the rest of you doing on this unexpectedly sunny bank holiday?
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I am pleased to announce that after 12 days of horrible achiness, lethargy and general bleughness, that a more normal Japes-like service has been resumed!

So, I've been to church, done a little light housework, and a load of laundry. (Yes, I know it's Sunday, but I'd not done any of those activities for 12 days!)

However, if you spot me over-doing things, you are at liberty to tell me to sit down and do nothing.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Japes, go and sit down and do nothing. [Smile]
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... unexpectedly sunny bank holiday ...

According to the Daily Telegraph on the interweb, it was supposed to snow.

Snow in Newfoundland in May is not at all unheard-of, but in England? [Eek!]
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Pausing in the middle of chopping small birdseye chillies for a fiery curry (a special request) to take to the community soup kitchen, and reminding myself of Sioni Sais, washing hands and not rubbing eyes.

Cold and bright weather out here, probably several degrees warmer than an English Bank Holiday. The last red leaves falling from the pin oaks.

Today I have to hit a word count of 6 000 words if I am to make a publishing deadline, so it is a perfect time to make a layered and complex curry and then hang around on SOF reading old threads.
 
Posted by amber. (# 11142) on :
 
Japes, sit down and do nothing! Tsk!

Morning all. No snow here, but since we're on holiday oop North next week, it'll definitely snow then. Be warned.
 
Posted by ElaineC (# 12244) on :
 
It's sunny here in Orpington.

I'm sitting here at my computer trying to complete a theological reflection essay for my Reader training course. The word count is creeping very slowly towards the required 3000 words.

Clearly inspriration is failing for the moment as I'm here on the Ship!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Lovely sunny morning ooop north today amber.

I'm making bunting this morning then we have relations for tea.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Sun is out here but I'm still coughing and spluttering - haven't had cold like this for as long as I can remember!! I've tried to drug it into submission but no joy so far. [Frown] What a waste of a bank holiday weekend.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
What is this "sun" of which you speak? It's been raining almost all day here. This is Traditional Bank Holiday Weather, we have to have this.

"A law was made a distant moon ago here,
July and August cannot be too hot;
And there's a legal limit to the sunlight
In this northern spot.

The summer is forbidden until mid-June
And exits September second on the dot.
By order, winter lingers through the spring
In this northern spot.

I know it sounds a bit bizarre,
But in our soggy isle
That's how conditions are.
The rain may never stop till after sundown.
After ten, the morning fog may disappear.
In short, there's simply not
A less waterlogged yet drought-ridden spot
For happily-ever-aftering than here
In yes, you guessed it."
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Yes. I did that once while cutting chillies, absentmindedly rubbed my eye and immediately wished I hadn't. It takes a while but it does wear off. Hope you're OK now.


A friend of ours was a missionary to the Po-Karen tribe in Thailand, where chillis are a staple. They check if the chillis are ripe by wiping them across their eyes. OUCH!!!
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
An apt ode, Ariel.

Cold and wet here in the centre. Hoping it's fine on Saturday for my niece's wedding in Norfolk. [Votive]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Glad to hear you're feeling better Japes- but do sit down and rest. Ditto Enigma with the rest instruction! Hope you feel much better soon!

We had a reasonably fine couple of days in Winchester. I recommend Marwell Wildlife Park heartily! I saw lots of lovely animals I hadn't seen before - a field of grazing capybara, three beautiful snow leopards, an ocelot and some leggy, nervous okapi who reminded me of thoroughbred horses. The Sand Cats were determinedly asleep so they were just formless puddles of fur. It was blimin' cold all day and drizzled a bit.

Today was a bit a drizzle, a bit of sun and a long walk around old Winchester, the cathedral and Great Hall with (supposedly) King Arthur's round table (a 13th Cent. round table, anyway).

We cheated on the cathedral as they were charging 6.50 each to get in - went to Evensong and saw most of the place on the way in and out. Sadly not choral evensong and no Winchester Bible. Maybe we'll invest in a proper visit another time.

What did you all get up to? Fetes, curry...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Normal working Monday - it's not a Bank Holiday here, which might explain why the sun made a brief appearance this afternoon. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tree Bee:
An apt ode, Ariel.

Thanks! It's actually based on the Sixties musical "Camelot", where King Arthur explains to his bride-to-be how wonderful the weather is in Camelot, which I felt needed updating in view of how things are these days.

Apparently we had a tornado in Oxfordshire yesterday. I haven't met anyone yet who noticed, though.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Tried a whole day in work today and gave up early. I have a good boss in general terms. When I arrived coughing and spluttering over all he said 'Why are you here'. I pointed out that there was a monthly service review meeting this afternoon that was important and suggested that he attend instead of me .......... well - I came home after the meeting!!! He's busy too I know.

I just hope that this lurgy has not spread otherwise he might regret his words.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Today I have bought tickets for us to go and see Half Man Half Biscuit! [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]

AG
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
As it was a really nice day here, after w*rk we drove out into the country, stopping at a walking trail near Gull Pond for the first walk of the year (so far most of this year's Nice Weather Quota happened while we were away [Frown] ).

There was a perfect Poohsticks bridge, so we had a game (which I won). On the way back, D. was out for revenge, which he sort of got, as my first stick sank, but I got lots of extra points when my second stick took a more interesting route ...

We settled for a draw. [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Guess who I'm having lunch with today?

Yes - WW!

I can't make the evening meet tomorrow but couldn't miss the chance to see him in the flesh.

How exciting! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Just don't nibble his flesh. I'm sure he tastes lovely, but other foodstuff may be available!

Please give my kindest regards to W2, if you will. [Smile]
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Flesh-eating in an English spring?

Two kilos of Jerusalem artichokes to scrub and peel for a farty soup (or for a dozen farty soups, unless I give a dinner party). Then to finish a long dull chapter for some to-be-embargoed UN funding agency report.

I recognised the Camelot source immediately and recently read Sylvia Townsend Warner's 1950s biography of TH White, who wrote The Sword in the Stone, on which the film was based (very loosely).

Bright & crisp winter weather here in the mountains, blue-headed guinea fowl running up and down the road.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary LA:
Two kilos of Jerusalem artichokes to scrub and peel for a farty soup (or for a dozen farty soups, unless I give a dinner party).

Wow, that would be some dinner party! A case of 'light the blue touch paper and ...' [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Fun and games on the railway tonight after a herd of 10 cows strayed onto the line outside one of the little country stations and a train ploughed into them, "sustaining substantial damage" and all services on that line were immediately suspended indefinitely. It took 4 hours to get home and still no estimate of when things will be back to normal.

Those poor cows. The driver is probably in a state of shock, the farmer coming to terms with the loss of his herd, and there are still people stuck on the train in the middle of nowhere waiting to continue their journey.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Cows don't get any more sensible. I remember, when I was about 7 or 8 being in the front seat of the family car when we collided with a cow on some unlit Irish back road. We were ok (I think cars of the period had a top speed of about 35 mph), but the cow was burger (if indeed those had been invented).
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The chief animal danger here is moose on the roads. They're really not the most intellectually-gifted of creatures and moose collisions are all too common.

There was a story on the evening news today of a lady near Gander who hit a moose, and something happened to her memory that meant she didn't realise what had happened. She apparently drove about 40km (no idea what that is in English) with no idea that the whole front of her car was buggered and arrived at work to find her colleagues saying "what the hell happened to you?" It was only when they showed her the bruises (and a couple of broken bones) that she had any idea of what had happened.

[Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Out here in the Overberg mountains, we get eland (the largest antelope found in southern Africa with a blue-grey coat and spiral horns, magnificent) crossing roads as they come down from in search of water or sweeter grass. A drivers' hazard in the drought but locals know to drive slowly. Not as large as a moose, I don't think.

Scraped clean half a kilo of knobbly Jerusalem artichokes and made a tasty soup with chopped leeks, onions and some cream added at the end. Very silky and earthy flavour. I did put in a teaspoon of bicarb which didn't affect the taste but didn't stop the flatulence. Not for dinner parties, as QLib pointed out.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
There was a story on the evening news today of a lady near Gander who hit a moose, and something happened to her memory that meant she didn't realise what had happened.

Incredible picture of the car - she really was very lucky to still be able to drive to work after that!

She must have been really traumatized to blank it out so deeply. Hope she doesn't start having flashbacks or anxiety attacks, and that she gets the space she needs to recover.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary LA:
Out here in the Overberg mountains, we get eland ...

And I thought they were only found in crossword puzzles ... [Big Grin]

I was really touched today when I went in to type the Cathedral bulletin to discover that members of the choir had made a donation to the Choral Scholarship fund in memory of my mum, although none of them ever met her.

What a nice thing to do. [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Happy 40th Anniversary to our Church today. We are in for a weekend of celebrations.

My contribution was hand painted bunting. Oh, and a cake!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Nothing more welcome than cake and bright bunting at a 40-year church celebration!

Took my Great Dane for a walk through some vineyards and saw a falcon as well as a small geometric tortoise, quite rare. If I get the next 5 000 words of my report done today I shall treat myself to an evening of listening to live jazz from Gugulethu musicians.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Happy anniversary indeed to Boogie's church - CAKE is always welcome ... [Big Grin]

For those with a taste for plainer food, there's a loaf baking in the machine, which should be ready and cooled down by Brit breakfast time. I'll put the kettle on, and there's a selection of Tiptree jams that we smuggled back from Blighty, and sundry jars of homemade marmalade that we got as presents for anyone wanting toast.

We've got the Bishop tomorrow for Confirmation. [Snore] It could be worse though - at least for Confirmation he uses the Book of Common Prayer, which is our default setting. When he does ordinations, he insists on the Book of Alternative Services (BAS), or Bloody Awful Service Book, as it's unaffectionately known.
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
Tiptree jam! I'll be first in the queue, please. [Smile] Especially with home made bread. Yum yum. I'm hoping to make some jam this summer, I need a friend's help as I'm not very good at it. We made some raspberry jam a few years ago and it was wonderful.

It's finally sunny here. Hoorah hoorah. I should probably go out and attack the garden. I may be some time....
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Lovely day in London yesterday at Liberty's, two crafts markets, Covent Garden and the V&A. It was warm and sunny, and I could actually believe it was May. Liberty's is still beautiful, with dark, ornately carved wooden panelling and balconies draped with Oriental rugs, swathes of William Morris fabrics, and attractive, unusual artifacts to look at - though it'd be nicer if they didn't play loud in-store pop music at such a volume that at certain places in the shop, people were having to shout over it to the sales assistants.

They were having a Punch and Judy festival at Covent Garden, interesting and colourful, though very crowded. Lots of performances in pleasingly traditional little booths, and showmen wandering around in costume with puppets (and someone with a sousaphone wrapped round him, a bit like an enormous brass cobra rearing over his head).

This morning started off beautifully too, as I sat in a sun-drenched windowseat in a coffee shop thinking that it all seemed full of promise, but it's clouding over now, so normal service should be resumed shortly...
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Mmm... fresh bread!

Lovely sunny day here - I went out without a coat! (With wooly underwear but without the coat). We had a nice long walk exploring more bits of the city - gorgeous views across to the forest under the suspension bridge.

Yesterday we walked up to the market and had the most amazing Moroccan food - melting chicken with chickpeas in tomato sauce with preserved lemon. Nom!

Nice evensong tonight (my husband read quite nervously in his mild NZ accent but people seemed to like it), just waiting for the lasagne he made to bake. There's enough for an army so dig in!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jemima the 9th:
Tiptree jam! I'll be first in the queue, please ...

Bearing in mind where you live, you can get your own. [Big Grin]

Ariel, I absolutely love Liberty's - no trip to Oxford Street is complete without it. They used to do gorgeous skirt-lengths (sometimes in those lovely Liberty prints) - the elastic waistband was already sewn on, and all you had to do was stitch up the side seam and the hem. I lost count of the number of them I had; I used to buy one every time I was in London. I still have a few that must be cracking on for 20 years old ... [Eek!]

EJ, I was going to ask why on earth you'd need woolly underwear* in the south of England in May, but then I remembered you come from Warmer Climes™, so you're excused. [Big Grin]

* Slightly TMI, methinks. [Devil]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Just popping in to bemoan my weight - I weighed myself this morning and was NOT amused - I have been eating so much! For example yesterday a friend and I went out for an "all you can eat" Chinese banquet for lunch and then later other friends and I went out for an Indian meal. Everyone wants to meet up and eat - and I love food. Another meal out tonight, meal with family tomorrow and then the Shipmeet on Wednesday. Will they charge Excess Baggage on my stomach on the flight back?

[ 14. May 2012, 07:16: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Don't worry, Weasel. I'll make sure that Thursday is just water, with maybe a stick of celery or two to dunk in it. Anything to oblige [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Wod, you're on holiday. Enjoy it. It's not about sitting there glumly eating a small stick of celery, denying yourself this, that and the other and being generally penitential, you can do all that when you get home. Just have fun - and when you do get home, you'll have some good memories to look back on.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
What Ariel said.

Wodewick, you're in Britain in spring and there is an abundance of fantastic food asparagus and wild garlic, oysters, woodland strawberries, artisanal cheeses and Welsh lamb all around. Not to mention ethnic markets and restaurants. Italian restaurants with prima vera dishes with pea shoots and snap peas!

I wrote features on Chelsea Flower Show for a lifestyle mag at one stage and would fly out of a drought-stricken South Africa and eat like a little piggie for a fortnight, then go home and live on lentils and steamed vegetables for a month while writing up prize-winning dahlias, flowering dogwoods etc.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Besides, I read somewhere recently that thanks to gravity you weigh more in the northern and southern hemispheres than you do at the Equator - the further you get to the poles, the heavier you are apparently.

(Though that might have something to do with the layers of thermal clothing and the clumpy snowboots...)
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Yup, layers of thermal clothing... I'm a whimp about cold. Never was one of those girls strutting about town with no clothes on of an evening. Even in NZ I wore wooly singlets (not panties in case you're wondering Piglet!) all winter and into bits of spring and autumn. Here when there are highs around 8 - 12 degrees it's colder than the Auckland winter (NZ does get a lot colder, Auckland is one of the warmer bits).

WW - enjoy and weigh later! I'm sure you're doing plenty of walking at least.

On another matter - I now am prepared to forgive the huge emphasis on security here (passwords, pins, secret numbers, memorable phrases which arent etc) as someone tried to rip off my credit card for US$4000! Very startling. Luckily they didn't succeed but now my card has been cancelled and I won't get a new one for 5-7 working days...
[Waterworks]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
So sorry EJ hope it's all sorted soon.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Wodders - Eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow ye diet.

EJ - that's a real bummer. I had my wallet nicked about 20 years ago and IIRC it took the bank over a month to replace my cheque/cashline card. Fortunately in those days cheques would be accepted if you wrote your name and address on the back.

We went for a walk at Quidi Vidi this afternoon; there were two icebergs close in where the sea narrows, so we clambered across the rocks to get a better look.

They were quite impressive but now my favourite sandals are b*ggered. [Frown]

[ 15. May 2012, 02:35: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Wearing sandals when it's cold enough for icebergs — I am impressed.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I think it was about 16°C - easily warm enough for sandals. [Big Grin]

I said to D. yesterday before we saw the iceberg that I thought I could feel ice in the air; it might be warm and sunny, but there's a sort of cold edge that you can feel when there's ice about.

We went back today (although not over the rocks again) to see how they'd progressed; the smaller one had disappeared altogether and the larger one seemed to have moved a bit closer in to the shore.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:

We went for a walk at Quidi Vidi this afternoon; there were two icebergs close in where the sea narrows, so we clambered across the rocks to get a better look.

