Thread: Keep Calm and Carry On - the British thread 2014 Board: Oblivion / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The kettle is on, there's a packet of chocolate digestives in the larder and the hangover cure is in the bathroom cabinet.

Welcome to 2014, fellow Brits! [Smile]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
You keep bloody Marys in the bathroom cabinet? [Eek!]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Ugh - no! Solpadeine™, an over-the-counter brand of paracetamol (acetaminaphen) which I have to buy in as much bulk as possible when I'm home on holiday, as I can't get it here, and nothing else quite does the trick.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
V good choice of thread title, piglet.

Sitting here with a cup of freshly brewed coffee, the aroma scenting the first morning of the new year. Dark outside and raining; the roads are very quiet, hardly a car to be seen. Back to work tomorrow, but there's still today, there'll be the New Year's Day Concert from Vienna later on, and there's the long-awaited Sherlock tonight! Happy New Year - let's hope it will be.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Btw, I have to ask, was anyone at the London fireworks and did you try the "edible confetti" and "peach-flavoured snow"?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We had two visitations of young mummers last night and on each occasion as they shoved the collecting tin under my nose I took it from them and walked into the house with it - the expression on their collective faces was wondrous!

Don't worry, I did add something to it and give it back to them - eventually! I just wished we had thought to set up the video camera to record the jaw-dropping.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
The kettle is on, there's a packet of chocolate digestives in the larder and the hangover cure is in the bathroom cabinet.

Welcome to 2014, fellow Brits!

Thank you piglet!
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
Happy New Year! Wondering if I will manage to break most of my resolutions (the ones I would have made if I made resolutions) today.

I don't think NYD counts as it is a holiday. Start tomorrow.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Happy New Year to everyone.

No - didn't go to see the fireworks, I went to the Millennium ones and the noise echoing between buildings was LOUD. In my student years we pub crawled to Trafalgar Square every year - which was fun - all joining arms to sign Auld Lang Syne and kissing policemen. All the local pubs had expensive parties or a charge to get in which removed any enthusiasm for that entertainment.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My new year news -

I have applied to become a Guide Dog puppy walker.

References have been taken up so I'm getting excited. I enjoyed Tatze's puppyhood so much that I decided I wanted to do it again, and do some good at the same time. And I think Tatze will make a great 'Mum', we have had several little visitor puppies and she has been great with them.

Getting approved is a long process so, even if accepted, I don't expect to start until May at the earliest.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Good for you, Boogie - I knew people that did that I lived in Knutsford, a long time ago now, and they found it great fun.
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
Good for you Boogie. I too had a friend who did a of this for the guide dogs organisation. She loved it. Such a good thing to do.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
That sounds good Boogie - the puppies are really cute, one of the Guides' families did it and the puppy arriving at collection time used to get mobbed.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Thyme:
I don't think NYD counts as it is a holiday. Start tomorrow.

Absolutely! I've come to the same conclusion about the decluttering and the diet.

That's great news Boogie, what a worthwhile and enjoyable thing to do. [Smile]

Nen- not much enjoying the wet windy weather which has followed us into the new year.
 
Posted by Lucia (# 15201) on :
 
I just watched the New Year fireworks from London courtesy of Youtube. Fantastic! One year, when I actually live in the UK again I would love to go and see this for real! Until then virtual fireworks will have to do....

Happy New Year fellow Brits, whether expat like us or home in Blighty!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Happy New Year!

We have a friend who had a gorgeous guide dog puppy, the school eventually sent a letter out asking everyone not to mob him at collection time!

One of my new year resolutions is a declutter-a-day but that, and the inevitable diet, won't start in earnest until the children are back at school. I also need to discuss with my other half about who will be our first group of victims to invite for our new dinner party pact.

Today I will potter around in my craft room and possibly go for a walk if the wind dies down. Must have a cup of tea first though.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Happy New Year to everyone.

No - didn't go to see the fireworks, I went to the Millennium ones and the noise echoing between buildings was LOUD. In my student years we pub crawled to Trafalgar Square every year - which was fun - all joining arms to sign Auld Lang Syne and kissing policemen. All the local pubs had expensive parties or a charge to get in which removed any enthusiasm for that entertainment.

Some years ago I spent New Year at Parliament Square. It was so noisy, we couldn't hear Big Ben chime.
 
Posted by rolyn (# 16840) on :
 
We were in bed at 12.00 last night and heard what sounded like WW3 . So we got up and had the benefit of watching three or four separate firework events from a goodly distance .

This morning we wake up to strong wind, lashing rain and visibility of 100 yards . I think the Lord must have smiled on those revellers .

Welcome to 2014 [Smile]
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
I had a happy New Year's Eve cooking a large dinner including an extremely yummy celery sauce courtesy of my secret santa's Christmas gift. A happy evening was spent consuming said dinner and playing silly games. Watched fireworks on the TV, trying to get into London doesn't appeal. On the other hand a local pub crawl might be worth considering next year.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Great thread title, Piglet - thank you!

So far, 2014 looks very like 2013...windy and pouring with rain - and the wind is howling round the house and moaning at the keyhols.

In a few minutes time, I shall disturb the heap of cats on my lap and go and put the kettle on. Coffee, anyone - tea if you prefer, and there are shortbread biscuits in the tin if anybody would like to indulge? Then I'd better think about getting dressed...
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Wishing us all a year full of love, laughter and blessings!

We stayed at home, had a yummy meal of pintard in truffle sauce (prepared by the butcher) and went to bed at 11.30...The centre of the village was dead - bars & hotel/restaurants already closed for the night!

I'm preparing lessons today, but I start back officially on Monday. The healthy eating/exercising (if you're lucky!) regime starts then too.
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
Hello, can anyone join in?

I spent last night at a party at my church. First time in living memory (well, in the time I’ve been there anyway) that they’ve done anything on New Year’s Eve and it was certainly an improvement on what I usually do on that day – ie sit at home by myself feeling depressed.

I’ve just been pottering around at home this morning and now I feel the need for some fresh air and am wondering whether to venture out in the rain…
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Rain and wind outside here in the damp and not very cold North West of England. But I want to go for a walk!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I have waterproof everything. Coat/trousers/hat/gloves/boots. They were put to the test today (45 minutes pouring rain).

They passed!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Happy New Year!

Ooo.. I am very excited by the puppy walking, Boogie. I grew up very close to one of the training centres, and my current workplace is next to the local area Guide Dog mobility team, as well as working with and alongside people who have Guide Dogs, as well as with young people on the waiting lists.

In the meantime, any vegetarians, or veggie food lovers, want some nut roast or lentil and carrot soup? I took one look at the fridge and decided it was time to do something with the veg there, and the larder also needed a bit of a clear-out, and I seem to have made enough of both to feed all the visitors to this thread!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Japes - freeze it in individual portions for those days when you can't be bothered to cook?
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Oh, that's the plan CK! I always have a cooking day like this at least once per half term... I'm just having a generous moment first! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Abigail:

I’ve just been pottering around at home this morning and now I feel the need for some fresh air and am wondering whether to venture out in the rain…

Did you manage to get out? I never did, it's been pouring down here and I'm beginning to get cabin fever.
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Happy New Year!
Saw the new year in with family in Norfolk then drove home to Bucks this morning.
Got steadily wetter and windier as we travelled. Yucky old day.
Good to be home though. Planning when to undecorate.
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
Did you manage to get out? I never did, it's been pouring down here and I'm beginning to get cabin fever. [/QB]

Yes, but only as far as the local shops. I didn’t need to buy anything so just browsed for a while then came home. Only ten minutes’ walk away but I got soaked. It’s still pouring now.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:

In the meantime, any vegetarians, or veggie food lovers, want some nut roast or lentil and carrot soup? I took one look at the fridge and decided it was time to do something with the veg there, and the larder also needed a bit of a clear-out, and I seem to have made enough of both to feed all the visitors to this thread!

While you weren't looking I helped myself to a portion of each - very nice they were too [Smile] Thank you!

Happy New Year everyone!

Due to the rain I've not been able to bring myself to open the front door except to show the cats why they might not want to go out (they agreed). Had a lovely day pottering and getting through Death comes to Pemberly.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:


In the meantime, any vegetarians, or veggie food lovers, want some nut roast or lentil and carrot soup? I took one look at the fridge and decided it was time to do something with the veg there, and the larder also needed a bit of a clear-out, and I seem to have made enough of both to feed all the visitors to this thread!

The new year weaher must be inspiring people in this direction. A FB friend has posted a very tasty looking North African spicy lentil soup (IIRC spicy means about 500 chilis) with onion and olive bread. If you survive the soup, you can withstand the weather.
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
We went for a very brisk walk along the clifftop this afternoon: stongest wind I've ever been out in, and was very thankful not to get blown over. But it was very invigorating!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I haven't managed to get out of town since before Christmas, thanks to weather, grotty roads and lack of public transport. I'm almost looking forward to resuming the commute tomorrow just for the sake of being able to get out.
 
Posted by Late Paul (# 37) on :
 
As the day wore on and I increasingly felt the need to get out of the house, I waited impatiently for the rain to slacken off a little. By about 3:30 I realised that I either walked in the rain or I'd be walking in the rain and the dark.

So I went for a little toddle in the park. The ground was soaked and lots of water everywhere. It wasn't raining hard but the previous rainfall hasn't dissipated yet. The little stream was up by about a foot and overflowing its banks, there were large puddles everywhere on the paths. A sizeable tree had blown over and was blocking one my usual routes.

It was quite pleasant though overall.
 
Posted by Starbug (# 15917) on :
 
Happy New Year, everyone!

We're still working our way through the remaining Christmas chocolate. Help yourselves to a Quality Street.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Well, it looks like we have a virtual fuddle on our hands. To finish off, there is some of may Mum's mincemeat tart left, if anyone would like. It's a puff pastry base, mincemeat layer and frangipane topping. Lovely with a cup of tea.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Abigail:
Hello, can anyone join in?

Absolutely - pull up a chair! [Smile]

Thanks for the nice comments about the thread title - I'm indebted to my boss, who gave me a tote-bag with the logo on it for Christmas. [Cool]

We took the New Year in with friends from the choir, and this evening we're going to the same friends whose house we were at on Christmas Day, this time for roast beef, which they like very rare. That suits me fine, but D's preferred degree of doneness is "cremated", so he has to make sure he gets the end bit ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Rain and wind outside here in the damp and not very cold North West of England. But I want to go for a walk!

I made it about 500 metres to my sisters house and she offered me a cup of tea and then I spent the next five hours playing a computer game with my brother in law [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Another bright, calm, sunshiney morning here - but I'm pretty sure none of you really wants to know that. A bit cool having breakfast on the verandah, even with a t-shirt on but we were brave and carried on without too much complaint.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Of course you were, Wodders dear. [Roll Eyes]

According to Environment Canada, it's currently -14°C here, (-26° with the wind-chill), and they're apparently forecasting anything from 6 inches to 2 feet of snow on Friday/Saturday. We're rapidly running out of places to put it. [Eek!]

Just back from a v. pleasant evening with friends from the choir, and excellent roast beef and all the trimmings.

well-fed piglet [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Ah well. Hi ho, hi ho, it's off to work we go, public transport and weather permitting. It may be dark but it's mild out there and the hours of daylight are starting to lengthen.

Anyone see Sherlock last night? Great start to the new series.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
It's very much back to normal routine today and although I have the day off tomorrow when I would normally be working the festive feeling is definitely over. January is going to be silly-busy for all the Nen family and it's a bit daunting. [Eek!]

Yes, I saw Sherlock, we were mesmerised.

Nen - trying to sum up enthusiasm for the grocery shopping so procrastinating on the Ship instead. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Yes, I think its time to de-Christmas. Take the cards down, put the tinsel away [Frown]

However, that will take me all morning, which means I can put off yet again the job of taking the bathroom curtains down and replacing all the broken hooks!

I saw Sherlock - I'm still trying to work out the plot. If there was one. Burt its brilliantly done.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:

Anyone see Sherlock last night? Great start to the new series.

I saw 2/3 of it as 10pm is my bed time - don't tell me - I've taped the rest to watch this evening!

I'm off to meet a friend and her pooch for walkies, then visit my Mum followed by my brother's farm + great niece and nephew twins (6 months old)

A sociable day [Smile]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
I saw the first ten/fifteen minutes of Sherlock before I fell asleep in the chair. I woke just towards the end so raced out of the room and off to bed at high speed to avoid seeing the ending before I'd had proper chance to watch the story unfold.
Guess what's on the agenda for today!

Meanwhile, today's going to be a "get a series of things done while the boy is out at work" day. I changed my job partly so we'd get a bit more time together - is it bad of me to wish he'd go out a little bit more often?
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
I don't go back till Monday, and am beginning to feel a bit stir crazy, having been in all day yesterday due to the vile weather, so it's off to London in a bit to see an exhibition of gates made by Bob Dylan
I stop have rather a lot of Christmas cake if a anyone's interested.
 
Posted by Stejjie (# 13941) on :
 
Bit late this, but happy new year everyone!

Was delighted to find, on returning from our Christmas hols at my in-laws', that there was an unfinished (and still good) bar of Aldi milk chocolate in the fridge. By some miracle, there's still a bit of it left (though perhaps not by the end of the day...).

If I started with a cold on New Year's Eve and still have it now, does that make it my last cold of 2013 or first of 2014? No doubt there'll be plenty more to come... [Mad]
 
Posted by Starbug (# 15917) on :
 
Mr S went back to work today, but I'm off until Monday. As the weather has finally calmed down enough to go out, I'm planning to walk out to our local shopping centre to look round the sales and hopefully spend the Waterstones voucher that a friend gave me. I also have a Haskins voucher, but that can wait for another day because it requires driving; today is too nice to be wasted in the car.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Went to bed at 3 a.m. on New Year’s day. Felt pretty ok yesterday, but feeling the kickback tiredness this morning. Mercifully I patronised Marks and Sparks the other day and have a plentiful supply of English tea to which you are all welcome.

For New Year’s, we did one of those proper French dinners that do something or other to the space time continuum and consequently send you into some kind of alternative dimension and go on for several years. This is a very convenient approach to New Year’s because if you sit down at about nine o’clock, you’re just about approaching the dessert by midnight. When I say a proper French dinner that means:

Aperitif: Grapefruit kir and little nibbly things on sticks

Entrée the first: Samosas and spring rolls made by a person from Reunion Island and Spinach/smoked salmon roll made by someone else

Entrée the second: Foie gras and homemade paté

A bottle of white Burgundy with the above

Plat de résistance: Roast beef with foie gras sauce

Cheese: St Marcellin, Roquefort, Goat's cheese and some kind of squidgy cow cheese that I forget the name of

A bottle of Claret to keep all of this company

Midnight arrives, cue silly hats and streamers and crack open a nice bottle of champagne

Dessert: mince pies made by my own fair hand. Well, the mincemeat was from Marks and Sparks, but I made my own sweet shortcrust. The French people liked them.

Crawl home and sleep until lunchtime. The following day decide that enough is enough and eat vegetable soup. [Biased]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
That all sounds delicious and my kind of meal [Smile] we had dinner with French friends last week and I was surprised to find out that they have the cheese course before dessert.

Other half is back at work and I'd love to go for a walk in the sunshine but I suspect my children are less inclined [Roll Eyes] I have been good, though, and set some work for my students for when they return from their break next week.
I might go and do some decluttering in my sewing room/study.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
That all sounds delicious and my kind of meal [Smile] we had dinner with French friends last week and I was surprised to find out that they have the cheese course before dessert.

But of course. That is so that the red you are having with the main course can segue seamlessly into the red/ port to go with the cheese.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
I saw Sherlock - I'm still trying to work out the plot. If there was one. Burt its brilliantly done.

Yep. Loved the reunions and explanations. I thought generally he seemed a gentler and less abrasive character in this episode.

La vie en rouge - that sounds like a proper dinner and a really delicious one. Let us all know next time and we'll come and join you.

Public transport is half empty so I'm guessing a lot of people are taking the rest of this week off - quite quiet here so a chance to make good progress catching up and getting back into it.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
That all sounds delicious and my kind of meal [Smile] we had dinner with French friends last week and I was surprised to find out that they have the cheese course before dessert.

But of course. That is so that the red you are having with the main course can segue seamlessly into the red/ port to go with the cheese.
Eating cheese at the end would feel bizarre to me these days. It also seems quite logical to me to keep all the savoury stuff in one section of the meal and end with the sweets and coffee.

(In posh French restaurants one eats one's cheese with a knife and fork. At home people use a bit of bread. Crackers are unknown.)
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
...In posh French restaurants one eats one's cheese with a knife and fork...

[Ultra confused]

The bread I understand but knife and fork?

Oh well, it takes all kinds.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
But one of the best things in the whole world to eat is applewood smoked cheddar cheese and those biscuits which are shaped like little loaves and are the same taste as digestives. [Big Grin] It just wouldn't be the same with bread. [Disappointed]

In other news, I'm listening to the weather and it sounds as though there's more grim stuff on the way. [Eek!]

Nen - battening down the hatches.
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
I don't usually do the "British" threads, but I want to try & be a regular visitor this year. I thought I might anyway, but when I saw the title, that clinched it - I was born just across the street from Barter Books, where the "Keep Calm and Carry On" phenomenon started. (It wasn't Barter Books then, it was still Alnwick Station.)

So hello from one of the Ship's Northumbrians in exile (I'm sure there must be others).
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
That all sounds delicious and my kind of meal [Smile] we had dinner with French friends last week and I was surprised to find out that they have the cheese course before dessert.

We always have the cheese before the fruit or pudding which ends the meal. You can then finish off the wine with the cheese and not have clashes between dry wines and sweet foods.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
I don't really like ending a meal with a sweet taste in my mouth. Left to my own devices I'd start with the dessert and finish with the starter. Or have cheese instead of a dessert - I can't usually manage both.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
...In posh French restaurants one eats one's cheese with a knife and fork...

[Ultra confused]

The bread I understand but knife and fork?

Oh well, it takes all kinds.

Unless it's Brie, Camembert or or one of the really smelly ones like Livarot or Pont l'Eveque, in which case you'll need a spoon.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
La Vie, your dinner sounds absolutely heavenly. I'm definitely in the "cheese after pudding" camp - if we're entertaining I'll bring the cheeseboard through to the sitting-room so that we can sit in comfort and nibble on pieces of cheese, grapes and nuts as we want. In restaurants, I prefer to have cheese instead of pudding, although I can only think of one restaurant here that offers a cheeseboard, and fiscally it's in the "occasional treat" category. [Frown]

Adeodatus, thank you for the link to Barter's web-site - I assumed that the logo must have been a war-time thing, but I didn't know where the modern incarnation started.

Very cold day here today (-16°, feeling like -29° with the wind-chill) but beautifully sunny, so we went for a drive out of town for lunch before I came back to do the Cathedral bulletin. Sort of getting into practice for returning to the grind on Monday ...
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Mr. S likes cheese with Christmas cake - apparently a Northern thing - but then again he likes cheese, full stop. (I don't, except very rarely, which is a blessing, cf. Safe from Kidnapping thread [Hot and Hormonal] )

In our house, the motto is 'Keep calm, cut off the green bits, and carry on' [Devil]

Mrs. S, whose children DID survive to adulthood in spite of the above
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Cheese goes well with anything sweet - especially jam [Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
Cheese goes well with anything sweet - especially jam [Smile]

[Eek!] Ugh no! I hate sweet with savoury. Full stop. I know, I know, oranges in salads, sweet sauce with meats, etc. etc. it seems all the rage now, but not on my dinner plate, thank you very much! [Frown]

I'm just an old fashioned eater! [Biased]

[ 03. January 2014, 08:19: Message edited by: Nicodemia ]
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I'm mostly with you, Nicodemia - I've never understood what MrD calls "jam with meat" (cranberry sauce + turkey; apple sauce + pork etc) BUT I do like slightly sweet biscuits with a sharp cheddar (Hovis/ digestive type) - not that one can find either in France!
Chutney with cold meat is a different kettle of fish, and we eat a lot of chutney, but that's more sweet/sharp than "jam"
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Fruit and fruit sauce with meat have been around for centuries. Redcurrant jelly with lamb is wonderful when I can get it - nicer than mint sauce IMO. I'm not too keen on crackers with cheese – for me they need to be thin and preferably water biscuits rather than proper biscuits, otherwise they detract from the actual cheese. There's nothing like a slice of a freshly baked loaf still warm from the oven with a piece of your favourite cheese, though.

And I’m not going to mention Danish blue with honey drizzled across it or cheese pancakes with golden syrup, as they do in Holland.

Meanwhile, we're having some crazy weather – about an hour ago we had a hailstorm with chunks of ice like large marbles which must have been nearly an inch across. Quite spectacular (and really noisy) while it lasted.
 
Posted by Pooks (# 11425) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
...In posh French restaurants one eats one's cheese with a knife and fork...

[Ultra confused]

The bread I understand but knife and fork?

Oh well, it takes all kinds.

(*Cackles*)

Oh yes. Not just knives and forks! Some of us eat broken bottles and turn into werewolves during the full moon too. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I've booked our summer hols this morning, 2 weeks in Cornwall; one in the Lizard, one near Land's End. The lady I spoke to on the farm in Land's End was battening down the hatches for the storm. We had a heavy thunderstorm and hail about an hour or so ago here.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
That hail storm has just come through here - black skies, really noisy hail.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pooks:
...Some of us eat broken bottles and turn into werewolves during the full moon too. [Big Grin]

I thought that only happened Sarf of the River!

Signed: Essex boy by birth.
 
Posted by Stejjie (# 13941) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
That hail storm has just come through here - black skies, really noisy hail.

[smug hat] We seem to have gotten away with it here, at least this time - just some heavy rain (though not bad for Manchester) and fairly strong winds - don't know if it's 'cos we're inland, but it seems the worst has passed us by.
[/smug hat]

[Votive] for those it hasn't passed by...
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Definitely a time to Keep Calm and Carry On. Severe Flood Warnings in effect practically in the centre of Newport, and lesser, but still serious warnings for Caerleon and plenty of other places in walking distance.

[ 03. January 2014, 17:10: Message edited by: Sioni Sais ]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Windy rainy cold here....mind you, if we were flooded the water would be half way up the tower of the Town Centre church...the town centre is low-lying.
Hope everyone is safe and snug tonight.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I generally go for a 30 minute run on Friday lunchtimes, with some work colleagues. The hail arrived about 10 minutes into the run.It only lasted about 10 minutes, but then we had heavy rain for the final 10 minutes. Normally I really enjoy the run but today the hot shower afterwards was the best part.
 
Posted by Sherwood (# 15702) on :
 
Chocolate Hob-Nobs...I don't half miss them! Can't get them at all in Finland. The joys of being an ex-pat Brit!

Sorry for the interruption, but I didn't think the "Welcome Aboard 2014" thread was appropriate, since I'm a returning member and not a genuine new poster.

Anyhoo...

I joined a few years back but didn't post much. I ended up moving to Finland due to falling in love with a wonderful Finnish woman online, and I kind of cut my internetting down a heck of a lot.

The time seemed right to jump aboard again, this time for a good while longer hopefully!!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Interested to see footage of the storm hitting Aberystwyth. I used to stay in a flat on the seafront. A big sea was an annual event - it always demolished the paddling pool and took another bit off the pier.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by Pooks:
...Some of us eat broken bottles and turn into werewolves during the full moon too. [Big Grin]

I thought that only happened Sarf of the River!

Signed: Essex boy by birth.

Oh for Gawds sake, there's no such place as "sarf London". That's just how poncy media types from north of the river think we talk. The correct term is "saaf Lunden"
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
[Biased]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Interested to see footage of the storm hitting Aberystwyth. I used to stay in a flat on the seafront. A big sea was an annual event - it always demolished the paddling pool and took another bit off the pier.

You'd think they'd have learnt, and moved them inland where the sea couldn't get at them.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
[Killing me] Sorry Spike & ken, I stand corrected.

Went to my room about 8.15 last night then thought I'd have 5 minutes before I came back in here and then woke up at 02.30. It was bliss! Later had a really weird dream where I was at a party with friend who is a judge in UK and we were both smoking illegal substances and I was worried that she might harm her career - it was quite a relief to wake up and know that she is safe!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Blimey Wodders, I thought I had weird dreams ... [Eek!] I should keep off the old Stinking Bishop before going to bed if I were you. [Big Grin]

It's blizzarding merrily outside; the little path that Kind Neighbour dug out in front of our house has almost been obliterated and it's not showing any signs of stopping. We're supposed to be going to an "open house" do at the Deanery on Saturday afternoon, but if the weather's still vile, it'll be postponed until Sunday, which will interfere with our afternoon snoozing habits ...

Hope those of you with more water than you'd care for are keeping safe.

As it was a "battening down the hatches" kind of day, I made a pot of chicken-and-veggie soup for tomorrow's lunch, and set a loaf going in the bread-machine - do help yourselves.

[ 04. January 2014, 03:25: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Talking of bread - most bread here is sold sliced rather too thinly for my liking BUT we have recently found a source of thickly sliced bread, ok, only available in white but it makes good toast for breakfast after mass on Sunday mornings. For some reason my bread making skills have disappeared in the last 30 years so we have to have the bought stuff.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I have started a low carb diet so made almond crackers and almond bread yesterday. Very nice too!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
They seem to have stopped slicing bread thinly here these days. It's now medium, thick or doorstep, which is annoying because I'd prefer thin if I could get it.

Raining again today here in Oxon-on-Sea. Strange, that.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
My word, the cold weather here is putting paid to my resolution to get up and get going bright and early this morning. All I want to do is snuggle down under the duvet and preferably go back to sleep, but that might also be because I have a mountain of paperwork to do for school on Monday.

I have rather a glut of bread for some reason. Maybe a good excuse to dollop some special jam on top for second breakfast. I wonder why my new year diet isn't going very well!

Anyone got the kettle on?
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Have a cuppa! smudge. I also have some rather odd gingerbread porridge.. Not sure if I like it but good for a miserable day. After being unable to sleep most of the night I now feel very odd, and not sure what I want to do today. The latest Hobbit film has been suggested, which sounds like a good idea
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I've just made a drink so the kettle is still hot.

Went to town to collect something else from a courier and we found that the place actually MAKES bread and it would be ready in half an hour so we did a bit of shopping then went back and we got it unsliced, fresh from the oven - still HOT! The smell in the car on the way back was exquisite!

eta 15 minutes later: I have just been brought two doorsteps of fresh warm bread and a little pumpkin soup to dip it in - if you're not jealous, you should be!

eta again: This morning I completed the 22 page form as required by HMG for claiming my State Retirement Pension and got it in the post, registered, to Newcastle. Pete was a bit upset when I told him the postage cost was under C$3 [about UKP1.70]

Btw, just asked and the bread is about 25 pence a loaf!

[ 04. January 2014, 08:55: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Bread sauce... that's what I'm going to do with my glut of milk, bread, onions and to help finish off the jar of cloves.

I'm having a quiet, do as little as possible day other than the bread sauce making. Yesterday was remarkably exhausting, what with playing for a funeral on an organ I used to know quite well (and which has developed more idiosyncrasies since I last played it regularly) and coping with the extraordinary merging of various parts of my past, none of who I ever expected to converge in that place!

Though people who think it's appropriate to come and whisper in the organist's ear for any other reason than the church is on fire and I need to get out now whilst she is playing the final voluntary are on my hit list. Especially if they start with "I don't want to put you off playing, but...."

Just because it's possible, doesn't mean you should do it!
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
A bit grey and murky here. Not much doing, but need to finish the white chocolate and ginger cheesecake that I promised to make for a friend.

I made an interesting leftover-chocolate-fondue-tiffin-type thing yesterday. There's some in the fridge if you want to try it - basically crushed speculoos biscuits in butter, chilled. Chocolate fondue re-melted, mixed with chopped nuts, dried cranberries & crystallised ginger, poured over the biscuits and reset. Mr D seems to like it verrrry much, so get a morsel while you can!
 
Posted by Stejjie (# 13941) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I've just made a drink so the kettle is still hot.

Went to town to collect something else from a courier and we found that the place actually MAKES bread and it would be ready in half an hour so we did a bit of shopping then went back and we got it unsliced, fresh from the oven - still HOT! The smell in the car on the way back was exquisite!

eta 15 minutes later: I have just been brought two doorsteps of fresh warm bread and a little pumpkin soup to dip it in - if you're not jealous, you should be!

I am!

Was going to make bread rolls with our two girls to have for breakfast this morning but a) we didn't have any strong bread flour and b) making a cake (that didn't rise [Frown] ) was quite traumatic enough for one day. Maybe next week...
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sherwood:
Chocolate Hob-Nobs...I don't half miss them! Can't get them at all in Finland. The joys of being an ex-pat Brit!

Sorry for the interruption, but I didn't think the "Welcome Aboard 2014" thread was appropriate, since I'm a returning member and not a genuine new poster.

Anyhoo...

I joined a few years back but didn't post much. I ended up moving to Finland due to falling in love with a wonderful Finnish woman online, and I kind of cut my internetting down a heck of a lot.

The time seemed right to jump aboard again, this time for a good while longer hopefully!!

Welcome back. Discussing hobnobs is a good introduction to this thread, we generally discuss food and the weather [Smile]

I've just popped some glass in the kiln to make a bowl (a redo of a bubbled piece so I hope it works) and am about to put some dough in the breadmaker ready to bake for lunch. The children are nagging to play a new board game so I guess we'll do that once my other half finally gets out of bed [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
OK you have inspired me a plain carrot & sweet potato soup is in the slow cooker.

Do not think I will manage fresh bread though.

Jengie
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
I now have a cat, rabbit and pig in the fridge.... orange, chocolate and raspberry blancmange ready for tea tomorrow.

Time to think about breakfast. Or maybe skip straight to lunch. Although I' back at w*rk I am still in holiday mood so a very slow start to the day. Savoury pancakes anyone?
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Been to see Nenlet1 and the son in law. Their house is so cold! [Eek!] I guess they're young and don't feel the cold like their aged parents. [Roll Eyes] Also had a piece of their Christmas cake - made by his mother - and now feel a bit nauseous... [Ultra confused]

Planning to take the decorations down this afternoon but Mr Nen has another agenda so I'm waiting until he's available to help me.

Nen - glad to get home into the warm.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Having discovered that there is an alternative 12th Night, I have decided that as I am still enjoying my pretty tree I shall leave it up until 18th Jan. Thankfully it's not the sort to shed needles otherwise it might be down already.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
Been to see Nenlet1 and the son in law. Their house is so cold!

Now you know what to buy them for next Christmas - onesies!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
The plan to give up the excesses and be sensible in the New Year is not going all that well. This afternoon we went for afternoon tea at La Durée, purveyor of some of the finest patisserie on the planet, in very lovely Belle Epoque surroundings. They are famous for being the inventor of macaroons split in half with ganache in the middle, but everything they have is to die for. Their tea is also more than pleasant (I got green tea with rose, violet, ginger and mint - it was heavenly). You have to queue to get in on a Saturday and the prices are kind of obscene, but it's worth it. Calming down and being sensible will have to be to be for another day. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'm leaving calming down and being sensible for when I'm dead!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I'm working on being more frivolous and lighthearted, but a prolonged spell of too much rain and not enough sunlight has dampened most of my enthusiasm. We're expecting the fun storm they just had on the east coast of America to cross the Atlantic to us today, to top up the flooded roads in case they dry out.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I wish they had properly structured training courses in spontaneity!