How interesting! I've seen a glacier, but never an iceberg.

[selfpity]
I'm off to university today to the library, books to return etc. I'm finding this degree a bit lonely now that I'm on the research stretch. [/selfpity]

Next job is to start packing - I'm off to Barcelona with 5 girlie friends for four days on Saturday!

Ginger cake anyone?
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
How interesting! I've seen a glacier, but never an iceberg.

The difference is obvious. Glacier. Iceberg.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
I'm off to Barcelona with 5 girlie friends for four days on Saturday!

There's a tapas place on the new harbour development with good views over the harbour. The Sagrada Familia is another must.

As it is a girlie trip I won't recommend going to the Olympic village (was that '92 or '96?) but if you take the cablecar from the Olympic metro station you get to the fort with great views over the city.

And the magic fountain is the best free show in Spain.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Enigma mentioned work difficulties on the Prayer thread but my story is better here. Same here and I 'showed a bit of passion' as they say. Tedious, contentious meeting with users and two IT development team leaders, and yours truly in the role of UN peacekeeping mission, ie both sides want me to do the fighting! All I want to see is the developers and users collaborating but they treat each other as separate species.

I suppose we did make some process but there are vested interests masquerading as high principles all over the place. [Frown]

It was especially good to come home to Mrs Sioni's cooking. [Smile]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
I have booked a cruise starting in Barcelona. Must try to be strong regarding the food aspect!! Doing my best to get where I was a year ago before I go so there is a bit of room for slippage!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Another beautiful day here: 22°C this afternoon. [Yipee]

After D's organ recital, we went for a walk on one of the walking trails by the Geo Centre on Signal Hill; I'm sure all this gentle strolling's doing me good ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It's still cold here in UK - on Tuesday I was in the Yorkshire Dales and it snowed!!!

Today is my last full day here and I hope to meet up with Smudgie then a quiet evening with friends and off to the airport in the morning for an afternoon flight - I get home tomorrow morning in time for a shower before lunch and then a nap - I have had NO NAPS whilst I have been here, I am nap-deprived!

Off to shower and get ready. Normal service will be resuned on Sunday.

eta: the trousers I had made before I came over have been great - they are thicker and warmer than I wear at home and I had them made half an inch bigger around the waist as I knew I would be eating a lot - they now feel a little bit tight. Back on the bicycle and down to two meals a day when I get home.

[ 17. May 2012, 07:29: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
I hope that you've managed to meet up with Smudgie - I'm sorry to have missed you but hopefully next time I'll be better organised. Have a good trip back - do you think you could send us some of your lovely sunshine, please?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yes, sorry to have missed you too (when are you going to think about visiting this part of the Home Counties? It's nice here and we'd make you welcome). Glad you had a good time, and looking forward to some photos, she said hopefully.

Woke up this morning with the One Pound Fish Song going through my head. Have a free earworm.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Sorry not to get to your area, Ariel, though I did sort of pass through or by on my way south yesterday. Now I am off to pack my extra Marmite™ ready for the off tomorrow. I promise to do my very best to send you some sunshine.


eta: lovely to meet Smudgie and the Smudgelet today - as The Boy was at school Smudgie and I went out for a very abstemious lunch, hardly enough to keep a sparrow alive! We also, perhaps not too surprisingly, talked quite a bit. It was good.

Happy Birthday to Smudgelet for tomorrow.

[ 17. May 2012, 20:14: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
It was (entirely as expected) delightful finally to meet the weasel and exchange some offence in real life. Shame we weren't able to indulge in any serious eating - but the celery and water were pleasant enough and anyone who can consume marmite willingly should be grateful for what he can get.

The boy's comment "He's really nice, Weasel, isn't he?" - which is praise indeed.

Hope you got back to your friend's and the pasta wasn't too overcooked, WW. I'd feel terribly guilty if it were....
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Nice Ascension Day service at the Cathedral this evening - Missa l'hora passa by Viadana and God is gone up with a merry voice by Croft. And we actually had more in the congregation than in the choir, which isn't always the case at that service.

Wodders, have a safe journey home - hope the Marmite doesn't explode in your suitcase ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A saintly friend in Manchester bought me a jar of Marmite XO™ and I have bought six large squeezy bottles of the standard version of the nectar of the Gods as well - it should be enough to last a little while.

I have to report that Smudgelet is a nice lad, but then those of you who know him will know that anyway. It was nice to meet Pingu and have all my prejudices confirmed [Biased] It's a good thing I came out of the station on the north side - she hadn't told me there were two exits! I could still be standing there waiting on the other side.

Off to the station then the airport as soon as I have had a bit of breakfast and packed my bag - my friend's partner can then have his room back.

I'll be glad to have a rest on the plane, I have the required [OTC] drugs for the flight so should wake up just in time for landing at Riyadh, pop another pill and wake up as we land at home. A quick drive home, a shower, a little lunch and then an afternoon nap.

Bliss!
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Travel well, WW, and a joyful homecoming.

When are you planning your next visit?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
...six large squeezy bottles of the standard version of the nectar of the Gods ... should be enough to last a little while ...

[Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!]

As you know, I'm a Marmite™ Hater* but even D., who isn't, would take several lifetimes to go through that much.

I won't even ask what you do with it - you might tell me. [Devil]

* possibly because on the one occasion I tried it I spread it on as one might spread honey: no-one told me you just spread a little on and scrape it off again ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
* possibly because on the one occasion I tried it I spread it on as one might spread honey: no-one told me you just spread a little on and scrape it off again ...

No wonder you're traumatized. That would put me off too.

Marmite got its name from the French word for a cooking vessel, and you can indeed use a spoonful of Marmite in a stew. You won't taste it as such: it's comparable to using a stock extract, and adds a quite pleasant note to a casserole. You might like it better as an ingredient.

If you google "cooking with Marmite" one of the first things that comes up is some Gary Rhodes recipes for cooking with Marmite, though I'd probably use less than he suggests in the recipes as there's a lot of salt in it.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
no-one told me you just spread a little on and scrape it off again

No wonder you don't like Marmite if you abuse it like that! It must be dark and smooth and shiny, not scraped!
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Eeewww - gross...
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Big black jars of Marmite with those yellow labels!

I was brought up on Marmite sandwiches and Marmite on crackers and Marmite in stews for flavour if there was no Bisto around for a gravy.

Most of the time I loathe Marmite. But if I am sick with flu or gastric upsets and in bed, only slices of dry toast with a little smear of Marmite will cure me.

Bright frosty morning out here, squeezing oranges for glasses of juice at breakfast. The bathroom is full of little green geckos, presumably they like the warmth of steam.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
It seems to me that the entire world is divided into two camps: the Marmite lovers and the Bovril fanatics. No way will they drop their swords and declare a truce.

(There is also a third category: the "plague-on-both-your-houses, they're-both-disgusting" party. And, with the advent of Antipodean influence in the Mother Country, Vegemite is also making a bid for recognition).

PS I'm with Ken: scraping Marmite clearly alters its molecular structure, and must not be tolerated.

[ 19. May 2012, 08:53: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
No the one true only way to spread Marmite*, is to mix a small quantity with butter/margarine and spread that on your bread or toast.

This way it gets spread fairly evenly and thinly.

Jengie

* So I was taught by a South African so it must be true.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Butter first, Marmite second, then anything else you are putting in on top of that. (Marmite and cheese is a classic, though can get a little salty - Marmite and cucumber is good)

And it doesn't want to be even, that would be boring. You want some bits with lots, some with none, to provide variety in your sandwich. That's a general principle of sandwiches. Butter gets everywhere, other fillings should be anisotropic. Its mroe fun that way. A little bit of cheese here, a little bit of onion there, some mouthfuls have cucumber, others have dandelion leaves. Dandelion leaves are lovely in sandwiches. Try them someday. Young ones of course.

And it has to BE butter. Not ICantBelieveThisSlimeIsNotButterBecauseIAmAMoronWithNoTaste(TM) Proper butter, ideally unsalted though salted will do at a pinch, ideally not from British cows (I am still suspicious of Mad Farmer Disease), and certainly taken from a butter dish, kept at room temperature rather than in a fridge (there is a special Papal dispensation for summer when rooms are hotter than room temperature), and it ought to have been bought as a solid lump wrapped in foil or greaseproof paper - not a nasty plastic tub like margarine which just makes more rubbish and means you can't get the last bit out of the bottom where it goes mouldy in the corners.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
No the one true only way to spread Marmite, is to mix a small quantity with butter/margarine and spread that on your bread or toast.

Quite right. Though I'm sure we must have had this discussion many times and neither side has ever budged an inch from their entrenched positions...

Anyway, it was eggs Benedict this morning. There are few better ways to start the day, and I plan to have the same again tomorrow.

[ 19. May 2012, 09:46: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
No the one true only way to spread Marmite*, is to mix a small quantity with butter/margarine and spread that on your bread or toast.

Margarine? Margarine? [Frown]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
No the one true only way to spread Marmite*, is to mix a small quantity with butter/margarine and spread that on your bread or toast.

Margarine? Margarine? [Frown]
[Disappointed] No wonder the poor souls haven't yet learned the True Art of Sandwiches. One day they will make their peace with Marmite.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Margarine is indeed anathema! Here we can't get it so use proper butter - yes I know it has cholesterol but it has lots of goodness, too.

I'm with Jengie on mixing the butter and Marmite™ together first although I didn't do that the last two weeks - and I did have to eat margarine once as one of my hosts won't have butter in the house. My Marmite Mistake was converting HWMBO and Mrs E to liking the stuff and thus we need so much.

It was a great time away and the icing on the cake was to meet up with a guy who was a child in care in one of the places I worked in the '70s - he is now 51. He should never have been in care really but he had a rather violent stepdad so said that given the choice he would still choose the children's home over life at home. These days his dad would have ended up in prison - and rightly so. Back when he was 13 his brother one night carried him [clad only in pyjamas as they had to leave in a hurry] across town to one of the old children's reception centres and asked them to look after the lad as it wasn't safe for him at home!

It was lovely to meet so many shipmates - thank you all.

I had good flights back, dozing most of the way - I napped all afternoon and will be off to bed soon.

Goodnight.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Hey we could not afford butter when I was a kid. It is still a treat to this day.

Jengie
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It was the same with me - I think that later on, after my brothers left home to join the navy, we had butter occasionally but mum usually bought Summer County™.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Welcome back, WW - glad your flights went well.

I'm definitely in the butter camp - to my mind margarine is an Abomination Before The Lord. I remember my mum used to use margarine for baking, but I think she must have had some kind of light-bulb moment and started using butter ...

Talking of baking, I made a couple of citrus cakes this afternoon - I had a few slightly elderly clementines, so their grated rind and juice went in, along with a little bottled lemon juice and lime juice. Quite nice, v. moist and almost citrussy enough (I think my lemon ones were nicer). Also made a brown loaf in the bread machine - it tastes all right, but the top has sunk. [Frown]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
One of my sons has a Friday lunch at the pub with workmates. Apparently the pub owner told the cook to use margarine rather than butter in garlic bread. First day it was tried was a Friday.

Son who loathes marg, was talking to cook later and complaining about the switch. Boss walks up and cook says, "See, I told you people would know the difference."
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Definitely butter rather than margarine, although we have olives grown all around here and very good locally pressed olive oil. Grassy green and peppery. I cook with olive oil, not butter.

Church bells clanging away on a Sunday morning, walked the Great Dane and admired klipspringers (small buck) on the hillside.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Sorry I couldn't get to meet you, WW, but we were away on the high seas (down by the Canary Islands, actually)

Obviously all you who can't bear to have margarine in the house were not alive (or too young to know) when rationing was around. Butter simply was not available in any decent amount. Margarine was, reluctantly, king.

When I went to uni, I was in digs, and we had "big butter week" (2 oz, I think) and "little butter week" (1 oz.) alternately. The landlady, who had our ration books, would give us each our rations on a Sunday morning.

We three girls were divided as to whether it was better to eat all your butter at once, or divide it up into 7 tiny bits and scrape it on our toast each morning. Margarine was the alternative spread.

It was one in each camp, plus one ditherer who was usually late for breakfast anyway.

Personally I favoured the "eat it all at once at least you can taste it and then use marg for the rest of the week".

I don't remember Marmite being anywhere in the picture. Though I do like it on toast when I'm not well.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
When I was at university I used to buy soya marge, which was a leading supermarket's economy/no frills/basic of the time. It wasn't particularly nice but as I explained to a student friend, at 18p a tub it was a lot cheaper than butter (which I think was about 45p a packet). I don't know why the price has stuck in my head all these years.

Fun morning shopping yesterday - came back with another impulse buy, a beautiful Indian cotton shawl in rich dark reds, ambers, gold-beige and black (at the seriously cheap end of the range but it doesn't look it). I will have to go back and have a closer look at the rest of the range - this has fast become a favourite item. Or get a spare for when the inevitable happens.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
For a lot of things I use olive oil and a little bit of butter melted together just to get the flavour right - normally with the addition of rather a lot of garlic.

Why was it that shipmates I met found our consumption of a kilo of garlic every 2 to 3 weeks excessive? We think it is quite moderate.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
When I was growing up, margarine wsa definitely infra dig - Mam would never countenance using it on bread, it was only ever used for cooking.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
When I was growing up, margarine wsa definitely infra dig - Mam would never countenance using it on bread, it was only ever used for cooking.

Thankfully old New Zealand still had a butter mountain when I was growing up, so it was Anchor butter in a block wrapped in paper. I still love butter and do enjoy Marmite but NZ Marmite is a totally different thing to UK Marmite or Aussie Vegemite. NZ Marmite is jet black and much thicker than UK Marmite.

Glad to hear you're safe back WW and Piglet, I'd love some cake! I was actually inspired to make crumble the other day, so there's a bit of apple and peach crumble left if anyone wants to help me finish it off...

Also, I had my first faggot for dinner tonight. Delicious with gravy n mashed spuds.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
My mother told me not to play with youse
Because you're in the dirt.
It isn't because you're dirty;
It isn't because you're clean;
It's because you have the whooping cough
And eat margarine.

 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
My mother told me not to play with youse
Because you're in the dirt.
It isn't because you're dirty;
It isn't because you're clean;
It's because you have the whooping cough
And eat margarine.

Ah yes! Even now I can see the disdain my grandmother poured upon one of her DILs for using margarine. They didn't get on well at the best of times but margarine just about finished off the relationship. Made worse because my aunt insisted it was "margarine" with a hard "g". My grandmother said aunt was putting on la-de-da airs but ate margarine.

NZ butter? For many years down here I knew people who insisted on buying Fairy brand margarine as they had been told it was NZ butter in disguise. It was much cheaper than proper butter. Why anyone would want to disguise butter as marg I don't know. Even as a child I knew that Fairy tasted nothing like butter.

I was at school in the 50s. A lot of our beautiful butter was being sent to UK and we had rationing down here. Not wartime restrictions as many had, but it wasn't easy or cheap to buy. A raffle at school had a prize of four pounds of butter. My mother, who never won anything, won it and were we ever delighted.

[ 20. May 2012, 22:37: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Pace EJ and Lothlorien, but I remember being sent to do the shopping on a Saturday afternoon, and my mum being Not Best Pleased when I brought home Anchor butter because she thought it was too salty (not for health reasons, you understand - she just didn't like the taste).

There used to be a creamery in Orkney; I remember being taken round it when I was in primary school. As is usually the way with factories, the best bit was the machine that put the foil wrapping on the butter, but for some reason in the late 70s/early 80s they stopped packing it themselves and had to send it away for packaging, which put the price into the stratosphere. [Frown]

Day off w*rk tomorrow - Victoria Day. Happy birthday, Vicky. [Devil]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Ah. That would be the time difference? I was wondering why they'd make you take Tuesday off when her birthday was actually on Thursday, which would probably be compensated for by the Monday off instead.