* * * *

I am rapidly coming to the conclusion that I am going to have to do something drastic about this room - I think I may have to tidy my desk [Eek!]

I haven't attempted it in over a year and these days I can never find anything without a 10 minute search. This also means that I shall have to do the filing! - a task I loathe and detest even though I know it never really takes long.

Perhaps I'll start it all tomorrow, or Wednesday - it can't be Tuesday as I'm going to The Big City. I really need to find the form donating my body to the local Medical School and get it all sorted out - after I check that it expressly stipulates that I have to be dead first! It all needs to be done on Stamp Paper and signed in front of a Notary and all that - which is fair enough but takes some organising as it means the witnesses have to taken along to the Notary's office as well.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
Afternoon all, I'm loving the thread title, too.
The weather seems to be giving us a day's respite, so I walked home from church, instead of catching a lift. Was quite a nice service, but I seem to be signed up for the junior church rota... [Help]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
3 magi visited us this morning, complete with frankincense so much sneezing! Hope they moored their camels securely because water levels are rising rapidly
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Can't camels swim? [Confused]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Elephants can
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Lots of animals can. However, according to the internet, the only camels that can swim are the swimming camels of Gujarat.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
So as ships of the desert go, more like SS Titanic?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I'd have thought the Bactrian camel, having two humps, probably stood a better chance of floating to the surface than the Arabian, which only has one. However, the Bactrian has a shaggier coat, so their chances of sinking are probably about even.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
Been to see Nenlet1 and the son in law. Their house is so cold!

Now you know what to buy them for next Christmas - onesies!
They've both got onesies! I'm the one who needs one, for when I visit. [Biased]

I'm of the opinion you can't start the New Year Diet until the house is clear of Christmas chocolates. I am working on this. [Big Grin]

Nen - chocolate addict; nobody knows the truffles I've seen.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
Perhaps camels don't swim because they never encounter a large enough body of water? It always makes me smile when I read statistics like'you're more likely to be attacked by a shark than win the lottery' well, probably that statistic will be influenced by how often you swim in the sea and how often you play the lottery. Or not.

[ 05. January 2014, 13:41: Message edited by: Taliesin ]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Stay dry. Statistics show that sharks are less likely to attack you if you are dry.

Talking of statistics, when I studied them back in the olden days, there was a story that the rise in the crime rate correlated with the sale of television sets. The press said it was a sign that crime on TV caused real life crime.

We found that the number od homes with washing machines correlated better with the crime rate. This (if the press were right) means that you are more likely to be a victim of crime if your clothes are clean. A fact I have known from college days. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
99% of statistics are made up
 
Posted by quetzalcoatl (# 16740) on :
 
I liked the finding that people who eat chocolate live longer; of course, the tabloids had to opine it as 'chocolate makes you live longer', stupidly, stupidly, inanely, asininely, thumpingly wrong. It's the effort in opening the chocolates that makes you live longer, cos of the xersize.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I see Oxford's on sandbag alert. Anyone in the area able to say how things are going?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Before we go any further will people please read How to Lie with Statistics

If you are going to use statistics this way you may as well do it as well as possible.

Jengie
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I see Oxford's on sandbag alert. Anyone in the area able to say how things are going?

So far, nothing more than the usual. Flood barriers up on Osney, the only roads closed that I know of are the ones which go underwater very fast (one of them is the bank of the Ray in Islip.

The Environment Agency has Flood Alerts (lowest level of warning) up for the Cherwell and Thames, but so far, so good. Where's the fingers crossed smiley when I need it? Especially since we live on a floodplain...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Off to work today - crumbs!

I don't usually work on Monday's but the new headteacher has asked me to do a morning's staff training (behaviour management) on the recommendation of the outgoing headteacher.

Better manage my own behaviour while doing it!

So an early good morning dear Shippies [Smile]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
[QUOTE]
Nen - chocolate addict; nobody knows the truffles I've seen.

[Killing me]

love it!

We have nearly eaten our left-overs; down to the last bag of lebkuchen and box of Thornton's. They are actually too sweet for me, but hey, what can you do? We still have two monster-sized sacks of peanuts left from the afterparty for Miss S's wedding back in October, but I just daren't open those bags as peanuts are so addictive.

Anyway, the way the rain is coming down I may need them as sandbags...

Mrs. S, making heroic efforts in the interests of food decluttering.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm back to work again but nothing too stressful, just catching up on my students and I need to write some advice for an assignment. My children are still home until tomorrow but they are too busy on the main computer to bother me unless they are hungry.
After I've done that I need to make a Tudor outfit for my younger son to wear tomorrow! I think he has a suitable shirt to wear as a shift and he'll probably be okay with trousers tucked in long socks but I've promised him a velvet jacket and hat (I have a stack of recycled velvet curtains in the sewing room). So that will take me all afternoon.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
January 6th, last day of Christmas - "Old Christmas Day". We took the decorations down at work; as always when decorations are gone, it looked so drab in this dreary weather that I suggested putting them back up.

Anyhow, I always mark Old Christmas Day with a plum pudding, and there are still some mince pies, and tomorrow I'll take the tree down and put it away again until December. I've loved the cheery glow of the lights amidst the green branches, and the gleam on the decorations; will miss that.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
[QUOTE]
Nen - chocolate addict; nobody knows the truffles I've seen.

[Killing me]

love it!

[Axe murder]

Back to work today and lots to catch up on. And we have a meeting tomorrow morning so no proper work will get done. [Roll Eyes]

Does anyone else watch "Countryfile" on a Sunday evening and did you hear that from about Wednesday onwards our weather is going to turn "whimsical"? I'm looking forward to seeing what that's like.

In other news, I'm home alone this evening and making very good progress with the last of the Christmas chocolate.

Nen - loving the way she can rely on Mrs S to appreciate her attempts at humour. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Starbug (# 15917) on :
 
We have lots of chocolate left over, but Mr Bug has had food poisoning and can't eat any of it. I feel guilty eating it in front of him, so it's just sitting there, mocking us.

The house looks very empty without all the decorations. I collect teapots and all the Christmas ones (Santa, snowman and two Christmas puddings) have been washed, ready to put away. I still need to dust the fireplace surround and get out the non-Christmassy teapots, but that can wait for another day.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
My apologies for my recent enforced absence; Newfoundland Power is having a major brainfart at the moment and we had no electricity from 9 a.m. on Saturday until 1 a.m. on Sunday, and again for most of Sunday evening. This is less than helpful when your only source of heat is, um, electricity, and the temperature outside is -12°C.

No, Wodders, you are not allowed to snigger. [Devil]

The minor up-side of the said brainfart is that in order to conserve power, all the schools in the province and the University are closed on Monday and Tuesday*, so I'm getting a couple of unscheduled days' holiday. [Yipee]

Nenya - how can you possibly still have chocolate left from Christmas? It's Epiphany for heaven's sake ...

[Confused]

I'm off downstairs now to eat a nice healthy Greek salad that my Beloved has made for me.

* This is particularly fortuitous for my friend J., who was due to start a new teaching job on Monday, and is starting with a couple of days off. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Stejjie (# 13941) on :
 
Our two daughters have far more Christmas chocolate than us, as in they have a huge tub full each whereas Mrs Stejjie and I only have one small tub full between us (oh, and the box of Celebrations from Mrs Stejjie's work).

This is a sad and sorry state of affairs. Since most of these chocolates for the girls came from members of our church, I shall have to reprimand them in a future sermon. After all, that's what's preaching's for, right?

(BTW is it bad and wrong that I sometimes wonder if we should "help" the girls with their chocolates? After all, we don't want their teeth to go bad, or them to eat too much unhealthy food and they'll only get more at Easter... [Two face] )

I saw a bit of Countryfile but didn't see the forecast, Nenya - I love the sound of whimsical weather, can't wait to see what it actually turns out like!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I’d nearly finished my Christmas chocolate, then my mother sent me two more boxes. The tree has been undecorated now, but not yet put away.

Fun journey to work this morning with the train going at 2 mph over waterlogged tracks and the bus going through a puddle that managed to generate a 7’ wall of water up over the windows. More road closures today; it's all a bit soggy here.
 
Posted by Cara (# 16966) on :
 
Rather than left-over Christmas chocolate, I have a left-over Christmas cold--started with my sister, our kind hostess on Christmas Day, and has been making the rounds. I thought I wasn't going to catch it from my husband, but am being paid for my smugness. Then I thought I wasn't going to get it very badly, and now I'm being paid for that smugness too!

Today, a day late, I must take down the decorations and put away the tree, which is a very tiny artificial one (allergies to real ones)--so shouldn't take long. Worse, have to finally sort and put away all sorts of clothes still in boxes from our move--the work was suspended for Christmas, offspring visits, etc.

Ah well. First, more tea with lemon and honey! While outside, more wind and rain.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
The course was very well received, the new boss seems like a decent bloke - keen to get to know us all.

I must admit to having a 'been there, done that' sort of feeling in the staff meeting. Being the oldest member of staff, there really is nothing new - it all comes round again if you wait long enough. Mustn't grumble 'tho - I only work a day and a half a week.

I'm just impatient now to hear from Guide Dogs so that the new adventure can begin! (fingers crossed!)


[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stejjie:
Our two daughters have far more Christmas chocolate than us, as in they have a huge tub full each whereas Mrs Stejjie and I only have one small tub full between us (oh, and the box of Celebrations from Mrs Stejjie's work).

This is a sad and sorry state of affairs. Since most of these chocolates for the girls came from members of our church, I shall have to reprimand them in a future sermon. After all, that's what's preaching's for, right?

(BTW is it bad and wrong that I sometimes wonder if we should "help" the girls with their chocolates? After all, we don't want their teeth to go bad, or them to eat too much unhealthy food and they'll only get more at Easter... [Two face] )...

Definitely a few sermons in Church between now and Easter AND homilies at home on the Importance of Sharing with those Less Fortunate and on the Vital Importance of the Fifth Commandment!

eta: If that doesn't work you may be required to break the Eighth Commandment; but in Christian Love, of course.

[ 07. January 2014, 09:07: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I've been sitting here very soggy since the school run (rain hammering it down) and now suddenly feel cold! Must get changed.
My youngest skipped off very pleased with his Tudor costume and I was relieved to see several others all dressed up too. I live in fear of sending him to school in fancy costume on the wrong day!
I plan to enjoy my day free from the noise of children. I hadn't planned to do any OU work but a student wants a phone call so I need to prep for our discussion and may as well plan Saturday's tutorial while I have the main computer on. But I'll leave that til this afternoon.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We have a new sofa - very posh. It came second hand from ebay for £99. Only six months old and leather. I am very pleased as when (if) a pup comes to stay I will decamp to the kitchen for house training purposes.

No dogs allowed on the sofa!!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
They were about to close the railway line at lunchtime thanks to flooding, so my manager kindly let me work from home for the afternoon. At the time of writing it's touch and go whether the water will cover the active tracks; the sidelines are already submerged. Unfortunately, the Oxford stretch is part of one of the major cross-country railway lines that stretches from the south coast to Scotland.

Lots of local roads closed now so "rail replacement services" i.e. bus journeys would be a bit of a nightmare if this happens, as their usual routes aren't accessible at present.

Ho hum, we went through all this a few years ago, it's tedious having it back again.

[ 07. January 2014, 15:58: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
No dogs allowed on the sofa!!

And are you consistent about that? [Biased] I ask because Nenlet1's in-laws got a dog. The progression went like this:

Dog has a basket and sleeps in it; is not allowed on the sofa; sleeps downstairs in basket every night.

Dog has a basket but is allowed on the sofa by invitation and sleeps upstairs in the basket as a treat once a week.

Dog is allowed on sofa. Dog sleeps in owners' bed every night.

She also pulls when on the lead. In fact, I don't know a dog that doesn't.

[Roll Eyes]
Nen - lover of Dogs Who Know Their Place.
 
Posted by Pooks (# 11425) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
We have a new sofa - very posh. [*snips*]...

No dogs allowed on the sofa!!

[Smile]

[*Warning: Goo!]

Awww... What a sweet looking pooch! [/Goo!]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Tatze doesn't pull at all - she has been taught to walk to heel since puppyhood. She comes to the whistle every time too, thanks to this book.

She is allowed to snuggle on my sofa in the front room with me, and the chair nearly in the photo is hers - she's not allowed on the others at all and is crated at night.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Piglet - I hope the electricty stays on and the snow goes away. We felt miserable enough when our boiler broke last year, and it was plus 7 degrees centigrade outside.
Second day back at work today, and so far it's been an enjoyable term - long may it last.
Still some cake left if anyone wants to get in before my family fianlly demolish it, or are you all caked out?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
So far, so good; we haven't had any more power-cuts since Sunday night. The outside temperature shot up to +9°C today and it rained, which cleared a bit of the snow-heaps, but it's back to about 0° now, and plummeting merrily - it's due to be -9° tomorrow. Oh well, I'll be back at w*rk, so not really thinking about the weather, except for avoiding the Patches of Treachery™ on the pavements.

Regarding excess CAKE ( [Confused] ) we got two little fruit-cakes from different people, and I finished the first of them this evening with some cheese (whoever thought of eating cheese with fruit-cake deserves a medal). I've still got the other one (the Dean's wife's speciality) to look forward to, and as I like it more than D. does, I get to eat most of it. [Big Grin]

The next week-and-a-half is going to be completely mental, getting the orders of service printed for the Bishop's consecration; the Diocesan Office decided that we should print it after all, and it's going to be a mammoth task - 1000 copies*, each with 6 pages of folded legal-size paper. [Help]

* The Cathedral only seats 700, but that's a minor detail ... [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Husband's 40th today, I suppose I should go and make a cake...

I did get him whisky though, English, Swedish and some samples of Japanese single malts. Perhaps if he samples them he won't notice the lack of cake?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
... I did get him whisky though, English, Swedish and some samples of Japanese single malts ...

Heretick! [Big Grin] But happy birthday to Mr. Anarchist!

I am a piglet of very little brain; if I'd checked the news or the University web-site yesterday evening I'd have known that we were closed again and I didn't have to come in to w*rk. Oh well, this is a short day for me anyway, so I'll get a few things done before I leave at lunch-time ...

[brick wall]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
If you were here in the UK*, piglet, you'd have a very good chance of being a more literally accurate 'piglet entirely surrounded by water'!

* Muchelney, perhaps, or that place in Wales we aren't allowed to mention [Devil]

Mrs. S, ever the pedant [Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Oh but I am almost entirely surrounded by water, Mrs. S., it's just that the water's frozen ... [Eek!]

Seriously though, [Votive] for those of you who are being flooded, blown to b*ggery and generally messed about with by Bad Weather.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Hi ho, hi ho, it's off to work I go ...

I have put my swimming stuff in, just in case I'm motivated to pop to the swimming baths on the way home.

Unlike some down south, who could simply swim home [Votive] for them.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Living on a river delta we are completely surrounded by water as well but nobody ever seems to have any sympathy for me, not even when I have to put up with the heat, the dust, the flies and the constant drumming.

[Waterworks]

Enjoy your swim, Boogie.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Tatze doesn't pull at all - she has been taught to walk to heel since puppyhood. She comes to the whistle every time too, thanks to this book.

She is allowed to snuggle on my sofa in the front room with me, and the chair nearly in the photo is hers - she's not allowed on the others at all and is crated at night.

[Smile]

[Smile] [Overused]

If ever I get a dog I shall be coming to you for advice and book recommendations. Do you take Tatze to puppy training classes as well?

It's not raining here this morning and the sky's a strange colour... a kind of blue tinge... [Confused] I am off on a day's retreat. Can't wait to get through that door having turned my phone off and being out of circulation till after 5pm. [Big Grin]

Nen - wishing all shipmates an equally enjoyable day. [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Drizzly here, the sky is menacing on the horizon though and the wind is blowing.
I need to do some reading today for the tutorial I'm teaching on Saturday. I'm teaching a module I know well and have taught for a couple of years but it has just been re-written so the structure is no longer the same, various bits of research have gone in or out and some of the case studies are now completely different. Consequently I have to relearn it all from scratch.
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
I might almost have been faster swimming home last night. [Razz] Waited 15 min for the bus, and the one that showed up was the one which should have been there 15 min before I got there. Then once I'd collected my repaired bike I had to go back a mile to get home (the bike shop is further away from work than home is).

Now just hoping for some dry days so that the water goes down - we've had one drowning not too far away [Frown]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Not much fun this morning negotiating the Patches of Treachery™ between the house and the car* - I put down some salt, but it's probably too cold for it to work. Some friends have suggested that cat-litter works for traction-control ... [Eek!]

* It may be only the width of the pavement plus a bit of snow-bank, but it only takes one misplaced step on a patch of ice for complete loss of balance (and dignity).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I lost my dignity so long ago now that I can barely remember having any!

We took Pete cloth shopping today and I was very good and didn't buy anything.

[Cool]

...but then on Tuesday I ordered 2 shirts and a pair of trousers [the latter in a fab cotton/linen mix] and on Wednesday I bought two kurta tops. So my virtue is not unstained.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:

If ever I get a dog I shall be coming to you for advice and book recommendations. Do you take Tatze to puppy training classes as well?

Yes - once a week. They are really helpful.

I am a step closer to becoming a Guide Dog puppy walker. The trainer is coming to assess me on the 12th May. I'm very excited and keep telling Tatze all about it.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Sherwood (# 15702) on :
 
The weather here in Western Finland is not good. We had a week and a bit of actual Finnish Winter at the beginning of December and that was it. Now it's so British that it's making my home sickness feel worse. If I have to put up with murky wet weather, I may as well be back in Blighty!

On the upside, there's a new shop in the local shopping centre that sells some British food. I can now get a jar of Branston without having to order it from Helsinki. It's 5 Euros a pop, so it's pricey, but it's around 2.50€ cheaper than ordering it online! Shame they sell the PG Tips at such a huge mark up - 14.95€ for 160!

That didn't turn out to be as much of an upside as I thought! Woops.
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Not much fun this morning negotiating the Patches of Treachery™ between the house and the car* - I put down some salt, but it's probably too cold for it to work. Some friends have suggested that cat-litter works for traction-control ... [Eek!]

* It may be only the width of the pavement plus a bit of snow-bank, but it only takes one misplaced step on a patch of ice for complete loss of balance (and dignity).

We used cat litter for that purpose one year. It hung around for months, even as we swept it up we couldn't get rid of it all. Never again!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I ordered 2 shirts and a pair of trousers ... so my virtue is not unstained.

I don't think ordering trousers actually stains your virtue - it's not as if trousers are something you can do without. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Some friends have suggested that cat-litter works for traction-control ...

You will never get it out of your carpets.

Moo, who learned the hard way
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
...it's not as if trousers are something you can do without. [Eek!]

But most of the time I do! I have adopted the local habit, at least at home, of wearing a lunghi or sarong - wonderfully comfortable!
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I don't think ordering trousers actually stains your virtue - it's not as if trousers are something you can do without. [Eek!]

psst, piglet! He has about 40 other pairs of trousers; some of which haven't been worn since the Flood.

[ 10. January 2014, 02:46: Message edited by: PeteC ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Would that be because they shrank? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Please don't mention floods. We have more than enough of that here.

I was advised yesterday not to bother trying to go home by the usual route but to travel to London instead and try to get a train from another station, a trip that would have added 3 hours and about 150 miles to my journey home. Today, the reduced service has been reduced even further to a train once every two hours. I've taken the day off work rather than struggle with this, and can't wait for the waters to recede and things to get back to near normal.

I've been sending out the usual dove, but this morning it returned with frost all over its beak, so probably not the best day for travelling early anyway.

[ 10. January 2014, 06:53: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Sympathies to anyone caught up in floods, or any other sort of horrible weather for that matter. It was nice to look out today and see it wasn't raining. I might even be able to clean the floor by the front door which has been muddy since beofre Christmas.

This is my first day home alone for ages and I inted to enjoy it, a bit of shopping, a bit of cooking, and doing the lovely jigsaw puzzle my son gave me for Christmas (a bespoke one of a cottage that we go to with friends every year).
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I have succumbed to the sales. One purchase was completely justifiable – a bargainous pair of shoes exactly the same as another pair I have that were worn out. And I don’t really regret buying the pretty dress with 70% off because it’s a pretty dress and it was 70% off. [Biased]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
"Bargainous" - what a wonderful word! [Big Grin]

Due to unforeseen Plumbing Malfunctions™ I suspect I won't be patronising the sales very much this year, bargainous or otherwise.

[Frown]

[ 10. January 2014, 13:40: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Please don't mention floods. We have more than enough of that here.


Thankfully they seem to be going down - we noticed last night, and at our end of town the water was definitely starting to drop - not much, but enough - by this morning.

AG
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
And here we are looking at all that water enviously. TP is out in the garden trying to do some deep watering to help the fruit trees survive the next three days (forecast is for 38-40 degrees celsius). Still, there is much of Oz that is worse off, with news of much loss of livestock. No-one, however, will be missing the bats that are dropping dead from the heat, though I do feel sorry for those that have to put up with their pong, whether dead or alive.

Strange times, strange climes.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence (and ours is currently much greener because of overwatering).

I see David Cameron came to visit some of the flooded householders. What does one say in these situations? "We're having a bit of a problem with the damp at the moment"? "Pull up a raft and sit down"? Or "Would you like some water biscuits to go with your tea?"
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
If David Cameron ever bothered to come and see me I'm afraid my Words of Welcome would not be at all suitable for All Saints.
 
Posted by Sherwood (# 15702) on :
 
Not that I had much chance to bump into Cameron when I lived in England, but I'm glad that I have absolutely no chance of that happening now. I'm pretty sure I'd end up saying something that I'd regret.

It seems my grumbling the other day about the lack of snow was a little premature, as it finally arrived again yesterday. I'm not counting on it sticking around for long, but while it's here I shall appreciate it.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Ooh, the forecast is for sun today! Quick, get the sun glasses!

Just in case you were worried, it has rained already today and the forecast is for rain for the next few days for at least some of the time. My local weather station tells me we've had rain everyday for 12 days so far.

(ETA a missing word)

[ 11. January 2014, 06:43: Message edited by: Chocoholic ]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
No sun here. It is raining. Forecast for overcast (in my book, likely to rain) Temp 3°C feels like 0°C.

Oh joy! Still, I do feel for those who are/have been flooded. Very nasty.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
It's raining again here - but the forecast is for sun today, here's hoping.

Our garden is a mudbath and needs a re-think. Either some nice decking or that stuff you put on the lawn and the grass grows through, like they have on car parks. Because, having a big pooch, muddy grass = muddy kitchen!

We bought one of those steam mop thingies last week - it's great and used every day atm.

[Smile]
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
Hi everyone, I'm still here (they haven't deported me yet) and hope to be about on the ship a bit more this year.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ecumaniac:
Hi everyone, I'm still here (they haven't deported me yet) and hope to be about on the ship a bit more this year.

Glad to hear you'll be around but note that posting is not dependent on British residence. At times this thread resembles an ex-pats club!
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Sunny here, which is great as I'm about to go up to London and meet friends for a bit of culture at the National Gallery. Oh and a nice gossipy lunch too.
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais: At times this thread resembles an ex-pats club!
Kinda like the aussie thread Then!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Lovely and bright all day, but very cold. We went to Abergavenny and home by a roundabout route, taking in the Brecon Beacons Mountain Centre for a cup of tea. That cafe must have the best view in the country.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
It's going to snow? We keep being promised snow, but it's not appearing. Getting colder. Cold with no snow isn't fair.
 
Posted by Sherwood (# 15702) on :
 
I shall cross my fingers that some of the fluffy white stuff heads home for you all soon. A Winter without snow is no Winter at all.

St. Gwladys - compliments on your good taste in music! Commoners Crown is one of my favourite Steeleye albums, after 'Bloody Men' and 'Winter'.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sherwood:
I shall cross my fingers that some of the fluffy white stuff heads home for you all soon.

Gee, thanks.

Nothing much to report: W*rking most of the weekend, but managed a walk in the sun this afternoon.

<waves to ecumaniac> [Smile]
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
I like steeleyespan, but I don't understand how Peter sellers fits in... wanted to say to Boogie, let me know how the lawn netting thing works cos I have two big dogs and a mudpatch garden, and a constantly filthy carpet and sofa unless I dry their feet every time. Don't get decking, it gets slippery and dangerous, and rats live under it. I would pave the whole damn garden,personally...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
At times this thread resembles an ex-pats club!

[Big Grin]

I'm definitely with Taliesin on the paving-the-garden thing; one of the reasons we bought our last house was that it had no grass.

Although we seem to be heading into a "January thaw" (it's to be +7°C with rain tomorrow), we've still got plenty of snow lying about, and if I could send it over to you I would. I know it's very pretty when it's just fallen, but once it's been there for a couple of weeks it turns to what my friend J. calls "snirt", i.e. a mixture of snow and dirt, and isn't pretty at all. And once it's been there for a couple of months you're thoroughly fed up with it.

I've been part lazy git/part domestic goddess today; after a very long lie I did some laundry, put in a loaf to bake in the bread-machine and made scrambled eggs - on toast for D., and with left-over smoked salmon for me - smoked salmon and scrambled eggs is truly a marriage made in Heaven.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sherwood:
I shall cross my fingers that some of the fluffy white stuff heads home for you all soon. A Winter without snow is no Winter at all.

No, thanks. We've just had a lot of travel disruption and it would be good to have a break. The one good thing about the current weather is that it's been mild: at least when trying (and failing) to get from A to B, there hasn't been biting cold and snow to add to the joy. Some other time, perhaps.
 
Posted by Sherwood (# 15702) on :
 
Well, I'll still hope that Taliesin gets some, then. FWIW, I was just meaning a light dusting anyway. I'm not callous enough to wish for enough to cause trouble, especially at the moment! Hope the flooding clears up soon, too.

I find the biting cold much easier to cope with then mild-but-wet weather. It's easier to just shove some more clothes on before heading out than it is to constantly be drying wet clothes and jackets once you've got, IMO. Even when it's snowing, clothes don't get as wet as with rain.

As for Peter Sellers, Taliesin, Steeleye got him in to record 'New York Girls' with them, which St. Gwladys quoted [Smile]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Oh yes, I'm one who's mostly looking forward to the chance of a bit of snow - preferably enough to force a snow-day at school (did I say that out loud?) and crisp enough to go stomping through Richmond Park. Not enough to cause mayhem on the roads, though, or put lives at risk.

I missed church this morning - slept in instead - and have quite a pleasant list of "to-do"s for today. I started off by opening all the windows to let the sunshine in, but now I think I might dash round and close them all again as it's bloomin' cold! Then the debate - do I wake the sleeping teen because he ought to be up and making the most of the day or do I let him sleep in because it's nice having the flat to myself? [Two face]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I vote you have a sit down and a coffee first.

If you wake the teen then he will tell you that you shouldn't have; and

If you don't wake the teen he will tell you that this one Sunday he really needed you to do it as he needed to...

In other words, you can't win!
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
The one downside of my not so new job is I am now within walking distance of work which has a mixture of residential and day clients.

Whilst the non-residential ones might get a snow day if it's deemed bad enough for their transport not to be running, there are those in the residences who will be there, regardless of the weather, and staff within walking distance don't stand a chance of a snow day!

But, I gather timetables go into freefall, and as long as the little dears are morally and legally occupied and safe no-one really minds what goes on!
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Hmm - snow days. I like them when the snow hits in the morning and you can't get to work. Not so keen when it happens while you are at work and you have to try to get home.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
If we can't get to work, we have to take a day's holiday, and I prefer to use my holiday for something more constructive. Speaking as someone without central heating, I am quite happy for the cold weather to stay away.

I also know someone who had rats under their decking, which proved tricky to get rid of. But I am sorry to see people concreting over their gardens.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Brrrr moonlitdoor - I work from home 3 or 4 days a week and kept the thermostat at about 18, and wear a wooly jumper and a poncho made from a fleece throw from a certain Swedish store, with a hat - and even more layers when the white stuff arrives.

Today at church our wonderful choir was accompanied by a robin that has managed to get in - when I heard it yesterday I wasn't sure if it was sitting close to a window outside or was inside. This seems to happen every 18 months or so - the last time was at harvest so there was plenty of food in the flower arrangements, and what with Christmas & a couple of weddings I don't think this robin will go hungry. But I expect something is planned to set it free soon.

[ 12. January 2014, 12:08: Message edited by: daisydaisy ]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
But I expect something is planned to set it free soon.

They'd better be careful. Robins can be bad tempered. As for central heating, we have it but it isn't switched on in the daytime Monday to Friday. If it's cold work can pay to keep me warm, who needs snow days?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
If we can't get to work, we have to take a day's holiday, and I prefer to use my holiday for something more constructive. Speaking as someone without central heating, I am quite happy for the cold weather to stay away.

Precisely. Fingers crossed that we might have a train service tomorrow more frequent than once an hour at 5mph.

Meanwhile, I'm amusing myself by watching the incomparable Ian Richardson as Francis Urquhart in "House of Cards" (remember that?). Having never seen the series at the time, I'm finding it quite gripping.

[ 12. January 2014, 12:41: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:

Meanwhile, I'm amusing myself by watching the incomparable Ian Richardson as Francis Urquhart in "House of Cards" (remember that?). Having never seen the series at the time, I'm finding it quite gripping.

We have the series on DVD and re watched it quite recently, it's a favourite of mine. There were so many good TV series in that period, 'Oranges are not the only fruit' is another that springs to mind.
 
Posted by Sherwood (# 15702) on :
 
I've been meaning to get both 'House of Cards' and 'Oranges are not the Only Fruit' for ages. I did get the BBC box set of 'Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy' and 'Smiley's People' for my birthday, which was ace. I'm not sure which version of 'Tinker, Tailor...' I prefer, the BBC or Nolan's film. Both are excellent.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Charlotte Coleman and Geraldine McEwan were amazing in Oranges. It was so sad to hear of Coleman's early death, I even remember her as Marmalade Atkins from my youth. A tragic loss.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Taliesin:
... wanted to say to Boogie, let me know how the lawn netting thing works cos I have two big dogs and a mudpatch garden, and a constantly filthy carpet and sofa unless I dry their feet every time. Don't get decking, it gets slippery and dangerous, and rats live under it. I would pave the whole damn garden,personally...

This stuff is what I am thinking of using. I will try it in the worst areas first, if it works I may do the whole lawn! It (apparently) binds with the roots of the grass. It has to be laid before the spring, so I'll get a strip at the end of February to try it out for this year.

I'll let you know [Smile]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
It's not mid-January but this could be the highlight of the year for Newport. I suppose County could get promoted, but the demolition of a long-disused central carpark was quite a spectacle.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Being terribly British and bringing all conversation back to the weather...it's been quite dry today, and quite chilly but cos we can't have a rain free day, it's just started....
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
I also know someone who had rats under their decking, which proved tricky to get rid of.

At various times (but not the same time) I have had opossums, ground hogs, raccoons, and skunks living under my deck. I didn't bother them and they didn't bother me except for the skunk who sometimes sprayed underneath my bedroom window and woke me up very unpleasantly.

Moo
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Well, the thaw certainly shifted some of the snow. Not all of it (it's piled 10 feet high in places) but enough for a start.

**[hums] Hello pavement, my old friend ...**

Gearing myself up for a v. busy week; the final draft of the order of service for the Bishop's installation has been approved and D. is setting the first batch to copy. When I'm not at w*rk, I'm going to be folding, stapling, getting paper-cuts and swearing ...

Oh yes, and producing a batch of tiffin for the bun-fight afterwards. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
piglet you make running a cathedral a sort of cross between All Gas & Gaiters, Dad's Army & 'Ello, Ello.

[Big Grin]

Church Festival last night at the Syro-Malabar Catholic church we sometimes attend - it was good fun with getting on for a thousand people sitting out in the evening cool - well, cooler than the day had been. They'd bought in some semi-professional troupe to sing and dance and do comedy routines - all good fun and lots of pics. But it was another late night and I really find them tough these days - not so much the night itself but the morning after.


eta: I really must learn some basic sentence construction!

[ 13. January 2014, 03:02: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I'm off to Manchester for my final eye check up. I've been more than pleased with the results. Perfect vision for distance and driving. They said I'd need reading glasses, due to old age, and I do for long bouts of reading. But I'm typing this without them.

I have simply been transported back to my early 40s when my arms stopped being long enough.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Having caught a specially early pre-dawn train to be at work on time because of the residual flooding problems as mentioned on the train company's web page, I then found that there were no problems and consequently arrived at my destination 45 minutes early. [Roll Eyes] Anyway, all's well that ends well.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
piglet you make running a cathedral a sort of cross between All Gas & Gaiters, Dad's Army & 'Ello, Ello. ...!

I suppose it sort of is, although unlike All G&G, we've got a really good Dean.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Sorry for the double-post - where is everybody?

Orders of service for the consecration are now done, folded and stapled; I didn't actually have to do any of the folding/stapling as D. and a couple of the office volunteers came in and did it, for which I'm very grateful.

Tiffin has been made and delivered for the post-service bun-fight, and music has been rehearsed.

I hope the new Bishop appreciates all the work that's going into this show* ...

* I think he probably will, but if not, we'll have to send him to the Dean for lessons in Choir Appreciation. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
<waves>

I'm off to work soon, but only for half a day - hurrah! I'll go swimming on the way home. I did the same last Thursday and the pool was reasonably quiet with half of it set out for lane swimming - which I prefer.

Tatze didn't want to get up this morning and went straight back to bed after her breakfast (I don't blame her!) Mr Boogs was working yesterday and said she did just the same for him.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
I wondered if the swimming on the way home was cos of flooded roads [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
**[hums] Hello pavement, my old friend ...**

Thank you, piglet, for today's earworm. [Biased] It's only fairly recently that I've become attuned to the way that doesn't take much for me to get a tune on the brain, sometimes for the weirdest of reasons. One day in the supermarket I read the notice on the small plastic vegetable bags which asked customers to take "one bag at a time." "One bag at a time, sweet Jesus..."

I am off to said supermarket this morning, taking the Nenlets out to lunch and then probably trying to tackle some more of the paperwork mountain. [Roll Eyes] In other words, I expect to be back on the Ship sometime this afternoon. [Biased]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Sunny and warm here, most disconcerting for January.
I really should be doing some work but am feeling grotty and achy with a cold. I will put some glass in the kiln and then write a tutorial plan later this afternoon. I have managed a walk to the post office this morning so at least I've had some exercise.
 
Posted by Anglo Catholic Relict (# 17213) on :
 
Coldish. We had a hailstorm earlier, but it has passed now.

The good news from here is that my d (3rd yr History undergraduate) applied to a London uni for an MA on Monday, and was offered a place yesterday. We are hoping they will also offer finance in due course, but the offer of a place is very good news.

I am currently taking far too long to turn the junk room into a study for d, but have every hope it will happen at some point before the Lord returns. Aiming for cosy, pretty and very conducive to MA/(PhD?) studies.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Anglo Catholic Relict:
...I am currently taking far too long to turn the junk room into a study for d, but have every hope it will happen at some point before the Lord returns. Aiming for cosy, pretty and very conducive to MA/(PhD?) studies.

Remember that we knoweth not the hour...

* * * *

We had a rather lovely elephant at our local temple this evening - and all the local kids thought I was there to photograph them and not the rather large mammal just behind them! It then went off in procession with drummers and dancers and ladies carrying trays with lit lamps. The whole thing looked splendid.

Tomorrow is the big festival in the main village and temple so we shall be off photographing that most of the morning and evening - with a nap after lunch.
 
Posted by Anglo Catholic Relict (# 17213) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Remember that we knoweth not the hour...

Just as well, I suspect. [Smile]

quote:


* * * *

We had a rather lovely elephant at our local temple this evening - and all the local kids thought I was there to photograph them and not the rather large mammal just behind them! It then went off in procession with drummers and dancers and ladies carrying trays with lit lamps. The whole thing looked splendid.

Tomorrow is the big festival in the main village and temple so we shall be off photographing that most of the morning and evening - with a nap after lunch.

I want to go to the zoo and see the elephants now.

I like elephants. (Who doesn't?) [Smile]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I have entirely failed to write my tutorial plan as my work computer has been playing up and when I finally got it to agree to connect to the network drive the relevant notes were nowhere to be seen! I suspect they are on the main house computer but as my two sons are now firmly ensconsed on that playing minecraft/portal I don't stand a chance of hunting it down til 9pm [Roll Eyes] My own fault for not doing the work earlier in the day.
I think I might have a glass of something to recover and get my other half to nip down the chip shop for tea.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
... Tatze didn't want to get up this morning ...

Tatze is a wee dog after mine own heart. [Snore]

HA, I entirely sympathise re your computer. After the big power-cut and the couple of extra days off, I couldn't get the computer programme I use to open; it kept telling me that the remote computer wasn't connected. I discovered several days later that the computer in question was actually the one right next to my own computer, which I had assumed was a spare left behind by the previous occupant of my office space, and merely needed to be switched on ... [brick wall]

Must go to bed now - I've got a long day tomorrow: working until 4, then grab a quick bite to eat and head down to the Cathedral for the bishopping. I'm expecting it to be a v. long service, as there's all sorts of shenanigans and then a Eucharist which'll take ages as we're expecting a full cathedral.

There may be a limit to how much sense I make tomorrow evening.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Turned up at the station this morning, pressed the button on the train door and watched as the train started to glide away, doors resolutely shut. I'd skipped breakfast to catch this early train, and did not want to be sitting on a bench on the platform on a cold, dark January morning at 6.25 am for half an hour.

Today's pub lunch really made up for that. Log fires, a window seat, and an unexpected confit of duck cassoulet with wild rice on the specials menu proving to be utterly delicious. Came back to the office smelling of woodsmoke and feeling very calm and content. There's just something about watching the flames in the grate flicker and dance, and the logs glow and turn to ash.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
...
Today's pub lunch really made up for that. Log fires, a window seat, and an unexpected confit of duck cassoulet with wild rice on the specials menu proving to be utterly delicious. Came back to the office smelling of woodsmoke and feeling very calm and content. There's just something about watching the flames in the grate flicker and dance, and the logs glow and turn to ash.

Oh, yes. It's not that long since we converted from coal to gas. I don't miss the expense or the filth or hefting coal or ash, but I do miss watching the fire and a proper roasted chestnut.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I had a rather strange experience last night:

There was a festival on in the bigger village so we all headed off there and were doddling about, as you do, when a man came up and started to chat about the festival and so on - he then asked where I am from so I replied "England" whereupon he took my right hand, raised it to his lips, kissed it, said thank you and wandered off!

Hmmm, I thought.

So, when was the last time a random man came up to you in the street and kissed your hand?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's your irresistible charm, Wodders. [Big Grin]

New bishop successfully consecrated and installed. The Cathedral was absolutely packed, and although the service took over two hours, it actually didn't feel like it: the whole thing went off very smoothly.

The music went really well - one of the Great Feelings you get as a choral singer is when the whole choir comes in with "claves regni coelorum" at the end of Palestrina's Tu es Petrus. [Cool] D. was well pleased, we got lots of nice comments from people at the bun-fight afterwards, and there was Decanal Grinning™.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Oooh, think of me this morning. I have a two hour drive - mainly on my favourite free carpark also known as the M25 (it must be my favourite, I spend so much time on it) - to go and make the acquaintance of a possible new car. It's all very exciting. Only thing is, my own beloved Smudgemobile is on its last.. er... wheels. Hope it makes it there and back again.

Must remember to send the Smudgelet into the garage ahead of me to warn the salesman not to mention the s***p word with regards to the Smudgemobile. My head knows that's where it will end up but my heart just doesn't want to hear it said out loud!
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Ooh, what are you trying to buy?

This early You might actually manage to see the M25 with none of the variable speed limits active! A rare treat!

[ 18. January 2014, 07:11: Message edited by: Chocoholic ]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
I love my Smudgemobile so much that another Renault Kangoo is pretty well the only option. No other car (except perhaps the Citroen Berlingo which are even harder to find second hand than the Kangoo) will meet the bill. The Kangoo will carry all our musical instruments (with the exception of the piano!), all our luggage when we travel, is like driving a small car rather than a big one, gives me loads of height so I can see what's happening on the roads and, above all, PeteC will be able to fit in it when he visits at Easter. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
I had a lovely day yesterday, taking a friend out for coffee and a browse round a nice garden centre, but it all went to rats when I got home and found I'd lost the sapphire from my engagement ring. [Waterworks] (This was the second, bought in Sri Lanka 13 years ago).

Then Mr. S came home and helped me look for it, taking the trap off the washbasin in the downstairs loo. Which of course proved to have been cross-threaded and now leaks. [Mad]

And to put the tin lid on it, the 'mystery mixed case of champagne and sparkling wine' from Tesco, advertised as 3 bottles of each, turned up with four bottles of cava and two of prosecco. [Mad] [Mad] We can return it, no problem, but I was so disappointed [Frown]

I know none of this compares with what other people have to put up with, but it wasn't the best Friday evening I've ever had!

Mrs. S, less than gruntled
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
My Friday was rather nice, first creative writing class of the year followed by meeting husband for shopping expedition and a pub lunch, by the very fast flowing Thames.

mrs S hope you have luck finding the sapphire and Smudgie that the M25 is empty and the car you are going to fits the bill.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
It was a nice slow start to the morning today - but now I have decided to have a steamy lunchtime.

(As in cleaning the kitchen with the steam cleaner and the steam mop [Smile] )
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Hope you've succeeded in buying the new car, Smudgie.

I'm really enjoying slobbing having worked straight through from start of term on 6 January to last night. We had "optional" training on Saturday and Sunday in preparation for OFSTED. I wasn't making sense by Friday.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
One of the great advantages of getting on a bit is that I am no longer at all concerned about whether I make any sense to others at any given time or place - I am sure Smudgie will be along shortly to give her honest and unbiased opinion as to how much sense I do make.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
... but now I have decided to have a steamy lunchtime ...

[Eek!] TMI. [Big Grin]

I had a slow start today too, although I haven't had a completely unproductive day. I decided while lying in bed thinking about getting up that what I fancied was some Scots broth, so as I had some lamb bones in the freezer I made some stock, chopped the veggies while it was cooking and then made the soup. Though I say it what shouldn't, it was v. nice.

I also had a flash of inspiration for the Vestry pot-luck* on Thursday: it'll be just a couple of days before the end of the haggis season, and I haven't made haggis for ages, so I suggested to D. that if I did that, he could do the clapshot (which he does very nicely).

* I'm not on the Vestry (I was asked years ago if I'd serve, but as the organist's wife I don't think I should), but we get invited to the pot-luck, which is usually a fairly jolly affair.

[ 19. January 2014, 02:15: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Clapshot obviously means something else to the Scots than it does to this ex-sexual health person!

Now have a guess which silly person forgot to take his nightly low dose antihistamine last night?

Correct; but, sorry, no prizes this week.

I woke up at about 02:30 with a sneezing fit and took a pill then but I still had trouble getting to sleep again until the temple music started about 05:00 when I dropped off into the void to be, quite rudely, woken by the alarm at 06:15 - Himself redeemed matters a bit by bringing me a hot cup of something just after my shower. We've done church and breakfast and I am now contemplating either going for a walk to wake myself up OR going back to bed.

I am not at all sure which one will win.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We went to a lovely dinner party last night, there were six of us and the food was great.

Smoked mackerel and salad to start, chicken and leek pie with roasted veg then custard tart with blackberries and cream. All home made.

Very nice.

My friend is the breadwinner and her husband the cook etc. He cares for the grandchildren during the week. She works looong hours but the house is sooooo neat and tidy I always return with new resolve to get sorted! We have so much more time than them, but are 100X messier!

[ 19. January 2014, 09:52: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I had to google clapshot too. Yet another strangely named British dish to add to the list of toad in the hole and spotted dick.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Does noone make marmalade these days ? I've been looking round without success for seville oranges and may have to go for grapefruit marmalade instead.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
Does noone make marmalade these days ? I've been looking round without success for seville oranges and may have to go for grapefruit marmalade instead.

My Mum used to get them in big tins like
this. Ahhh ... memories!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
Does noone make marmalade these days ? I've been looking round without success for seville oranges and may have to go for grapefruit marmalade instead.

My Mum used to get them in big tins like
this. Ahhh ... memories!

Mine too! [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I came this -"- close to buying a tin for old time's sake!

[Axe murder]

But my New Year's revolution is 'no impulse buys' so I resisted!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
moonlitdoor - Tesco's had boxes of Seville oranges for making marmalade last winter - late January time. They didn't do well, because I bought some very cheaply as they went out of date (and promptly used them in other cookery). I've only found marmalade Googling now.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Different Google suggests Borough Market.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It might be out of season. They had them in Morrisons before Christmas. You might still be able to get them in some other supermarkets, Waitrose do them but I don't know whether they have a year-round supply.

Nice peaceful afternoon out in the countryside on this sunny January day. It felt more like early spring. The cottages looked beautiful, the sheep were out grazing on the hillsides, the snowdrops are coming up, and I stopped off at one of my favourite country pubs to be able to sit by another log fire and enjoy watching the flames dance, and tendrils of blue smoke drift up the chimney. Simple pleasures really are the best.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
Does noone make marmalade these days ? I've been looking round without success for seville oranges and may have to go for grapefruit marmalade instead.

My Mum used to get them in big tins like
this. Ahhh ... memories!

Mine too! [Axe murder]
Lakeland has tins of Seville oranges, I have some in my cupboard for marmalade making.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
Does noone make marmalade these days ? I've been looking round without success for seville oranges.

My local greengrocer has them. Which is probably of no use to you.
 
Posted by A.Pilgrim (# 15044) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
Does noone make marmalade these days ? I've been looking round without success for seville oranges and may have to go for grapefruit marmalade instead.

I make my own marmalade, as home-made is so much better than anything you can buy. I've just finished this year's efforts and have 18lb of the stuff stacked in the larder. Half of it plain Seville, the other half with added ginger in it (experimental recipe). It's rather fun trying things out, but the cycle for learning from the previous experiment is rather long.

The Seville orange season seemed to start very early this year, as I saw them in the shops just before Christmas. My local Waitrose still has them in stock, so shipmates wishing to get some might try that variety of supermarket (if they have one near).
Angus

[ 19. January 2014, 19:21: Message edited by: A.Pilgrim ]
 
Posted by A.Pilgrim (# 15044) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
It might be out of season. They had them in Morrisons before Christmas. You might still be able to get them in some other supermarkets, Waitrose do them but I don't know whether they have a year-round supply.

P.S. Sorry for DP, but forgot to add that Sevilles have one of the shortest seasons of any fruit, and are not available at any other time of year.
A.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Where I live is more Aldi territory than Waitrose. I have sometimes thought there should be a Waitrose diet as shopping there would drastically reduce the amount of food I could afford to buy. There are branches a lot nearer here than Borough Market though, that's well over an hour away. So thanks Angus, I'll try that this week.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
The Seville orange season is about 3 months too long - marmalade looks beautiful but spoils a good piece of toast [Projectile]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Waitrose has them, plus jam-making sugar and maslin pans.

BUT if you can't find oranges then Tesco and Sainsbury usually stock something called Mamade which is really tinned ready prepared oranges for making your own marmalade.

Not ideal, but better than nothing.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
posted by daisydaisy
quote:
...marmalade looks beautiful but spoils a good piece of toast
Toast ???

Marmalade is best eaten spread on fried bread: the combination of the slightly sweet fat-fried bread and the sharpness of bitter orange marmalade is unbeatable.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Clapshot obviously means something else to the Scots than it does to this ex-sexual health person!
...

Clapshot is a dish of potatoes and turnips (tatties and neeps), cooked separately then mashed together with butter and a generous grind of pepper, and is de rigueur with haggis.

Fairly ordinary sort of Sunday here, except we had the new Bishop preaching in the morning; he particularly wanted his first episcopal sermon to be in the Cathedral, which is just as it should be.

We think he's going to be a Good Thing. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Carrying on from Thursday night and the elephant at our local temple who then took part in a procession to another temple down by the river.

Apparently when he got there he got a bit bad tempered, thankfully nobody was injured in any way but he took exception to an ice cream truck, lawfully going about its business, and pushed it into the river! This has been the cause of much jollity locally but I think it is all rather tinged with relief as an elephant getting out of hand is really the stuff of nightmares - they are VERY big and VERY strong!

Presumably the local fish enjoyed the ice cream dessert.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
An ecumenical elephant then.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
An ecumenical elephant then.

Ecumental if you ask me!


[Eek!]
 
Posted by A.Pilgrim (# 15044) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
Where I live is more Aldi territory than Waitrose. I have sometimes thought there should be a Waitrose diet as shopping there would drastically reduce the amount of food I could afford to buy. ...

It is an urban myth that Waitrose are expensive. (Though I notice that you give your location as London, so it might be different there). There was a brief tangent on the ‘God’s Cadets’ thread in Purg about supermarkets, and pydseybare made the accurate observation that
quote:
Originally posted by pydseybare:
Lots of poor people shop in Waitrose. Their reductions on shrinkage food (at the end of the day) are often much greater than those from other leading supermarkets, and their stores are more regularly accessible by walking rather than having to drive to an out-of-town park.

It is entirely possible to live on a diet spending less money in Waitrose than you would in Aldi or Lidl - providing you are prepared to shop every day just before the shop closes and prepared to eat whatever is near the sell-by date.

followed by Jade C:
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
I'm a poor person who shops at Waitrose - along with their reductions, their Essentials range costs just the same as the major supermarkets and is better quality. My local Waitrose is also my nearest butcher, meaning I can save money by buying individual pieces of meat. It's also possible for poor people to prefer more ethical supermarkets and to approve of the John Lewis Group's business practices.

I have a freezer full of food bought from the Waitrose meat and fish counters at bargain prices. My guess is that because Waitrose have ethical relationships with their suppliers, in the event that they find themselves oversupplied, they don’t make up false excuses to reject consignments of food – unlike what at least one other supermarket has been reported as doing.

Hope you get the oranges. [Smile]

Angus
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Waitrose is my local shop, 10 mins walk away in the village. Great for me as I do not drive and cannot carry shopping far, I have a handy shopping trolley. Having a supermarket nearby which also fits in with my ethical values is an added bonus and the meat is very good quality.
Been to the dentist in town this morning and was feeling virtuous so I walked the 3 miles back home. I've just popped the slow cooker on, beef in ale [Smile] I'm using up some leftover home brew (Woodforde's Sundew) so I can make some more Woodforde's Wherry.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Its not just on price that Waitrose wins: in soft fruit season the choice for me is between market - but cheaper only for very large quantities - Lidl or Waitrose. T**co fruit starts to rot the minute you get it out of the shop IME.

And, as mentioned above, the reductions at Waitrose can be very good.

Last summer at the end of the day got 5 ready-cooked chickens for £3 - fed children and 6 of their friends (plus me) and enough left over for a meal for another 6 the next day.
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
We spend less with Waitrose than we did with Tesco. Waitrose Essentials range tastes better than Tesco's Finest range.

Plus we get 15% discount as Hugal works for John Lewis.

Their delivery service is still finding its feet, but improving gradually. Last week we received a bag and a half of someone else's shopping along with our own - so we phoned up, and were told to keep it free of charge.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
No Waitrose here, can't get to Supermarkets to shop because of disability, so have Tesco deliver. Everything is usually fine, including fruit and veg. And not expensive so long as you don't choose out of season stuff. And the men who deliver are very good, and helpful.

We also have local Co-op shops, which are very ethical, and easy to get round, but don't have the range of goods of a big supermarket. We shop there quite often, prices usually about the same, but you have to watch the quality of fruit and veg.

And I am lucky enough to have a Real Butcher just down the road, so I get real meat. The Aberdeen Angus beef is superb for a treat, the farm in Scotland is known, in fact, I could probably find out the name of the animal I am eating if I tried!

What more could I want??
 
Posted by Bene Gesserit (# 14718) on :
 
Locations of office and home have meant, for the last x years, weekday shopping at Waitrose, main weekly shop at Sainsbury's

Then an Aldi shop opened just near Sainsbury's, and we found that Aldi food is much better quality than Sainsbury's so we do the bulk of the weekly shop there, just getting loose veg (which Aldi don't do, theirs is all prepacked)and a few other odds and sods from Sainsbury's.

Aldi's food and the Waitrose range are both excellent quality and even the latter is not what you'd call expensive. Between the two of them - theoretically at opposite ends of the spectrum - they do us proud.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
Aldi is fantastic. As you say, good quality food and inexpensive. They do a good range of bottled beers too at a fraction of the cost of the same stuff at Sainsbury's. Even when Sainsbury's do their 3 for £5 special offer, Aldi still works out cheaper.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm sort of assuming that this tangent is about avoiding Tesco's and Sainsbury's, but when we lived in Belfast it was quite a novelty when they moved in (it was part of the "peace dividend") - before that we only had very ordinary Co-ops, a one-off called Supermac, a local chain whose name now escapes me and Marks & Sparks (which was lovely but expensive).

There was a very good Tesco Metro (with a tiny but very well-stocked wine shop) which was about 10 minutes' walk from both D's and my work, and Sainsbury's was a 10-minute drive from our house. Also, when they first came to NI, Sainsbury's did Air Miles, and with clever shopping, having their credit card (double points) and buying our petrol there, we could get a trip to Orkney* once a year, which would have cost us anything from £600 to £800 if we'd had to pay for it.

* That was by far the most sensible way of using Air Miles - a short, but (per mile) expensive route.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
There has recently been a slackening in the rules about Foreign Direct Investment in retail here and Tesco have inked an agreement with Tata Group, the people who make Land Rover and Jaguar, so we may be getting Tesco bursting out all over - I am not at all convinced that this is a good idea.
 
Posted by A.Pilgrim (# 15044) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bene Gesserit:
Locations of office and home have meant, for the last x years, weekday shopping at Waitrose, main weekly shop at Sainsbury's

Then an Aldi shop opened just near Sainsbury's, and we found that Aldi food is much better quality than Sainsbury's so we do the bulk of the weekly shop there, just getting loose veg (which Aldi don't do, theirs is all prepacked)and a few other odds and sods from Sainsbury's.

Aldi's food and the Waitrose range are both excellent quality and even the latter is not what you'd call expensive. Between the two of them - theoretically at opposite ends of the spectrum - they do us proud.

Interesting, in the light of this discussion, that when the Christmas trading figures for the supermarket sector were released in the New Year, Aldi and Waitrose (as you say, theoretically at opposite ends of the spectrum) both showed growth, while the middle-ground retailers Morrisons and Tesco reported a drop in sales. I'm not sure how Sainsburys did.
Angus
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spike:
Even when Sainsbury's do their 3 for £5 special offer,

That's not a special offer, that's the standard price at our local off licence.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
Wow, you've got a local off licence? I thought they'd all been killed by the big supermarket chains.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
I start my shopping at Aldi, and anything I can't get there I buy at Waitrose but I'm not convinced I spend less at Aldi, and it seems I'm not the only one


[link coding corrected - WW]

[ 23. January 2014, 02:38: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Great link daisydaisy - thanks!

Himself isn't well and even went to see the Dr last night, on his own! It seems to be a throat infection [man flu?] and he'll be right again in a few days. We've cancelled the order of wood for his cremation.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The haggis is made for the Vestry bash tomorrow; it just needs to be baked, and D's going to make the clapshot as near the time as possible, as it really needs to be served piping hot.

Poor Himself. [Frown] He needs some of your patent ginger-and-honey thingy. He's in good company; I've been getting the feeling over the last day or two that my office-mate has generously shared his aeroplane-flu with me, so I've taken a cold-remedy powder with lemon and honey* and will shortly go to bed.

[Snore]

* I would have put some whisky into it, but I used it in the haggis ...
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
I start my shopping at Aldi, and anything I can't get there I buy at Waitrose but I'm not convinced I spend less at Aldi, and it seems I'm not the only one


[link coding corrected - WW]

[Killing me]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spike:
Wow, you've got a local off licence? I thought they'd all been killed by the big supermarket chains.

Three within a hundred yards of me. Booze is cheaper than in the supermarkets.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Our village has an awarding winning local wine merchant who doesn't sell real ale and closes at 8pm. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
We have five quality wine merchants within a mile of us. It's all we can do to keep up.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Disappointed] seems the nearest we have to an "envy" smiley; in Newfoundland the Liquor Corporation is a government-run affair and all the wine shops stock pretty much the same stuff, so there's never much in the way of excitement. I miss nice, interesting off-licences.

Very enjoyable pot-luck at the Cathedral; about half of the haggis and nearly all the clapshot got eaten, which isn't bad considering how un-fond most Newfoundlanders are of lamb or things made from it.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
And the Newfie version of clapshot shows up in the Newfoundland boiled dinner.

We once took a commercial haggis to a weekend Scout camp with about 50 troops from the USA and Eastern Ontario. It was relatively popular with those who ventured to try it - a fair proportion of kids from the USA blenched - but that left more for those of us - leaders and boys alike - who actually liked it.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:


Very enjoyable pot-luck at the Cathedral; about half of the haggis and nearly all the clapshot got eaten, which isn't bad considering how un-fond most Newfoundlanders are of lamb or things made from it.

Haggis is made of lamb? (as opposed to pork, beef etc).

I know it is, but if you aren't told, would you ever know??? It is, after all, a form of sausage and one should never ask what goes into a sausage (nor watch one being made).
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
My haggis is made from minced lamb and chicken livers (should have been lamb liver, but it's very hard to find) along with oats, an egg, an onion, lots of spices and a wee drop of whisky, but I make no claims whatsoever as to its authenticity; the recipe is adapted from one I found on the Interweb called "Americanised Haggis".

[Killing me]

Oh, and there's no sheep's stomach involved: it's baked in the oven like a meat-loaf. I told people last night to think of it as a Scottish meat-loaf ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
We're having a MacSween one. I actually have a MacSween veggie one too as I think that tastes even better, we'll have that next week.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Marmite banned!

[Waterworks]

[Waterworks]


Care packages cheerfully accepted after May 1st.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I feel a letter to Her Maj coming up - Brits have an inalienable right to poison the Colonies!

The additives to Marmite™ are really nothing to worry about - it's the massive salt content that should raise eyebrows!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
And the Newfie version of clapshot shows up in the Newfoundland boiled dinner.

We once took a commercial haggis to a weekend Scout camp with about 50 troops from the USA and Eastern Ontario. It was relatively popular with those who ventured to try it - a fair proportion of kids from the USA blenched - but that left more for those of us - leaders and boys alike - who actually liked it.

I'll bet that had they not known what it was called/where the original came from/what the ingredients were it would have been wolfed down by any scouts I have ever come across.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
My haggis is in the slow cooker [Smile]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Of course - it's Burns Night! I'd completely forgotten. [Roll Eyes]

Not a haggis fan, frankly. Just enjoying a glass of red wine with Mr Nen before bed.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Thanks Nenya

I knew there was a good reason to finish PhD working a while before I went to bed.

Jengie
 
Posted by pete173 (# 4622) on :
 
Haggis, neeps and tatties in a Wetherspoon. Burns in London NW. And a decent glass or two of Auld Acquaintance Scottish Ale. Scots customs aren't all bad - though I failed in my attempt to read and comprehend the Address to a Haggis.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
D. would agree with you, Pete173 - he reckons the Burns Supper would be fine if it weren't for the awful Burns poetry. He's contemplating the instigation of a McGonagall Day. [Big Grin]

I've had a moderately productive day - I made and froze a batch of chicken stock, and turned the chicken livers left over from the haggis production into pâté.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A few months ago two of our neighbours had babies. The other evening during our walk Pete and came across Mum 1 with little daughter on her knee, daughter clad in knickers and top so, at mum's request and agreement took a photo for her of her and baby. Mum 2 comes along, sees what is happening and [being hugely camera shy] plonks little son on Mum 1's other knee - he was clad in a rather short top and nothing else but I felt obliged to take a photo of Mum 1, Baby 1 & Baby 2.

Yesterday I took the photo in for printing full knowing that in UK I would run the risk of being arrested. When I returned to collect the prints not a word was said.

I also yesterday, in the post, received my letter from The Department of Work and Pensions telling me how much State Retirement Pension I will be due later in the year when I turn 65 - certainly enough to make our lives here a little easier.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
D. would agree with you, Pete173 - he reckons the Burns Supper would be fine if it weren't for the awful Burns poetry. He's contemplating the instigation of a McGonagall Day. [Big Grin]


How about the other McGonagall, combined with a general Dame Maggie Smith day when we can repeat her marvellous Downton lines?
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Well, that was the wettest, stormiest walk evuur!

Tatze and I were the only people in the park. Thank goodness for waterproof trousers/gloves/hat/wellies! I think Tatze was grateful for her waterproof labrador fur too (they were originally bred as fisherman's retrievers). She still hoolied around - she just played with imaginary friends instead of real ones!

My mobile has decided there is 'no signal' - could this be due to the storms?
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
When 'No Signal' happens to me I take it as a sign that the phone has decided I have no mates.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Our Burns' Night supper was modified by the replacement of the haggis by venison steaks. Neeps, tatties etc all present and correct and, for all we know, the venison could have been Scottish.

We deviated from the standard by drinking wine rather than Scotch.
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
Saw pic. of one tonight - neeps, tatties and a sausage.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
We had haggis and sweet tatties. Not authentic, but there's not a drop of Scottish blood in the house so we were just going for what's tasty, washed down with a bottle of cider.