Speaking of monarchs, the Jubilee is coming up - the country is breaking out in a rash of red, white and blue already. I'm quite enjoying seeing the decorations and looking forward to seeing some of the more imaginative efforts.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yes it took me a few days of being back to realise the number of Union Flags about was not the BNP taking over but preparations for Brenda's jubilee. I think the actions of the EDL just when I was arriving added to the confusion.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
With the news that the O****** Torch is coming to Newport on Friday I have booked the day off. Traffic is bad at the moment thanks to roadworks and the buses are always crap on Friday, so it's a good day to avoid the town unless you want to see the Torch and wave flags.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Hey we could not afford butter when I was a kid. It is still a treat to this day.

All the more reason to enjoy it if you can!

When I was a kid I didn't know what asparagus or artichokes or aubergines or avocados were. Doesn't mean I can't eat them now if I want!

Heck, I didn't even know what a pizza was. We ate different in them days.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Hey we could not afford butter when I was a kid. It is still a treat to this day.

All the more reason to enjoy it if you can!

When I was a kid I didn't know what asparagus or artichokes or aubergines or avocados were. Doesn't mean I can't eat them now if I want!

Heck, I didn't even know what a pizza was. We ate different in them days.

I remember the first pizza I ever ate. It was at school, had a pastry (!) base with cheese and tomato paste on top. It was disgusting and the least popular meal on the school lunches menu, despite stiff competition. That was in c 1964, so lousy food at school is nothing new, and I don't recall Fanny Craddock or Marguerite Patten making a fuss. We were supposed to clear our plates and be grateful we didn't have to bring a matchboxful of rice to school, like children did in China.

As for the 'A' team that ken mentions, the only one I remember before the 1970's is asparagus, which was a favourite of my mother's.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
My father tried to grow asparagus in our London garden, c.1967. He had to prepare a special sandy bed first, but it never worked. All we got were a few spindly fronds.

Here in Suffolk we usually have the most wonderful asparagus, but this year's crop has been devastated by the cold wet weather.

My wife can't stand the stuff - clearly a deficiency in her Scottish education. (On the other hand, I don't like spinach).

[ 21. May 2012, 12:17: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
My mother used to make pizza back in the 60s. I remember being quite disappointed when I went to Italy and found it didn't taste any different. I complained to my mother but for some reason she seemed very pleased.

My father was one of those people who would buy something interesting on impulse at a shop or market, then bring it home for my mother to cook. My mother was one of those people who enjoyed trying out new recipes, so it worked pretty well. Living overseas gave us plenty of scope for eating multiculturally, anyway. I seem to have inherited my father’s impulse-buying traits, but it's led to some quite interesting discoveries.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Can someone explain the attitudes re: all the bunting, Jubilee parties etc.?

My impression was that most Brits weren't actually that fond of the Queen and weren't necessarily that openly patriotic (but were deeply patriotic in a private way). NZers tend towards a stiff upper lip, 'let's not make a show of it' type of patriotism. I can't imagine *any* event making NZ break out in a such a rash of red, white and blue. Here you can buy everything from underwear to foot stools to tea cakes with Union Jack decorations...

What gives? (In a spirit of friendly enquiry.)
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
We like shopping?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Life is short and there's a recession on, let's party?
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Chipping in on butter: I love it, I does, but I is lactose intolerant. [Waterworks]

We had butter at Christmas sometimes* when I was a child. Otherwise it was white margarine coloured by an orange blob with which it came. It was my Gran's job to mash it all up so Mother could pretend it was butter.

No one was fooled. Gran was usually performing the deed as I (and the others) arrived from schools in the afternoon.

*The PeteC pater and mater were dirt poor, which meant the kids were poor as well.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Can someone explain the attitudes re: all the bunting, Jubilee parties etc.?

What bunting? What parties?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
... the O****** Torch is coming to Newport on Friday ...

I looked up its route on t'web and it's going right past the end of the road where I used to live; if I still lived there I'd have tried to see it.

In answer to Firenze's questions, I don't think Jubilee street-parties and such things were ever big in Scotland (not in Orkney anyway), possibly due less to lack of patriotism than to the unlikelihood of sunny weather ...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I still remember the street party for the Coronation but sadly my Coronation Mug got lost or broken somewhere in the mists of time.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Can someone explain the attitudes re: all the bunting, Jubilee parties etc.?

What bunting? What parties?
There's masses of it all over the place here down south... Maybe you could import some? [Smile]

Every shop has some kind of red, white and blue display. Bristol doesn't seem to be doing that much (that I've seen) in terms of events, but the little (and not so little) towns I'm visiting are mostly having street parties, hog roasts, church services, concerts etc. I'm thinking of going to my Grandmother-in-law's tiny village where they're going to crown a couple of school children King and Queen, have a procession, a fair, dressing up and all sorts. My parents-in-law are singing suitable patriotic tunes in a scratch choir. Sounds like fun.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Oh my - I just opened the back door and stepped straight out into summer. It's a blaze of light and shimmering heat, and the air smells of flowers. There's the sound of an ice-cream van in the distance, and the grass looks very green and lush to sit out on. I hope we won't be back to drought again in a short space of time after the rainy season.

Re the Jubilee - I think it'll be great. Much more fun and interesting than the Olympics. The torch isn't coming anywhere near where I live or work, though it's going past a colleague's house, apparently. I suspect she'll have some difficulty getting home from work that day – there's probably going to be traffic diversions, road closures and rather a lot of people trying to catch a glimpse of it.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Can someone explain the attitudes re: all the bunting, Jubilee parties etc.?

My impression was that most Brits weren't actually that fond of the Queen and weren't necessarily that openly patriotic (but were deeply patriotic in a private way). NZers tend towards a stiff upper lip, 'let's not make a show of it' type of patriotism. I can't imagine *any* event making NZ break out in a such a rash of red, white and blue. Here you can buy everything from underwear to foot stools to tea cakes with Union Jack decorations...

What gives? (In a spirit of friendly enquiry.)

Well, I'd put the whole, royal family in a council house on minimum wage.

However, most people like an excuse for a day off and a party. We (I mean my street) are having a street party and I will be looking for somewhere to go to avoid it.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Can someone explain the attitudes re: all the bunting, Jubilee parties etc.?

What bunting? What parties?
None here that I've seen either. But then I live in inner London. Maybe its different in Much Binding in the Marsh.

No doubt our local pub will treat it as another excuse for a barbecue - but they have about ten of those in a year anyway, so it doesn't take much! A big football match will do it. There was one on Saturday.

quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
My impression was that most Brits weren't actually that fond of the Queen...

Oh we love our Queen, Gawd bless 'er and all who sail in 'er. Its just the monarchy we can't stand. And most of us are pissed off with the government as well.

So far the only direct impact the Jubilee has had on me is a few of my friends whinging that its too late to book any camp sites so they can get away from London for the weekend.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Unfortunately, hot weather and MS don't quite go together. Temperature up, walking ability veryu definitely down today. I think it's because we have gone from Winter woolies to Summer flimsies in 24 hours.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
St.Gwladys posted:

quote:
I think it's because we have gone from Winter woolies to Summer flimsies in 24 hours.
Well, they do say "ne'er cast a clout till May be out" [Biased]

My Mum used to make sure we had our Liberty Bodices on until she was sure summer had come.

How many remember Liberty Bodices???? Ken might, if he had been of a different gender
[Big Grin]

Sorry you are having problems, though St.G - I do wish you well for the rest of the summer.
 
Posted by Miffy (# 1438) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
St.Gwladys posted:

quote:
I think it's because we have gone from Winter woolies to Summer flimsies in 24 hours.
Well, they do say "ne'er cast a clout till May be out" [Biased]

My Mum used to make sure we had our Liberty Bodices on until she was sure summer had come.

How many remember Liberty Bodices???? Ken might, if he had been of a different gender
[Big Grin]

Sorry you are having problems, though St.G - I do wish you well for the rest of the summer.

Too young for liberty bodices, Nicodemia, but at my prep school we were only allowed to change out of our winter uniform (scratchy grey flannel skirts and equally scratchy blue twinset) into our summer dresses when the head deemed fit. It often seemed a long, hot, uncomfortable wait for us. I'm sure summers were much sunnier in those days!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Today was sunny and warm: yesterday was sunny-ish and not particularly (there was still the bone chilling undertow of east- coast haar). Nevertheless, the bus I was on had folk in the full on coat-scarf-tights-boots and a chap in jeans and a vest. Today there was a definite swing to the summer wardrobe - beige raincoats rather than black, with again a vanguard moving on to out and out beachwear.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It was an absolutely glorious day here - it reached 26°C in the afternoon. Temperatures like that would normally fill me with horror, but it wasn't muggy (no Humidex), so it was lovely.

We took a drive a wee bit out of town after w*rk and there were four icebergs (two quite decent-sized) out in the bay, which moderated the feel of the temperature a bit.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
There were a few days of rain here whilst I was over there but very little since I came back though we had a sprinkle this morning when I was in the shower after my cycle ride. Such rides may become scarce at the beginning of monsoon in a week or so's time so I'll have to fit in what exercise I can when I can.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
Well, I'd put the whole, royal family in a council house on minimum wage.

However, most people like an excuse for a day off and a party. We (I mean my street) are having a street party and I will be looking for somewhere to go to avoid it.

"Bah, humbug"?

Beware, no matter where you go, you may be visibly reminded of the Spirit of the Jubilee [Razz]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Helloooo I'm hoooome! (Been to Barcelona for a long weekend with the girlies)

I have white choc chip and fudge cake (that's in one cake) and lots of crushed ice with ginger beer.

Do help yourselves.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Did you take lots of photies?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Did you take lots of photies?

Yes - loads - but it was hard to do my usual obsessing as I didn't want to hold my friends up!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Speaking of photos, my new camera has just arrived. I'm amazed at how much lighter it is than my existing one from earlier in the range - when the box arrived I was convinced they must have left the camera out.

Really looking forward to trying it out, but that must wait until I can get a memory card. This weekend should be fun!

(Makes up for yet another evening of delayed and cancelled trains. I'm getting really tired of spending half the evening trying to get home. At least this time there was a nice surprise waiting.)
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Next Monday is a public holiday, we are going to make the most of it to practise the cello for our upcoming concert. The plan is to precede the hard work with a goûter, i.e. afternoon tea. I have said I am going to provide English baking. What do the panel think I should make?

I am thinking I should probably make scones, but then I might have to try to explain to the French people the jam first or cream first controversy and that might get complicated…
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Have you ever considered making pork pies? The French do wonderful charcuterie but they don't seem to have pork pies.

I don't pretend they are simple to make but they are an adventure and the most English of foods.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
A Victoria Sandwich (sponge cake)! They're easy to make, and always popular.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Bakewell Tart. Or a traditional short crust apple - no, better, rhubarb - tart.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Fairy cakes are good and easy - but otherwise I like the Victoria Sponge idea or the scones.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Cherry cake. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I've just read the recipe, piglet - that sounds lovely!
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Cherry cake. [Smile]

My blood sugar just shot up into the stratosphere. I haven't had so many maraschino cherries since I graduated high school. (Long, involved story)
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, it IS a VERY long time ago!
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
I see that the news reports from the UK say the temperatures are higher than Bermuda or Africa.

Out here in South Africa we are having a mild winter that is like a cool summer and bracing ourselves for a rash of royal family documentaries on local television, old films about the Royal Visit to the Dominion of South Africa and the Rhodesias & Nyasaland in 1947, Princess Diana reruns and endless royal weddings replayed.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I thought about Bakewell tart but I've made it before - it went down very well with the French people. I'm making some sterling progress on convincing this particular group of French people that English food is tasty. And afternoon tea is definitely the bestest of all British meals (except for breakfast possibly).

In the end I'm sticking with the original plan of scones because I have just made the frabjous discovery that Marks & Sparks sell clotted cream - which you can normally never get in France [Yipee] . I shall endeavour to initiate the Frenchies into the mystery that is cream tea - jam first or cream first? (I say cream because it looks prettier, but we all know this is a tortured subject…)
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
... My blood sugar just shot up into the stratosphere ...

Sorry about that. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:

So far the only direct impact the Jubilee has had on me is a few of my friends whinging that its too late to book any camp sites so they can get away from London for the weekend.

That's why we're going to Amsterdam. OK, I tell a lie - actually, it's because a loooong bank holiday weekend is perfect for a cricket tour to Amsterdam, and the Knotweed (as have a number of spouses...) seems to have suddenly taken an interest in the game for the occasion.

I suppose as a wannabe historian I should be interested in only the second ever Diamond Jubilee of a UK monarch, but actually I'm just bummed that I'll be missing the pageant of ships up the Thames. That's the bit I'm excited by, I've got a bit of a thing about ships, I think it's the sailors in the family...

AG
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
I have said I am going to provide English baking. What do the panel think I should make?

Marmite on toast.

Proper English toast - thick slices, of crusty bread, ideally an inch thick or more, toasted quickly and unevenly on *both* sides - none of your even golden brown of dried-out toasted-in-the-oven stuff, we want some bits almost uncooked, other bits black. And heaps and heaps of butter put on while its still hot so it melts right through in places and drips on to the plate underneath. That's REAL English cooking! [Yipee]

Wimps can have marmalade rather than Marmite of course.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
... actually I'm just bummed that I'll be missing the pageant of ships up the Thames.

As far as I understand the security arragnements you would need to queue from the night before to get within a mile of the river, and agree to be stripped naked and searched internally by one of the 873,000 armed police specially drafted in to ensure no Muslims get within long-range rifle shot of her Maj.

Not that they really care about the Jubilee from a security point of view, its just a dry run for the Olympics. Which are themselves a dry run for the planned simultaneous coup in every country in the world when the Metropolitan Police, in association with the Moscow Mafia, will take overcontrol of everything, subservient to the New World Order Supreme Ruling Council which consists of Prince Philip, Roman Abramovich, Tony Blair, David Attenborough, and Boris Johnson.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
I thought about Bakewell tart but I've made it before - it went down very well with the French people. I'm making some sterling progress on convincing this particular group of French people that English food is tasty. And afternoon tea is definitely the bestest of all British meals (except for breakfast possibly).

In the end I'm sticking with the original plan of scones because I have just made the frabjous discovery that Marks & Sparks sell clotted cream - which you can normally never get in France [Yipee] . I shall endeavour to initiate the Frenchies into the mystery that is cream tea - jam first or cream first? (I say cream because it looks prettier, but we all know this is a tortured subject…)

Clotted cream is a wonderful thing! (We didn't have it in New Zealand). I've tended to go cream first 'cos it sticks better to the scone then dollop jam on top. And add extra little bits of jam and cream as I go... mmm.... sounds good... (there isn't a drooling smilie).
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
I suppose as a wannabe historian I should be interested in only the second ever Diamond Jubilee of a UK monarch, but actually I'm just bummed that I'll be missing the pageant of ships up the Thames. That's the bit I'm excited by, I've got a bit of a thing about ships, I think it's the sailors in the family...

You'll be able to get it on iPlayer - in fact, it'll probably be streamed live at the time, too.

It's been a perfect hot summer's day here in rural Oxfordshire, fields full of green leaves, and acres of yellow rapeseed flowers adding a vivid splash of colour to the countryside. Shimmering heat on dusty country roads lined with tall lacy white cow parsley and buttercups, birds shouting loudly to each other. People think the countryside is quiet, it's rarely ever silent.

(And commuters muttering epithets as for the third night in a row there were major delays and cancellations on the line. We're not being told why. Is this a rehearsal for the Olympics?)
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I'm also thinking I might try piglet's recipe and not bother with the part where you share it with other people [Snigger]
 
Posted by Tubbs (# 440) on :
 
test
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... I might try piglet's recipe and not bother with the part where you share it with other people [Snigger]

[Big Grin]

It's dead easy, La Vie, and even more so if you mix everything in a food-processor. I used to mix it in a big bowl with an electric hand-whisk, but when my whisk went phut I tried it in the food-processor and it worked just grand. You're better to fold in the cherries with a spatula though, as they'd be cut too small by the blade.

The recipe also works with sultanas instead of cherries: soak about ¾ cup sultanas overnight in a tablespoon or two of the booze of your choice (I use Pimm's No. 1 if I have it, or port), add the liquid to the sugar/butter/cream cheese mixture and cut down the vanilla to about ½ teaspoon. Dredge the sultanas in flour the same as you would the cherries - it helps them not to sink.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
I'm also thinking I might try piglet's recipe and not bother with the part where you share it with other people [Snigger]

This right and proper - you may need to do it several times as a sort of quality control to make sure you have it just right.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
This right and proper - you may need to do it several times as a sort of quality control to make sure you have it just right.

When my sons were young I did lots of baking, especially slices. For a long time they wondered how I could bake a slice with a neat corner cut from it! Quality control strikes again.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Piglet, your recipe sounds great but do you have any equivalent imperial measurements? I'm at a loss when it comes to cups.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
According to this conversion chart, 1 cup is 4.4 ounces; I'd say half a pound of flour would probably do it, plus a couple of tablespoons to dredge the cherries. I don't think I'll ever really get used to the idea of cup measures, even for butter* ... [Ultra confused]

Having said that, if you've got a cup of 8 fl. oz. capacity, fill it with flour using a scoop or large spoon until it's just heaped, and then level off the surface with a straight-bladed knife, then sieve it into a bowl.

It was another lovely day here, so we went for a walk along the walking trail beside the Fluvarium after w*rk. Another day, another bridge, another game of Poohsticks. [Smile] And it's forecast to be even nicer tomorrow. [Yipee]

* The foil on butter here is marked with lines showing ¼, ½, ¾ and whole cup measures; you cut at the desired line.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I have trouble with tablespoon as a measure. I tablespoon down under contains 20 ml, elsewhere 15. I need to check origin of recipe. In some places, the difference is negligible but i have put too much/little of some things by mistake.

[ 26. May 2012, 05:00: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
You can buy measuring cups in the UK - and measuring spoons. At a pinch I've used an empty individual yoghurt pot or the same mug. There's a recipe for blackberry fairy cakes using a yoghurt pot at Nature Detectives , (scroll down on that page) although I stopped using that one when I wasn't just substituting the yoghurt for soya yoghurt but also the flour for gluten free flour.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I turned off the alarm at 06.10 this morning and thought I'd have five more minutes. I woke at 09.30!

[Hot and Hormonal]

No harm done but it is very unlike me but then I won't get a nap this afternoon so perhaps it was in anticipation of this.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Thanks, Piglet and Curiosity. I've promised to make a cake for the office Jubilee celebrations. I pretty much know the sort of thing I'll be doing but am still open to recipe suggestions and like the sound of Piglet's cake.

I'd found a Jubilee Cake recipe online somewhere (which I'll have to google for as for some reason I didn't bookmark this) which is a kind of luxury Victoria sponge with a filling of clotted cream and fresh raspberries. I was going to decorate it with pale blue icing, as we're going for the "red, white and blue" theme, but my worry is that the raspberries might make the cake soggy pretty quickly.

[ 26. May 2012, 05:46: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
There's a recipe for a rather fruity Jubilee cake here

Also there are decorated cupcakes.

Personally if I see another red white and blue recipe I will go and live somewhere else for the duration !

Lovely sunny day here with nice, but strong, breeze. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
I'm going to have a go at that one for the schools' celebrations, Nicodemia. Though I bet it'll prove really popular and there will be no blueberries or raspberries to be found anywhere! The Victoria sponge with raspberry filling does sound wonderful, though. I can't imagine it'll last long enough to go squidgey.

It's another lovely day. I'm off to the garden centre - woefully late with everything this year but just too tired to manage that and work and being enormously pregnant all at the same time. So all low maintenance plus a few strawberry plants if I can get any.

Mr Jt9 has taken the kids for a day trip on the Norfolk broads, which will be glorious, I should imagine. All local family are away for the weekend, though so I am not allowed to go into labour. Hahahaha! I still technically have 2 weeks to go, though, so I don't expect I shall. Besides, have gardening to do, it would be terribly inconvenient! [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think if the clotted cream is smeared on both top and bottom pieces of the sponge then the raspberries added between the cream layers then all should be fine. What I mean is a sort of sponge-cream-fruit-cream-sponge sandwichy thing.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I have trouble with tablespoon as a measure. I tablespoon down under contains 20 ml, elsewhere 15. I need to check origin of recipe. In some places, the difference is negligible but i have put too much/little of some things by mistake.

I'm probably teaching grand/mothers to suck eggs but Mrs S has measuring spoons that contain 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 ml when level.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yes, I have a set of those too, Sioni - they are very useful.

- - - -

In other news a fugitive penguin has been recaptured in Tokyo - good grief we don't want creatures like THAT on the loose in our cities!

- - - -

In other other news I saw a teenage lad in town today wearing a T-shirt which read

quote:
Trouble Every Day
Had I not been on the bus and him on the footpath I'd have stopped him to ask where he bought it so I could get one to send to Smudgelet [I met him last week and he's lovely] - I know it is not true of him in the least but it would give him a standard to which to aspire.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Thanks for the tip, WW. I think you're right - will have to give that a trial run.

quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
There's a recipe for a rather fruity Jubilee cake here

Thanks for that, Nicodemia - that sounds tasty! One of my colleagues has a nut allergy which means that anything with ground almonds would probably be out, but I won't be the only one baking and I like the fruit decoration.
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
Bother bother. Only just realised that the Mary Berry cake requires greek yoghurt, which I do not have in, and I am too lazy to sally forth and get any. Hm, will have to be left a day or two. Yoghurt? In a cake? Really? I have put it in pancakes before, but a cake?

Will have to bake something though, as we are currently in a house without cake [Eek!] , and that will not do.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I think it was the Winnie the Pooh Cookbook which gave all measurements in yoghurt pots. Very practical if you are a student without a set of scales trying to cook in Hall. I've still got it somewhere. The book also includes a recipe for "eskimo bananas" - cut a banana in half, stick a couple of cocktail sticks in each cut end,. wrap them in foil and freeze them. Just before serving, take them out of the freezer, unwrap, use the cocktail sticks as a handle and dip the frozen banana in melted chocolate.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Yogurt pots and not honey jars in the Winnie the Pooh cookbook??
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jemima the 9th:
Bother bother. Only just realised that the Mary Berry cake requires greek yoghurt, which I do not have in, and I am too lazy to sally forth and get any. Hm, will have to be left a day or two. Yoghurt? In a cake? Really? I have put it in pancakes before, but a cake?

Will have to bake something though, as we are currently in a house without cake [Eek!] , and that will not do.

Yoghurt in a cake is fine. Makes it rich and dense and if you use a flavoured one eg mango or passionfruit or similar it adds a slight extra flavour. Dilute it with milk if you want to, but when I've used it, it's usually because I didn't have enough milk in house for cake.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jemima the 9th:
... we are currently in a house without cake [Eek!] , and that will not do.

It certainly won't, Jt9. I have citrus cake - it's the cherry-cake recipe but with the grated rind and juice of some left-over clementines, plus a wee squirt of lemon and lime juice instead of the cherries. It was an experiment - I've done it with just lemon rind and juice before, but I didn't have any lemons, and D. pointed out we had some superannuated clementines. Not quite as nice, but not bad at all. Do help yourself.

BTW, are you sure you ought to be gardening in your condition?

As it was another nice day, we went for a walk up to Fort Amherst, where we could see a couple of icebergs, though not nearly as big or as close as the one in the picture. However, we also saw the first whale of the season, really close in.

[Yipee]

[ 27. May 2012, 02:55: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Yogurt in a cake is absolutely fine - makes it lovely and moist.

If you haven't got Greek Yogurt, tip some ordinary yog into a fine sieve and let it drip through and then use the thickened residue as Greek Yogurt. The density of the residue depends on how much of a hurry you are to get the cake in the oven!

Those Eskimo bananas sound gorgeous! [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think HWMBO, or indeed anyone from here, would be enthralled by the sight of an iceberg like that - it gives a whole new meaning to "do you want ice with that?" Personally I'll stick to the warm.

Lovely touch after mass this morning when one of the littlest altar boys came rushing up to the car as we were about to drive off to shake my hand and say hello.

I think I upset another one of the guys from church, a fellow in his mid-20s and a ManUre fan, when I asked if he'd like my friend in UK to send him a Man City shirt [Snigger]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I used plain yoghurt in a cake recipe where it called for buttermilk. It went very well. Give it a go, you might be pleasantly surprised.

Another beautiful day. I hope it'll be like this for the Jubilee Week - are those of you who work all working that week or taking the three days off? With bank holidays and weekends thrown in, it can mean 11 days off [Cool]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I suspect I'll be taking the 3 days off. It would normally be half term, but I'm finishing with current work at the end of the month - basically because they can't afford to pay me, and am too bogged down in the leavers ceremony slideshow and tidying up the things I'm leaving behind to job hunt or sign up at temping agencies.

If anyone asks if I've transferred everything I will not be responsible for my actions. It's not quick. A goodly chunk needs converting from Open Office format to Micro$oft for me to be able to pass it on. Yes, I have asked if they can open OpenOffice format, they don't know. It doesn't help being one of the most computer literate around.

And adding the massive task of producing an individual collage of photos for each student to be framed for them to take with them to the slide show is not helpful. Particularly when offers of help aren't going to help - 75% of the job is going through and finding photos out my tens of thousands.

I want to go out and play in the sunshine, not stay in stuck in front of a computer! Grump!
 
Posted by FooloftheShip (# 15579) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Piglet, your recipe sounds great but do you have any equivalent imperial measurements? I'm at a loss when it comes to cups.

As in all things, Delia saves
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Curiosity Killed

Send them an email attachment in Open Office format, then see how many complain that they can't open it.

If you can make it something that needs a reply that can only be given once opened even better.

Jengie
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by FooloftheShip:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Piglet, your recipe sounds great but do you have any equivalent imperial measurements? I'm at a loss when it comes to cups.

As in all things, Delia saves
Then perhaps she should play in goal for Norwich!

[Sorry, Delia, that was a low shot!]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Hi All,

your cake ideas sound fabulous... especially the citrus one. I've got mini vanilla cupcakes from M & S. I get hooked by the edible glitter!

In terms of this weekend, I'm taking the Friday off so I'll have 5 days off. We're thinking of going up to the little village where my husband's grandmother lives as they're having a bit fete and my parents-in-law are singing in a festival choir. Keen to have a go at the hog roast!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I think HWMBO, or indeed anyone from here, would be enthralled by the sight of an iceberg like that ...

You'll both have to come over and visit then. [Smile]
quote:
I think I upset ... a ManUre fan, when I asked if he'd like my friend in UK to send him a Man City shirt [Snigger]
[Killing me] [Killing me] You're a man after my own heart.
quote:
... Delia saves

Then perhaps she should play in goal for Norwich!

[Killing me] [Killing me] See previous comment. An Ipswich Fan Has Spoken. [Big Grin]

We did lots of lovely Tudor music today - Alleluia, I heard a voice by Weelkes in the morning and Gibbons' Short Service, O Lord, give thy Holy Spirit by Tallis and the Office Hymn set to the tune of the Agincourt song at Evensnog.

Good music and stuffing the French - what more could one ask? [Devil]
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
Encouragement to try yoghurt in cake is noted, thank you. I shall have a trial run tomorrow before one needs taking to school on Friday.

Am suffering the ongoing saga of the Olympic tickets here they tried to deliver them on friday, allegedly, but left no collection card. Man on RM phone says it isn't needed, but man at RM sorting office says it was. Although I haven't got one. So he has my tickets, and I have the text from RM and my ID, but I can't collect them. Apparantly they're going to deliver tomorrow........

Gardening seems to be ok in advanced pregnancy, though getting up off the ground can be difficult, after weeding. I think this is God's way of telling me not to weed [Snigger] Family legend has it that mum went into labour with me whilst planting out sweet peas - I am hoping for the same result.

Lovely day yesterday - child A admitted to communion and then all of us off for pizza to celebrate. All very super. Today child A has gone to school in tudor costume to meet Henry VIII. As one does. [Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jemima the 9th:
... Today child A has gone to school in tudor costume to meet Henry VIII. As one does. [Smile]

How cool is that? I hope His Majesty is heralded by some Proper Music.

[Cool]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Is the child off to Kentwell?
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
I should hope there will be no beheadings! [Eek!]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
My scones were a triumph. I have now successfully converted a group of food-snob Frenchies to the institution that is the English Cream Tea™. Her Majesty would be proud of me. [Big Grin]

I would offer virtual scones but there's none left.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
My scones were a triumph. I have now successfully converted a group of food-snob Frenchies to the institution that is the English Cream Tea™. Her Majesty would be proud of me. [Big Grin]

I would offer virtual scones but there's none left.

We are proud of you too. It's all about quality. The French and especially Parisians have the idea that British food is awful, so countering that is work of great value. [Overused]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Well done, La Vie! Glad to hear it was well received. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
Hoorah for scone triumph!

piglet - I'm really looking forward to playing the Proper Music (TM) to Child A when she gets in, it's lovely.

Henry was visiting the school as part of their project on tudors. There weren't any beheadings, but apparantly there was jousting [Eek!] though I don't think any horses were involved. I must find out more....

I love Kentwell. We went there earlier in the month for their May Day celebrations; more I think for my benefit than the kids' (ahem [Hot and Hormonal] ) but they do really enjoy it too. We met the lady of the manor, saw the May Queen parade and the mummers' play, the girls did some spinning, Mr Jt9 chatted to the man in the hovel about his coracle, we pottered round the kitchen and bakery - no free food though, we've had hot cross buns at Easter in previous years.

Ah, 'twas ace. It's one of my most favouritest places, especially in May.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jemima the 9th:

Henry was visiting the school as part of their project on tudors. There weren't any beheadings, but apparantly there was jousting [Eek!] though I don't think any horses were involved. I must find out more....


I've seen some a jousting display with horses and very impressive it waas too. Needless to say it wasn't in Britain but in France, about five years ago. I think some Spanish guys did the riding which included knocking each other off their mounts. The Safety Elves would never permit it here.

We got a lot of friendly stick when we were heard speaking English, but once we told them we lived in Wales all was hunky-dory.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
The Safety Elves do permit it in the UK - Leeds Armoury do competitive jousting, for real, with falling off and everything.

And if it was Good King Hal visiting the school, he has a quite amusing blog at www.goodkinghal.blogspot.com I believe the jousting includes the quintain and 'riding' in and out of poles, and keeps a running total of the winning teams (he divides it up into girls vs. boys).
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I've seen real jousting in the UK, at least twice.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I like the idea of Henry VIII writing a blog. I've got a Facebook "friend" who calls himself "William Byrd - resurgam" and writes in mock-Tudor: "To ye Cathedral where my Masse for Four Voyces was sunge skillfullye by ye choir" - you get the idea. I have no idea who he really is, but he's rather fun.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Fun? Nay he is verily a varlot and a knave. [Biased]
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
I've seen real jousting in the UK, at least twice.