I'm very happy to celebrate other people's high days and holidays so long as there's food involved. Chinese noodles on Friday anyone?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We seem to have festivals all the time here, it's the advantage of a very mixed village with Hindu, Muslim and Christian living all mixed up together - I can send you our dates!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I can send you our dates ...

I don't like dates; can you send raisins instead? [Big Grin] **fetches coat**

We had some wet and wild weather here today too: it didn't start off too badly but by the time we got home after lunch it was chucking down freezing rain, blowing a gale and making the pavements treacherous.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We had a light dusting of snow today. Not for long, but was nice while it lasted. We need some winter here - all we have had so far is rain rain rain.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Sunshine and (chilly) showers here...the sun is shining now, and showing me that I do need to clean the windows! But I probably won't...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thinking about cleaning windows is stressful enough without having to actually do it!
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
We seem to have festivals all the time here, it's the advantage of a very mixed village with Hindu, Muslim and Christian living all mixed up together - I can send you our dates!

Well I've got the rellies celebrating Kavadee at the moment which would be a good excuse, but sweet Indian cake takes a bit more organising.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
A good food day here, it's my eldest's 13th and I've made him a chocolate cake that look like the one in his Portal online game. I've also made bread, apricot Danishes and almond croissants so quite the baking day.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I've had a very pleasant day so far...which is about to be spoiled by having to complete some statistical returns. Hey ho.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I am proud to announce I have managed my first ever on-line Tax Return all by myself, and all done and dusted before the deadline. Last time I had dealing with such things it was through an accountant, was paper based, and wrapped in mystery.

I am far less proud of the grumpy, uncommunicative, anti-social grouch I have been for more weeks than I like to think about, and finally ended up giving myself the most colossal talking to, and stern instructions to pull up my big girl panties and just deal with it. (I may need loads of prayer for patience with at least two people in the process).

Hopefully, normal Japes service has resumed. I was getting bored with myself!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:
stern instructions to pull up my big girl panties and just deal with it.

I used the expression about putting on our big girl panties at work the other day; the woman I work with was completely nonplussed. [Killing me]

Well done about the tax return - Mr Nen does ours and talks me through mine... I have to work hard to stop my eyes glazing over... [Hot and Hormonal]

More rain today; feeling so sorry for the Somerset Levels and other flooded areas. [Frown]

Nen - rather weary of wind and rain.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
It's a brilliant phrase, isn't it - "Pull up your Big Girl Panties and Deal with It..."

I had forgotten it, and I need to do just that very thing in several areas at the moment (messy study/desk. statistical returns, expenses claims...some decisions to be made...)

But at the moment, it's high time this Big Girl went off to Bed. Night all!!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My turn to be grouchy. I am having my maths lesson observed by the head tomorrow. I have not been singled out - he's a new head so doing the rounds. It feels uncomfortable + will take extra preparation, effort and time away from my normal teaching for Thursdays.

Grump grump grump [Mad] grump grump grump grump

I must now stop procrastinating and get on with preparing said lesson - humph!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I seem to be having a day of students phoning and colleagues finding me extra work to do.
Never mind, I'm still in a state of euphoria for having resigned my February course; no new students starting in 2 weeks, no overlap in courses to teach and the whole summer off [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I was too annoyed to post here yesterday. I finally had confirmation that the phone I lost a week ago was indeed handed in at Bournemouth station that morning - from where the trail has gone cold. It hasn't been passed to the Lost Property people at Waterloo, and I have no idea whether I will see it again. Nor has the replacement Sim card arrived, so I can't buy a replacement handset because it won't count as an upgrade, it would have to be a new phone and number with compulsory top-up credit, £30 more expensive.

The Lost Property website, annoyingly, says it only takes 2 days for an item to reach them, though the staff say it can in practice take two weeks.

Yes, it's my own fault and I know it. Still, it is a First World Problem, and I can do Sudoku on the journeys.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
It's a brilliant phrase, isn't it - "Pull up your Big Girl Panties and Deal with It..."

Indeed. Having to do that a lot at work at present. [Roll Eyes]

But the whole family is going out for a meal this evening to celebrate Nenlet1's birthday so not only do I not have to cook [Yipee] but we have a get-together and a good chat and a lovely meal with a glass of wine. [Big Grin]

Nen - diet starts tomorrow.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Lots more rain but today I have my waterproof boots which are fluffy inside, so warm and dry feet for me! No walking round or jumping over puddles, just walking straight through them! I've resisted the urge to jump in them so far...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
We had a light dusting of snow today ...

We're getting quite a heavy dusting at the moment, which is why I'm posting at this time on a Wednesday evening, when I'd normally be at choir practice; D. decided to put off the rehearsal and have one on Saturday afternoon instead, as we've got a big service on Sunday for Candlemas.

This has been a bit of a b*ll*cks of a day; the snow was supposed to start at 11 a.m., but didn't start until about 1 p.m. The University was closed in the afternoon (after I'd finished for the day [Disappointed] ) and although we're due to get a total of about a foot of snow, it'll probably have stopped by the morning, so we won't get a snow-day tomorrow either.

Stuff that for a lark. [Mad]

[ 30. January 2014, 19:34: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Fredegund (# 17952) on :
 
I can see snow falling...unhappily I don't suppose it will settle considering how sodden the ground is. And probably not serious enough to stop the trains. Bother.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I went to buy a new internet dongle for Pete this morning and noticed that on their smellies shelf they had a bottle of a new [to me] fragrance from Imperial Leather™ called Liverpool - the mind veritably boggles!

I imagine just a hint of The Albert Dock at low tide and a soupcon of the smell of the paddock after the Grand National.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
No snow here, just endless drizzle.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
No snow here - just chilly and overcast. [Roll Eyes]

I am Home Alone for a few hours and it's such a treat that I hardly know what to do with myself. [Big Grin] I could write my journal, start one of the books on my ever-growing To Read list, watch one of the DVDs I got for Christmas which are still in their cellophane...

Nen - drinking coffee. [Biased]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I went to buy a new internet dongle for Pete this morning and noticed that on their smellies shelf they had a bottle of a new [to me] fragrance from Imperial Leather™ called Liverpool - the mind veritably boggles!

I imagine just a hint of The Albert Dock at low tide and a soupcon of the smell of the paddock after the Grand National.

Wonderful!! [Killing me]

There could be the makings of a thread in this.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
The lesson observation went really well. I am still glowing from all the good feedback.

Phew phew phew phew. If it hadn't gone well I'd have jacked it all in there and then. I put so much effort into one lesson it darn well had to be graded outstanding!

Hopefully I'll be left alone to get on with it now.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
That's good news, Boogie. [Big Grin]

I've had a delightfully indulgent day in front of the fire with my books but now need to embark on cooking tea.

Nen - wishing she could have days like this a bit more often.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Good on you, Boogie. [Yipee]

I get the feeling I may regret asking this, but what's a dongle?

[Confused]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
After providing the most shocking customer service in the known universe this Christmas (not one but two cancellations that added up to a seventeen hour [Eek!] delay for our flight) Air France have somewhat redeemed themselves.

We sent a very strongly worded letter and the reply came back today. Some of it is a bit weaselly (we was obeying safety regulations and our staff totally did their best - yerright) but on the upside, they have given each passenger a whopping 250€ for a new ticket our of choice. Which is (a) not so bad and (b) pretty much an admission of guilt anyway, since it's more than the value of our original tickets on the doomed Christmas journey.

They may now get off the spit.

[ 30. January 2014, 19:42: Message edited by: la vie en rouge ]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
A dongle can be used to plug into your computer for mobile data, so if you are out and about you can get internet connection. You pay a subscription for them generally or get them as part of a package.

It's a great word!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
...Some of it is a bit weaselly...

Ahem!

Glad you got it sorted, airlines are all bad but some are worse than others - they all care more for the shareholders than either customers or staff.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
As of last night, my phone has decided to finish its little break by the south coast seaside and is now in London, wanting a lift home.

I suppose this is the trouble with smartphones - they're intelligent, so they get curious and bored, and want to explore. I’ll be having a few words with it later on.

(Given the way things have gone so far, I may also christen it either "Romy" or "Wanda".)
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Glad you found it, it must have been very worrying.

Finally got the tax return in last night (a day later than last year [Big Grin] so much for best laid plans and all that). Today is a busy one shopping, tidying and baking as we have 7 thirteen year old boys descending on the house for my son's birthday - pizza, film and fireworks, if the rain holds off.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Have fun, HA! Sounds rather terrifying, lots of 13 year old boys around the place...

Having spent a lovely lunchtime and afternoon catching up with a friend whom I have not seen for several years (and we picked up where we left off) I now have to Get On With It and prepare for tomorrow morning and write Sunday's sermon and choose a month's worth of hymns...
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
Having spent a lovely lunchtime and afternoon catching up with a friend whom I have not seen for several years (and we picked up where we left off)

I have this to look forward to tomorrow. [Big Grin] Am having coffee with a friend I haven't seen to talk to properly for months and prior to that it was years - and we talked as though we'd never been apart. In fact, I have a lovely, if busy, day ahead tomorrow and haven't got to do any planning for Sunday apart from take a dessert for shared lunch at church.

Nen - whose weekends are not always such fun. [Biased]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Today I received a letter from work confirming that they are taking up my offer of voluntary redundancy for my February course (not full redundancy as I still will teach 2 October - June courses, more a reduction of hours) but that they need to pay me 3 months salary in lieu as I didn't get 3 months notice of confirmation. So next month I get an extra 3 month's pay for giving up a course I no longer want to teach. Now I have less marking to do in the Spring, the whole summer off and I get 3 months pay for doing nothing. Result! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That sounds like a very good deal, HA - hope you enjoy practising for retirement. [Yipee]

Fun times today - went out with the lab staff and students to celebrate one of the students handing in her PhD thesis, and the choice of celebration was bowling. No matter that I'm absolutely rubbish at it (I think I got two "strikes" the whole afternoon) - I really rather enjoyed it, although I think I may have developed bowler's knee/shoulder/back/neck ... [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Were you wearing a bowler hat?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
Glad you found it, it must have been very worrying.

Yes, 11 days of "who has got it and are they doing anything with the info on it". It's back, a bit dirtier and scuffed, and someone has opened the cover and removed the 32GB SD card so my photos and apps have gone, but everything else is intact. I'm a bit annoyed about having to pay £11 retrieval and storage fees after nearly 2 weeks and having the SD card taken, but what the hell.

Nice afternoon in Chinatown and the National Gallery afterwards, despite the rain. I'd meant to explore the South Bank, but it really wasn't the weather for it and ended up in the medieval section of the NG: a real delight. Some of those paintings look startingly recent, so clear and bright with the gold still sparkling, even 700-odd years later.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I'm off to walk the dog then visit Mum. The dog comes too - she is like a PAT dog for all the old folks, puts her head on their knees to be fussed. One lady says "I love you" to her over and over again.

It's a lovely sunny day! [Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Sun just disappearing here, and getting windy. But going over, minus our dog, to see family. [Smile]
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
been niceish weather here, but weird. Bright sun then hail, and a strong wind. Now an odd yellow light over everything!

But not cold. which is good.

My son (14) has had xbox and kindle privileges removed for the day, and is currently building a kit car left over from christmas. peaceful...
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
... and I just want to report the weridness of taking dogs out but picking up wrong jacket, so having to go out again afterward to retrieve poos. In the hail. I took the car. We are the strangest nation on earth.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Taliesin:
But not cold. which is good.

Not good at all. While it's nice at the moment, the ramification of this is that this summer we'll see a larger than usual influx of insects, particularly ants and wasps, as we've not had a decent frost so more of the queens will survive the winter than usual.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
I was being upbeat, dammit! I'm actually praying for snow.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
It's raining again. Pouring with rain. I've had enough of it. Am sick of rain. Want the rain to stop. [brick wall] We're going out this evening and we'll get wet. I'm tired of getting wet. I'm fed up with hearing the sound of rain on the windows. I don't want to keep waking in the night to the sound of rain.

Nen - did I mention I was tired of rain?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spike:
Not good at all. While it's nice at the moment, the ramification of this is that this summer we'll see a larger than usual influx of insects, particularly ants and wasps, as we've not had a decent frost so more of the queens will survive the winter than usual.

Not necessarily. Winter hasn't finished with us yet: I've a feeling that February may yet see the winter chill we haven't had so far. Snow will be fine, provided it doesn't settle.
 
Posted by Ceannaideach (# 12007) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spike:
quote:
Originally posted by Taliesin:
But not cold. which is good.

Not good at all. While it's nice at the moment, the ramification of this is that this summer we'll see a larger than usual influx of insects, particularly ants and wasps, as we've not had a decent frost so more of the queens will survive the winter than usual.
See this is exactly what I'm not looking forward to this year. Is there a patron saint of snow and frost to whom we might entreat?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Taliesin:
... I'm actually praying for snow ...

We're supposed to be getting about 6 inches of it tomorrow - would you like some? [Big Grin]

It was one of those beautiful, sunny but cold winter days that Newfoundland's so good at today. I can't say I did very much with it though, except go to the choir practice postponed from Wednesday. Should be a good Candlemas service tomorrow. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Candlemas and no morning mass at the Latin Catholic church we usually go to [this weekend there are evening masses both last night and tonight] but we found they were having a morning mass at the very old and very beautiful Syro-Malabar alternative so we hied off there despite it being quite difficult getting Pete in there - three steepish steps up, a lintel of less than a foot wide then a step down is not easy with a wheelchair. They have another new priest, which was a surprise, and it was nice to have a change of rite, not that I understood a word of it, of course. The new priest was entreating us to return next week but I don't know that we will. I may attend there on my own occasionally when Pete goes back to Canada, the building is very beautiful.

What did surprise me a bit is that the new priest must be a Sunderland fan as the altars were decked out in Red and White vertical stripes. Is this usual for Candlemas? I suppose I should ask in Eccles but I don't think I've posted there for several years.

The altar boys lead parts of the service but they are the only ones without microphones - 11 or 12 year old voices just can't be projected adequately in a large building full of about 300 folks.

Meanwhile the weather continues warm and bright and sunny and the younger son of our new neighbours feels it necessary to ring his cycle bell almost continuously as he cycles round the neighbourhood - he and his brother bought the bike between them by saving up industriously for a couple of years and they are very proud of the fact!

Their parents are quite proud of them, too.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I rather fancy a short, very cold snap to kill the slugs and snails. But the good news is that for the moment, the rain has stopped and the sun is shining!

Still, more rain is coming I hear. I have noticed the weather forecasters on TV are running out of suitable expressions for their forecasts, and rather tell us its going to be wet, wet, and wet again with a brisk, no nonsense attitude.

Anyone noticed, or is it my imagination! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Meanwhile the weather continues warm and bright and sunny

That's really nice, WW. Really. I mean it. Seriously.

In other news, it's raining here.

Nen - who is pretty sure that Candlemas won't be mentioned or even thought of in the Baptist service she'll be part of in less than an hour.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
What did surprise me a bit is that the new priest must be a Sunderland fan as the altars were decked out in Red and White vertical stripes. Is this usual for Candlemas? I suppose I should ask in Eccles but I don't think I've posted there for several years.

He's just celebrating the thrashing of Newcastle.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
I know that an organist friend, also from God's own country, drapes a flag from her organ loft when we're victorious on the rugby field (not sure if this is for every game or just the championship).

Only after the blessing and dismissal, of course, but I'm told the Sunday School has children who are fascinated to see a dragon flag in church!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
A second beautiful sunny day that feels like early spring - sunshine, blue sky, fleecy clouds and NO RAIN. It was so nice that I went out for breakfast, and even had it at a quiet corner table outside, in the sun. Food always seems to taste better outside, and this was no exception. First time this year to eat al fresco: spring is on its way.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
What did surprise me a bit is that the new priest must be a Sunderland fan as the altars were decked out in Red and White vertical stripes. Is this usual for Candlemas? I suppose I should ask in Eccles but I don't think I've posted there for several years.

He's just celebrating the thrashing of Newcastle.
Not if he is a Sheffield United football fan.

Jengie
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
A second beautiful sunny day that feels like early spring - sunshine, blue sky, fleecy clouds and NO RAIN. It was so nice that I went out for breakfast, and even had it at a quiet corner table outside, in the sun. Food always seems to taste better outside, and this was no exception. First time this year to eat al fresco: spring is on its way.

There must be quite a divergence in temperature north-south. Bright enough today, but a high of 6 C (aka chew-your-face-off cold). But at least not the episodes of sleet there were yesterday.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
'Bout 10C here, Ariel must be made of strong stuff!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The wind wasn't blowing. Also I suppose I've become inured to having to spend longish periods of time on station platforms at either the crack of dawn or sunset, when it can be bitingly cold (and they will have those damn metal benches for you to sit on that freeze your entire body within two minutes), so by around 10.30 am, a quiet, sheltered table in the sun with a hot meal is a lovely bonus.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
... a high of 6 C (aka chew-your-face-off cold) ...

No no. A high of minus 6°C is chew-your-face-off cold. [Big Grin]

It wasn't quite as bad as that today, but it started to snow while we were in church this morning and has only stopped in the last hour or so, so we've got another 6 inches or so. And again, not coming at the right time to give us a snow-day. [Frown]

Candlemas went off very nicely (even though we were without our most confident soprano, who's recovering from surgery); both the Dean and D. were v. pleased.

I've actually got a bit of time off tomorrow, as we've got a big funeral at the Cathedral - a former president (equivalent of a vice-chancellor) of the University, who also happened to be a parishioner, so there'll be lots of academic big-wigs there. Nothing too elaborate musically - he didn't want a requiem, so we'll probably only have to sing an anthem, a Nunc Dimittis and a few hymns, maybe with a psalm thrown in for good measure.

We saw some fairly fearsome weather pictures from Aberystwyth this evening - hope the Welsh contingent round those parts are all doing all right.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
We saw some fairly fearsome weather pictures from Aberystwyth this evening - hope the Welsh contingent round those parts are all doing all right.

Wodders, wodders, piglet used a naughty word! [Two face]

Mrs. S, telling tales ...
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
I'm not well, so I'm curled up in bed with hot water bottle and kindle... I do love my kindle... And have dropped into the ship via its tiny screen to see if tea and sympathy was available.
I have a high temperature and feel grim but no other symptoms. Only time and sleep well tell. But I really need to go to school tomorrow. [Frown]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Awwww, virtual tea and sympathy from me!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and from me, too.

Mrs S, piglet is Orcadian, what can one do?

[Biased]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
No-one ever told me that "Aberystwyth" was a naughty word* ... [Big Grin]

The funeral went well - in the event there was even less for us to do than we'd thought - just a couple of hymns and the Nunc Dimittis from Gibbons' Short Service (our favourite setting).

Taliesin, virtual tea and CAKE coming your way.

* although when the Grauniad published a British Universities Monopoly board, instead of "Go to Jail" it had "Go to Aberystwyth". [Devil]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
No-one ever told me that "Aberystwyth" was a naughty word* ... [Big Grin]

* although when the Grauniad published a British Universities Monopoly board, instead of "Go to Jail" it had "Go to Aberystwyth". [Devil]

I thought we all had to refer to it as Kumquat, in memory of the blessed Erin??? [Devil]

Oddly, both my children went there, although mercifully not at the same time. Master S loved it, loved every minute of it. Miss S loathed it with an equal passion and only lasted a term. I mean, I knew they were different, but really! [brick wall]

Mrs. S, still amazed at what a let-down genetics and heredity are.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Sympathies, Taliesin, I'm not well either and keep hoping to feel better soon. I went to the doctor's this morning and the whole expedition has worn me out completely. [Frown]

Nen - who has hit the bottom of the pit and is watching daytime TV. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
What a shame they cancelled Crossroads all those years ago - at least it was good for a daytime giggle!
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
Sympathies, Taliesin, I'm not well either and keep hoping to feel better soon. I went to the doctor's this morning and the whole expedition has worn me out completely. [Frown]

Nen - who has hit the bottom of the pit and is watching daytime TV. [Hot and Hormonal]

From me too, both of you - I've just recovered from Something Unmentionable, and it is blissful to be over it [Overused] Sometimes antibiotics just ROCK!

Mrs. S, having a Good Day today
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Can you catch the dreaded lurg over the internet? I seem to have been laid low as well. Have spent 36 hours or so dosing my tea and hot lemon with (purely medicinal) booze and watching films. It's funny how satisfying it is to watch superheroes beating the snot out of each other when you are under the weather.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I took my first lot of medication from the doctor, turned off the TV and slept for most of the afternoon. Now feel noticeably better. [Smile] My lovely mum, a retired nurse, always used to say that sleep's the best medicine but I'm sure the tablets have something to do with it too.

Nen - happy to be feeling a bit more human.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Glad to hear you're feeling a bit better, Nen. I'm not a nurse but I reckon your mum was right - if you can get a good night's (or in your case, afternoon's) sleep it'll do you the world of good.

V. cold (but bright and sunny) here today - it was -13°C when I got up to go to w*rk, and it hasn't really got a whole lot warmer.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
I took my first lot of medication from the doctor, turned off the TV and slept for most of the afternoon. Now feel noticeably better. [Smile] My lovely mum, a retired nurse, always used to say that sleep's the best medicine but I'm sure the tablets have something to do with it too.

Nen - happy to be feeling a bit more human.

Where's the 'Like' button when you need it? [Smile]

Hope everyone is feeling better this morning!

Mrs. S, off the tablets at last [Overused]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I'm feeling very sorry for all you lurgy-struck Shippies! Not nice to feel under the weather when the weather itself is enough to feel under, if you see what I mean! [Big Grin]

Blowing gales here, though not quite so bad as down in the southwest. And being on a hill, inland, we are saved from flooding.

Time, I think to make hot coffee (or any other drink you fancy) and get out the Hobnobs! [Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
You've got Hobnobs? [Yipee]
 
Posted by Meg the Red (# 11838) on :
 
Dagnabit! Why did I have to glance at this thread? (toddles off to buy Hobnobs)
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Canuck tangent]
They'd go perfectly with one's morning cup of Timmy's™, don't you think? [Smile]
[/Canuck tangent OFF]
 
Posted by Theophania (# 16647) on :
 
HOBNOBS!!!! No no, I do not want any no. I will eat carrots and like them and thus become thinner and less manky of skin.

Mmmm, hobnobs.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
Thanks for kind thoughts and virtual cake. I went to work, heroically!!! And am now home, and about ready to sleep again. There are no hobnobs in my house... but there is chocolate.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Theophania, who do you think you're kidding? [Devil]

If the weather forecast's right, we just might get a sn*w-day on Thursday - they're offering us about 6 inches of sn*w and quite a lot of wind. With my luck it'll either fizzle out by the morning, or not get going until after I finish w*rk at 1 o'clock ... [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
Hello piglet, I'm awake, but other Brits are sleepin. Wish we had snow. Although I'm too sick to play in it. [Frown]

I'm supposed to be going to London on Friday and Saturday to a major convention of music teachers. I'm so looking forward to it, but at this rate I'm not going to be able to go.

Bum. Feeling v sorry for myself.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I hope you are better soon Taliesin.

I'm about to attack another marking mountain - thirty 2000 word essays! But at the moment I am procrastinating [Big Grin]

I may have also just offered to teach a class of year 5s Tudor medicine [Eek!]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Taliesin, if you rest completely today might you be well enough to travel tomorrow? I hate to think of you having to miss something you've been looking forward to so much. [Frown]

I have a reasonably quiet day today, just seeing a couple of friends for a bit this afternoon, although I do have to do the grocery shop which always seems like a mammoth task. Have other shipmates experienced online shopping and what are your thoughts?

Nen - who has no interest in food at present so is finding it hard to think about. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
Have other shipmates experienced online shopping and what are your thoughts?

I love it!

I save a lot of money - food isn't tempting online like it is in the shop! The firm tells you when the delivery slot is, within an hour's margin. They have a frozen, a chilled and a normal section to the van. You can click 'replace with similar' or 'don't replace' for any stuff they don't have in.

I would do all my grocery shopping online if Mr Boogs wasn't the shopper/cook round here.

[Smile]

It's a beautiful, sunny, almost Spring day here in the Ribble Valley.

I am still at my brother's farm watching and waiting with Mum in her last days. She is a tough bird, like her daughter! She weighs four and a half stone and has had no food or drink since Sunday - and still she hangs on!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
That's interesting and helpful, Boogie. I must get my head round it, I think. I daresay it takes a while first time round?

Glad the weather is pleasant where you are. Have you been out with Tatze? It's raining here, just for a change. I'm thinking of you and your family often, may your dear mum go well and in peace. [Votive]

Nen - shopping. Yes.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Yes - but it's really easy.

Tatze isn't here but may be coming tomorrow if all is the same. Mr Boogs goes to Mexico on Saturday, he is taking a charity team to work out there. So Tatze will have to join us here.

I still get my doggy walks as there is a Springer spaniel called Bryn here. He's a livewire!

[Smile]

[ 06. February 2014, 09:47: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
In his last few years my dad did most of his food shopping online and loved it - he and a neighbour did it together to do a sizeable order - he lived in Sedbergh and the stores was in Kendal and he was in his 80s/90s and had had to give up driving - and in any case driving over t'fell at that age might have been unwise. ASDA are not my favourite UK store but they certainly gave him great service.

When one of us were there we would drive him down to Booths in Kirby Lonsdale - a lovely store with wonderfully helpful staff and with a stunning cheese counter!

As I may have mentioned before we like food!

Himself has been targeted by the JWs again so Pete and I have tried to warn him off a bit - he didn't seem very impressed with them after two of them visited here today. They told him that going to mass, etc. was not a good idea - he was not amused.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Re: online shopping. Remember not to click 1, thinking it means bags or kg and end up with a single solitary vegetable.

Am trying to conserve energy so I can leave the house tonight and go see this . I've pre-booked, but no one else will thank me for burbling and coughing my way through it.

[ 06. February 2014, 14:01: Message edited by: ArachnidinElmet ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
I still get my doggy walks as there is a Springer spaniel called Bryn here. He's a livewire!

Nenlet1's in laws have a springer. She's totally nutty but very cute too.

Thanks to everyone who has expressed sympathies for us poorly ones on the thread and for the advice about the online shopping. I obviously need to look into it further.

Nen - who has been sharing time with lovely friends all afternoon [Axe murder] and now needs a rest.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
There is a minimum order charge for online shopping isn't there? Something like £50? This is one reason why I've never done it.

[ 06. February 2014, 17:50: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Not at Tescos (which is the only one I have used), I regularly order under £50. I do a monthly shop for heavy and bulky stuff but like to see what I am buying with fruit and veg at least.


Jengie
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
But there is still a minimum spend, right?
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
From Waitrose and Ocado you can often find vouchers for discounts on your first online shop.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
I think the minimum spend affects how much for delivery. Waitrose does free delivery, but expect you to spend over 50 quid. Sainsbury delivers free if you ask for delivery on thursday and spend over 100... it might have changed, I did it a couple of times, but can never get into the rhtyhm of it - when I need shopping, I need it today, for dinner. Not some forseeable time into the future when its convenient for them to deliver...

Nen, thanks for kind thoughts and glad you had nice time with friends. Aracnidelment (apols for sp??) hope you get to your thing tonight!
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
But there is still a minimum spend, right?

None I know of. There is no free delivery, and you pay a flat rate however much you order but no minimum delivery either.

Jengie

[ 06. February 2014, 18:51: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
... we just might get a sn*w-day on Thursday ...

We did! [Yipee] Not only that, but they re-opened at 1 o'clock, which is when I'd have been leaving, which makes up for last Wednesday when the opposite happened - I'd already finished when they decided to close.

Mind you, in order to get it we've had about a foot of sn*w. [Frown]

quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:

I may have also just offered to teach a class of year 5s Tudor medicine ...

Ooh, that sounds interesting - can anyone join in?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
None I know of. There is no free delivery, and you pay a flat rate however much you order but no minimum delivery either.

Ooo that's interesting and their website says it's much less than I expected, thanks for the tip.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Woo hoo for Piglet's snow day!

I am a bit kid -like with snow, hoping for a load and loving see it snow and settle but after the initial excitement the reality of needing to drive in snow on icy roads gets in the way and when it goes sludgy and dirty. Also if we can't get into work we either don't get paid or have to take it as holiday. [Frown]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
There is a minimum order charge for online shopping isn't there? Something like £50? This is one reason why I've never done it.

If I do an online shop, it's usually Sainsbury's. 'Sfar as I recall, the delivery charge varies with the time slot, with maybe a £ more for 'peak' times - but no minimum spend.

It's useful if the family driver is indisposed or busy, or if it's foul weather. But I would primarily buy bulky, prepackaged stuff - bread flour, tins, cartons of juice - fresh meat, veg and fruit not so much.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Boogie, thinking of you and all your family from down here and praying for an easy passing for your mum. I went through this with my dad but mum had a huge stroke and was gone in a few hours.

I love online grocery shopping generally. I've had a few hassles over the years I've been doing it, but they are usually sorted easily. I think I've been shopping online for groceries for at least twelve years now. I get the heavy or bulky stuff especially, although now my son is here I get it less frequently.

Delivery cost down here is now usually on time of order, although it used to vary with amount spent. Great to have someone else lug the heavy bottles etc to my door.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
More rain overnight. The station forecourt is a lake which buses can no longer enter, several side roads are flooded so it’s a circuitous route to work this morning. More railway line closures – the Worcester to Oxford (and by extension, London) line’s now out of action which is going to inconvenience an awful lot of people. I was hoping the rain would clear over the weekend but it looks set to rain some more. When will this ever end!?
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Seconded, Ariel! At least there were a few days gap between bouts to let the existing floods drop a little to make space for this lot, but I'm getting royally fed up with it all. Apart from anything else, this morning we discovered a damp spot in the bathroom where the rain is getting in.

AG
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
We have had an outbreak of serious RTAs. The M4 was closed for most of Tuesday after a coach hit a barrier, then yesterday there were four on one two-mile road to the north-west of Newport, leaving a police office seriously injured, a motorcyclist with a broken leg and other cuts and bruises. With the usual bumps and scrapes the traffic police, rescue crews and hospitals have been very busy.

It's sunny and breezy now, which is outstandingly pleasant by current standards, but more lousy weather is expected later. Stay at home everyone.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
What a treat - I am looking out at a lovely blue sky with puffy clouds. I will take my wellies for a walk this lunchtime.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We've been getting several pictures on the Weather Channel of extremely wet bits of the south of England and Wales, and there were pictures on FB of huge floods in Cork city centre.

It kind of puts our snow into perspective; we're used to it, and our infrastructure can (more-or-less) cope with it. If the forecasters are right, we shouldn't get too much more over the next wee while, but what we've got won't be going anywhere as the temperatures are in minus double-digits ...

**brrrrrrrr**
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Thanks to severe flooding on the route to my planned stroll, my walk turned into a couple of hours at the allotment moving rainwater from barrels connected to the shed roof to 2 disconnected barrels. It's hard to imagine a time in the not-too-distant future when this water will be needed. Thankfully the allotments are not flooded, despite being on low-lying ground.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yes, my lunchtime walk was suddenly made er interesting by a little stream having burst its banks and flooded the road. Cars sent foaming waves lapping across the already submerged pavement and the tidal wave from a passing white van made me glad I had a waterproof jacket on, though there was a point at which wellington boots (which I didn't have) were needed. There was a solitary bench at the side of one lake to remind us that in summer, this is a meadow where animals graze.

Ah well, it's the weekend, let's see what happens next. Today's sun will hopefully have helped.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
We made the most of the pleasant afternoon by marching our (not so) little darlings off to the local park for a good stomp about. We could justify it as Road Safety practice, and Planning a Journey and Listening to and Carrying Out Verbal Instructions.

It would've been better for our student in a motorised wheelchair if six out of the ten dropped kerbs on the way there didn't have parked cars blocking them. Or two cars spectacularly parked on and completely a triangular island with two dropped kerbs which was meant for pedestrians to wait on as they crossed a wide road. The walking group made it twice round the park before the wheelchair group made it to the park to join us!

The last hour and a half of the day was so peaceful as they all recovered from the fresh air and exercise. Here's hoping for more Fridays which are as peaceful.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Taliesin:
... Nen, thanks for kind thoughts and glad you had nice time with friends. Aracnidelment (apols for sp??) hope you get to your thing tonight!

I did, many thanks. The sniffles and wheezes were kept for the interval.

Has anybody else been to the cinema showings of theatre events? Last night was Coward's 'Private Lives', and last week was Coriolanus with Tom Hiddlestone which was stunning. Not as good as seeing it in the flesh, but cheaper than a weekend in London. Well worth it.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I've lost a filling or cap or crown or something so today will have to be Visit the Dentist day - not an exciting prospect. He's a nice guy and I feel that socially we could be friends but when I am sitting in that chair, or lying back in that recliner, he is The Enemy! He may wish to extract and do some bridgework but I would far rather have it capped, I think. There is no pain yet but I'd rather be pro-active and get something done BEFORE the pain starts - one of my more noticeable features is the yellow streak down my back.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... There is no pain yet ...

Wait until you get the bill. [Eek!] The pain in a dentist's chair is as nothing compared to the pain in the wallet; my boss recently had to shell out $6,000 for orthodontic work for her daughter.

I've never been to the cinema/theatre things, Arachnid, but a friend used to go to cinema screenings of "live" operas from the New York Met. Proper opera really isn't my thing, but if they were to show a Gilbert & Sullivan, wild horses wouldn't keep me away ... [Big Grin]

**toddles off, humming [insert G&S tune of your choice]**
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
New young dentist, very pleasant, very into conservative treatment - he gave me a filling and said that if it cracked he'd have to put in a crown but thought it should hold all right.

Rs 50 for registration and Rs 500 for the filling - so under six quid for the lot. I can live with that.

Got a phone call when in the dentist's chair [Hot and Hormonal] to go and pick something up from the courier, just down the road from the dentist so no problem.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I had to go to the Dentist on Thursday, for a check up, and visit to the Hygienist. I hate her and her little ice pick that going round my teeth so that they all hurt! [Frown]

However, nothing had to be done after visit to proper dentist, so as PeteC says, only my wallet was hurt - to the tune of £100!!

"Another appointments in 6 months,?" asked the Receptionist. "No way", says I, "make that in a year's time"

I'll start saving. [Help]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
When I was working on Merseyside I had a lovely Dental Hygienist and we used to swap recipes then she upped and left, she said that she had got Birkenhead organised so was off to Ellesmere Port to get them properly trained. She was a bit of a star. Yes the doing of it was not the most comfortable but my teeth felt so clean afterwards.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Picks? My man goes in there with this little electric buzz saw. Mind you, the teeth come out so clen you could eat your dinner off them.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Good grief - what's happened to the weather?????!!!!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I'm back home now and recovering. Mum's funeral is all in hand for 1pm on Friday. I did all the running around and paperwork yesterday - I'm so very glad I didn't have to wait over the weekend. I have treated myself to an M&S ploughman's sandwich, yum!

Mr Boogs left for Mexico this morning, which is bad timing. But he is leading a team of ten people on a charity project, so couldn't back out.

It's bright, sunny and breezy today. We really have been lucky with the weather up here in the North West!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
quote:
Mind you, the teeth come out so clen you could eat your dinner off them.

[Killing me]

[ 08. February 2014, 13:59: Message edited by: Thyme ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Glad you've managed to get a lot of practicalities sorted out, Boogie. After my mum died I was amazed at how much there was to do.

Mr Nen has sensitive teeth so the hygienist is always an ordeal for him. I don't really mind and I like my current one. But I did have one once who went round one section of my mouth with her sharp prong thing, made all my gums bleed and gave me a major talking to about my dental hygiene. [Eek!] It took my mouth ages to recover. I never went back to her.

Nen - reminded that she is overdue for the dentist.
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
The great thing about having to go to the dentist and dreading it is that I don't have enough mental space to worry about anything else!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's not so much the mental space as the dental space ... sorry, I'll get my coat. [Big Grin]

Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
under six quid for the lot

Oh for goodness' sake ... [Roll Eyes]

Just back from our friend M's 70th birthday bash, which was quite a jolly affair.

I did a spot of Retail Therapy this afternoon - there are a couple of shops here that give you vouchers for your birthday - so I got a nice little pair of ankle-boots and a top which didn't fit (by the time I saw it I'd tried on so many things I was fed up and decided to buy it without trying it on, which was Not A Good Idea), so I'll have to take it back. [Frown]
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
When my mother died 2 years ago, we had to wait 3 weeks for the funeral as that was the first available slot, so I'd say you've done well there Boogie.

Frustrating morning today, I was supposed to be running in the Wokingham half marathon, but it has been cancelled due to flooding.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Well it's pouring down this morning, never mind England needs the water [Roll Eyes]

I remember, during the drought and hosepipe ban a couple of years ago. I ranted "It falls from the sky, if it's not raining now it will be soon - just save some of it!" Meanwhile the TV was full of programmes about how to plant up your Mediterranean garden. Ho hum, pig's bum. Rain rain go away!!
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
And at church this morning we sang "Morning has broken", trying to keep a straight face during the second verse as we gave thanks for the rain!
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
I'm glad you were with your mum for her last days, Boogie, and you seem to be handling it all amazingly well. I hope the week goes smoothly for you.

As for me,I went to London for my music event but an now shattered. It was well worth it.

Not sure I'll manage work tomorrow though...
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I'm so glad you made your event and enjoyed it, Taliesin. [Big Grin]

I had reorganised my week (I work part time) to accommodate an all day meeting on Tuesday. As it was I was ill so didn't make the meeting after all, but it meant I didn't work after Wednesday lunchtime. It wouldn't be possible as a regular thing but I have to say it did make for a nice week, once I was feeling well enough to enjoy it.

Nen - bracing herself for work tomorrow. I do love my job but...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I know what you mean, Nen - I love mine too, but it suits me that it's part-time.

On the subject of funerals, when D's father died the length of time waiting for a "slot" actually worked in our favour. He died the night after we arrived on holiday and because of the wait we were able to go up to Orkney as planned, as the funeral was arranged for when we were on our way back a couple of weeks later.

On a cheerier note, at coffee-time after church this morning the Dean had everyone sing "happy birthday" to me (it's on Monday), which was embarrassing* but a nice thought ... [Hot and Hormonal]

* It could have been worse: when I had my 50th he announced it to the whole congregation. Vengeance will be mine, one day. [Devil]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Did you provide the descant?

* * * *

I forgot to phone my UK bank this morning - my work pension went in this morning and I wanted to do a transfer to my bank here but getting an international line out is hell at this time of day so it may have to wait for tomorrow as soon my bank there will have callers queued around the block and I hate the Thank you for waiting, you are moving forward in the queue and will be dealt with as soon as possible-bit.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
... the Dean had everyone sing "happy birthday" to me (it's on Monday), which was embarrassing* but a nice thought ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Well, it's Monday - so HIPY PAPY BTHUTHDTH BTHTHDY* to piglet!
[Yipee]
*can't remember the exact phrase and too lazy to walk upstairs for the source text!

Did you get a balloon, piglet? or a Useful Pot to put things in?

Hope you have a great day, anyway [Axe murder]

Mrs. S, who has another 8 months to wait for hers
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
[Hot and Hormonal] I forgot to say Happy Birthday in my post, sorry, piglet - I'm a WW of very little brain.

I tried one more time to get the bank and got through straight away to a nice young guy called Sean so transfer is now arranged and, hopefully, the money will be here before bed tomorrow night. This will be a Good Thing.

Sean told me that Skelmersdale is a bit nippy this morning so I didn't upset him by telling him what the weather is like here.

I also paid my credit card bill online when I was checking my account balances so feel truly virtuous. Now that I have a zero debit on the account what should I buy next?

[Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
A round of drinks? Cheers!

And happy birthday Piglet [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Happy Birthday, Piglet!

And yes, Nen, I join you in a nine-month wait for mine. Don't think I want it this year, its a real biggie [Frown]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫

Happy Birthday tooooo Piiiiglet,
Happy birthday toooooo yoooouuuuu!

♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
Me too. Happy birthuthday, piglet xx
 
Posted by Starbug (# 15917) on :
 
Happy Birthday, Piglet!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thank you all for the kind wishes - I got some lovely flowers (and something's on order from Ortak) from D., and sundry other nice things from friends.

Also going out for dinner tonight - will report back. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Ok I thought people would appreciate this form of lateral thinking when dealing with the consequences of the weather.

Jengie
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Happy birthday Piglet!
Taking the top back will provide you with a lovely excuse to shop some more!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
And yes, Nen, I join you in a nine-month wait for mine.

Not me - it was Mrs S who commented on that. But she and I are soul-sisters, although we have never met, so you'd be forgiven for thinking it was me who said it. [Biased] I actually have over 10 months until my next birthday but the last Big One is a few years behind me and the next is comfortably distant. [Smile]

Have a lovely meal, piglet... Something better than haycorns, I trust. [Biased]

Nen - now feeling the urge to reread A A Milne.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
We could have done with a Duck Train. Nearly 5 hours to get to and from work today and that was with the rail replacement services mostly doing their best to be helpful. I don't want to think how tomorrow might go.

On the plus side, I went to a Tai Chi introductory class today. I don't want to commit to a series of classes, but the intro was quite interesting - never did anything like it before.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
You could take up karate, it's like tai chi at full speed. [Two face]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Ok I thought people would appreciate this form of lateral thinking when dealing with the consequences of the weather.

Jengie

Why am I thinking that Jeremy Clarkson or Captain Slow ought to be driving that? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
You could take up karate, it's like tai chi at full speed. [Two face]

Yes, our instructor said that (then demonstrated).
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Better late than never: Happy Birthday!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
And from us as well. We had pavlova for pudding to celebrate for you.

[ 10. February 2014, 19:38: Message edited by: Gee D ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:

On the plus side, I went to a Tai Chi introductory class today. I don't want to commit to a series of classes, but the intro was quite interesting - never did anything like it before.

Which sort? I'm currently doing the 24-form variant - previously I was taking the Taoist, which has 108. I have to say I could only ever get through that if there was an instructor out front that I could follow. The current class is a bit chaotic - but cheap - and is provided under the Council's adult ed programme.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Happy birthday to piglet [Smile]

TME and I did the Cheng Man Ch'ing form of tai chi (which has 37 movements, takes about 10 minutes to do the form in total). I could never do it without having someone to watch and copy. Our instructor was very fond of lengthy anecdotes about the various tai chi masters, I always wished he would cut out the anecdotes and give us a bit more practice, maybe the form would have sunk in a bit better. I can't remember any of it now. I wasn't at all into the philosophy of it, but it was a nice thing to do together for an hour once a week and it was very calming at the time.

Hope those of you down south who are struggling with the flooding get some relief from it very soon.

[ 10. February 2014, 20:49: Message edited by: Jack the Lass ]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
I got a tai chi DVD recently, I love doing it but am rubbish at it! No idea how many moves etc. I can just remember one called parting the wild horses mane.

I just have to get myself to do it more but you know how it is, get in, get changed, sort food, do some bits round the house, there's another evening gone!
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
I've just started a Tai Chi class. I love it so far. I've only done two classes. There are lots of YouTubes showing moves (are they called Forms?).

It is a very small class mainly over 60's. I don't think I could do it without seeing it demonstrated and having someone to follow. I'm not good at physical coordination.

Our teacher doesn't give too much information about it all, just enough to help us understand how the moves are supposed to benefit us.

I struggle to do the practice at home alone though.

I've also started a Hatha Yoga class and am very pleased with that as well.

My motivation in all this is physical fitness more than the spiritual side, but it can certainly be very meditative.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
Thank you all for the kind wishes - I got some lovely flowers (and something's on order from Ortak) from D., and sundry other nice things from friends.

Also going out for dinner tonight - will report back. [Smile]

Ooh, Ortak, very nice.
Happy Birthday, Piglet, and happy truffling. [Smile]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chocoholic:
I got a tai chi DVD recently, I love doing it but am rubbish at it! No idea how many moves etc. I can just remember one called parting the wild horses mane.

If it lasts about 6 minutes, it's the short (Beijing) version - in which Parting Wild Horse's Mane is the second form, just after Commencement.

Are there no classes to be had locally? I have been taking various classes for the last three or for years - besides having done it a few decades ago - and I still can't follow the moves just by watching video.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I did a little online shopping this morning just to make my credit card feel needed - stuff for Pete and a little bit [?] for me, too.

Now it's time to hang the washing out on the roof and make up my bed with clean sheets. It's all go!
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
I've been doing t'ai chi for 18 months, and we spend 25 minutes or so doing the 'warm-up', and then another 25 or 30 minutes going through whichever routine it is, usually twice - but we don't always get as far as parting the wild horse's mane.

Our instructor always says that we don't need to remember the sequence because we have him to do it for us, which is just as well, because although I now have some muscle memory of the sequence, it is by no means reliable!

But it is a great way of doing some concentrating, and is great for balance (and it's cheap - a local school does it as part of their community education and we oldies get a discount [Yipee] )

Mrs. S, rooster stands on one leg (and falls over [Killing me] )
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Which sort? I'm currently doing the 24-form variant - previously I was taking the Taoist, which has 108.

I don't know... I think he said it was classical rather than martial arts-y. He also said it wasn't anything like his regular classes as it was just a taster session.

He was confident, experienced and had a great sense of humour. Lots of laughter, especially when we tried to "look snaky, not like Ancient Egyptians" and failed almost completely. I couldn't get the hang of that bit at all, but overall it was a lot of fun and a great introduction. The only other named position I remember is the Lifting Three Dishes as the others either had names in Chinese, which I've forgotten, or weren't introduced as such.

[ 11. February 2014, 07:23: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
The only other named position I remember is the Lifting Three Dishes as the others either had names in Chinese, which I've forgotten, or weren't introduced as such.

That's a new one. However, I would totally recommend taking up Tai Chi. All my life, my proficiency at games/sports/exercise has been that of a wall-eyed sloth with vertigo. Tai Chi is the one thing I have found at which it is impossible to fail.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
However, I would totally recommend taking up Tai Chi. All my life, my proficiency at games/sports/exercise has been that of a wall-eyed sloth with vertigo. Tai Chi is the one thing I have found at which it is impossible to fail.

[Overused] [Overused] [Overused]

How very true...

Mrs. S, equally un-sporty [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Tai Chi is the one thing I have found at which it is impossible to fail.
I’m glossing over my hopeless attempts at the Snake position but will have a look in the local library and see what they’ve got in the way of DVDs.

The Lifting Three Dishes is probably better known by some other name. It involves standing with your slightly bent legs apart and hands out in front of you as if you’re holding an invisible cast-iron dish. You maintain the pose then an invisible being adds a second dish to your load and you sink a bit more under the weight. The invisible being then adds a third and you hold that pose. Then he kindly takes them away one by one.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
The only other named position I remember is the Lifting Three Dishes as the others either had names in Chinese, which I've forgotten, or weren't introduced as such.

That's a new one. However, I would totally recommend taking up Tai Chi. All my life, my proficiency at games/sports/exercise has been that of a wall-eyed sloth with vertigo. Tai Chi is the one thing I have found at which it is impossible to fail.
I must look this up. My sense of balance is virtually nil, so it might help.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
That's a new one. However, I would totally recommend taking up Tai Chi. All my life, my proficiency at games/sports/exercise has been that of a wall-eyed sloth with vertigo. Tai Chi is the one thing I have found at which it is impossible to fail.

I must look this up. My sense of balance is virtually nil, so it might help. [/QB]
Sioni, I broke 3 wrists in ~15 years* and decided I needed to DO something about it. hence, Pilates and t'ai chi for the last 18 months.

All I can say is, I haven't broken one since I started...

* Yes, they were all mine. My bone density is normal, but the females in my family were all born with the clumsiness gene, sadly [Waterworks]

Mrs. S, discovering it's hard to post with your fingers crossed
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
... Taking the top back will provide you with a lovely excuse to shop some more!

Sadly not. I took it back and explained that it wouldn't fit, no matter what size it was (it just didn't fit my shape [Eek!] ), but when I asked if I could re-use the 40% off voucher they said no - they could only refund what I'd paid - so I thought stuff this for a game of soldiers, and didn't buy anything else. [Frown]

Dinner was v. nice if somewhat expensive - hurrah for D's boss who had given us a gift-card for the restaurant for Christmas.

First they brought very good herby bread with balsamic vinegar and olive oil, olives and Feta, then we shared a charcuterie plate, which was nice but very salty - there was toasted bread and various sorts of smoked meats and salami-type things, and a kind of tapenade and a couple of lettuce leaves, but there was no sweet element, which it really rather needed. A dollop of tomato chutney, red-pepper jelly* or similar, or a couple of bits of fresh tomato would have helped.

Then I had blackened salmon with a spicy-but-not-too-scary sauce, stir-fried veggies and crushed potatoes, which was v. good, and D. had "southern fried chicken" which was like an upmarket KFC - very nicely cooked chicken with lavender-honey dipping sauce, a corn-bread roll, and excellent macaroni cheese, all washed down with a nice Pinot Grigio. There was so much of it that he gladly accepted the offer of a doggy-bag.

We were both so full up after all that we didn't have room for pudding ... [Angel]

* I could have offered to be their supplier ... [Big Grin]

[ 11. February 2014, 15:34: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
... we didn't have room for pudding ...

Does not compute [Confused]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Sorry, JtL - I'm one of those oddities who would rather have a cheese-board anyway (except when there's un-messed-about-with crème brûlée), but very few restaurants here offer one. There was a cheese plate option on the menu as a starter*, which was probably very nice, but the term "market price" scared us off ... [Eek!]

* They really don't understand cheese here. [Confused]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Heh - I'll often go for a cheeseboard too, as I'm quite fussy with puddings despite the sweet tooth. I must admit I just class cheese as pudding too - if you eat it after the main course then it's pudding in my book [Smile]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I don't see the problem. Dinner is

Not that we have that exact thing every night, of course. Sometimes we have Sherry.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
You missed the fish course.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Formal dinner (service a la Russe)
A digestif could be drunk with, or instead of, post-prandial coffee and petits fours.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
You missed the fish course.

Like I say, we're talking weekdays.
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
Perhaps coffee to follow?

(As dry land is so wet, I have floated past to see how everyone is and to apologise to East Anglian shipmates for turning up at the meet to welcome Malin - gulp, several years ago - and then vanishing when work took me suddenly half way across the country.)
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Hello Landlubber, and welcome back! The kettle's on, and I believe someone might have a packet of Hobnobs, so pull up a chair and help yourself.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
Morning all, glad to see tai chi alive and well in adult ed... I think it should be freely available in parks, as it is in China... I think.

Do any of you have any experience of fighting mobile phone companies? I'm wondering how I go about taking mine to court.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Coffee and tea here. But you'd better be quick if you want a hobnob - they are in an airtight cannister - but not for long!

We are allegedly going to get snow and gales later today. [Frown]

What's different??
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Rain coming soon here but we haven't had it too bad, there's always less rainfall here in the east.
Sorry I've not been around for a few days, I've had a monster load of work (still have) and haven't been well either. But hoping for a few days off shortly - then I'm going to make cheese and brew beer [Smile]
I'd happily have cheese instead of dessert any day, but share the love of creme brûlée.

[ 12. February 2014, 08:25: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by Fredegund (# 17952) on :
 
I think there's hail mised in with the rain today. Would have liked some more of the snow from yesterday.
If you're out of Hobnobs I have home made fudge in the office fridge (not as set as it should be, but who cares?)

I think the cats are evolving webbed feet.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Rain has arrived. Or, rain, scudding across the car park, propelled by strong gusts of wind that make opening outer doors something of a workout and umbrellas an instant write-off.

Bored now. Let's move Britain somewhere sunnier - I'm thinking the Med, somewhere near Cyprus.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Is everyone keeping dry?

I used to live in Staines (massive innit) and it’s very weird seeing the pictures of places I know under water (not to mention the Prime Minister wandering around the town in his wellies).
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Several places including Romsey and Birmingham have made it on to the Weather Channel here, looking frighteningly moist, and now according to the Telegraph online you're going to be getting wind and sn*w as well ... [Eek!]

Look after yourselves. [Votive]
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
At 5pm the sky here turned very, very black. Then the thunder, lightning and high winds began. In the worst storms we lose power for several days and lose tiles off the roof, with the rain pouring in. But that hasn't happened this winter.... yet....
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Rain and high winds here for most of the day, it's a bit calmer now as the storm heads north.

So desperately sorry for anyone affected. Watching the water rising and invading your home must be one of the most awful feelings ever. We are not on the coast, nor living in a particularly exposed area to winds, nor at risk of flooding, nor have we lost our power. But I still feel very anxious about it all.

In other news I also had a very slow and not-nearly-as-productive-as-I-would-have-liked day at work. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - losing the plot... Is there a plot...?
 
Posted by Alex Cockell (# 7487) on :
 
Checking in - still OK here in Reading RG1...
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
So far it's been a week of replacement buses and heroic attempts to keep at least some trains running if only occasionally and very slowly. The train companies have been brilliant - plenty of coaches laid on, as soon as they're full up they get going, no hanging about. I've been on time for work each day so far, which is a miracle considering that it's taking an average of 4.5 hours to get to and from work.

This evening, believe it or not, a fire on the tracks, despite all the rain, cancelled my train home so it was back to the bus again. I arrived at the destination station just in time to see the place suddenly turn black as a large power cut knocked out the area. I walked home through the unlit, rain-sodden streets with a cold, rough wind trying to detach anything movable - branches, signs, hair, etc, and the only illumination coming from the headlights of passing cars.

I'm really grateful for the replacement buses, for getting home in one piece, for there being electricity when I got in, and no imminent danger to life. It must be terrifying for people on the west coast and especially the Isle of Man right now. Which means it must be at least equally awful for people in Ireland.

Have a safe night, everybody.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I got absolutely soaked at the graveside at about 10 to 2 this afternoon. My brolly blew inside out - probably just as well really, I could not have managed that plus keeping the cloak/cassock/surplice combo under control and holding a book agh the same time.
I felt for the mourners, but at least they had their backs to the prevailing weather. I was facing into the wind, and the rain, and the hail. I couldn't keep my eyes open - but as my glasses were of no use whatsoever, it didn't really matter anyway.

I'm looking forward to getting into bed tonight and listening to the wind roaring around...well, not the wind part, but the being tucked up warm and snug part I am.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
We've got weather in Birmingham, that's for sure!

Yesterday was all four seasons in one day - the hour of snow caused much excitement yesterday morning, but it had sunk in amongst the damp and soggy ground by lunchtime.

Today, we'd normally march a gaggle of the not so little dears off for a 45 minute session at the swimming pool, but decided it was so cold, wet and blustery we'd better not risk it.

I am thankful tomorrow's exciting day out is an indoor activity and even if it's not my film of choice, it should be warm and dry. (That is not a challenge to the wind that is currently howling around to blow the roof off the cinema, please and thank you.)
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
Went for a walk this afternoon, managed to keep feet on ground, unlike this poor soul....
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
I'm afraid I'm being a (nice and warm) coward tonight. I should have been attending a thing at the Chantry Chapel in town, ie a medieval building with minimal heating sat on stone stilts above a river. Watching the little river accumulating in the street and listening to the howling wind, it didn't seem like a good place to be. There's been a tiny lights-out, but nothing serious. Definitely [Votive] for those more seriously under water.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
I want to drive down to cornwall next week, to visit family. Are the roads ok?? Or is the rail line having a knock on effect?

love to all of you, sloshing about our soggy countryside. I got soaked so often today... and there was just hail. even the dogs don't want to go out.
 
Posted by Not (# 2166) on :
 
Apart from the odd tree down and small floods the main roads are fine. But leave extra time; the storms just keep coming in and that can make driving pretty slow and unpleasant.

Cornwall's pretty tough! battered but still functioning
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Alex Cockell:
Checking in - still OK here in Reading RG1...

How's Caversham? I used to live right by the Thames, couldn't help thinking about it today.

100mph winds here in Manchester tonight, though it seems better now than it was a couple of hours ago. [Votive] for anybody who has to be out and about in all this.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
This morning one of the weather sites carried advertisements for "Idyllic holidays in Devon and Cornwall". I have pleasant memories of holidays in the south-west, but right at the moment it really isn't appropriate (for one thing, the best route to the south-west is badly broken).

Here in deepest, dampest Gwent the wind howls but it has eased off somewhat. A coworker lost electricity on Monday night and I wonder if it will be restored before the next round of storms on Friday. His other concern is that the fences stay up and keep the sheep out, although most stock are indoors at the moment.
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
Another Tai Chi person here. I go to a U3A class with a very patient and tolerant teacher, though he does get a bit carried away sometimes telling us at length about the theory and the ancient masters.

I started Tai Chi because my back got too bad to lie on the floor to do Pilates. I like being able to exercise upright and with shoes on!

I also can't do the standing-on-one-leg stuff :-(
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Polly Plummer:

I also can't do the standing-on-one-leg stuff :-(

Eek! I can stand on my right leg, but the left gets tired and painful quite quickly. Then again, keeping some 20st. off the ground is a sizeable task, so they deserve some credit.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
According to some weather boffins, the same system that's giving you your floods is giving our chums in the south-east US their sn*w, and is shortly to give us the sn*w when they've finished with it.

It's been very cold here (around -15°C, feeling like -27 with the wind-chill), but due to shoot up to +5° on Friday with "mixed precip." which may or may not result in a sn*w-day.

[Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I have the ceiling fan going this morning, possibly because with a new lady guest here I don't want to inflict the sight of my body upon her.

I feel awful for all of you back there and pray you are all safe and warm and dry.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It'll all come to an end one of these days. The sun is shining as I type (I'm typing this quietly so it doesn't hear and take fright).

However, I've run out of dark chocolate and there are no more Cadbury's Mini Eggs left in the packet. How am I going to get through the morning??
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Sunny and calm here at the moment, but more gales etc. etc. expected tomorrow. [Frown] Going to take the dog for a walk in a mo - see if all our trees in the park are upright with their roots firmly in the ground.

Daughter driving home in Manchester yesterday had nasty experience when a tree fell onto a house just as she was passing, and apparently a flagpole at a car dealer fell down, right across the cars! [Eek!]

Think I'll put the kettle on. We still have some hobnobs, plus ginger nuts and plain digestives for the masochists among us! [Biased]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
London calm and bright from the little I can see of it from the hotel window. But I notice the train service we will be looking to to take us home in a day or so got stranded on the North York moors last night.

Memo: pack chocolate.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My son is flying over from Heidelberg tomorrow morning for Mum's funeral - fingers crossed that he makes it and we make it to the airport and funeral in one piece.

It will be a small service at Church, followed by a smaller one the crematorium then back to Church for food. The minister was at college with Dad so knew them both well, which will be nice. My niece is doing the eulogy and I am reading a poem.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Scary stuff with the wind damage and falling trees!

Fairly mild here, with a chill in the air. I've just about finished my marking mountain (just 2 stray ones to do) so I'm catching up on housework as the house looks like it's just survived the Blitz. Need to shop too as we have no food.
I'm desperate to get out of this house after being cooped up for days, I think we might eat out in the pub tonight.

[ 13. February 2014, 08:20: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
My son is flying over from Heidelberg tomorrow morning for Mum's funeral - fingers crossed that he makes it and we make it to the airport and funeral in one piece.

It will be a small service at Church, followed by a smaller one the crematorium then back to Church for food. The minister was at college with Dad so knew them both well, which will be nice. My niece is doing the eulogy and I am reading a poem.

I hope it goes as well as it can for you [Votive]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... there are no more Cadbury's Mini Eggs left in the packet ...

[Waterworks] [Eek!] [Waterworks]

Boogie, hope all the arrangements work out and the weather doesn't play silly-buggers.

[Votive]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
We had a birthday on our team today and the somewhat unhinged birthday boy brought in biscuits, Jaffa cakes, wagon wheels, creme eggs, marshmallows, caramel hob nobs (did I say he's got a thing about caramel?) and some weird gooey Maryland cookies.

I have this urge to go home and eat a carrot.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Don't worry, I'm sure if you lie down for a bit, it will pass. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I'll be thinking of you all tomorrow, Boogie. I hope it all goes as well as it can. [Votive]

Today's been a welcome respite from all the rain, there was even a bit of sunshine at times. But I gather there's more to come. I did hear a forecaster on the radio a couple of days ago say that next week will be "not so bad."

It's cold though. [Frown]

Nen - not much looking forward to going out this evening.
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Hope your son get's in safely Boogie and everything goes well tomorrow.
We're off early in the mroning to Madeia where the weather looks to be wet, at least for the first day or two. It'll be a real home from home, but hopefully a bit warmer.
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Taliesin:
I want to drive down to cornwall next week, to visit family. Are the roads ok?? Or is the rail line having a knock on effect?


Best to avoid the route via Gunnislake - the bridge is out due to a van driving straight through the wall and diving into the water. Fortunately, the driver escaped and survived, but the bridge will be closed for several weeks. Launceston A30 is your best bet; sometimes the Tamar Bridge (Plymouth) is a problem in high winds.

Enjoy your visit - Creamtealand is still open for business!
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
A30 it is then, thank you chorister.

Love to you and your family, Boogie.

Here, it hasn't rained all day!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
We had a birthday on our team today and the somewhat unhinged birthday boy brought in biscuits, Jaffa cakes, wagon wheels, creme eggs, marshmallows, caramel hob nobs (did I say he's got a thing about caramel?) and some weird gooey Maryland cookies.

I have this urge to go home and eat a carrot.

Mrs Sioni had read my mind. No carrots but we had cauliflower cheese and stuffed tomatoes. There were sausages too but I had one instead of my usual three and would have been fine without that.

There's still about half-a-hundredweight of chocolate, biscuits and assorted sweet gunk left. I think it will end up on Ebay.
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Taliesin:


Here, it hasn't rained all day!