I've seen it at the Royal Armouries tilt yard at Leeds. Choreographed stunt falls rather than real fighting, but still good fun.

The demonstration of pole-axe fighting indoors is the best of the fights though.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'm on my own most of the day today so I am going to have a completely lazy day and read and doze a bit then read some more!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I saw jousting at Blenheim Palace last year which was great fun - lots of posturing and some convincingly stroppy performers snapping at each other and threatening to storm off the field, but no splintered lances. They have jousting about twice a year, I think, Easter and summer.

Re the blog thing, there used to be someone writing as Chaucer ("Geffrye Chaucer hath a blog") which I followed for a while. That was quite well done.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
One of the niceties of train travel is that you get to hear the most interesting of conversations. On one trip I got too over hear a conversation between two people who stage historical re-enactments. They were discussing forth coming events and the jousting amongst them. Aparently the jousting is set a quite a precise historical time, because it is relatively easy to take a tumble and survive, as you get later in history the armour gets heavier and though harder to actually tumble the risks involved if you do increase. There are very few jousters therefore willing to do re-enactments of these dates for that reason.

Jengie

[ 30. May 2012, 07:55: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
That's me told then! I'll to look about myself more carefully for jousting.

Nevertheless, thanks for the heads up about Leeds Royal Armoury. That appears well worth a visit.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:


Re the blog thing, there used to be someone writing as Chaucer ("Geffrye Chaucer hath a blog")

Still is.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Thanks for the link, Firenze. The image of Chauser and King Richard pot-holing from the latest blog was great. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A day of rest well achieved - off to shower now as we are off to a pre-marriage event tonight and the actual marriage tomorrow.
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
Thanks for the King Hal link, Eigon, I'll show it to Child A, she'll like it. She's something of a history fan, due in no small part to Horrible Histories off the telly, which I love too. And the books, which are great, but rather lacking in dishy young men for my liking.

Your day of rest sounds lovely, WW.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
WW, your yesterday sounds like my sort of day. I don't suppose this pre-marriage event thingy will involve FOOD, will it? [Big Grin]

I seem to have frozen my left shoulder, which is v. nasty; I can't lift my arm more than about 80° without going "ouch"*. Treatments with frozen peas followed by hot-water bottles haven't been entirely successful.

[Frown]

* or possibly %*@#. [Devil]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:

I seem to have frozen my left shoulder, which is v. nasty; I can't lift my arm more than about 80° without going "ouch"*. Treatments with frozen peas followed by hot-water bottles haven't been entirely successful.

[Frown]

* or possibly %*@#. [Devil]

Mrs S had this successively in her shoulders a few years ago. It's worth checking with a Dr as it tends to afflict women.

[Votive] in the meantime
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
WW, your yesterday sounds like my sort of day. I don't suppose this pre-marriage event thingy will involve FOOD, will it? [Big Grin]


Why would he go, otherwise? He goes to the wedding too. Feast is an implied word.

The day before is hosted by the groom's side. The day of is hosted by the bride's side. Usually.

And Wodders is there scooping up his rice and curries, regardless.

He might take some pictures, or 200, as well.

Who got married, Wodders?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:

I seem to have frozen my left shoulder, which is v. nasty; I can't lift my arm more than about 80° without going "ouch"*. Treatments with frozen peas followed by hot-water bottles haven't been entirely successful.

Another one here too Piglet. Apparently women of over 50 are particularly susceptible to this. I can with great difficulty lift my left arm to same height as shoulder but absolutely no further. Changing the plane in which arm is operating is also very painful. Elbow down is fine but above elbow is very painful. Pain also goes down the outside of the arm to the elbow and this is one way of assessing the problem. I am using a gel pack heated in the microwave on it at night in bed. Do you find that across shoulders is also painful and tight because the muscles used to move arm are not being used correctly.

Apparently it can go as suddenly as it appeared and that time can't come soon enough for me. None of this is helped by my osteoarthritis either.

[ 31. May 2012, 12:00: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It was a lovely, lovely wedding - and I say that as someone who doesn't really like them very much.

The bride lives on an island in the delta - but then don't we all? This island however has no land connection with any other and thus we travelled from the groom's house to the marriage function by bus and then by ferry - I've never been to a wedding by ferry before. It was then a short walk, 10 minutes or so, from the jetty to the hall beside the temple.

It was Vimeesh, from Cheriyapilly, who got married Pete and he was the first groom I have ever seen at a marriage in India who didn't look terrified. Being a Hindu marriage the formalities were over in minutes and the serious business of eating got underway. It was dry all day and the sun shone quite a bit of the time, too - strange weather for the last of May but very welcome under the circumstances.

The scenery, being set where it was, was glorious and the ferry ride back was, erm, a little crowded as was the bus but we got back to the groom's house okay where there was more food for those who wished it - not me, I had had ample.

Later the newlyweds will travel back to the island to the bride's house for the night and then back to the groom's house to start their life together tomorrow.

I took a mere 213 photos which I shall now write on a CD for the groom to write on to his PC.

Btw - the food was excellent.

eta: I have no idea how much it costs to hire a complete ferry for a day - bad enough to hire the buses! It was a big ferry by local standards, too, but then it needed to be.

[ 31. May 2012, 12:03: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
What I forgot to mention is that on arrival at the groom's house this morning there was breakfast on offer to anyone that wanted it - HWMBO, Mrs E and the neighbour we took with us all availed themselves of the offer - even though they had hadbreakfast before we left!

It was also fun that a lad from our village appeared at lunchtime - apparently he is at college with the Bride's brother - everyone is either related or otherwise connected to everyone else down here!

[ 31. May 2012, 15:58: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Just had my 2 youngest cats to the vet as they had been in a fight yesterday with a neighbouring cat and were each walking on 3 legs.

They are fine - ish having had treatment. I, however, have been bitten on the finger. B***dy cats!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Apparently it can go as suddenly as it appeared and that time can't come soon enough for me.

I went through a period of that, waking up in agony and unable to even so much as carry a light shoulder bag on that side. That happy state of affairs lasted for weeks, the beginnings of it shifted slightly to the other side, then vanished. You have my sympathy as it's horrid to live with, and you don't have any idea how long it'll last - but it should go eventually. The menopause (or peri-menopause) can throw up a whole bunch of odd symptoms which are very real to the point where they may dominate your life, but they do usually fade out.

Anyway, on a happier note - am baking a Jubilee Cake. I've decided to go for a slightly adapted version of this, cutting down the sugar and using yoghurt instead of buttermilk, which I can't get; and the icing's going to be mascarpone with raspberries and blueberries. Fingers crossed that this works - it smells lovely but you never quite know how these things will turn out.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Ah well, live and learn. Guess I'll be buying a cake tomorrow morning on the way to work.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Sorry to hear about the cake. Pour yourself a large one as consolation.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Have I mentioned that I have a Diploma in the Disposal of Failed Cake(s)? [Smile]

Just sayin'. Don't feel obliged.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... This island however has no land connection with any other ...

I think that's kind of what "island" means. An Islander Has Spoken. [Devil]

D. went and got me some Napoxy-something-or-other tablets (having asked the advice of the pharmacist) and they seem to be helping; I can raise my arm almost straight up, although stretching back is still a bit iffy. As I only turned 50 in February, it's a rather depressing thought that I might get this every so often for the rest of my days ... [Frown]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... This island however has no land connection with any other ...

I think that's kind of what "island" means. An Islander Has Spoken. [Devil] ...
Thank you for the clarification, piglet.

What I meant to say was that there are no bridges to the island - nor are there likely to be for many years since the Government has just published its road building plan for the next decade and it's not included.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I had a feeling that's what you meant. Having said that, I'm generally not in favour of bridges - they take away that essential islandness.

When the British government imposed a bridge on the people of Skye in the Western Isles, they weren't best pleased, especially as there was a toll to be paid. This was waived for anyone carrying livestock, so there was this sheep ...

You've guessed it - people "borrowed" him and put him in the back of their cars, in order to avoid the toll.

Once the tolls had paid for the cost of the bridge, they were removed, and I couldn't help feeling a bit sorry for the (now unemployed) sheep.

Mint sauce, anyone? [Two face]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
D. went and got me some Napoxy-something-or-other tablets (having asked the advice of the pharmacist) and they seem to be helping; I can raise my arm almost straight up, although stretching back is still a bit iffy. As I only turned 50 in February, it's a rather depressing thought that I might get this every so often for the rest of my days ...

I'm happy for you, Piglet, that something seems to be helping the shoulder. I have osteoarthritis and have tried pretty well all those things. They rarely do and sometimes the cure is worse than the complaint as they upset my stomach.

I hope the improvement continues quickly.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thanks, Lothlorien - I'm more-or-less back to normal now as long as I don't try up and back at the same time. Deo gratias - I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy.

We've been having a few things done to our house; just before we went away D. found A Man to build a new set of steps at the front door, as the old one was (almost literally) falling to bits. He made a really nice job of it, and as is the way with these things, he found a few other things that weren't quite right, and they are now.

He's also started the process of replacing the wooden siding on the front of the house; the lowest 8 planks have been done, and when I got home this afternoon I found that they've had their first coat of vermilion stain*, which looks brilliant. While we're away in the summer, he's going to replace the front windows (which are currently horrid sliders - not in keeping with the house at all) and do the rest of the siding at that stage.

v. happy piglet. [Yipee]

* Staining the wood lasts much longer and looks better than just painting it.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Fun day at the office yesterday with lots of cakes, bunting everywhere, people wearing red, white and blue, turning up in Royal Family masks, etc. Some of the masks were put up in the window for the day. It was a bit disconcerting seeing the green light from the landscape outside shining eerily through their empty eyesockets, which flickered as you walked past. None the less it was an enjoyable day with a colourful, cheery atmosphere to work in.

The Jubilee weekend's begun with rain. It's very nice to be in, with no plans, and not have to go anywhere. Hope the river pageant isn't rained off tomorrow!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Off to Cardiff for the rugby today (if my lift turns up), Wales v Barbarians. I don't expect too much Jubiliana.

One of the offices at work really went to town yesterday. Union flags everywhere, banners, all red, white and blue. The effect was more like VE Day than the Jubilee.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Funny you should say that - the thought of VE Day had crossed my mind too.

Someone told me that on the way to work they'd passed another office where they were all sitting round in homemade crowns, some of which were about a foot tall. Wish I'd seen that.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We've got bunting up everywhere - road I'm off is having a street party and they're getting keen. I'm hoping for a puddle shot of decorations in the rain, but it's not quite raining enough.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I've only seen one house in a half mile radius with bunting up, two thirds of pubs are not bunted* either. We like the extra bank holiday though [Big Grin]

On the other hand there is a buzz about the Olympic Torch relay coming through here on the Sun 24th.

*New word, you saw it here first.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
After yesterday's abortive bureaucratic trip when I got there to find both the clerks on leave I went back this morning and was in and out in 5 minutes having collected and signed for the correct papers which means I am now fully legally resident again. After all these years the papers are getting a bit flimsy but they only have to last another 18 months. Does anyone know of anything that you can spray on papers [or otherwise treat them] so they stay strong?

I now have to cope with the minefield of applying for copies of my birth certificate from the General Register Office in Southport - don't tell them but I was surprised how inexpensive their service is. I think I might get a couple of copies whilst I am at it.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
After all these years the papers are getting a bit flimsy but they only have to last another 18 months. Does anyone know of anything that you can spray on papers [or otherwise treat them] so they stay strong?

You could put them in sheet protectors. That's what I do to keep papers from getting flimsy.

quote:
I now have to cope with the minefield of applying for copies of my birth certificate from the General Register Office in Southport - don't tell them but I was surprised how inexpensive their service is. I think I might get a couple of copies whilst I am at it.
We had to get copies of our daughter's birth certificate from Northern Ireland where she was born. There are separate fees for looking up the record and making the copy. This means that you save money by ordering more than one copy at a time, assuming you may ever need more copies.

Moo
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Whilst the papers are with me they are always in sheet protectors but when they are with them they are just held in a file and pawed by all and sundry - that's where the damage occurs.

Off for a walk in the evening cool in a little bit, I think.
 
Posted by passer (# 13329) on :
 
I wasn't sure on which board to post it, but I believe that the linked news item might be of interest to some of the English members, with possible shipmeet potential.

I'll just leave this here and tiptoe away.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Off to Cardiff for the rugby today (if my lift turns up), Wales v Barbarians. I don't expect too much Jubiliana.


Yup, no Jubilee stuff at all. We did have mention of the Queen's Dragoon Guards, guests of the WRU, who have recently returned form Afghanistan (most of them that is; some never made it and a few others are in still in hospital or rehab). They got a huge round of applause, as the QDG is regarded as Wales own tank regiment and there's a campaign on to retain it.

In other news Wales second-string beat a hard-case Barbarians team 30-21, but it was closer than that looks and not an outstanding game. The highlight was one of our party asking a question that will forever be understood as 'Where is Barbaria?'
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
... Wales v Barbarians ...

I was going to ask how you can tell the difference, but that may just be to do with the Welshmen I know ... [Big Grin]

Just back from v. good supper in a restaurant downtown which is an all-day breakfast joint until 4 p.m. and thereafter does evening food. My lamb chops were perfectly cooked and subtly flavoured, as were the accompanying veggies (carrots, asparagus and brocc.) and baked potato. And it only cost $16.99, which is less than half what most eateries here charge.

Lamb is the most expensive thing on most menus - [Frown] - as a lot of people here don't seem to like it, I suppose it must be a supply-and-demand thing.

How could you possibly not like lamb? [Confused]
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
About to head up to central London in order to see the Jubilee boat flotilla. After a couple of weeks of fine weather it is raining so not ideal for sitting around reading a book for a few hours until it's time, but I think that among all the sceptics and republicans there are enough people who still like the queen that it will be wise to get there early.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
You are very brave, Moonlitdoor - I hope you get a good vantage point and have a strong umbrella!

I might watch the Thames pageant on the TV - a river pageant sounds interesting, whoever it is for - big ships, little ships and all that.

Otherwise I've had enough of red, white and blue appearing on everything - well nearly everything, haven't seen the aforementioned colours in the bathroom. So far.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Good luck with that, moonlitdoor, I was hoping to go, but reckoned the chances of seeing anything wasn't great with everything shut off, and gave up on the idea
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Hope s/he makes it OK - looks like a dismal day and they were just saying on tv that people have been camping out overnight (!) to get the best places to see it from.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Hope you get a good place on the embankment, moonlitdoor.

Here in the Overberg mountains of South Africa, everyone is getting ready to watch the flotilla on the Thames, even those who still resent the British for the Anglo-Boer war. The TV coverage here will be two hours later than in the UK and there is much excitement tempered by the possibility of a replay of the rugby from yesterday in which case that might be watched instead.

Lovely hot winter sunshine, a glorious day.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
I loved watching the choir singing "Rule Brittania" in the pouring rain - such a thoroughly British piece of nonsense - it makes me quite proud.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Britons never, never, never shall be slaves

Well done, indeed from what I saw of it.

[ 03. June 2012, 17:22: Message edited by: PeteC ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
That poor choir, singing "Land of Hope and Glory" with such enthusiasm as the rain streamed down, plastering their hair to their skulls!

Wonderful pageant - the organizers should be very proud of themselves.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary LA:
Hope you get a good place on the embankment, moonlitdoor.

Here in the Overberg mountains of South Africa, everyone is getting ready to watch the flotilla on the Thames, even those who still resent the British for the Anglo-Boer war. The TV coverage here will be two hours later than in the UK and there is much excitement tempered by the possibility of a replay of the rugby from yesterday in which case that might be watched instead.

Lovely hot winter sunshine, a glorious day.

Next instalment of the Anglo-Boer war begins in Durban on 9th June.

Both sides are in flux but this will be a serious test for the English, some of whom haven't been in a head-to-head with South Africa.
 
Posted by amber. (# 11142) on :
 
Oooo I loved all the Jubilee stuff today. Was up at the Royal Albert Hall last night at the Gala event there...brilliant fun with much flag waving and singing of all the usual songs.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
TV in this household was the river pageant on BBC, followed by All the Queen's Horses. I'm all Royalled out for one day.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I stayed away from the TV all day and had a day's solid reading with a short interruption for a cycle ride late afternoon - not a royal event to be seen!

Bliss!

[I still can't spell]

[ 04. June 2012, 02:29: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The reason I'm even later than usual posting on here is I've just been watching the evening showing of the pageant. BBC Canada showed it live in the morning but, it being Sunday I was otherwise occupied. They very kindly showed it again just after Evensong. I thoroughly enjoyed it - like the Royal wedding last year, it was Britain doing what Britain's best at. Felt sorry for the soggy choir.

The down-side was I'd put a pot of soup on to cook and thought that there would be commercial breaks during which I could go and check it ...

D. came into the den about 2½ hours in and said "how's the soup doing?"

... oops ... [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I reckon there will be a lot of very wet uniforms drying out today, after the wet pageant and sopping wet soldiers/sailors/whatever all standing to attention in the pouring rain!

I hope the Royals had some thermals under their royal clothes - be a lot of sniffling this morning!

Ah, but it made you proud to be British, didn't it? [Two face]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I was hoping for seriously big puddles where there's a lot of bunting because I really wanted reflection shots. I know, I'm not nice.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Sino Said posted:

Next instalment of the Anglo-Boer war begins in Durban on 9th June.

Both sides are in flux but this will be a serious test for the English, some of whom haven't been in a head-to-head with South Africa.


Rugby, more brutal than militarised combat. Head-to-head is a perfect description for those thuggy scrums.

Enjoyed watching the stoic queen and washed-out but magnificent flotillas. My elderly neighbour remembered the coronation and how it rained that day.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
I was hoping for seriously big puddles where there's a lot of bunting because I really wanted reflection shots. I know, I'm not nice.

Haha - hopefully you will get some today. We had puddles, but such low light the photos didn't add up to much.

I took pictures of the telly instead!


Here they are.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mary LA:
...Enjoyed watching the stoic queen and washed-out but magnificent flotillas. My elderly neighbour remembered the coronation and how it rained that day.

Oi, less of the elderly - I remember the coronation!

I am a mature man, not one these young whippersnappers.
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
(sheepishly) My neighbour is 75 but can pass for a frisky 49. Apologies, Wodders.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Lol - good grief, your neighbour is even older than PeteC!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Oi, less of the elderly - I remember the coronation!

Which one?
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I had chosen the area outside Tate Modern and arrived at half past ten. I secured a place 4 people back from the front which was fine as I am reasonably tall. It quickly filled up behind so it was necessary to stand in a fixed position for 5 hours waiting and an hour and a bit watching the boats. When it came time to move at last my knees seemed locked into place so it was a bit of an effort.

A lady close by me seemed to be in her 70s and with an illness that gave her a constant tremor in the hands so considering that I am doing a 10k race next weekend, I can hardly complain. Still I am glad that I did not have to go to work today.

I see on the internet that someone from the national republican society has said that not that many people were there and that other events get more, but all I can say is that I am glad I don't have to get home by public transport after those other events.

I have just been out to buy a newspaper, something I have not done for years, and found one with a photograph showing the same scene I was looking at, the millenium bridge, St Paul's, and the City of London school, so I have a nice memento of my day.
 
Posted by Caty M. (# 11996) on :
 
It's been quite a while since I stuck my head round the door here and waved at you all, hasn't it? [Hot and Hormonal]

Sorry about that.

Still. Hello, everyone.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Oi, less of the elderly - I remember the coronation!

Which one?
This round to Ariel.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
I had a wonderfully festive weekend. We popped up to the little village where my husband's grandmother lives. They were having all sorts of events over the weekend.

We spent quite a bit of time in the pub 'cos it was reeeally cold and fairly wet. There was a lot of wet bunting hanging about the green! We ate hog roast and W.I. cake. We got roped into singing in a scratch choir Sunday morning and evening (Great fun bellowing the Hallelujah chorus!) and watched most of the action on the Thames nice and warm in Grannie's lounge room.

Yay England. [Smile]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Was a cricket match planned, only to be rained off? That would make the ultimate English day.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
No cricket, but a do on the village green with a small dog show (the organiser was pleading on the mic. for people to enter their dogs), coconut shy, a small carousal (sadly too small for me to have a go) and a few stalls. All damp and cold but soldiering on (with regular trips to the pub for the loos and fortifications).

Oh, and a guy hollering some pop songs... I do wish folk would realise that singing is something you need to put some effort into learning how to do, just like you learn to play guitar or drums etc. (Climbs off hobbyhorse)
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
There's no point complaining about the low standard and limited participation in village shows, fetes and the like. Everybody knows that Tom will win the prize for racing leeks, his wife will win the best decorate cake award and their daughter will guess the weight of the cake. It's part of the charm of such events. Our cricket team used to demonstrate this too, until we got South Africans in.

btw, I'm sure there's a better alternative to 'enter their dogs'. [Biased]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
Hope and pray Prince Philip gets well soon. [Votive]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Oi, less of the elderly - I remember the coronation!

Which one?
This round to Ariel.

[Big Grin]

Yes, indeed. I acknowledge defeat in this round.

However Pete and I were once discussing Royal Weddings and he remembered seeing one a while ago - he said the bride looked gorgeous and Prince Albert looked so dashing.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma: Hope and pray Prince Philip gets well soon.

Absolutely - poor old chap. [Votive] I suppose the up-side for him is he won't have to endure the Pop Concert ... [Big Grin]

I'm still debating with myself whether I thought the BBC's coverage was as bad as they're saying in the Telegraph. I accept it isn't the same without Tom Fleming, just as Wimbledon isn't the same without Dan Maskell, but as they're both dead, we can't really blame Auntie for that.

Because I've been on the other side of the Pond for nearly 10 years, I still assume that the worst of the BBC is going to be better than the best of anything I can get over here. For the most part that's probably still true, but they did seem to be aiming for the lowest common denominator, and I wasn't impressed by the two indoors (whoever they were) - they seemed a bit clueless.

As for the one who referred to the Queen as "Her Royal Highness" ... words fail me.

Is there still a block at the Tower? [Devil]

[ 05. June 2012, 02:09: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
The BBC coverage of the River Pageant was worse than awful. It was utterly inept, crass, inaccurate and naff. The presenters had not done their homework, and didn't actually sound as though they cared. I know it was a Bank Holiday and they probably didn't want to have to work, but still.....I bet they were paid extra and given TOIL to be there. There is no excuse for such slipshod and embarassing broadcasting.

As someone said, the Pageant Master had taken 2 and 1/2 years to pull it all together. The BBC sounded as though they'd pulled their bit of it together in the pub the night before on the back of a beer mat.

In other news...it's cold and overcast here today. Not quite raining...yet...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Erm, are you saying you didn't think much of it, then?
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
The BBC coverage of the River Pageant was worse than awful.

The Pageant Master had taken 2½ years to plan it, and all the Beeb did was show the same boats over and over again. Too many reporters at too many camera positions. One commentator and a camera at each of the start, finish and somewhere along the way would have been better, at least then they'd have had to show more than a few boats. A case of too many cooks.

However having just seen the balcony appearence and fly past flicking between channels, if the BBC coverage was poor then ITV was dire.

quote:
piglet:
I still assume that the worst of the BBC is going to be better than the best of anything I can get over here.

The worst of the BBC is still better than anyone else does over here too.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I never realized what an earworm Land of Hope and Glory could be. As if that wasn't enough, at a certain point it devolves into the theme tune from "It Aint Half Hot Mum" and a twangly sitar bit before starting all over again.*

Glad they didn't have to cancel the flypast - everything seemed to go well today.

*If you remember this you are old enough to remember the last Jubilee.
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
... and Windsor Davies shouting "Shaaaaaduuuuup!"
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I never realized what an earworm Land of Hope and Glory could be. As if that wasn't enough, at a certain point it devolves into the theme tune from "It Aint Half Hot Mum" and a twangly sitar bit before starting all over again.*

Glad they didn't have to cancel the flypast - everything seemed to go well today.

*If you remember this you are old enough to remember the last Jubilee.

I'm not sure how appropriate Land of Hope and Glory is. It was used as an anthem for England at the Commonwealth Games (Jerusalem is now used there and before every day's play at England's home cricket matches) while GSTQ is used for England's rugby union and football teams.

It's also the official anthem of the Conservative Party, while Jerusalem is sung at conferences of the Labour Party (and the W.I.)
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Was a cricket match planned, only to be rained off? That would make the ultimate English day.

Our match against VRA in Amsterdam was rained off - does that count?

AG

("Enter their dogs" [Snigger] [Snigger] [Snigger] [Snigger] [Snigger] )
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
... The worst of the BBC is still better than anyone else does over here too.

I'm not so sure any more. All the Queen's Horses, ITV's coverage of the Jubilee Pageant knocked the Beeb's efforts on Sunday into a cocked hat.

What did everyone think of the Service of Thanksgiving? My tuppence-worth:

Liturgy: mostly good; lessons should have been from the Authorised Version.

Choral singing: v. good (almost as good as the Royal Wedding from the Abbey). Pity they left out the trumpet obbligato bit in the Old Hundredth, and their descant to Cwm Rhondda wasn't a patch on James O'Donnell's one.

New anthem: I can't believe it's not Rutter. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Could everyone please put their wet bunting away now.

It won't dry left hanging, you know! [Snigger]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Surely the Anglicans have to leave theirs up for at least the Octave!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If you go out early when nobody else is around, the plastic bunting actually makes quite a clatter flapping in the breeze. I never realized how noisy it was.

Sorry Piglet, I'm afraid once the service got going I turned the TV off and went shopping. Superficial, perhaps, but I'd had the TV on for a while already to enjoy the anticipation and see who was arriving, and it was the fourth day of Jubilee in a row. It's all downhill from here now with a succession of sporting fixtures until September. [Snore]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
What did everyone think of the Service of Thanksgiving? My tuppence-worth:

Liturgy: mostly good; lessons should have been from the Authorised Version.

Choral singing: v. good (almost as good as the Royal Wedding from the Abbey). Pity they left out the trumpet obbligato bit in the Old Hundredth, and their descant to Cwm Rhondda wasn't a patch on James O'Donnell's one.

New anthem: I can't believe it's not Rutter. [Big Grin]

Agree with most of above (definitely missed that obbligato!), although I was happy with the Bible version used (was it NRSV?) One point was that the language in the prayers of intercession varied between "trad." and "modern" - a bit bumpy.

I thought ++Rowan was excellent - not too sycophantic and he actually said something worth saying. Not that anyone will take any notice, sadly. The "Daily Mail" hated the sermon, so he probably got it right.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Surely the Anglicans have to leave theirs up for at least the Octave!

Mrs A was indignant about the skimpy quality of most of the bunting she's seen: smaller flags, she says, and further apart than e.g. in the glory days of '77. Hadn't noticed this myself but has anyone else?
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
We had bunting outside our church: when we unpacked it we discovered that the Union Flag motifs were only printed on one side, the other sides were blank. Not much good as it fluttered in the wind ...
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
The store Mrs Sioni works at had fabric with Union Flags on, but that, like the vast majority of fabric was only printed on one side too. It was the very devil to cut correctly as the flags weren't lined up near the edge!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
BT - I agree that the switching about from Cranmer's matchless prose to modern stuff was v. lumpy and a Bad Thing.

D's regular Wednesday organ recital today had a nice royal feel to it: Renaissance dances by Susato (as in The Six Wives of Henry VIII) and by Henry himself (Pastime with good company), French-stuffing music (the Agincourt Hymn [Big Grin] ), Vaughan Williams' variations on Greensleeves and Master Tallis's Testament by Howells among other things.

All good stuff. [Yipee]

[ 07. June 2012, 02:11: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We think the monsoon has officially arrived though it is not announced in the morning paper, hopefully it will be confirmed tomorrow morning. There was a LOT of rain overnight and the temperature dropped alarmingly - I will be getting a blanket out tonight.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yes, we're just waiting for the monsoon here too, according to Radio 4. It will be accompanied by 70 mph winds and probably the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.

I booked this week off but guess this is another day that isn't really suited to going off for a summer's day out. Are we getting the tail end of Beryl? I thought that had been and gone.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I rather think you're getting the tail end of Brenda!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I rather think you're getting the tail end of Brenda!

[Eek!]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
[Overused]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
[Killing me]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We once had a pet snail called Brenda ...
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
...red white and blue shell?
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Yes, we're just waiting for the monsoon here too, according to Radio 4. It will be accompanied by 70 mph winds and probably the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.

Sure, and my wife is face-painting for the Diocese all day and tomorrow at the Suffolk Show. She will be cold (although, just as I write, the sun has actually emerged for a moment!)

(You will realise from the comment above that my wife is not a True Baptist but Dangerously Ecumenical - or, as she prefers to describe herself, a spiritual mongrel).
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Balaam:
...red white and blue shell?

Just for you Balaam ...


RWB Snail :0)
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Aha! The announcement has been made - Monsoon has set in over southern and central Kerala - it has been a wet day - which is VERY GOOD! We love the rain.

My maths student didn't come to me all last academic year and still did very well at exam time but now he is in Xth standard, with the big exams in March, he is coming back to me again to get a bit more confidence, which is fun. Sadly the book I want to use as a guide isn't available yet but I hope to get a copy next week - the textbook his [English medium] school uses is NOT well-written. He comes from a lovely family, quite close neighbours of ours.

I made a classic error with him today and failed to read one of the questions in his coursebook properly so worked out quite a complex equation and then found the answer was something completely different so reread the question - DUH!! I told him to learn from that and always read the question thoroughly. The question they asked was actually quite simple.

Will he listen?

Probably not but he might.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
The traditional English summer really has arrived.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
I'm sick of England now - can someone assure me it gets better? The last two times I've visted it's been in July/ August and the weather was generally warm and pleasant. Tell me I can look forward to that?

I'm finding it quite depressing being back in winter clothing, putting the heater on, having a lap rug on the couch etc.

And it's so confusing! The roses are blooming, the days are long, but the weather is like winter in Auckland, New Zealand! (tears hair and gnashes teeth)
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Come to Canada where we often get 4 seasons of weather in a twenty-four hour period.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
I'm sick of England now - can someone assure me it gets better? The last two times I've visted it's been in July/ August and the weather was generally warm and pleasant. Tell me I can look forward to that?

Yes you can - but there is NO predicting when!

quote:

And it's so confusing! The roses are blooming, the days are long, but the weather is like winter in Auckland, New Zealand! (tears hair and gnashes teeth)

There is only one way to describe English weather - completely unpredictable! I have an umbrella and sunglasses in my handbag at all times!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Come to Canada where we often get 4 seasons of weather in a twenty-four hour period.

I've been to Winnipeg in Autumn - it was pretty consistently amazingly cold! And very dry - my lips and nose etc all dried out. It was pretty and nice for a change but I don't think I could cope with months of snow.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
It's not Wimbledon fortnight yet either, that starts next Monday
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
And it's so confusing! The roses are blooming, the days are long, but the weather is like winter in Auckland, New Zealand! (tears hair and gnashes teeth)

Yes, but at least it's not boring. Now you see why everybody here talks about the weather so much.