What magic potion are you using?? Need to get some in. We had a large branch of our tree crash down onto the roof this morning, so loud I jumped right out of bed! Fortunately (as far as I can see) it hasn't cracked the roof tiles, as it's raining fit to bust out there.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We had a very welcome shower during the night and rather hope we might get another tonight except not too much as we are planning an Expedition tomorrow and we don't want Pete to get muddy wheels.

A lost day with massive headache today but much improved after many hours sleep.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Glad to hear you're feeling a bit better, Wodders - even little headaches are horrid, let alone massive ones. [Frown]

We've got A Lot Of Snow descending (well, sort of whirling about horizontally) at the moment, but for reasons I can't fathom, not a snow-day (although I'm keeping an eye on the University web-site to see if there are any changes).

Stuff that for a lark. [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Just checked the travel news in the area... hazardous driving conditions, because of surface water. A landslide on the railway line somewhere between Leamington and Banbury, so that's the south coast to Birmingham line and the Birmingham Moor Street to London line both screwed.

Honestly, what with all the disruptions, evacuations, blackouts and sudden damage to property, cars, etc it's beginning to feel as if we're in some kind of war.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
All year the matrix signs along the M4 have read "Poor Driving Conditions" and I regret that too many motorists have taken this as an instruction and they are driving very poorly indeed.

Put your lights on! No, not your fog lights, it's raining. Now get out of the middle lane BUT SIGNAL when you do so.

I'd better stop before a host comes along setting up a diversion to a different board.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Hazards around here start with the quaint belief of at least 25% of drivers that indicators will wear out if used, so its down to good reflexes and/or ESP.

Particularly good at the moment that the local cyclists aren't being cowed by the bad weather into either wearing light clothing or using lights - it all helps to keep the adrenaline pumping... [Mad]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
L'organist, aren't you in South Wales too? I'm sure motorists hereabouts feel that in not switching on their lights they are helping to save the environment.

I simply despair of cyclists, on road, pavement and through Newport bus station.
 
Posted by Chamois (# 16204) on :
 
No river flooding so far in this part of London but groundwater flooding is becoming a real problem. I was on Wimbledon Common this morning (it's a flat plateau on the top of a hill) and many of the grassy areas resembled lakes.

I was reading the Evening Standard yesterday while riding the underground home. Thames floods all over the front pages, and inside a long feature on how we need to build lots more homes at Ebbsfleet on the Thames Estuary floodplain. Am I missing something here?

The wind and rain are building up again outside now. Stay safe, everyone.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Not actually raining here at present but when it comes it's horizontal as the wind is absolutely vicious. [Eek!]

Nen - glad to be home in the warm and dry.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Stay safe, everyone!

Friend who arrived this week lives in coastal south Devon so is quite glad to be here rather than there.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Clear skies, but the wind's now got up. The country can now look forward to power cuts and fallen trees overnight.

[brick wall]
 
Posted by Qoheleth. (# 9265) on :
 
A howling gale and horizontal rain on the way to and from Choir Practice. Flooding not a problem where we are, but I fear for the Church spire roof shingles. Also worried about w*rk which is somewhat insecurely attached to the electricity network, so also fearing for the 01:00 phone call from my night shift. [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
By the time I finished w*rk at 2 o'clock the horizontal snow had turned to horizontal sleety rain, which has now turned to horizontal ordinary rain. The temperature's gone up to +6°, the water and melting snow are cascading merrily down the hill outside Chateau Piglet and it's blowing a gale.

Not really in the same league as the weather you've been getting, but pretty filthy all the same.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We're going for a country walk this morning and at the moment it is pleasantly overcast - if it lifts and clears that is fine [we all have hats], if it remains as it is that is fine too - if it turns to rain I will NOT be amused but shall take a brolly just in case.

Lovely ex-colleague from toxic workplace* e-mailed that she and her equally lovely hubby have booked their flights for November - arriving here on her 66th birthday!

*Perhaps it is fairer to say workplace with toxic boss. Was she ever!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
We're going for a country walk this morning and at the moment it is pleasantly overcast - if it lifts and clears that is fine [we all have hats], if it remains as it is that is fine too - if it turns to rain I will NOT be amused but shall take a brolly just in case.

After weeks of Weather I initially had some difficulty visualizing this. I still pack an umbrella but have pretty much given up using it as they turn inside out so quickly.

This island has taken quite a battering overnight - the full extent should be clearer later.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
A friend on a year's leave in Ireland said she was watching (with amazement) the horizontal sn*w flurries when the said sn*w smashed through both her car windows.

That's some serious sn*w!

She is now thinking longingly of returning to the drought, heat & fires of the Oz summer. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Alex Cockell (# 7487) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Adeodatus:
quote:
Originally posted by Alex Cockell:
Checking in - still OK here in Reading RG1...

How's Caversham? I used to live right by the Thames, couldn't help thinking about it today.

100mph winds here in Manchester tonight, though it seems better now than it was a couple of hours ago. [Votive] for anybody who has to be out and about in all this.

Caversham flooded...
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Banner Lady:
A friend on a year's leave in Ireland said she was watching (with amazement) the horizontal sn*w flurries when the said sn*w smashed through both her car windows.

That's some serious sn*w!

She is now thinking longingly of returning to the drought, heat & fires of the Oz summer. [Roll Eyes]

We're not looking forward to repairing (or quite probably replacing) the shed and most of the fence panels but it's minor compared to what a lot of people facing.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The emergency services and transport network people really are heroes. Working through the dark in rain, floodwater and strong winds trying to keep things going, clear fallen trees off roads and lines, sort out landslips, pass out sandbags, shore up weakened flooding defences, make attempts to get people to hospital (there are bound to be stories coming out of this of babies born somewhere other than they were supposed to be) and so on.

[Overused]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
The funeral went well and the Church was full, which was lovely.

Now I have to change gear and think about getting ready. I'm off to Mexico to join Mr Boogs on Thursday. I don't feel in the least ready, but it will be nice to see some sun [Smile]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
The emergency services and transport network people really are heroes.(etc)

Given that Oxford City Council are legendary for never getting anything done, moving at the pace of a particularly elderly and unwell sloth, I've been very impressed by how the city has been kept going. I'm pretty much in agreement with you on that!

Thus far we've stayed on the edge of the waters, which have only risen two centipedes overnight, but the next 48 hours could be quite bum squeaky depending on what fell yesterday. Our stuff will be OK as we have an upstairs flat, but most of where we are is flat and just a few inches off the water meadows... [Eek!]

AG
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
So glad to hear the funeral went well, Boogie. [Smile]

Will you be out of internet range while in Mexico? And who's going to look after Tatze while you're away?

It was a wild night here with rain lashing at the windows and a howling wind [Eek!] but it seems to be calming down now and I can see blue sky. The weather forecaster on the radio this morning sounded so delighted when she said, "And tomorrow's going to be a beautiful day." [Big Grin] Still so aware of all those affected by the floods, which may get worse before they get better.

Nen - doing domestics this morning and meeting a friend for coffee this afternoon.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Sandemaniac:

quote:
two centipedes
[Eek!]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
Our stuff will be OK as we have an upstairs flat, but most of where we are is flat and just a few inches off the water meadows... [Eek!]

I was wondering how you and the Knotweed were doing. This weekend is going to be pretty much on a knife-edge for a lot of people, fingers crossed your centipedes scuttle back down.

(That includes any visiting ones doing the flood tourism thing.)
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:

Sandemaniac:

two centipedes

My God! That's two hundred feet!
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Well out of the way of British storms in Madeira. Sunshine and showers here. I managed to crack a tooth on the almond brittle I'd bought my husband as a Valentine's Day treat. Only just been to the dentist for check-up so more expense when I get home.
Glad funeral went well Boogie, enjoy Mexico when you get there, will you be able to holiday or are you helping Mr Boogie out?
Hope everyone else is fine and not suffering too much storm damage.
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
We are on a hill. So far the water is running down it and the drains are coping. Good luck to everyone where the water is encroaching.

Earlier in the week Piglet said someone had hobnobs. Are there any left? We jumped the queue for the builders, as our jobs were inside and it was too wet for them to carry on working up the road, but they have eaten all the biscuits.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Just glanced through the window...and seen a bit of pale blue sky, in between the dark grey clouds.

It is still there! Yay!!
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Clear skies and a pink sunset to the west, dark glowering clouds to the east.
At least the wind's died down, and it's been an almost dry day.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:

Will you be out of internet range while in Mexico? And who's going to look after Tatze while you're away?

I'm taking my Kindle Fire and hope to get some wi-fi. My friend, who has a black lab the same age, is having Tatze. She loves him to bits so they'll have a ball.

What an exhausting day! My niece and her 7 month old twins have been here all day. Phew! they are lovely but my legs ache now!!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I was wondering how you and the Knotweed were doing. This weekend is going to be pretty much on a knife-edge for a lot of people, fingers crossed your centipedes scuttle back down.

(That includes any visiting ones doing the flood tourism thing.)

[Big Grin] Good one, Ariel! Currently the water is still falling gently, so we should have a bit of reserve, but the allotment has reached the point where the stuff standing in water has had enough and is giving up. Salvaged some brassicas today, and can't really moan too much as until know it's been the best year I've ever had for them, but it's a bit cheerless all the same.

The amount of stuff the wind blew about last night is quite startling - probably the most damaging storm since I've lived here (13 years now). Funny, though, it smelt lovely heading up the Banbury Road his morning, as the gutters were full of twigs blown off the conifers and there was a wonderful clean aroma of fresh pine!

AG
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Sitting in hotel lobby appreciating how easy it is to keep in touch
via wi-fi and not appreciating the resident band's rendition of 'Blowing in the Wind'. As a Bobcat I object to musak renditions of Dylan.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Landlubber:
... Earlier in the week Piglet said someone had hobnobs. Are there any left?

After all this time? Are you kidding? [Big Grin] I do, however, have some bread (made by me) and some seriously good lemon-curd (made by my friend L. and given to me as a birthday present). Will that do?

It was a nice day today after all the wind, rain and whatnot yesterday and last night. I did a spot of shopping this afternoon, which involved the purchase of a small bear* for the choir baby who's being baptised tomorrow.

Boogie, glad to hear all went well on Friday. Travel safely and have a great time in Mexico. [Smile]

* Everyone ought to have a small bear or two, and I didn't notice any at her baby-shower. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Well, yes there are hobnobs a-plenty here! Mr.N is abstemious to the point of miserly eating them, and I'm dieting (successfully, I might say!)

Also some rather over-chocolated biscuits which anyone is welcome to!

Kettle on!

Sun out, but plenty of clouds, so beware showers I think. Hopefully the ground might dry out a bit. The Park has acquired two or three more lakes.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
We cancelled choir practice on Friday night due to the dire weather forecast. So our Music Director is hoping to do an Emergency Anthem this morning - i.e. something we all know that we can relearn in the few minutes before the service.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Before I go any further can I categorically state that it was not in the least my fault, I was ambushed into going into that ice cream parlour yesterday and I was force-fed the two sundaes I was given. I blame Herself for waylaying me aided and abetted by Himself and our Devonian guest.

The second sundae, a Plazza [sic] Special was particularly good - Vanilla, Butterscotch and Pista[chio] ice creams with strawberry sauce, tutti frutti [chopped dried fruits] and candied cashews.

Four people, eight ice creams and a bill [with tip] of about three and a half quid. Can't complain.


eta: We plan on going back at some point just to check that they are maintaining their standard.

[ 16. February 2014, 08:47: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
The second sundae, a Plazza [sic] Special was particularly good - Vanilla, Butterscotch and Pista[chio] ice creams with strawberry sauce, tutti frutti [chopped dried fruits] and candied cashews.

Oooooooooohh
It's winter over here but I would love some of that. Well, maybe not the strawberry sauce but the rest sounds ideal.

Lovely sunny day today. I have all the energy of a sloth, but feel I should make the effort to get out while the sun is shining.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
pista


You b*****ds! And there was me saying just yesterday morning that I craved pista!

[Waterworks]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
You were also saying that you like ice-cream but that it doesn't like you and that you are better not having it.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
The sky's gone a strange blue colour and there's this odd bright thing in the sky. It's also quite warm and there's no rain. What's happened?
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Don't worry, it's only a temporary blip.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Apparently, there's a hole in my (shared) roof; the neighbours were hoping our insurance companies would treat it as storm damage, but my insurers say it's almost certainly a (poor) maintenance issue and I fear they're right. Hope it continues dry for a while longer! [Frown] Still, plenty worse off.
 
Posted by Chamois (# 16204) on :
 
QLib, sorry to hear that. The last thing anyone needs at the moment is a leaky roof.

Glad everyone here is OK
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
The sky's gone a strange blue colour and there's this odd bright thing in the sky. It's also quite warm and there's no rain. What's happened?

At our church meeting today we were told that the yellow object was the sun, which is a form of star. I asked about the blue stuff, but no one seemed to know. Someone suggested it was the sea, which with the wind we have had would be no surprise, but no sea anyone can recall is anything other than a muddy grey-brown.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
The sky's gone a strange blue colour and there's this odd bright thing in the sky. It's also quite warm and there's no rain. What's happened?

Is the bright thing glowing? It's probably a UFO. They move through the sky and silently give off heat, and the radiation colours the atmosphere. It'll go before long, but if really worried, you could try ringing the police.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Friends have been over from Norfolk. They have had one of their better winters, mostly (I think) because the weather has all been from the west and it has run out of a) precipitation and b) puff before it gets to the east of England. Then again, they were hit by the storm surge back in December.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Also some rather over-chocolated biscuits which anyone is welcome to!

I didn't know there was such a thing.

Moo
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I was wondering what "over-chocolated" meant too. [Confused]

SS, I think you're right; my m-i-l lives in Essex and she says it's not really been too bad there.

Filthy weather here today: freezing rain, which by the time we came out of church at lunchtime had encased the car in a thin veneer of ice. Now just blowing a gale, but apparently more sn*w on the way.

Choir baby safely christened this morning, and she slept through the whole thing, even the loud bits, of which there were quite a few. D. wrote a very jolly anthem* for the procession to the font, and played La mourisque by Susato** during the offertory, and we had Cwm Rhondda with the descant. Small bear delivered.

Evensong was a feast of the music of Morley: his responses and Short Service, and Out of the deep with solo piglet. There was Decanal Grinning™.

* As he put it, the Muse took a long time to strike (we got the copies at choir practice on Wednesday and learned it there and then), and when she did, she was in a frivolous mood.

** That was inspired: it was what the baby's mother came up the aisle to when they got married a few years ago.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
I was wondering what "over-chocolated" meant too. [Confused]
A very small round biscuit covered with a lot of very thick milk chocolate.

I don't like milk chocolate. I thought it was dark. In which case I would have kept the whole thing secret and away from you chocolate gannets! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Is the biscuit in question one with a hole in the centre?

I agree with you. I like chocolate (and I like it to be dark) but a biscuit should be a biscuit, not a chocolate bar with a thin layer of biscuit filling in the middle.

My favourite are dark ginger chocolate ones, btw, which don't have a hole in the middle and have got the ginger proportion just right.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I'm with you Ariel, on the chocolate ginger! Good dark chocolate and just the right amount of ginger. [Smile]

No, the milk ones are solid across and down and remarkably hard to bite.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
For those of you who are suffering an excess of milk chocolate, my address is Château Piglet, St. John's NL ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Ariel, have you come across Borders biscuits dark chocolate ginger biscuits? I bought a large box (500g) for £1.99 when they were selling off Christmas stock in our local Morrisons and was hooked. Morrisons sell them as does Tescos, but much more expensively.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
I feel with all this talk of chocolate I should join in! I still can't fathom a biscuit with too much chocolate [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Ariel, have you come across Borders biscuits dark chocolate ginger biscuits?

Oh yesssss... one of my all-time favourites.

Have you tried the M&S Dark Chocolate Gingers? Very more-ish, too. They seem to go just as quickly at the office as the Borders ones.

PS I'm currently eating dark chocolate butter biscuits. Supermarket's own version of the wonderful Leibniz biscuit, and every bit as good.

[ 17. February 2014, 18:21: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
Further to the dark chocolate question....surely there was one... and linking to our British make do and mend/ waste nothing ethos:

Having fin1shed the bottle of sloe gin (I leave the sloes in when making it) remove the gin soaked sloes, destone them,and mix them into the darkest, highest percentage of cocoa solids chocolate (melted) that you can find. Spoon into mini cupcake holders and refigerate till hard. To die for - these beat any liqueur chocs you can name. Not too sweet, and very alcoholic. [Eek!]

[ 17. February 2014, 22:53: Message edited by: jacobsen ]
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
I'm another who would love a dark choc ginger biscuit, but never buys the borders? Ones as hopeless luxury!

I'm going to Cornwall today, to see my little ones. To excited to sleep so will get up now and accidentally wake the others. Time to be on the road!
Love to all. I'll be back...

No idea if this will post, I seem to have logged myself out by accident. Ho hum!

[ 18. February 2014, 04:53: Message edited by: Taliesin ]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
Further to the dark chocolate question....surely there was one... and linking to our British make do and mend/ waste nothing ethos:

Having fin1shed the bottle of sloe gin (I leave the sloes in when making it) remove the gin soaked sloes, destone them,and mix them into the darkest, highest percentage of cocoa solids chocolate (melted) that you can find. Spoon into mini cupcake holders and refigerate till hard. To die for - these beat any liqueur chocs you can name. Not too sweet, and very alcoholic. [Eek!]

Ooo yum - I'll try this, but with the blackberries and raspberries that I used for vodka and gin.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I do a similar chocolate mix with rum soaked raisins - it's one of the few things that works well with white chocolate when I'm making a mixed box. But glacé cherries soaked in kirsch need the darkest possible chocolate, milk chocolate is OK if they're soaked in brandy.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Taliesin:

I'm going to Cornwall today, to see my little ones. To excited to sleep so will get up now and accidentally wake the others. Time to be on the road!
Love to all. I'll be back...

Have FUN!

I will have to stir myself and begin to pack for Mexico - but can not muster any enthusiasm. I did buy a new (posh) suitcase yesterday as my eldest pinched the last one we had to take piles of baked beans and tea back to Heidelberg.

They do have baked beans - but they cost the earth. Tea? Nope, no decent tea to be had in the whole of Germany. They have stuff called 'black tea' and 'English breakfast tea' but it is yuk!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
Further to the dark chocolate question....surely there was one... and linking to our British make do and mend/ waste nothing ethos:

Having fin1shed the bottle of sloe gin (I leave the sloes in when making it) remove the gin soaked sloes, destone them,and mix them into the darkest, highest percentage of cocoa solids chocolate (melted) that you can find. Spoon into mini cupcake holders and refigerate till hard. To die for - these beat any liqueur chocs you can name. Not too sweet, and very alcoholic. [Eek!]

You've reminded me, I have some gin soaked blueberries to use up. Might make some chocolates [Smile]
A lazy day here. The parenting forum I'm involved in has a crafting week so this morning we are having a virtual crepe making class and this afternoon I'm leading a sewing class (we're making aprons, a good beginner's lesson for children). At some point I need to mark a stray essay but other than that I am work free [Big Grin]
Oh, I might have gin soaked blueberries on a crepe!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I have brandy, I have raisins. I can find some dark chocolate, so off I go. Sounds delicious!

The unloved milk choc biscuits are still languishing here if anyone fancies one with their cuppa!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
PS. The sun is actually shining and lots of crocuses I didn't know were there have suddenly opened! [Yipee]

Maybe Spring is somewhere around after all!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A good day in the city doing bits of shopping and generally having fun with Devonian friend - that is she lives in Devon, not that she is from the Devonian era - she is older than me but not by that much!

We're leaving for the hills in ten and a half hours and I really think I had better do some packing! To be fair to myself most of the stuff is on my bed ready but I have to move it from there into a suitable bag.

I solemnly swear that I will do it before bed...

...possibly.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:I will have to stir myself and begin to pack for Mexico - but can not muster any enthusiasm. [/QB]
Be kind to yourself, Boogie dear. Bereavement will take its toll. I was exhausted for many months after my mum died.

The sky here has been that weird blue colour this afternoon and at times the yellow UFO has also been sighted. Strange times. [Eek!]

Nen - thankful to be warm and dry.
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:I will have to stir myself and begin to pack for Mexico - but can not muster any enthusiasm.

Be kind to yourself, Boogie dear. Bereavement will take its toll. I was exhausted for many months after my mum died.
[/QB]

Words of wisdom from Nenya.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I must admit the thought of you buggering off to somewhere exotic like Mexico before you've even had a chance to catch your breath is filling me with tiredness-by-proxy ... [Snore]

And admiration. [Overused]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Thank you all again.

My **PA** is already there so I am travelling alone. Airport taxi is booked, now to check in online. I'm not used to all this!

[Help]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Rather you than me, Boogie - travel safely!

My first attempt at Lancashire hot-pot is now hopefully doing what it's supposed to do in the slow-cooker for tomorrow's lunch - I must just go and turn it down to "low" before I go to bed, and then turn it to "keep warm" before I go to w*rk in the morning.

Quite nasty snow-storm today - they told us we'd get about 5 centimetres, but I'd say it was more like 5 inches. [Frown]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Prayers for safe travel and arrival, Boogie, plus a good time there! [Votive]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The hot-pot turned out really quite well: there are one or two minor adjustments to be made (I always seem to over-estimate liquid in the slow-cooker for fear of it drying out and/or burning), but on the whole I think it's a "keeper".

All sorts of weather here today including freezing rain, which always seems to find its way down the back of my neck ...
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
Hello all.I'm back from the west country. Was lovely to see everyone and I'm glad to be home.

Just putting the kettle on. Rich tea, anyone?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Here at last in San Diego. All flights were on time, but it was a long journey all the same. It was odd having no one to talk to. I'm here alone too, till tomorrow evening, when four others join me, We head over the border the day after [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Just tried a reflexology session for the first time, which was interesting. Don't think I'd do it again, though; it didn't seem to make much difference, if any.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Taliesin:
Hello all.I'm back from the west country. Was lovely to see everyone and I'm glad to be home.

Just putting the kettle on. Rich tea, anyone?

Just having a cup of tea myself. I've made gin and lemon drizzle cake, if anyone fancied that.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A lovely few days away in the hills but quite glad to be home and in the warm - it was warm in the daytime up there providing you were outside but my room seemed cold all the time. Lots of photos currently downloading from my big camera. Today there was an accident on our route so we were diverted by the police and had an interesting experience navigating some back roads with quite a bit of traffic, including bl**dy big buses, also diverted and coming in the opposite direction. Himself very cleverly took another route and we ended up bowling along quite comfortably then found an adipoli [wonderful] place for lunch - YUMMY!!

Yesterday we had a great walk through some of the highest tea plantations in the world. Fab. Then in the evening our favourite cheap amd cheerful restaurant was closed so we ended up having street food which was excellent.

Now back to the daily grind.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Glad you had such a good time, WW, and that Boogie arrived safely.

I'm a Very Relieved Piglet today, as my (frankly splendid) boss told me that all our jobs are safe until June, and there's a further funding application in for after that, and that she'll fight hard to keep me.

[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Oh, I love having reflexology Ariel, soooo relaxing [Smile] I've not been far ages but aim to go in a few weeks [Smile]

[Yipee] for Piglet and her job!

[ 21. February 2014, 17:19: Message edited by: Chocoholic ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
That's great, piglet.

Glad you arrived safely, Boogie, hope you are not too lonely and that company arrives soon.

Nen - glad it's Friday evening and work's done for the week.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
In my capacity as the Château Piglet Soup Dragon, I'm trying out a slow-cooker soup recipe with veggies, rice, lentils and chicken stock which I'll set to cook overnight, and trying to decide whether my domestic goddessishness will extend to putting a loaf on to bake before I go to bed to eat with it.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Isn't overnight a very long time for the slow cooker to be on, particularly if you won't be eating the soup until lunchtime of the following day at the earliest? Or do you turn it off in the morning and then reheat as needed?

Having said that, I did a new (to me) recipe in the slow cooker yesterday and it was a real disappointment. The instructions were to cut the parsnips and carrots into "chunks" - and after 10 hours they were pretty much as hard as they were when they went in. [Roll Eyes]

Here today the sky is a milky blue colour so we might get a sighting of the strange yellow UFO that makes occasional appearances these days.

Nen - seeing a friend for coffee later. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Well done Piglet!

It was a glorious sunny day yesterday. I enjoyed looking round San Diego yesterday and went on a harbour cruise. Watched sea lions playing in the water. I have a little toy dog called Phileas Dog to photograph. He travels the world for my labrador forum.

Tomorrow, over the border then a six hour drive - hope the vehicle has air con!
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Glorious sunshine here today - I am making the most of it by visiting the local NT place for a serious stroll before coming home to tackle the back garden again.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Sunny here too, though I haven't been out in it having spent most of the day assisting my 9 year old make a theatre scene from A Midsummer Night's Dream in a shoebox for his homework.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It's been sunny here too, but with the sort of huge dark clouds on the horizon that make you wonder whether you should have brought an umbrella.

Went out for a drive in the countryside - wonderful to see the irrevocable signs of spring, buds on the trees, crocuses in the grass, birds calling to each other, calves in the barn and sheep in the fields. It shouldn't be long before the first wobbly little spring lambs appear in the fields as well, exploring their new world.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Swansea was fine but the sea looked grey, and lots of evidence of storm damahe to trees in the Neath Valley.Lots of daffodils in bud in the verges - the local councils plant daffodil bulbs whenever they do work on the verges.
Our second week where we've actually managed to get the things we set out to get - this is unheard of!
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Sunshine and showers on our drive from Border territory (if you are/were a Roman soldier) to the Midland territories. And it isn't particularly cold although I am always cold and today is no exception...)

Cheese and wine, anyone (well, it's Saturday!)?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Here we are in San Filipe. That was a loong drive! It's a real one horse town! But the villa we are staying in is fabulous, with a pool and a sea view.

[Smile]

[ 23. February 2014, 01:15: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
Isn't overnight a very long time for the slow cooker to be on, particularly if you won't be eating the soup until lunchtime of the following day?

Not as much as it sounds. As it was the weekend, I went to bed very late, and the recipe said to cook on "low" for 8 hours, so when I woke up (also very late) I turned it down to "keep warm". Then it was switched off altogether* as D. suggested going out in the early evening to investigate a new Brazilian barbecue place that's opened here, which was very good indeed. It's part-buffet, part table-service: there's a soup, salad and fruit bar where you help yourself, and a short menu, and they bring things from it (usually on skewers, although there was also v. good roast beef and baked gammon) to your table at short intervals, which you can take or leave as you please.

You have to be quite a carnivore to enjoy it (D. was beginning to glaze over a bit by the end), but the food was very flavoursome and beautifully cooked, and not horrendously expensive.

* I'll turn it on to "low" again before I leave for church in the morning and we'll have it for Sunday lunch. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Is it warm and sunny, Boogie? I could put up with a one-horse town for a pool, hot weather and SUN!!
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
The waters have been receding round here this week - now there are just large ponds all over the meadow next to us, with the lower half flooded, instead of all of it flooded. I'm not going to complain too much at the aroma of drowned vegetation, mind, as on the way to Silbury Hill yesterday we went across the Downs and through villages where there are still sandbags across doors, single-file light-controlled traffic through still-flooded roads, and water fountaining up from the drains. We got off lightly here.

If anyone gets the change, it's worth going to look at Silbury Hill and the landscape around it. Right now, the water table is high enough that you can see how it may have looked soon after construction, with a 'moat'. We spent most of yesterday around there, with a flying visit to Stonehenge on the way home (despite it being in the opposite direction [Biased] ). Can't say much about the new visitor centre there, as we went straight to the stones, and it was shut when we got back to the carpark after walking back via the Cursus. Oh well, another weekend maybe... [Smile]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
We were at Avebury a couple of weeks ago - showing some American friends some real history. I've been to Stonehenge, but Avebury is, in its way, far more impressive. And they have a National Trust tea shop. Silbury Hill is part of the "ceremonial landscape" around Avebury. The other advantage to Avebury is that ther's a good pub at Beckhampton, again, very near.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
I've always wanted to go to Avebury. It's on the must see list just below Sutton Hoo.

On work experience with the National Trust, I did a tour of the landscape around Stonehenge. Lots of really interesting bits and bobs are outside the rings, barrows and ditches and whatnot, but they are not accessible to visitors. The new visitors centre is supposed to be pretty good though.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I've never got closer to Stonehenge than seeing it from the road (en route from somewhere to somewhere else), but having grown up in Orkney, I've probably had enough prehistory to be going on with ...

V. jolly sort of day today - Canada won the men's hockey gold medal just before we went to process in, and there was some interesting improvisation on the organ ( [Big Grin] ). We also had Byrd's Teach me, O Lord (with solo piglet) and at Evensong Purcell in G minor and O pray for the peace of Jerusalem by John Blow.

The soup survived its re-heating very nicely - I'll use that recipe again.
 
Posted by ExclamationMark (# 14715) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
I've always wanted to go to Avebury. It's on the must see list just below Sutton Hoo.

On work experience with the National Trust, I did a tour of the landscape around Stonehenge. Lots of really interesting bits and bobs are outside the rings, barrows and ditches and whatnot, but they are not accessible to visitors. The new visitors centre is supposed to be pretty good though.

Well worth the visit. It's just a few miles from us and we've been lots on our own, with visitors and with children/grandchildren. Try and get in the house if you can - timed tickets, friendly guides - you can handle everything in there. It was the house used for the TV series "Country House Rescue"

Weekends are very busy but the stones are open 24/7
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I am back from a week in the South-West of France, where the gastronomy is not for the faint of heart. By which I mean it’s really, really tasty, but Lord is it hefty. You can feel your arteries hardening by the minute (although I guess the red wine helps with that).

As a friend of mine likes to say, it’s one of those places where you go not to detox but to *tox* [Razz] . On the menu: duck products of all descriptions (this be the land of foie gras but that’s not the only thing to be done with a duck), garbure (a sort of soup with potatoes, cabbage, ham and beans), aligot (a purée of potato and Cantal cheese), Toulouse sausages, Pyrenean cheese… And obviously an appropriate quantity of the local wine and aperitifs. Well sort of. The local thing is pastis (aniseed liqueur), which I don’t like. OTOH, violet is also a Toulousain speciality, and violet kirs (the violet alcohol mixed with white wine) are a thing of great beauty.

I am now completely fooded out and planning to eat nothing but vegetable soup for about a week in order to give my poor beleaguered digestive system a rest.

Some other good news: I can confirm that the sun actually still exists. I was beginning to have doubts. On Saturday we went to Carcassonne and ate lunch outside on the terrace in 15°C of glorious South-Western sunshine. By this point I didn’t have the courage to order the cassoulet [Eek!] … although we did burn off a few of the week’s calories climbing up the ramparts. I think I like the castle at Carcassonne better than the one at Warwick. It’s slightly smaller but the views over the Pyrenees are amazing.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... the gastronomy is not for the faint of heart ...