In just a fortnight we should reach the solstice and the nights should start getting shorter, too. Given the way the weather is going at present, December should be hot and sunny, though the actual hours of daylight will probably be too short to do much about it.
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
British Weather is often very predictable - school holidays and bank holidays = rain.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... Monsoon has set in over southern and central Kerala ...

Come down off that roof and put on some clothes, Wodders. [Snigger]
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Come to Canada where we often get 4 seasons of weather in a twenty-four hour period ...

As we say in Newfoundland, "if you don't like the weather at the front, look out the back".

After really heavy rain yesterday (I felt wetter after the dash from the car to the entrance at w*rk than I did coming out of the shower) which then turned to fog*, it's not been a bad day here, and is forecast to get better.

[Yipee]

* Fog is the St. John's default setting: we're not called Fog City for nothing. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :
 
I'm thinking of building an ark but perhaps a guttering repairer/clearer might be cheaper due to the pouring from above and the pool outside my front door. Fed up now - where is our summer??? Where is my bin??
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma:
Fed up now - where is our summer??? Where is my bin??

You have only to look to your sig. to find your answer!

[Snigger]
 
Posted by Silver Faux (# 8783) on :
 
Having bicycled a bit more than 40 KM today, I managed to disover how loud heavy rain sounds on the top of a bike helmet. [Eek!]
Oh well, at least no forest fires in the forecast at the moment!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
I'm sick of England now - can someone assure me it gets better? The last two times I've visted it's been in July/ August and the weather was generally warm and pleasant. Tell me I can look forward to that?

I'm finding it quite depressing being back in winter clothing, putting the heater on, having a lap rug on the couch etc.

And it's so confusing! The roses are blooming, the days are long, but the weather is like winter in Auckland, New Zealand! (tears hair and gnashes teeth)

Those times must have been a while back. July and August haven't been too special recently. Last year we just enough sun in the 'summer' to ripen the fruit so we had a bumper harvest of everything, so the farmers were grumbling about low prices!

Still, (I think) all of Britain is north of Canada's major cities, so we don't do so badly, most of the time. Just don't expect a climate, just weather. That why our Met. Office is the best in the world - they get more practice than anyone else!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and all of Britain is basically West Coast so not usually subject to the fierce sort of weather that east coasts can get - cyclones, hurricanes, etc - extreme weather is rare in UK. There is a massive difference here between east and west coasts, we're in the west, with devastating cyclones quite often [i.e. one every few years] ploughing into the east coast with resultant damage to crops and property - and sometimes loss of life.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Enigma:
Fed up now - where is our summer??? Where is my bin??

Where are the snows of yesteryear?

As I used to remind my mother, we are as far north as Labrador. She never thanked me for this either. We had summer back in March, I think - this year's hot spring spell.

It would be nice to go out for the day, but it just isn't the weather for outdoor enjoyment. The Three Counties Show in Malvern is at the end of next week, but I'm probably not going this year. It can get very muddy quite quickly after rain and getting there could be tricky in this weather, anyway.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
If you want sunny (though not desperately hot) weather I'd wait for September and October. The tropical storm season will be over, so there should be few truly unpleasant westerlies and the winter chill will be to come. The kids will be back at school and the cricket season all but over.

The family joke was that we had better weather for my birthday (September 21st) than for my Dad's (June 23rd) and that was before anyone talked about Global Warming.
 
Posted by blackbeard (# 10848) on :
 
Long range weather forecast for Southern England is brought to you by Flanders and Swann.

In June, it rains and never stops.
Thirty days and spoils the crops.

In July, the sun is hot.
Is it shining? No, it's not!

August, dank and cold and wet,
Brings more rain than any yet.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
...all of Britain is basically West Coast...

Not the bit I come from. [Big Grin]

The weather here's been rather odd. We had lots of sunshine in early May, some of it really hot (26° one day), but at the end of the month the temperature plummeted into single figures and hasn't really recovered. Socks, coats and even heaters have been re-deployed, which is rare for me. Usually once the socks come off they stay off until mid-October ...

A brave band of volunteers (of which I'm not one) is spring-cleaning the Cathedral tomorrow. As we're Anglicans, food has to be provided, which is where I come in, so there's a pot of Sandy's Spiced Winter Soup* merrily cooking on the stove. Should be ready for virtual tasting in a couple of hours.

I also baked a loaf the other day that didn't sink in the middle. [Yipee]

* I told you the weather had been cold. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It was apparently Corpus Christi on Thursday and it was translated to today here so a bit of a festival mass this morning with the centre 'aisle' at church covered with flower petals for the sacramental procession afterwards. The parish priest was there today, not the usual young assistant priest, and the altar boys found him a bit of a handful - they haven't had the chance to train him up properly in how things are done at Kizhacumpuram but they did surprisingly well, considering.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Corp. Christ. is always on Sunday chez nous. Not like the heretical others.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Miffy (# 1438) on :
 
Eleanor Jane, here's a handy fashion hint I once heard: When you're choosing summer clothes in the UK, never buy before you've considered what the garment looks like with a cardigan worn over it!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Could everyone please put their wet bunting away now.

It won't dry left hanging, you know! [Snigger]

I thought of you when I went into the supermarket a couple of days ago. They've replaced the Jubilee bunting with football bunting.

Which will no doubt be replaced by Olympic bunting in due course. [Roll Eyes]

[ 10. June 2012, 17:16: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Could everyone please put their wet bunting away now.

We can now. The local council kept their Jubilee celebrations till this weekend with a 3 day party in the park.

Day one was tribute bands for the Bee Gees and Abba.

Day two was the orchestra and chorus of Opera North.

Day three (today) was a concert with Tinchy Stryder headlining.

I hadn't realised Her Majesty was a Tinchy Stryder fan. [Biased]

Now that the Jubillee is over we can get back to what the summer is all about, SPORT.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Wouldn't a Queen tribute band have been more appropriate? [Big Grin]

I can even recommend one - Flash Harry - an excellent outfit from Northern Ireland, in whose backing group I sang a couple of times 20 years ago [Eek!] . It was easily the most fun I've ever had with my clothes on ...
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Could everyone please put their wet bunting away now.

Bunting stayed dry for the Jubilee concert and fireworks on Saturday but the flags are drying out now... they got drenched in Pimms [Frown]
Packing them up ready for next year when we celebrate the diamond jubilee of the coronation - this year is a rehearsal for that, isn't it?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
I'm getting used to my new location, in the same office but with a window seat. Less storage, but it isn't so bad.

It's been raining, more than drizzle, but the 'runners' have still gone out, returning like drowned rats.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If it means we get some more bank holidays I'm all in favour of it.

Raining heavily here and has been all morning. Funny to think that yesterday morning was hot and sunny with people queuing for ice creams, sitting out in deckchairs by the river, taking boats out, etc – hard to believe when you look outside now.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
Packing them up ready for next year when we celebrate the diamond jubilee of the coronation - this year is a rehearsal for that, isn't it?
You CANNOT be serious!!! [Eek!] [Biased]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Miffy:
Eleanor Jane, here's a handy fashion hint I once heard: When you're choosing summer clothes in the UK, never buy before you've considered what the garment looks like with a cardigan worn over it!

In my case, with tights under it (if it's a skirt), a wooly vest (if it's any kind of top), a cardigan and probably a coat!

What I'd quite like now is trick summer clothes i.e. a light coloured wool cardie, light coloured lacy patterned tights, pastel coloured trousers, floral silk scarves, shoes/boots that are waterproofish but not heavy black things etc. Things that look summery but work for the current weather. Unfortunately budget doesn't allow at this stage.

I did buy a lovely marled grey wool lap rug from the National Trust. I love the National Trust shops!

And I guess another plus is the trees etc are incredibly lush and green. I do enjoy that as I walk home from work beside the river.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:


What I'd quite like now is trick summer clothes i.e. a light coloured wool cardie, light coloured lacy patterned tights, pastel coloured trousers, floral silk scarves, shoes/boots that are waterproofish but not heavy black things etc. Things that look summery but work for the current weather. Unfortunately budget doesn't allow at this stage.

I did buy a lovely marled grey wool lap rug from the National Trust. I love the National Trust shops!

And I guess another plus is the trees etc are incredibly lush and green. I do enjoy that as I walk home from work beside the river.

If your budget runs to NT goods, I'm sure you can stretch to some trick summer things. I'd suggest shoes first as they are harder to find. Charity shops are another option (I kid ye not) but choose carefully. Go to the smarter towns and you'll find a better class of discard (ie, Winchester rather than Newport).
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
quote:
Packing them up ready for next year when we celebrate the diamond jubilee of the coronation - this year is a rehearsal for that, isn't it?
You CANNOT be serious!!! [Eek!] [Biased]
I don't think Daisymay was that far off the mark; when I mentioned on Facebook that I thought St. Paul's choir was nearly as good as the Abbey, a friend who sings in the Abbey choir replied that we'll have them to look forward to at the Coronation anniversary next year ... [Big Grin]

Bring it on ... [Smile]

It seems as if summer is gently nudging its way into Newfoundland - it turned into a really nice day today, and the forecast for the next wee while is getting better.

Mind you, my heart goes out to those of you back home who are thinking of fitting outboard-motors to your cars or investing in gopher-wood. [Eek!]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
When did Daisymay post, Piglet?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Hey Pete, she lives in Newfieland - they have a different reality over there!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yup, you're right, it's me again!

I just want to say I love the little bit of maths tutoring I do - it gives me a real buzz when my tutee gets what I'm saying to him - he had a lightbulb moment this evening when I showed him how something worked - it was brilliant!

In other news it rained like heck in the city today, incidentally when I was heading to buy the maths textbook for the tuition, and it was a very wet WW that climbed on the bus home, but it is warm wet so no harm done.

My eyes have been playing up today somewhat more than somewhat so I have HWMBO on standby for the morning to make an appointment for me with the Dr for Thursday, if they are still bad then, i.e. in the morning, and then I may have to go in and under the knife this very week [Eek!]

I know it will be so much better when it is done but...
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
Laser surgery WW? Prayers that it goes well.

Icy weather out here with bright sunshine, avocados ripening on the tree, lemons in abundance. Rewrote the same damn chapter five times and it still doesn't work well.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It's sort of squint surgery - she says 15 minutes or 20 at the outside - should be no problem.

What I have done when I've had problems like that with writing is give it up until the next day when it all seems to flow so much better - no idea why.
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
It's sort of squint surgery - she says 15 minutes or 20 at the outside - should be no problem.

That sounds like a local anaesthetic job. I remember eye surgery under local, it isn't pleasant. Prayers ascending.

Due to a 3 day gap in what has become normal June weather, I've been able to get the grass mown and strimmed. The gopher wood supplier will have to wait for the order.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Good luck with that Welease Woderick
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Hope it works out okay WW. [Votive]

Re: clothes, I'll get there. We're still recovering from months of not working, the costs of moving country and coming over with just a suitcase each.

On another matter, I'm thinking of getting a bird feeder. Our neighbour has goldfinches and I want to steal some of them! I've been having a look on the RSPB site at recommended foods etc.

Anyone else enjoy England's lovely birds? I love them. I saw some young long tailed tits outside my work the other day. So cute! [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
[Votive] [Votive] For you WW

quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:

Anyone else enjoy England's lovely birds? I love them. I saw some young long tailed tits outside my work the other day. So cute!

Oh yes, I feed them every day. We get sparrows, blue tits, great tits, greenfinches, chaffinches, long tailed tits and robins.

Get a bird bath too - in dry spells it will be VERY popular (Yes there will be dry spells!)

I find cheap plastic bird feeders best because you can have plenty to easily keep them washed and clean. Enjoy!

(PS - cheap £1 bags of bird seed from Lidl are as good as anything, they seem to have all seeds mixed up so attract a great variety of birds :0)

[ 12. June 2012, 17:55: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
PPS - This bird bath is fantastic - looks good but is plastic and easy to clean. When the frosts come the ice just slides out. Heavy bird baths are hard to clean and de-ice.

<code>

[ 12. June 2012, 18:00: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Hmmmm.... I had one in my old place (rented). It does look very plastic, but is not so bad if half hidden under shrubs. When full of water (or ice) it is a bit unstable - but yes, you can usually get ice out without too much difficulty.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
When did Daisymay post, Piglet?

You're quite right, Pete - she didn't - it was Daisydaisy. I am a Piglet Of Very Little Brain and send my apologies to all concerned. [Hot and Hormonal]

Wodders - good luck with your eye surgery. [Votive]

Another nice day here - it's really getting summery now. [Smile]

After w*rk went shopping for a vacuum cleaner - we think we've settled on one of these. Having gone through two cheap models in less than nine years, we reckon it may be worth investing in a posh one. Anyone have any thoughts?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
...Anyone have any thoughts?

At my age I try to avoid thinking as much as possible.

Actually I think what you really need isn't a Dyson but staff - it makes things so much easier!

Appointment made to see Dr Elizabeth tomorrow afternoon so things moving on there - in honour of which I think I shall give myself an easy day today.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by QLib:
Hmmmm.... I had one in my old place (rented). It does look very plastic, but is not so bad if half hidden under shrubs. When full of water (or ice) it is a bit unstable - but yes, you can usually get ice out without too much difficulty.

Nonsense [Biased]

I even have huge wood pigeons bath in mine and it's perfectly stable - I re-fill it several times a day in dry spells, the birds splash so much out! I tell myself it looks like metal - that'll do for me :0)

I am up early and off to work today and for the rest of the week - a bit of a shock to my system, I'm really enjoying semi-retirement and w*rk is getting in the way a little!

<eta grammar>

[ 13. June 2012, 06:24: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Half day today - perfect summer weather, warm, strong sunshine. I've just borrowed the DVD of "War Horse" from the library and am wondering what I'm letting myself in for - is this going to be harrowing?
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
The play wasn't, it was amazing, not seen the film.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... what you really need isn't a Dyson but staff ...

Right on, WW - when can you start? [Big Grin]

In fact D. usually does the hoovering - [Axe murder] - he doesn't mind it and I hate it with a passion.

It being another glorious day (up to 23°), we went down to the Irish Loop coffee house in the afternoon for Earl Grey and the best cinnamon-and-raisin bread pudding imaginable.

nomnomnom [Smile]

Ariel - I've never seen War Horse, but I understand it has a fairly high Kleenex factor - apparently it made the Duchess of Cambridge cry. I'm no good at sad films, especially ones that are sad about animals; I cried at the end of Charlotte's Web, and that was only a spider ... [Hot and Hormonal]

soft-hearted piglet
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... what you really need isn't a Dyson but staff ...

Right on, WW - when can you start? [Big Grin] ...
No problem, piglet, as I said the other week to someone, I think it was you, you send me the air tickets [Business Class] and I'll happily pop over and clean up for you.

[Big Grin]

- - - -

A Special Announcement

If you take antihistamines, or probably any tablet, make sure you place them on the back of your tongue - if they are not swallowed first time and dissolve on your tongue they can taste disgusting!
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
War Horse will make you cry, if you are all inclined that way.
Just saying....
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
OK, so I should have qualified that comment about War Horse by saying that I don't cry easily, far more likely to cry with laughter
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
I couldn't even watch the trailer for Warhorse. My mother was taken to see Disney's Bambi as a child and said it was the most traumatic experience she could remember. My mother, sisters and myself all covered our eyes when anything involving animals came onto the screen or TV. A bit pathetic.