Sounds like my sort of place! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Carcassonne is lovely. I'm glad to hear it's sit-outable, as I plan to be in Aix-en-Provence in a few weeks.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It all sounds wonderful. I'd love to see Carcassonne - and the food sounds great. Warwick Castle is fun, but these days it's very theme-park-ish - and expensive! Unless you can get a deal, it's £25 per person now.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
It's sunny and glorious here in San Filipe, Baja California (27 deg C). I've had the laziest two days ever!

We are off to Guerro Negro tomorrow for whale watching - a six hour drive but well worth it I'm told.

The rest of our party have been working incredibly hard at a charity project up on the hill in Encenada. I'm just here for the ride and the holiday after they did all the hard work.

[Smile]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Boogie: Enjoy the ride and the holiday and the weather and the whale watching and the food.

Meanwhile life goes on for the rest of us.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Boogie, you go for it. You deserve it in general.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... Warwick Castle is ... £25 per person now.

25 quid! [Eek!] Does that include bed and breakfast? [Big Grin]

Boogie, glad to hear you're having a good time - if you can stand 27°, you're welcome to it!

Meanwhile, Domestic Goddess Piglet has been in action again - chicken stock made and put in the freezer, and lemon loaf CAKE cooling on the rack. Should be ready for virtual tasting any minute now - help yourselves.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think feeling patriotic towards a country one has chosen rather than one's country of birth makes perfect sense.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
It's sunny and glorious here in San Filipe, Baja California (27 deg C). I've had the laziest two days ever!

We are off to Guerro Negro tomorrow for whale watching - a six hour drive but well worth it I'm told.

The rest of our party have been working incredibly hard at a charity project up on the hill in Encenada. I'm just here for the ride and the holiday after they did all the hard work.

[Smile]

Hey, welcome to Pacific Standard Time!
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... Warwick Castle is ... £25 per person now.

25 quid! [Eek!] Does that include bed and breakfast? [Big Grin]
Whereas you get into the castle at Carcassonne for a mere €8.50 (less themeparky activities, but I don’t see that as a negative, personally).

Actually we got in for a big fat zero courtesy of my boyfriend’s disability card (he has a visual impairment). You see, in his head, boyfriend en rouge is not disabled. He just remembers that he’s disabled now and again when it’s in his interests. A disability card gets you into all kinds of tourist attractions for free and usually you get a second person in for free as well so they can look after you (as if he needed looking after [Killing me] ). There’s gotta be a few advantages…
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:

Actually we got in for a big fat zero courtesy of my boyfriend’s disability card (he has a visual impairment). You see, in his head, boyfriend en rouge is not disabled. He just remembers that he’s disabled now and again when it’s in his interests. A disability card gets you into all kinds of tourist attractions for free and usually you get a second person in for free as well so they can look after you (as if he needed looking after [Killing me] ). There’s gotta be a few advantages…

My twin brother is registered partially sighted and years ago we'd visit attractions like the Tower of London and he would pay a discount rate and I would get in free as his guide [Smile] the Armouries was great, we got our own personal display of objects to touch and try on and other people were shooed off away from us. He always carried his white stick though, both to clear a path (he didn't need a full guiding cane for orientation) and to let others know why he appeared to be behaving oddly in shops (security often followed him around [Roll Eyes] )
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
It all sounds wonderful. I'd love to see Carcassonne - and the food sounds great. Warwick Castle is fun, but these days it's very theme-park-ish - and expensive! Unless you can get a deal, it's £25 per person now.

Go to the races instead! A short walk from (or to) the castle. Three hours of action for between £10 and £20, with free parking.

(Other racecourses are available)
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
All these outings sound great, but I'm not going anywhere except back to sleep. How long does this beastly bug which is going round my corner of the UK last? It's been a cold, a cough, a sore throat, dizziness, high temperature, chills ... all one after the other.

Thank you for all the virtual food (I am still eating). All I have to offer are a few oat and blueberry muffins out of the freezer.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That sounds very nasty, Landlubber - sleep is probably the best thing for you, and lots of comforting hot drinks with honey in them.

Hope you feel better soon.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:

We are off to Guerro Negro tomorrow for whale watching - a six hour drive but well worth it I'm told.

[Smile]

Ojo de Liebre! Wonderful place to see such amazing creatures. One of the few, if not only, wild creatures which will let you approach and touch their young.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
As a member of the National Trust, I get into NT attractions free, but, as I use a mobility scooter, my "carer" can also get in free. Both Darllenwr and Lord P are also Trust members, but if we have friends with us, I ask them if they are willing o be my "carer".
The Eden project also offers free admission for carers - very useful when we go down to Cornwall as Lord P's girlfriend uses an electric wheelhair.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Well that was an adventure!

Never trust Google maps!

We travelled happily on normal roads for a couple of hours then hit 'road works for seven miles' turns out there IS no road after that, the road works are road building! We then travelled on a rough gravel and sand track over the mountains for 200 miles. Then 100 miles from anywhere, having passed nothing for an hour except sand buggies, we had a puncture.

What a picture, all our suitcases our on the sand, us jacking up the 4X4 and replaceing the shredded tyre with what looked like a pram wheel. The next 100 miles was driven at 15-20 mph. All five of us were very quiet, but nobody panicked PTL.

We arrived late but relieved to find the firt place was a tyre shop - surprise there! Manic jokes and laughter ensued! Our return journey isn't the same way and we are assured it's a 'normal' road.

Today we see the whales.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:

Never trust Google maps!

The satellite view is frequently your friend on that front.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Boogie: have the whale of a time
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
Isn't overnight a very long time for the slow cooker to be on, particularly if you won't be eating the soup until lunchtime of the following day at the earliest? Or do you turn it off in the morning and then reheat as needed?

Having said that, I did a new (to me) recipe in the slow cooker yesterday and it was a real disappointment. The instructions were to cut the parsnips and carrots into "chunks" - and after 10 hours they were pretty much as hard as they were when they went in. [Roll Eyes]

:

Nen - the timings for slow cookers are extremely flexible, and an extra few hours is usually not a problem. Re hard, uncooked veg, the usual advice is to cut them into fairly small chunks, no larger than your pieces of meat, and to put them in the bottom of the slow cooker with the meat on top. The longer the better, in my experience, with a quick blast (30-45 mins) on high to start off with, and stock made with boiling water. Not wishing to teach my Granny!
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
Isn't overnight a very long time for the slow cooker to be on, particularly if you won't be eating the soup until lunchtime of the following day at the earliest? Or do you turn it off in the morning and then reheat as needed?

Having said that, I did a new (to me) recipe in the slow cooker yesterday and it was a real disappointment. The instructions were to cut the parsnips and carrots into "chunks" - and after 10 hours they were pretty much as hard as they were when they went in. [Roll Eyes]

:

Nen - the timings for slow cookers are extremely flexible, and an extra few hours is usually not a problem. Re hard, uncooked veg, the usual advice is to cut them into fairly small chunks, no larger than your pieces of meat, and to put them in the bottom of the slow cooker with the meat on top. The longer the better, in my experience, with a quick blast (30-45 mins) on high to start off with, and stock made with boiling water. Not wishing to teach my Granny!
[Big Grin]

That's very much my regime too. I tend to only cook for 8 hours though, but that is easy for my lifestyle.

A day of marking ahead [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Interesting; thank you for all your comments. I'm always a bit scared to do too much over the cooking time; particularly as this particular recipe didn't have lots of liquid, just a tin of tomatoes.

I have plans to try it again with fewer root vegetables, cut smaller, and with mushrooms. And possibly stock. [Smile]

It's positively Spring-like here today, even the sun put in an appearance for a while, and I'm out to lunch with a friend shortly. [Axe murder]

Nen - Lady Who Lunches.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Back in Encenada now. San Diego tomorrow.

The whale watching was hard to describe. To stroke a huge wild animal which chooses to come up to you, then brings its baby to do the same is just amazing!

The nine hour drive back was worth the experience.

Photos to follow.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Boogie, that sounds amazing! I can't quite imagine how it would feel, such trusting whales round there too.

Glad you are having a great holiday! Please bring back some warm sun!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
That trip does sound wonderful [Smile]

A grey day here, matching my mood [Roll Eyes] marking again today (essays on social exclusion) but there's always the weekend to look forward to.

I'm applying to volunteer at Kentwell Hall, the tudor re-enactment, so might cheer myself up with some Tudor dressmaking next week. I'm also going to join the local sewing group on Monday as I need to get out of the house more.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Back in Encenada now ...

Isn't that something rolled up with spicy beans in it? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Not sure what happened to the snow we were threatened with but it never materialized, just rained heavily most of the day. (You don't want to know about the potholes that are making their appearances: each successive day of rain sees them a bit more pronounced. There's a terrific one in the station forecourt which I'm half convinced is a sinkhole in the making and which will suddenly swallow an entire double-decker bus one of these mornings.)

March tomorrow, and Shrove Tuesday next week. Where does the time go?!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... You don't want to know about the potholes ...

Welcome to our world - I don't know what kind of tarmac they use for the roads here, but it doesn't work, and they get eaten up every winter by the salt, grit and snow-ploughs. If you look closely, I swear you can see koalas ... [Big Grin]

In other news, having acquired a ham-bone and some yellow split peas, I'm making an attempt at Newfoundland pea soup - the stuff is all in the slow-cooker and will be switched on before I go to bed. The recipe said 8-10 hours on Low; I'm inclined to agree with Jacobsen that a bit longer won't do it any harm.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Every year, before the monsoon hits, the local authorities here spend a fortune repairing the roads and then, every year, the monsoon tears them up again - the power of water should never be underestimated. As for potholes, I lived in Liverpool before I moved here so I'm used to them.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Well you could be describing South Yorkshire except for "monsoon" enter winter. The rains and frost that come interact with old mine works and the results is there is nearly always subsidence that ruins the roads each winter.

Jengie

[ 01. March 2014, 13:14: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by MrsBeaky (# 17663) on :
 
Some of the roads here in Kenya are appalling, quite horrendous and can even lead to back injury...

But some of the roads are great, much much better than the pot-holed roads I used to drive to get to work in rural West Sussex.

Driving here has many different challenges from in the UK and requires a very different style, so I just hope I can adapt when I next come back for a visit!
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
S*d it - received a speeding ticket in this morning's post. Anyone know if I can do a speed awareness course near where I live instead of having to travel to the area where the offence took place?

(I am not a happy person now...cross with myself for being so bl***y stupid. It won't have been for "excessive" speed i.e. I won't have been doing 70 in a 30 area or anything. Just going faster than the speed limit for the road. I was driving up and down steep hills so accelerating to get up the hill I suspect - or having accelerated not slowing the revs down at the top. As the area is unfamiliar to me I can't be specific about where I was a Really Bad Person. And I do know that speed kills, having buried enough victims of excessive speed and bad driving.)

[ 01. March 2014, 13:59: Message edited by: St Everild ]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
I got a speeding ticket some years ago on a road near you, St E. I had driven along it when first learning to drive many moons ago and etched in my memory was my driving instructor's immortal instruction to, as he put it, "put your b****y foot down, woman" (this was just after he'd asked me what the speed limit was for that road, I'd said "fifty" and he'd pointed out that it was a clear road and I was only doing twenty five at the time!). I was reminiscing about it to myself as I drove along at 49 mph, little realising that in the intervening years the powers that be had seen fit to reduce the speed limit for that road to forty! No point being indignant, I just had to pay the fine and take the points, but it stung, I tell you. It stung!
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I went out today with the intention of booking two appointments;an eye appointment and a hairdresser's appointment. Then the plan was to get some new trainers and jeans. Oh, and computer ink.

Somehow, I managed to get both appointments for this afternoon, so I've now have had the hair cut and the eye appointment and chosen and paid for new spectacles.

However, I've bought three fleeces, three t-shirts, four pairs of socks, eight pairs knickers, a single bed sheet, a pair of pillowcases, and two lots of bin liners.

I did remember the computer ink though.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Sorry to hear it, St E. It can happen to anyone though - it happened to a retired friend of mine whose family used to tease her about her cautious driving because she never liked going fast, then suddenly one day there was the speeding ticket in the post. Like you she'd done something that she wasn't aware of at the time.

Beautiful sunny day here today and an enjoyable afternoon spent looking at some lovely paintings. It really is amazing that you can still see works of art painted in the 1400s, about 600 years ago, and they're still clear and beautiful.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
S*d it - received a speeding ticket in this morning's post. Anyone know if I can do a speed awareness course near where I live instead of having to travel to the area where the offence took place?

I think not - I know several people who have been caught like this. As you say, it's more likely to happen on unfamiliar ground. But, however much of a hassle it is, it's probably worth it in terms of car insurance.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I'm sitting in Starbucks, Phoenix airport - very delayed. Set off 7:30am Sat, will be home 8pm Sun. I'll be very glad to get home!

[Smile]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
I'm sitting in Starbucks, Phoenix airport - very delayed. Set off 7:30am Sat, will be home 8pm Sun. I'll be very glad to get home!

I've done that (except the flights were on time). That is jf you are changing at LAX for Heathrow on AA.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
It was San Deigo/Phoenix/Philadelphia/Manchester but with US Airways. But, due to the delay we have been re-routed San Deigo/ Phoenix/London/Manchester with British Airways.

[Snore] [Snore] [Snore]

[ 02. March 2014, 00:41: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
In my book airports and planes vie for the top spot in "the most boring places to be" - I medicate myself with OTC travel sickness pills and doze most of the time, it's the only way I cope without getting tired and ratty.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Poor you, St. E - it must be very frustrating getting a ticket when you're just over the speed limit.

Not quite as daft as what happened to D. when we were in Orkney for my mum's funeral though. A few months after we got back he got a parking ticket from some group called Town and Country Parking for an offence committed in Dundee. We hadn't been anywhere near Dundee and he wrote to them to say that about 100 people could attest that at the time of the alleged offence he was 200 miles away in St. Magnus Cathedral, playing the organ for the funeral. They re-credited his account, but with a very bad grace.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
In my book airports and planes vie for the top spot in "the most boring places to be" - I medicate myself with OTC travel sickness pills and doze most of the time, it's the only way I cope without getting tired and ratty.

Memo to self:

Must stock up on those pills for Wodder's domestic consumption.

Oh, wait! He sleeps most of the day, anyway.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and we've just got back from the supermarket and guess who was asleep?
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
WW and Pete, I have this lovely picture of you both in loose cotton clothes in the heat of India, sitting on verandas drinking long cold alcoholic drinks and teasing and joking with each other with the ease that comes with long acquaintance. Friendship is a wonderful thing. [Axe murder]

I hope the rest of your journey goes smoothly, Boogie.

Nen - heading for the shower and then off to church. [Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Soon be home, Boogie - and I bet your bed will look SO attractive!

I got a speeding ticket for just going 35 mph! Its a nasty little trap - you are turning right onto a main road, going downhill, so you accelerate to get into the traffic, go with the flow and bingo! you're done for speeding.

That camera is a nice little earner there - I know several people who have been caught! [Frown]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Nice image Nenya - the cotton clothes is surely right - and very few of them. Where you've got it wrong is the teasing and joking as Pete doesn't have a sense of humour - sorry - where you've got it wrong is the alcoholic drinks.

[Biased]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Of course Pete has a sense of humour. He refers to you as his friend, doesn't he? [Biased]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Smudgie:
Of course Pete has a sense of humour. He refers to you as his friend, doesn't he? [Biased]

[Overused]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
So much for the beautiful sunny start to the month that we had yesterday. I cut today's outing short - light rain and wind aren't ideal conditions for getting out and about, and gardens are still in pre-spring mode with a dash of sogginess.

None the less it's been a good weekend for seeing some nice paintings, yesterday and today. My only regret is that the way some are displayed makes it impossible to actually look at them except from some distance, because the closer you get, the more light seems to reflect off them. Unless of course you crouch down at a 35° angle at the side and squint up, which I've found tends to attract the attention of the gallery attendant.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
quote:
Originally posted by Smudgie:
Of course Pete has a sense of humour. He refers to you as his friend, doesn't he? [Biased]

[Overused]
[Killing me]

No loose cotton clothes for us here - got back from church and changed out of the glad rags into several long sleeved warm layers. Mr Nen's just put his thermal vest on.

Nen - raining and windy here. That makes a change. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
S*d it - received a speeding ticket in this morning's post. Anyone know if I can do a speed awareness course near where I live instead of having to travel to the area where the offence took place?

As far as I know yes you can. It's a national course, so you should be able to go anywhere. Might have to ask the company providing it to get the info though... (Knowledge based on being involved in referring people to the other national driving course, which is for people who were in accidents as a result of their driving, so I could be wrong!)
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I was wearing a loose cotton teeshirt this morning. But I was running in a half marathon, and put a few extra layers on soon after finishing.
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Celtic Knotweed:
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
S*d it - received a speeding ticket in this morning's post. Anyone know if I can do a speed awareness course near where I live instead of having to travel to the area where the offence took place?

As far as I know yes you can. It's a national course, so you should be able to go anywhere. Might have to ask the company providing it to get the info though... (Knowledge based on being involved in referring people to the other national driving course, which is for people who were in accidents as a result of their driving, so I could be wrong!)
The second time I did it, I could book it on line at my venue of choice (from the list). Sadly, I got clocked for speeding again a couple of weeks ago, too soon to repeat the course, and the fines went up from £60 to £100 last November. [Frown]

[ 02. March 2014, 18:06: Message edited by: jacobsen ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
All this talk of lightweight clothes is making me feel quite envious - they're forecasting a high of -14° for Tuesday, with a wind-chill of minus-God-knows-what. [Eek!]

Very jolly sort of day musically today - our last hurrah before Lent. We sang Haydn's Missa Sancti Joannis de Deo in the morning, and Stanford in B♭ at Evensong, both causing much Decanal Grinning™.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
What are these 'lightweight clothes' of which you speak?? [Confused]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Home!

What a long journey! 12 hours wait at Phoenix, but home at last - yes, my bed was VERY welcome after that. Only one problem - suitcase lost in transit - they are chasing it up today.

Lovely to see Tatze, she is just as waggy as ever.

I left Mr Boogs in the USA. He is doing the Natches Trace on his bike (Nashville to Natches).
Nutter!

It's bright and sunny here - I'm looking forward to a nice long walk in the woods to blow the cobwebs away.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
There was a young lady from Natchez
Whose clothing was always in patches.
When asked why twas so
Said "It's simple you know
Wherever Ah itches, Ah scratches".
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Woken by hail and thunder. Flood alerts again on local rivers, groundwater rendering roads dodgy at best, no-go at worst.

At the moment have Noel Coward's Bad Times just around the corner booming out

...There are dark clouds hurtling through the sky, And it's no good whining about a silver lining, For we know from experience that they won't roll by...

It seems appropriate and matches my mood.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
There was a young lady from Natchez
Whose clothing was always in patches.
When asked why twas so
Said "It's simple you know
Wherever Ah itches, Ah scratches".

Love it! An original? [Smile]

Piglet... Decanal grinning?

Welcome home, Boogie, glad the sun has shone for you.

Nen - humming this evening's earworm... We're going to unpack our troubles from our old kit bag and wait until we drop down dead...
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Alas, not original, and now well past its 100th birthday.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
... Decanal grinning? ...

decanal - pertaining to the Dean (of a cathedral) - Decani is the side of the choir where the Dean's stall is.

We're very fortunate that although not really musical himself (but he sings the Litany very nicely), the Dean thoroughly enjoys the music that we produce, and signals his appreciation by grinning broadly, especially (though by no means exclusively) in the loud bits. This phenomenon is what we call "decanal grinning". [Big Grin]

I've been a Good Organist's Wife today and washed, ironed and starched our surplices.

[Angel]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Alas, not original, and now well past its 100th birthday.

I'm so yesterday. [Roll Eyes] [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Some of us are on the way to 100, closer every day at a rate much more than others of you.

A good thing about that limerick is that it's so clean I could say it to a friend in front of his 13 yr old son with no fear of embarrassment.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's very cold here tonight - currently -18°C, and feeling like -33°. Having been sitting in the (relatively warm) den watching TV, I came out onto the landing to be hit by a wall of cold and discovered that the front door was standing wide open ... [Eek!]

As D. is the only one to have been out this evening, I know who it wasn't.

Wodders, you are permitted to shiver. **brrrrrrrrr**
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thank you, shiver I shall.

We had a little light rain a few nights ago and then last night we had our first real storm of the year - I know you are probably all heartily sick of the sound of rain but to us it was fab! A big, thrashing, tropical downpour - a noisy beast of a storm which put about 4 inches of water in our rainwater harvesting tanks. I was tempted to head up to the roof for my traditional dancing naked in the rain [it was dark at the time] but was too comfortable just lying there listening to it.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
Sounds nice. I am awake. And have been for an hour, and shouldn't be.
Looked at clock.couple of hours.

[ 06. March 2014, 04:27: Message edited by: Taliesin ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Woke at 4 this morning, which is fine - earlier starts can become a bit of a drag later in the day. It gives time to catch up on the news and have breakfast and a cup of tea before leaving for work.

The odds are, though that I'll probably still be in a bit of a scramble to leave at the right time. Nice mild day so far, though and good weather for the weekend - with no rain forecast, I may even get something done on the allotment then.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The Weather Channel said this morning that it would go up to -1° at the weekend.

[Yipee]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
S*d it - received a speeding ticket in this morning's post. Anyone know if I can do a speed awareness course near where I live instead of having to travel to the area where the offence took place?

You could come to our Church Hall on Saturdays ...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Rain rain rain rain rain grrrrrr!

But a heat wave promised for next week - hurrah!

I am still recovering from an horrendous journey and jet lag, but it's good to be back at work and back to normal.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Very dull and overcast here. I really should be doing some work...
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
One of those exciting days that alternates between bright sunshine and hailstrorms. Spent most of it crouched over a hot sewing machine.

My new summer shoes arrived in the post today - fuchsia pink.

Tomorrow I will make a dress - black with an oriental pattern of red and white chrysanthemum.

Thereafter, you may bring on the warm weather.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Thank God for a beautiful, warm sunny day. The crocuses are out, the daffodils are starting to show, the hedgerows are beginning to burst into blossom, and hordes of foreign tourists all clicking away with cameras are making their presences felt. It must be spring.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:

My new summer shoes arrived in the post today - fuchsia pink.

Lucky you. Mrs Sioni got a thoroughly sensible pair for work last week on her podiatrist's advice.
 
Posted by MrsBeaky (# 17663) on :
 
I'm returning to the UK tomorrow to sort out some family challenges and hopefully have some good times with them all too...I'm SO glad the weather is improving.
My husband will stay here in Kenya and keep these home fires burning.
For some reason I'm really quite nervous about the flight which is unusual for me.

Hello Blighty but Goodbye to the Ship as I won't have easy internet access whilst I'm there.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Went to Compton Verney this afternoon, now that it's reopened from the spring. They're doing Moore and Rodin, so the grounds are full of sculptures, including Moore's "Seated Woman" which has a curiously prehistoric look about it, like one of those figurines they dig up from time to time. I didn't do the exhibition as I don't actually like either artist, but enjoyed looking around the rest. There were about 12 of the Moore and Rodin sculptures outside in the grounds.

You know it's an interesting exhibition when you find yourself muttering "Good grief" and "What on earth is that!?" (Answer: a quite enormous, chunky representation of three vertebrae, cast in dark bronze. Of course.)
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:

My new summer shoes arrived in the post today - fuchsia pink.

Lucky you. Mrs Sioni got a thoroughly sensible pair for work last week on her podiatrist's advice.
These are totally sensible: they come from a specialist manufacturer of wide-fit, ultra-comfy flatties. When I'm not buying from that crowd, I buy a Dutch brand - I currently have a winter pair (red) and sandals (bright green). My other shoes are a pair in teal, and some yellow pumps.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Tomorrow I will make a dress - black with an oriental pattern of red and white chrysanthemum.

My hat is off to anyone who can make a dress in a day, just like that. [Overused]

I can't wear anything except extremely sensible shoes. My daughter wears high heels and my ankles want to break whenever I look at them. [Eek!]

Mr Nen and I have been in the garden this afternoon and I'll be cooking the usual Saturday night stir fry shortly. Then an early night. Mr Nen had a restless night last night and so I didn't get much sleep - less than he did, in fact.

Nen - been awake since 4am. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Firenze, where do you get them from?

I got some amazing fuschia sparkly pumps from M&S 18 months ago, everyone comments on them!)

Choccie (with wide, easily hurt feet)
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:


Tomorrow I will make a dress - black with an oriental pattern of red and white chrysanthemum.

That sounds beautiful [Smile] I'm currently making a set of linen shirts/smocks for myself and my youngest as part of our Tudor ensembles.

Pink isn't my colour but I fancy bright green sandals.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chocoholic:
Firenze, where do you get them from?

I got some amazing fuschia sparkly pumps from M&S 18 months ago, everyone comments on them!)

Choccie (with wide, easily hurt feet)

Here. The link should go to the Very Shoe (which is pinker than shown).
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:

Pink isn't my colour but I fancy bright green sandals.

There you go.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I have been looking for blue boots like this for ages!

Dare I look at the price?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
The prices are a wee bitty eye-watering - but OTH, I think my red shoes have just seen their 3rd winter.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Those pink ones are gorgeous, Firenze - not unlike a pair of turquoise Cotswold ones I got last summer in a sale in a shop in Great Yarmouth for £20. They're probably the most comfortable shoes I've ever had - why, O why didn't I buy a red pair as well when I had the chance?

Mustn't hang around here for too much longer - our clocks go forward tonight ... [Eek!]

[Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My heart rate is somewhat elevated this morning - Himself has been harvesting Jackfruit, a job his brother usually manages but, understandably, not this year. One particularly succulent looking fruit was a bit high up so it was a matter of calling in the reinforcements in the shape of a 16 year old neighbour boy who shinned 30 or 40 feet up the tree to disconnect it and drop it to the ground - he then had to get back down again.

My heart was in my mouth both as he went up and as he came down and, frankly, I wish I hadn't known he was doing it. He was perfectly safe, of course, and he knows what he is doing, and he does it for everyone locally but...

When he did get down it took the two of them to carry the fruit to the house - they are not known as the biggest fruit in the world for nothing!

And, Pete, comparisons with me as the biggest fruit in the world will not be entertained!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:

When he did get down it took the two of them to carry the fruit to the house - they are not known as the biggest fruit in the world for nothing!

But how do you eat them and are they tasty?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
You cut into them with a sharp knife then pull out the segments/bits/whatever and eat those, taking the seed out as you do so. Or you can cut up the flesh and fry it. Or you can make jam with it. The seeds you can cut up and put in curries or make chutney.

I quite like it fried but won't eat it otherwise though others in the house love it.

* * * *

The battery for my mobile phone is fading and apparently is an obsolete model, no longer available - a company has even approached the manufacturer but no joy so this afternoon I have ordered a new phone online which should be here midweek. It ain't an expensive one in case I run into the same problem when this battery starts to fade.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I had some jackfruit in Singapore, not sure if it is the same as the Indian one. I had it raw as a tropical fruit with pineapple from a roadside stall. It had a bit of a funny smell to it but I liked the taste very much.

I heard that unripe ones can be used as a sort of artificial meat like soya mince. Have you ever had that WW ?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Lovely morning at Charlecote Park (National Trust Elizabethan house with deer park), near Stratford on Avon. The deer were in fine form, the young stags chasing each other across the entrance, pausing to test their strength and lock antlers with each other.

It's always a good place to look around and by the time I got back to my car, for the first time in months, the sun was so warm that the inside of the car was like an oven and had to be aired, and the steering wheel cooled down a bit, before starting to drive off.

They have a good farm shop as well where I bought, amongst other things, a Hamburg Parsley Root, which is said to be like a parsnip, only spicier, and some Oca roots, which apparently have a sweet and sour taste and can be used like carrots. I've never heard of either, so this should be interesting.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... comparisons with me as the biggest fruit in the world will not be entertained!

[Killing me] I just Googled those jackfruits and you're not kidding - they're huge!

I know that the reasoning behind eating pancakes on Shrove Tuesday is to finish up the eggs and maple syrup* before Lent, but we enjoyed ours so much that we did them again for lunch today - if I keep practising I might get quite good at this flipping** malarkey ...

As is our wont during Lent, we do unaccompanied Evensong settings and tonight was a nice Tudor-fest of Byrd responses, Tallis canticles and an anthem by Sheppard.

* possibly not maple syrup in the medieval English tradition.

** with a fish-slice - I'm not that good. [Razz]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Morning all - a lovely bright, fresh sunny day here. My favourite!

Now then - park, woods, waterfalls, river, reservoir, moors or lake for dog walk?

We have an hour's walk a day now. [Yipee]
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
Any guesses as to how long the sun will stay out before we get a hosepipe ban?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TheAlethiophile:
Any guesses as to how long the sun will stay out before we get a hosepipe ban?

Now then - don't press my buttons, our incompetent and profit grabbing water companies are the subject of my favourite rant!

We went to the lake, Tatze loved paddling in the water. She's not swimming yet, but I reckon she will be in the summer. There's still a LOT of mud about so a hosing down was in order when we returned.

[Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
... a lovely bright, fresh sunny day here ...

You get sunny days in Boogie Wonderland? [Confused]
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
I have been eating my way round the South coast (try again - I have had lunch out by the seaside every day for a week) but today I am home so we have to cook for ourselves. It is freezing cold here; someone must have our share of sunshine. Food needs to be healthy and hot.

Please don't post any more tempting shoe pictures. I have just caught up with the thread and every time I see a wonderful pair of flat shoes my brain tells me I must buy them as it could be years before I find any more.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
You get sunny days in Boogie Wonderland?

Yes! And another one today! I took Tatze to meet her best friend Zaba (in front of Tatze) and we had a walk to the waterfalls near us. Then they hoolied around the kitchen before flopping and snoring, allowing my friend and I to have a good old chat.

[Smile]

Now I'm off to do some pruning in the front garden - long, long overdue as it seems to have rained since September!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Nice day here, too - hardly a cloud in the sky and bright sunshine! Bit of a chilly wind, though.

We leave the front garden more or less alone. Planted some cotoneaster horizontalis as ground cover, and it really has done its job. Not content with spreading all over, various small seedlings have grown and also spread all over. [Smile]

Apart from fishing out the odd crisp packet or chocolate wrapper, I really, really do not want to know what is going on underneath the spreading branches! [Eek!]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
It was glorious here on Sunday but has been overcast for the last 2 days and slightly cooler today, I have just had lentil soup to warm myself up. I've finished my work for the day and need to get on with some decluttering before doing some sewing.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Landlubber:
I have been eating my way round the South coast ...

I'm sorry - that conjured up an image of a large sea-creature rising up and biting bits off the White Cliffs of Dover and Beachy Head ... [Killing me]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Landlubber:
I have been eating my way round the South coast ...

I'm sorry - that conjured up an image of a large sea-creature rising up and biting bits off the White Cliffs of Dover and Beachy Head ... [Killing me]
Thanks to the weather that is pretty much what has happened.

Landlubber, stop it. Put that forkful of Chesil Beach down now.
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Landlubber:
I have been eating my way round the South coast ...