Snow on the mountains out here, blue cranes perching on fences, geometric tortoises floundering in wet ditches that are usually bone dry. The garden is full of tiny green-black tree frogs.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Oh the play of War Horse was just fabulous [Overused] and the puppetry amazing. Did anyone see Joey rearing up on the roof of the National Theatre, during the Water Pageant?
I only sniffed a bit near the very end - but I avoided the film as I thought it might be a real heartstring-tugging Disneyfied experience [Projectile]
Mrs. S, loving those puppets [Axe murder]
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
piglet, I would send tickets for HWMBO and Mrs E as well. Not that I would want to cast any doubt over WW's domestic goddess credentials, but I think I can fairly say that they work well as a team.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thank you, moonlitdoor, that was most delicately put.
 
Posted by Nanny Ogg (# 1176) on :
 
It's a lovely warm and sunny day hear in the land of the Yellowbellies.

The town market was not as full of stalls as usual but I did get some fresh bread, pork chops and venison sausages as a treat [Smile]

There are plenty of ducks and ducklings on the river which I have to cross to get to the supermarket. Lots of people on the "ducksteps" watching and feeding them - I just hope my pesky cat doesn't go on the hunt when the crowds have gone [Frown]

Popped into the vet on the corner to get the cat a new collar as his last one broke to find a couple with a female Bichon and three 10 week old puppies. They were absolutely gorgeous and I fell in love with them [Smile] Apparently she had 7 pups in total with 3 already with new owners and the 4th was in the vet's room with his new owner being chipped etc. No wonder the mother was barking [Big Grin]

The good thing about living in a small town is that people do stop and chat, even with people they don't know. It makes the chore of shopping a pleasant experience. [Smile]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I agree with Nanny Ogg. A friend moved back to our small town after living in London for many years. She's amazed at how many people talk to her or even just smile when they pass her. It's something you take for granted until you move away.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Re: tickets for WW, HWMBO and Mrs. E. - as soon as the lottery numbers come up ... [Big Grin]

We bought the Dyson today, and once it was charged up (it's a cordless one that you charge like a mobile phone) D. had a brief go and pronounced it to be very good. At $350 (about £220) it bloody well ought to be. [Eek!]

As we had some corn-cobs and cooked chicken that needed using I tried my hand at making Chinese chicken-and-sweetcorn soup today, complete with egg-drop. It wasn't bad for a first go although my substitution of powdered ginger for fresh* didn't quite work as I have no idea how to convert quantities from fresh to dried.

All I know is I let the ginger cook a bit too long and I can still feel it in my throat two hours later.

* Pace Wodders - I don't usually stock fresh ginger as I'd probably never use it up before it went off, although this might convert me.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Don't worry about that, piglet, I understand - we grow it in the garden so no problems for us. When I lived in UK I used to keep a jar on minced ginger in the fridge which was sort of okay, though I'm not sure HWMBO would really agree.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
You can keep fresh ginger root for longer by putting a root of it in damp sand on a windowsill. It tends to grow, which gives you fresh growing ginger. I used to ship it home from London to my very rurally based mother to be shown a green leaf in a tub and fresh roots some time later.

The other way to go through ginger by the root is to make tea from it - grated ginger with honey in a cup, pour over hot water, add lemon juice. Much, much nicer than lemsip.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Also, you can freeze fresh ginger and grate it or chop it finely straight out of the freezer then put it back. That's how I did things when I was being a bit more fancy-pants.

Also, ducklings! Where are all the ducklings? I've seen about four in total this season and I have been looking...

And you may be interested to know I got a cheap plastic bird feeder and some of those seeds for goldfinches. We don't have any squirrels here and I wanted to get a cheap one to see if anyone nicks it (outside our flat is semi-public property). Just need to put our address on it with marker and see how we go.

Really should get dressed and go to work now, considering it's past 9! Bye...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Another test at the hospital today - something they injected into me and tested my eyes every 5- 10 minutes - gave me horrible stomach spasms and some weird muscle tremor for half an hour or so and it was all negative so it looks like I go under the knife next week!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Another test at the hospital today - something they injected into me and tested my eyes every 5- 10 minutes - gave me horrible stomach spasms and some weird muscle tremor for half an hour or so and it was all negative so it looks like I go under the knife next week!

IANAD but could that be a muscle relaxant? A family member reacts to one or two of these and carries a card to that effect. The dramatic effect was that when the anaesthetic wore off she couldn't make any voluntary movements, though she could hear perfectly well!
 
Posted by Mary LA (# 17040) on :
 
That sounds really unpleasant WW [Votive]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
I agree with Nanny Ogg. A friend moved back to our small town after living in London for many years. She's amazed at how many people talk to her or even just smile when they pass her. It's something you take for granted until you move away.

That's Wales. A naturally chopsy lot. After eight years I was still a stranger in the Norfolk village I lived in.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
That sounds so horrible, Welease Woderick, best of luck for the next bits.

It's chatty here too, well it is where I am - could just be me growing up in villages and small market towns where I'm used to knowing people and chatting.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Another test at the hospital today - something they injected into me and tested my eyes every 5- 10 minutes - gave me horrible stomach spasms and some weird muscle tremor for half an hour or so and it was all negative so it looks like I go under the knife next week!

WW, one of my sons was admitted to hospital last year with excruciating stomach cramps and spasms. He was given a specific drug for the cramps but was also told he would have trouble staying awake because muscles in eyes were same type of muscle and would be affected too. Perhaps this is similar? Hope all goes well.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Goodness, WW, that seems a bit alarming. Best of luck next week though. [Votive]

Thank you all for the ginger tips; I understand you can store it in a jar with sherry, but it might have an interesting effect on the things you used it for. I may try the freezer option though - it sounds (a) sensible and (b) lazy, which suits me just fine ... [Big Grin]

D. is still waxing lyrical about the Dyson - he suggested it might convert me to hoovering [Eek!] but he's so impressed with it I doubt I'll get the chance.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:

D. is still waxing lyrical about the Dyson - he suggested it might convert me to hoovering [Eek!] but he's so impressed with it I doubt I'll get the chance.

Don't call it hoovering! Not in earshot of James Dyson, the inventor of Dyson vacuum cleaners at any rate. He's very sensitive about this and hires lawyers to say so on his behalf.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Just call it dysoning and all will be well.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Well, it was pouring down during the night but the rain has stopped now - so that's better than the forecast.

[Smile]

I won't get the lawn mowed today though - too damp. So, a lazy day it is then!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Don't call it hoovering!
Not a term much used down here in my neck of the woods. We call it vacuuming. Just as we don't do laundry, we do the washing.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I have declared a Lazy Weekend. no vacuuming, hoovering, dysoning, laundry, washing, dusting, or whatever.

It's been a busy few weeks, and weekends, and I think getting through the last week of term reasonably relaxed(technically there's another two weeks, but most of my students' courses are finishing this coming Thursday.)and gearing myself up for being sent off to work with students who need my carefully judged assistance for completing final work, is the best policy.

Coffee and cake, anyone?
 
Posted by amber. (# 11142) on :
 
Is it too late for coffee and cake? [Smile]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Never too late for coffee and cake in these parts.

I have enjoyed my lazy day!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I know Sir James wouldn't approve, but it's been called "hoovering" since long before I was doing it (although the term's not generally used on this side of the Pond either).

I had a fairly lazy day today: there was a supper at the Cathedral this evening given by the organisers of the Crypt Tea Room to thank everyone who volunteered* last summer. My contribution was a spinach, mushroom and mandarin orange salad, which seemed to go down well; there wasn't much left by the time I got to the buffet table.

* As I'm in the choir and we do one of the weeks, the term "volunteer" isn't strictly accurate; "conscript" might be nearer the mark. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
I have tickets to see Leonard Cohen in concert in September. I am so happy, happy, happy, happy. I saw him in Edinburgh a few years ago and he was fabulous and I never thought I'd see him again.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Hi Amber - great to see you!

And its never too late for coffee and cake! Or shortbread?

Bits of blue sky today, so I really hope the rain has gone for a bit!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Just finished watching "War Horse". What an amazing film, keeps you hooked right to the end wondering if the pair will make it back intact.

The story had personal resonance for me as my grandfather was in the Artillery in WWI and had a horse he was very attached to. Unfortunately the horse got injured in battle and my grandfather had to put it down - which as you'll appreciate was really difficult for him. So it was particularly interesting to see this film - and I'm grateful that it wasn't as harrowing as I thought it might be. Thanks for all your comments earlier!
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Ooh, cake, that sounds fabulous! Had a huge roast for lunch (chicken but they gave me a yorkshire pudding for some reason?!) so I don't feel like much. I am, however, always up for cake.

WW- maybe some cake might help you feel better in the short term? It does cure most ills...

I'm so glad I've got tomorrow off. Worked Saturday (two hours' drive away) then was on the door for the choir concert. Gutted I couldn't sing in it ('cos I had to miss the dress rehearsal) and they're now in recession for three months! And I heard today that Uni is off for four months!! What's with this, Britian?

In New Zealand, they tend to close down for summer holidays for January but life goes on after about the 20 somethingk. No choirs stop for a third of the year and Uni holidays are about 8-9 weeks depending on exams.

I was going to say that I don't know what to do with myself, but I've allowed myself to get roped into fundraising for the church roof, so that'll keep me busy, I think. A big target and a shortish timeframe... fun, fun!

Cheers,
EJ
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Son's idea of a Fathers' Day present was to take me on a cycle ride. Very enjoyable but keeping up with a 26 year old on a racing bike when I was on a hybrid, was not easy, even though he wasn't really trying. I was knackered.

Good news is that when we were out LRP made some lemon drizzle cake and some welsh cakes. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Ooh, cake, that sounds fabulous! Had a huge roast for lunch (chicken but they gave me a yorkshire pudding for some reason?!) so I don't feel like much. I am, however, always up for cake.


You never need an excuse for a Yorkshire Pudding. You certainly don't need roast beef to justify it...
 
Posted by Balaam (# 4543) on :
 
The traditional way of eating Yorkshire Pudding is as a starter with gravy. The roast (which can be anything, not just beef) comes afterwards, without any Yorkshire puddings.

Sadly, even in Yorkshire, Yorkshire puddings tend to be served with the roast these days. Another tradition gone [Frown]

A bit of a cross cultural thing, I enjoy large Yorkshire puddings filed with Irish stew. Delicious.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
... Bits of blue sky today ...

We had a whole blue sky today. [Yipee]

Slightly sad day for the choir today as we said farewell to one of our choral scholars who is going to Ontario to do post-grad study. She has the voice of an angel and will be sorely missed. [Frown]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I apologise in advance for upsetting Balaam but Yorkshire Pudding can also be smeared with jam and served as dessert!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Smeared with jam? surely you mean to be a bit more generous than that with one of those nice fruity jams?

How is HWMBO's mum?
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
As a child I had Yorkshire pudding with Golden Syrup. But not at my Mother's. She would be horrified.

I had a good friend's mother who knew what sort of sensible thing to give growing girls!! [Smile]

It has started a bit sunny today. I have no faith at all in it lasting longer than mid-morning. [Frown]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Weather should be a little bit mixed today but we get summer for Tuesday and Wednesday, after which we get deluged on Thursday and it's back to rain and gales. I can't keep track of it, but it always rains around Wimbledon anyway.

I wish you hadn't mentioned Yorkshire Pudding. I sometimes buy one that comes ready filled with roast beef, which is lovely.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Update on the family:

HWMBO's mum came out of hospital this morning - she was loads brighter when we saw her in hospital last night. She has been given a list of dos and don'ts which she will probably ignore. I believe she is currently resting.

HWMBO's brother also diabetic and with occasionally nasty figures has managed to make a major cut on one of his fingers so there is a concern about that and will it heal okay?

The rest of us are fine at the moment and awaiting my hospital trip at the end of the week after which I shall be given a list of do and don'ts which I shall probably ignore as well - I am not a good patient!

The week is forecast to be a wet one - we have not had much rain really so far so are looking forward to a bit of a deluge - looking at the paper over lunch I see we have so far only had 43% of 'normal average' rainfall for this date so more would be welcome.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Did anyone see Joey rearing up on the roof of the National Theatre, during the Water Pageant?
To answer my own question - I caught it on the coverage of the Queen's Birthday Parade on Saturday at Miss S's house. It was fab!

And the Birthday Parade took us back to the day when we took the Dowager Mrs S (much the same age as HMtQ) to the Parade, which was a truly amazing day [Axe murder]

Mrs. S, still awestruck by Joey [Yipee]
 
Posted by Jenny Ann (# 3131) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
And I heard today that Uni is off for four months!! What's with this, Britian?

In New Zealand, they tend to close down for summer holidays for January but life goes on after about the 20 somethingk. No choirs stop for a third of the year and Uni holidays are about 8-9 weeks depending on exams.

Yup - we got rid of our students last week, don't get them back til the 17th September. Seems long to me!

Jen
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
As a rough guide, the posher an Emglish university is the longer its vacations are and the shorter its terms.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I apologise in advance for upsetting Balaam but Yorkshire Pudding can also be smeared with jam and served as dessert!

I have known households in which Yorkshire pudding is served before the roast, with the roast and afterwards, all in a desperate bid to satisfy vast appetites.

I believe the tradition is to serve it with onion gravy before, then with the meat gravy with the roast.
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
Yum, I've just had dinner and a yorkie with jam/ golden syrup sounds pretty good to me!

Will have to make do with something else... maybe stewed apples 'cos I've got some apples that are past their best.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
chive, I am spectacularly jealous you are seeing Leonard Cohen. We have the DVD of the last tour and it looked amazing.

I'd offer some Hotel Chocolat truffles I got as a belated birthday present, but, er, well, even the virtual ones seem to have disappeared. Sorry* and all that.

* [Big Grin] <-- me looking very penitent, especially after the rum truffle.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Yum, I've just had dinner and a yorkie with jam/ golden syrup sounds pretty good to me!

Well, each to their own, but you might have a bit of a job getting all the jam and syrup out of its fur...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Yum, I've just had dinner and a yorkie with jam/ golden syrup sounds pretty good to me!

Well, each to their own, but you might have a bit of a job getting all the jam and syrup out of its fur...
[Eek!] Poor wee dog. [Frown]

We're beginning to do a spot of clearing (maybe I should visit the de-cluttering thread) in preparation for The Chap replacing the front windows while we're away. Dustbin-bags are filling and multiplying and our bedroom seems to have grown by quite a large degree ... [Big Grin]

The new bright-red siding, which so far reaches about a third of the way up the house, is apparently eliciting cries of "awesome!"* from passing teenagers.

* I believe this is among the highest accolades in the teenage lexicon. [Cool]

PS Glad to hear HWMBO's mum's doing well. [Votive]

[ 19. June 2012, 01:54: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
piglet thinks that awesome is
quote:
I believe this is among the highest accolades in the teenage lexicon.

Unfortunately, by the time we oldies pick up on teenage slang, they've changed the meaning. [Tear]
 
Posted by Eleanor Jane (# 13102) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Eleanor Jane:
Yum, I've just had dinner and a yorkie with jam/ golden syrup sounds pretty good to me!

Well, each to their own, but you might have a bit of a job getting all the jam and syrup out of its fur...
Nope, I just eat it fur and all! [Big Grin]

On another note, what a gorgeous day today! I had bare arms for a bit! And a lovely trip to Cardiff on the train for a meeting. I'm still excited by being able to go to another country so easily.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I think I must be getting old. My youngest colleague looked at me askance at lunchtime and said "It's hot outside, you won't need that jacket". I got outside and a cold wind cut through my summer clothing making me devoutly thankful I was indeed wearing said jacket.

I don't really call it hot until we get blazing sunshine in a cloudless sky and intense, direct heat shimmering off the sands in front, mirages on the way home, fellow commuters wilting and falling off their camels before we reach the oasis, etc etc.

Still, it's a change from the rainy season.
 
Posted by Enigma (# 16158) on :