I'm sorry - that conjured up an image of a large sea-creature rising up and biting bits off the White Cliffs of Dover and Beachy Head ... [Killing me]
It rather brought this to mind.
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
It wasn't me, honest, 'though you might want to keep me indoors next time high winds are forecast just in case.

There are some very scarred bits of coastline out there; some will never recover and some will take years to do so.

However, thank you to whoever sent our sunshine back. I need to say that now because I'll be so stiff tomorrow after starting to clear up the poor neglected garden that I won't feel at all grateful then.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Sixteen hours on trains. Have to say, all punctual and latterly v comfortable. Well, not so much the one between Gare du Nord and Gare de Lyon.

Now sitting in an orange and white room apparently signed by Cezanne.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A few months ago there was a flash on my UK bank's website about the new, improved, more efficient money transfers system they were just adopting - so now my monthly transfer from my UK bank to my Indian bank takes 3 days instead of one!

Ain't progress wonderful?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
You can't beat it [Biased]

Really dense fog this morning - if I thought yesterday's was thick, this is twice as much: can't even see the end of our car park this morning.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Whereas here, the fog isn't as bad as yesterday. Bits of the way in there was nothing to see out of tube windows (I'm overground)
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We had light fog yesterday, none today I'm glad to say. Off to work now. Swimming first lesson - which is good, no planning, no preparation, no marking.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Visibility is down to about 30 yards probably. I was going to take photos from the train, but there wasn't anything to photograph, except the outline of nearby trees and a thick wall of grey blank for most of the journey.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Lovely sunny morning here! [Smile] Had a bit of fog yesterday, but it cleared very quickly.

Fog is one thing we don't get much of. Rain, snow, hail sleet, yes. Fog, no. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Another lovely day here [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Waiting for the fog to lift before heading into Norwich with Mum.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Mr D has an interview today for a real live job. Fingers crossed!!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
On visibility I reckon I can beat you all…

Not fog here – we have some absolutely shocking air pollution. When you look down the street it’s all hazy in the distance. It’s now so bad that the authorities have decided to make all the public transport free for the next three days in the hopes of getting people out of their cars. [Eek!] [Help]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We had freezing fog* yesterday, then rain, and now we've got Patches of Treachery™ on the pavements again - ice with melted ice and rain on top. [Eek!]

* St. John's is (affectionately) known as Fog City.
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
After a very foggy journey yesterday I started wondering why God created fog. Sun and rain make things grow, wind gets rid of the dead bits of plants etc., but what's the point of fog?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Not sure. My hair was wet by the time I got to my destination, and it was as dank a morning as you might wish to find.

I also managed to catch the wrong bus this evening and miss my train completely, thereby letting myself in for a long, scenic route through blossom and daffodil-flecked country villages, past rivers and fields, on a sunny spring evening. When I eventually got to the city, the bus I was on stopped almost exactly outside a Spanish restaurant...

Every weekend ought to begin with an adventure, even if it's only a small one.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
No weather here today at all. It's not cold, windy, rainy, sunny or foggy. You can't even see any clouds - just grey sky.

I shall walk the pooch round the reservoir then brew some fresh coffee.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Although we have virtually finished this year's Black Pepper harvest this morning we ordered a proper extending aluminium ladder [12'-22'] to just finish off this year's harvest and to be here in future years. Yesterday I also bought myself a new lightweight aluminium stepladder with the handle bow thing at the top to help me access my books more easily. Happily neither of these things were as pricey as I anticipated and both are/were necessary.

Holi tomorrow, it is often a day early down here, so it will be a busy day with mass then breakfast then off to Holi, lunch with Himself's cousins just behind that temple then more Holi - I may even go back over there in the evening for the second instalment, it is only about 5 kms away.

That is the start of a busy few days but not all involving me so I will still get time for the odd nap.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Holi tomorrow, it is often a day early down here, so it will be a busy day with mass then breakfast then off to Holi, lunch with Himself's cousins just behind that temple then more Holi - I may even go back over there in the evening for the second instalment, it is only about 5 kms.

Such dedication, Wodders! Food involved, by any chance?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, actually no BUT there will probably be lots of food stalls about and street food here can be wonderful!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Polly Plummer:
... what's the point of fog?

It burns off the snow. I have no idea why or how - it just does. This is a Very Good Thing - you don't have to shovel fog.

It was a beautiful, clear but v. cold day here today, although I only ventured out to buy a birthday present for a friend in the choir.

Not a completely wasted day though - I made the Jamie Oliver chicken-and-sausage paella for lunch, which is a seriously good recipe (and there was enough left to freeze for another time).

Mustn't faff around here for much longer - laundry to be transferred to tumble-dryer before I go to bed.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Holi was good fun but we didn't get home from the first half until 4 p.m. so the chances of me attending the second half have been reduced somewhat!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Glorious warm spring day today. Lunch in the open air at a table in the sun, a walk around a country village with thatched cottages and daffodils, and a visit to see the spring lambs exploring their new world in the nearby fields. The birds are incredibly loud - shouting out at the tops of their little avian voices, just so there's no mistake and you know you're in the countryside. A lovely way to spend a spring Sunday.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
What is this "spring" of which you speak? [Confused]

It was dull and cold with intermittent freezing rain here today - if we get spring before Easter I'll be surprised. [Big Grin]

Never mind - we sang some nice music: Hassler's Missa super Dixit Maria and McKie's version of Psalm 121 in the morning, and Weelkes' Short Service and Morley's Nolo mortem peccatoris at Evensong.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I have started painting again - hurrah!

We have a £10 talents challenge at Church so I am doing 20cm x 20cm canvasses and selling them.

It was good to have an incentive to get my brushes out.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
It ain't spring up here in the Grim North! Cold, grey and dispiriting. Though the daffodils are out, which does make for a slightly more cheerful view from indoors!

Congrats on painting again, Boogie! Hope you make lots of money for the talents competition.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Expecting son to show up from SA. He was supposed to be here yesterday but delayed in Portugal.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We have spent the day in what is reportedly The Largest Mall in Asia - personally I think some of the Singapore ones have it beat but it is still a big mall. Pete and I studiously ignored the McDonalds, KFC, Pizza Hut, etc. but he did buy some new undies in Marks & Sparks - how more British can you get than that - and he's a colonial! The big food court was good, lots of choices - Pete & I had Sizzlers which were, not too surprisingly, bl**dy hot!

When we got home I had to go and meet someone in town then walk to collect my new phone then walk home - my little legs are a tad tired.

(Fixed your code for you)

[ 17. March 2014, 12:42: Message edited by: Firenze ]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Said son arrived. In time for supper and bed! He has to be at airport at 3am tomorrow morning so not much shut-eye for the taxi driver alias yours truly
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Went in to w*rk today although it was a public holiday - as I don't get any paid holidays ( [Mad] ) I need to bank as many hours as I can so that I can take time off when I want to (i.e. in the summer to come over to Blighty).

Cold, blustery day here, and now that God has cleared away a good bit of the sn*w, the Council lorries are bleeping away merrily outside Castle Piglet clearing away the rest.

At quarter-past-one in the morning - delightful. NOT!

Must go and try to get some sleep - anyone got some ear-plugs?

[Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
...

(Fixed your code for you)

[Hot and Hormonal] - thanks Firenze [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Fun evening at the allotment where one of the old boys was having a bonfire. I set off towards my plot thinking how delightfully rural all this was, nice bit of gardening on a sunny spring evening with the birds chirping away and the smell of woodsmoke gently wafting across the grounds. By the time I reached my plot the breeze had shifted, the plot was enveloped in a thick white cloud of smoke and I could hardly see the other end of the allotment. The birds had gone quiet and moved off somewhere else. After a quarter of an hour, so did I.

I didn't realize how well and truly fumigated I had been until I arrived at the supermarket and people started giving me a wide berth. Small moment of some embarrassment.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I spent the evening on my "other job" - secretary for the Anglican Cemetery Committee, which is much less depressing than it sounds.

The only trouble was, there's a rather deaf lady on the committee who insists on sitting adjacent to me so that she can hear the Chairman, and she wears a scent that makes my eyes water. I realised it at last month's meeting, and didn't say anything, but after dabbing at my streaming eyes for an hour tonight I thought "sod it" and asked her (as politely as I could, with much apologising) if she'd mind not wearing the scent in future (or not sit next to me).

I hope she remembers for next month - she's a bit dozy ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We are currently under The Curse of the Blocked Drains - happily only on the north side of the house so bathroom things are unaffected but kitchen and washing machine stuff is a problem. We shall call in our tame plumber [a nice lad] later today and hope to have it fixed in a day or so but it looks to be a major-ish job what with digging out the old pipes and relaying new ones and possibly the building of a sump.

Ah well, it's only money. I reckon that if a problem can be solved by throwing money at it then throwing it is the best thing to do - but only yesterday when I got my weekly balance update from my bank here by SMS I was thinking that things were looking up.

Counting chickens seems a waste of time.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Pay-day is always a Good Thing. It can, however, be improved by (a) winning a free coffee from Tim Hortons™ Roll Up the Rim; and (b) discovering that the one-off extra payment on your pay-slip marked "bonus" that doubles your pay isn't a mistake but honours some agreement with the negotiating unions that you didn't know about.

[Yipee]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
What's happening to the weather? We've had some lovely warm days, the catkins have been out since Christmas and the daffodils in the bank below our house are starting to come into flower. Spring is definitely showing signs of springing. Now we've had heavy hail and we're forecast snow for tonight, and i'm sitting at my computer wrapped in the lovely serape Darllenwr gave me for Christmas which has seen service indoors but not outdoors yet. At least it should mean I sleep reasonably well tonight as I wake if I get too warm.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
What's happening to the weather? We've had some lovely warm days, the catkins have been out since Christmas and the daffodils in the bank below our house are starting to come into flower. Spring is definitely showing signs of springing. Now we've had heavy hail and we're forecast snow for tonight, and i'm sitting at my computer wrapped in the lovely serape Darllenwr gave me for Christmas which has seen service indoors but not outdoors yet. At least it should mean I sleep reasonably well tonight as I wake if I get too warm.

All very true, but over here in Zooport we have had some torrential showers yesterday and today. It's an improvement on we've had so far this year though.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We had some v. heavy rainy-haily stuff today, but we're not really complaining as it helps to get rid of some of the sn*w.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Just the usual blue sky, sunshine and zephyr of a breeze here.

[Big Grin]

Off to see the bicycle repair man this morning as I have managed to get a puncture then have to go to town for some light shopping - it's a tough life.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Just the usual blue sky, sunshine and zephyr of a breeze here.

Just the same here - except that the breeze is 2 degrees C!

[Smile]

I have just recovered from the norovirus lurgy - yuk! My whole family have had it but I visited the farm on Tuesday, blithely saying "No problem, I spend my working life with contagious kids". Hmmmm!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Sun trying but failing to make it through grey cloud. Ominous black cloud coming up in west. Cold wind.

Just the usual British weather for March, then. Even if it is nearly April!

Sorry you got the norobug, Boogie. Mr.N got it on our cruise last year and we were disinfected twice a day to within an inch of our lives!! [Eek!]
Still, these things, as the Bible says "Come to pass". [Big Grin]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Been bright sunshine and blue skies since at least 8am here [Smile]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Darllenwr took me to The American Museum at Claverton Manor near Bath ro see the Kaffe Fassett exhjibition. WOW!!It was absolutely amazing - if you enjoy textiles and colour, it's well worth seeing.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Darllenwr took me to The American Museum at Claverton Manor near Bath ro see the Kaffe Fassett exhjibition. WOW!!It was absolutely amazing - if you enjoy textiles and colour, it's well worth seeing.

I'm sure it must have been beautiful! I've been to the museum before, some lovely old quilts.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Mostly good Saturday here; after a nice long lie-in I tried out a new hair-colour that claims (a) not to drip and (b) that you can keep what you don't use and use it again. They were stretching the truth a bit about the non-dripping: it was a rather thin mousse (think of the texture of imitation spray-cream from a can - what my late father-in-law used to call "all puff and no poop"), and dripped more than my usual brand, and the print in the instructions was so small a microscope would have been useful (see the TICTH thread downstairs).

Lesson learned: if it ain't broke, don't try and fix it.

Then, in the interests of research, D. suggested trying out a restaurant that's just opened on the harbour-front, Legros & Motti which was v. good indeed, apart from the fact that they charged $16 for a 9oz glass of wine. [Eek!] The charcuterie plate that we shared as a starter was one of the nicest we've ever had here.

Now laundry done and soup bubbling merrily in the slow-cooker to take to the Cathedral tomorrow to feed those that are setting up the crypt for the AGM in the afternoon. Mustn't forget to take my contribution to the post-meeting bun-fight - crackers with cream-cheese and red pepper jelly.

No rest for the wicked, eh?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I love the motto of that new restaurant, piglet:

quote:
Life is too short to not eat well.
Excellent!

We are off for another Alms Feast in a couple of hours but Pete has decided not to come as the venue is

[a]crowded; and

[b]noisy

so we are leaving him with a [(very) small] crust of dry bread and a glass of muddy water to tide him over until we get back.

I'm really looking forward to going as it is at the church we don't go to much these days [more difficult for a wheelchair than our regular venue] so it will be a good chance to catch up with folks we don't see very often - and also, of course, many folks from our regular church will be there. In the old days such an event would have used up a couple of rolls of film but these days I just mildly inconvenience a few billion electrons - far more environmentally friendly.

And, of course, there will be FOOD!

Have I mentioned that we like food?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Darllenwr took me to The American Museum at Claverton Manor near Bath ro see the Kaffe Fassett exhjibition. WOW!!It was absolutely amazing - if you enjoy textiles and colour, it's well worth seeing.

Mrs Sioni has suggested this. It's a gem of a museum and the only downside is that I foresee her taking up knitting and building up a stock of wool! Could be an expensive day out, in the long term.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Just the usual blue sky, sunshine and zephyr of a breeze here.

Just the same here - except that the breeze is 2 degrees C!
And only a day later we have hailstones the size of peas from clouds which have scudded over from Boogie Wonderland.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Pete and I took a little walk between innings in the cricket and just 20 yards into it a local 6 or 7 year old came tearing round the corner on his bicycle, not looking where he was going and straight into the back of Pete's wheelchair! Thankfully Pete was shocked more than hurt [although there was some not too major shoulder pain]. The boy appeared unhurt and cycled straight home and went inside a bit hastily.

Himself went to tackle the boy's mother and the boy's grandfather came out and immediately removed the valves from the boy's bicycle tyres, from which we gather that he is grounded!

Had Pete been hit by a motorbike or had the boy hit a motorbike, they go along the lane a lot, then there would, most likely, have been a fatality.

Watching the rest of the cricket when we got back made up for any trauma.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Watching the rest of the cricket when we got back made up for any trauma.

That boring, huh? [Biased]

Hope Pete's shoulder pain soon disappears and that the boy will be a wiser cyclist in future. It's surprising how easy it is to not look where you're going on a bike.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I tried out a new hair-colour that claims (a) not to drip and (b) that you can keep what you don't use and use it again.

It's probably the one I bought recently - two slim cans side by side and a special cap to fit over them. It wasn't too messy but the colour didn't seem to last long - I ended up using the remains for a second application after 3 weeks.
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Darllenwr took me to The American Museum at Claverton Manor near Bath ro see the Kaffe Fassett exhjibition. WOW!!It was absolutely amazing - if you enjoy textiles and colour, it's well worth seeing.

Mrs Sioni has suggested this. It's a gem of a museum and the only downside is that I foresee her taking up knitting and building up a stock of wool! Could be an expensive day out, in the long term.
I would say that the Museum visit is well worth the £9 entrance fee for full access - truthfully, the Kaffe Fassett exhibition alone would be considered worth that by many. Add to that the lengths to which the Museum staff have gone to decorate the grounds and you have the makings of a remarkable day out. I am no great fan of Crafts (ask St Gwladys about that!) but even I was impressed.

Long term cost, on the other hand? Well, I suppose it rather depends upon whether Mrs Sioni finds herself impressed by what St Gwladys called "Yarn Bombing". Basically, the staff (or somebody) have knitted close-fitting, multi-coloured socks for the lamp-posts. I would imagine that this is not a cheap undertaking ...
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Such a beautiful morning that Mr S and I went out geocaching at the north end of Test Valley - then the sunshine turned to hail, then to rain, back to sunshine, rain again...but the countryside was Just So Beautiful [Axe murder]

It's always lovely, but the fields are just showing the new green haze. The trees are mainly still in their subfusc shades of brown, beige and taupe, but some are just shading into green and some - amazingly - show wonderful flame-coloured tips to the branches, especially when the sun catches them. They might have been willows, who knows, but they were fabulous [Yipee]

I feel so blessed, a) to live here and b) to be able to walk those paths. What a great day...

Mrs. S, going to be sore tomorrow [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I liked that motto too, WW - I thought it would appeal to you. [Big Grin]

Hope Pete's shoulder's OK after his bike encounter.

St. G - yes, that's the one. I don't think I'm even going to use the remainder - I have a feeling that it's been the cause of my watery eyes today, so I think I'll just ditch it.

Lots of Church Eating™ today: my soup was almost completely devoured at lunch-time, and of course there was food after the meeting.

Then Byrd's Second Service with solo piglet at Evensong.

Quite tired - Doing Things on Sunday afternoons interferes with one's kip quota ...

I'm off now to do the Crew's Quiz and then to bed.

[Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Talking of kip quotas I didn't have a nap at all yesterday [Eek!] so today I woke up, switched off the alarm and promptly fell asleep again! Happily I didn't sleep long but it meant that although I showered, etc. and was down in time for the morning walk I didn't have time to shave so I'm thinking of treating myself to a proper barber's shave this afternoon - not bad value at just 40 pence.

First though I shall have a little nap before lunch.

This morning we took Pete's chair to have something restitched - a local lad working at an upholsterer did it for us for just 20 pence, a tad cheaper than leaving it until he gets home to Canada.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
We didn’t get hailstones the size of peas but there was a sudden splatter of them, just as I was attempting to drive down a series of steep, sharp bends with a temporary road surface, where the notice at the side warned you not to go more than 10 mph or you might plummet over the edge of the cliff.

It cleared after a few minutes and the skies were bright again. Yesterday afternoon was full of winding, tree-lined country roads dappled with sunlight and shadow, fields of sheep and lambs, blue skies with clouds scudding across, some pretty country villages and lots of daffodils. I stopped off in one village which was first recorded in the 900s, and still has a church tower that dates from the 1300s. It looks it: crumbly yellow stone, very weathered now.

Frosty this morning as promised but the sun on the fields is beautiful at this time of day.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Darllenwr:

Long term cost, on the other hand? Well, I suppose it rather depends upon whether Mrs Sioni finds herself impressed by what St Gwladys called "Yarn Bombing". Basically, the staff (or somebody) have knitted close-fitting, multi-coloured socks for the lamp-posts. I would imagine that this is not a cheap undertaking ... [/QB]

Here they tend to be bicycle rack cosies.

I fancy a day out geocaching, it'd do us all good to get some fresh air. Maybe if it is fine next weekend.

I had a lovely weekend, we went to Kentwell Hall open day on Saturday to be interviewed as prospective Tudors and had a really enjoyable day. I'm hoping to be in the Stillroom, my other half as an archer or woodsman, my eldest would appear to have been already been cast as a page and my youngest will be at barn school/pauper. We're practicing our speech whilst waiting to hear back and I have many costume plans on the boil. It's just a pity I am currently marking 56 1000 word essays...
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Yesterday, apart from one (very short, sharp) shower, saw glorious sunshine so I went to the allotment and put in some of my potatoes and some shallots. It was wonderful being out in the open air again.

Today, more glorious sunshine, forecast for all day. I'm thinking about putting my washing out on the line, although that will depend on whether the elf lass is awake or not (I could put her in the sling and carry on with it, but last time I tried that whilst hanging out washing she was really antsy and it was a bit of a battle). This sort of dilemma pretty much sums up life right now - it is a good thing she is so cute as the world really does revolve round her at the moment!

We (the elf lass and I) are off to the dentist this afternoon. Lucky us.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Off to Venice for 3 days holiday tomorrow morning.

Normally when I go away, I stay in hostels but March seems to be very much off season for Venice and I found a private room for 20 euros on the Lido. I have bought a 3 day vaporetto pass and a tourism pass which gives entry to the Doge's palace, some museums, and 3 churches of my choice.

Such things are a lot easier to arrange now we have the internet. Unfortunately it has also allowed me to see the weather forecast for Venice !
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Wow, that trip sounds fantastic! [Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Have a great trip, Moonlitdoor!

[hums]: "Just one Cornetto ..."

[edited code bollocks]

[ 25. March 2014, 00:28: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
You lucky man, moonlitdoor - have fun!

* * * *

We are heading towards Election Day here so many random callers offering party leaflets, most of which go straight in the recycling but one party gets read first. With some parties we wash our hands most carefully after handling their documents. Perhaps it is time to put our party flag up on the roof so that the others won't bother calling - A Hammer and Sickle on a Red ground is a fairly obvious statement.

* * * *

25 years ago today since my mum died - still remembered with enormous affection and missed muchly.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Tatze had her spay yesterday. She came home very groggy. She insisted on going in her crate last night 'tho we'd set up two old duvets in the kitchen in different places for her to sleep on.

The problem was that the comfy cone won't fit in the crate so she had to have the plastic one on. Anyway, she slept all night and went out for a wee fine this morning.

She's drinking plenty but not wanting any food 'tho I have offered chicken, scrambled egg and a bit of her normal food. I'm not worried as I, too, lose my appetite after a GA (and she weighs 26 kilos!)

Now she's snoozing again on one of the duvets. I'm not putting the cone on while I'm around to keep an eye on her.

It's great to have her back - yesterday was too long!

[ 25. March 2014, 07:00: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
25 years ago today since my mum died - still remembered with enormous affection and missed muchly.

I always remember the anniversaries of my mum and dad's deaths (5 and 15 years ago respectively). I still find Mother's Day tough.
A virtual hug to you.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Heard a brilliant organ concert last night: Thomas Trotter on the newly rebuilt organ at the Royal Festival Hall.

And a bonus of an interesting new work by Judith Weir.

If you get the chance, tune in on Wednesday when they've programmed the Saint-Saens 'organ' symphony plus the Poulenc organ concerto.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Just after D. had dropped me off at w*rk this morning, he phoned to say that we had two flat tyres - right off-side and left near-side, and that the electric pump (more-or-less brand new) wouldn't work.

A Very Kindly Colleague came out, got her car from the car-park across the road and let him use her pump (although it turned out that it probably wasn't our pump that was buggered, but the 12v socket in our car). Eventually they decided that the front tyre wasn't going to inflate (the rim had been dented) so they changed it for the spare.

Looks like that bonus I got last week's all going to go to Mr. Dunlop or Mr. Goodyear. [Mad]

I'm feeling more than somewhat guilty; I'd just been thinking it was quite a while (i.e. more than six months) since we'd had a puncture, although I didn't actually say so for fear of tempting Fate ... [Paranoid]

very pissed-off piglet
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I hope it works out cheaper than you think, piglet.

My eyes are so sore from constant marking that I've had to give up and have a glass of red wine instead. I think I'm going to go have a bath and an early night.
More marking tomorrow...

[ 26. March 2014, 21:27: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
I hope it works out cheaper than you think, piglet.

It did - $128 for a patch-up and a re-tread, which is less than one new tyre would have been.

We had Interesting Weather™ this evening: a big storm that had been battering the Maritime provinces all day hit us just before choir practice, and only five of the choir turned up. We have Compline with an address before choir practice each Wednesday during Lent, and once that was over D. decided there was no point in having a rehearsal with only five people, so we left it at that.

Usually we go to a pub for supper after choir practice, but as the rest of the crowd weren't going, D. and I went back to the Brazilian steakhouse place and had a v. nice feed - and they've now got a licence. [Yipee]

Sadly, the Almighty's timing is a bit off, so we're unlikely to get a snow-day. [Frown]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Hi ho, hi ho, it's off to work I go. OFSTED are kindly joining us for the next two days [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Good luck. Nil bastardies carborondorum.*


Supposed to be the Latin for 'don't let the bastards grand you down', but actually isn't.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Good luck Boogie, I feel for you, we've got OFSTED too.

I'm hoping that they will decide that they don't know which library I'm working in and won't come and find me, mostly because planning lessons and this particular student are incompatible activities. That's why I've got him one-to-one in libraries. I'm currently slogging through the process of getting his attendance up, so not pushing the teaching and learning as hard as I would be if we had a better than 60% attendance. His reaction to not liking things is to not come in.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Good luck to all you Ofsted-ridden teachers! If there's one thing I KNOW I could never be, its a teacher! I have great admiration for you all.

Instruction I found is something quite different. I was a Red Cross First Aid Instructor and Examiner for many years, and I enjoyed that (except trying to teach resuscitation on "Annie" to a class of Day-release brickies!! Had to ring for their tutor to come and keep them in order! )

So, Nil desperadum you probably know more than they do!!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Thanks all - Mr OFSTED watched the whole of my maths lesson and the feedback was all good. That'll do me, I just hope they leave me alone tomorrow now!

[Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I started (but didn't complete) a B.Ed. degree when I left school, and although I regret my failure, the only aspect of teaching that I covet is the long holidays; it seems to me that teachers these days are ensnared in red tape, targets and league tables, and as for the Ofsted inspections, don't even go there ...

[Eek!]

Good luck to all of you.

In other news, although we didn't get nearly as bad weather as the Maritimes, it's still blowing audibly outside and they're talking about more snow on Monday. [Frown]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Last day of my mega marathon week of marking. I'm also a day or 2 behind due to ill health (depression) but catching up nicely.
I definitely want to get out of the house tomorrow and go for a walk.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
They didn't come and find me - which was a Good Thing™ because said student was being a particularly resistant material
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Mad dash to pharmacy in The Big City today to get drugs not available here for brother in law. Just over 4 hours there and back, most of it sitting in buses. In another hour I'll start cheering on the West Indies Cricket team - I somehow think that a nap is not going to happen.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Mad dash to pharmacy in The Big City today to get drugs not available here for brother in law. Just over 4 hours there and back, most of it sitting in buses. In another hour I'll start cheering on the West Indies Cricket team - I somehow think that a nap is not going to happen.

Do you usually support the West Indies? Is this in opposition to your adopted country? [Smile]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
This household belongs to the school of ABA - Anybody But Australia™.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
India will be playing this evening and I will be supporting them against Bangladesh. If India play England I, a British national, support India whilst Himself, an Indian national, supports England. The frightening thing is in soccer, a game I don't really follow, where many folks locally support ManUre!

Sad or what?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
The politics of cricket! And there was me just thinking it was all tedium [Biased]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... many folks locally support ManUre ...
sad ...

I should imagine that most ManUre supporters are fairly sad at the moment ... [Snigger]
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Venice was good, and contrary to the BBC forecast it was dry though cold and windy. I had not felt like going on holiday since my mother died in early 2012, and was a bit apprehensive but I enjoyed it. Off season is a relative term for Venice as it was still full of tourists.

I think it is quite a romantic place. If I had a wife, I would certainly like to go there together so I recommend it to any couples. The suggestion given to me to stay on the Lido was a good one. A lot of the cheaper accommodation is in Mestre, and you have to get the bus over the bridge to the Venice main island each day, but from the Lido you get the vaporetto over to Venice which is much a nicer way to enter.

In the Rialto market they were selling cuttlefish which is apparently very popular there. Has anyone ever had it ?
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Paging Boogie...

How did OFSTED day 2 go?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Saturday at last. This week's evening commutes home have involved delays through signal failure, a fatality, a trespasser on the line, sheep on the line (twice), someone accidentally setting the onboard alarm off, a tree on the line and an unidentified obstruction on the line. That probably covers most of the possibilities apart from pheasants, the wrong kind of leaves/snow, a vehicle striking a bridge, lightning, aliens and the Rapture. Today I don't have to travel anywhere and this is wonderful.

Lovely lunch yesterday for a colleague who was leaving. We went to a country pub in a tiny hamlet, where even the starter-size portions were pretty much full-size, and enjoyed ourselves so much we completely missed the hailstorm and thunder further down the road. The Rioja was one of the best I've ever tasted, with a beautiful grapey flavour to it.
 
Posted by Taliesin (# 14017) on :
 
Happy Saturday, Ariel. I've just finished spring term reports for my school, but have been given a wedge of instructions about updating all sorts of assessment material, all done with one eye on the next ofsted...

Well done those of you who have just got thru an inspection... who shall be next? [Eek!]

[ 29. March 2014, 07:17: Message edited by: Taliesin ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I have a whole weekend free from marking and students in general. So far I have siphoned and stabilised some wine and made almond croissants. I might make some cheese later [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Paging Boogie...

How did OFSTED day 2 go?

Thanks for asking balaam!

I didn't get a visit yesterday and they were all done and dusted by 2pm. We are now officially a 'Good school with outstanding features'.

They have done really well - I joined them four years ago when they'd just gone into special measures.

We have a new headteacher who started in September. He's great. Very left wing and keen to look after the staff - hurrah!

I now have the best of all worlds - I only work two days a week, no responsibility outside the classroom, two lovely classes (Y4 Thursdays and Y5 Fridays) and a headteacher who cares. With OFFING STED off our backs for a while!

This will be my last school before retirement for sure and I'm grateful it's a good one.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
That's great news, Boogie. [Smile] My son in law is a teacher and OFSTED is such a huge stress.

Will be thinking of you tomorrow - the first Mother's Day or Mothering Sunday without your mum can be tough. So, for that matter, can be the second. [Frown]

Meanwhile it is fairly typically British spring weather here - glimpses of sunshine and a brisk cold breeze. [Biased]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I opened the front door earlier this morning and walked straight into summer: deep blue cloudless skies, a flood of bright hot sunshine, warm winds blowing. Bright flowers everywhere. People cheerful and relaxed, strolling, chatting, sitting at sunny tables outside cafes. The world seems to glow and sparkle on days like this. Utterly glorious!

I may have to go for an ice cream later on...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Oh did you have to mention summer??? We seem to be in the gap between one storm and another: they're forecasting another few inches of sn*w on Monday and Tuesday - probably just enough to make it a bloody nuisance, but not enough for a sn*w-day. [Disappointed]

Went out for a nice lunch yesterday to say goodbye to a colleague whose secondment to our department has just finished (although she'll be off more permanently in a few months' time as she's expecting twins in July). We went to a place called the Manna Bakery, which does really good sandwiches (I had chicken-curry salad on muesli bread) as eat-in or take-away.

Nice lazy-ish Saturday - after a lie-in I made a chicken-and-tomato pasta thing for lunch, which was really rather good, even though I forgot to put salt in the pasta-cooking water and had to add it later. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:

Will be thinking of you tomorrow - the first Mother's Day or Mothering Sunday without your mum can be tough.

Thank you so much. It feels strange, no one to visit, nothing to organise [Frown]

My sons sent sensational flowers, but neither were able to visit as one is in Bristol and working today and the other in Heidelberg.

We are off to Cologne to visit Boogielet1 at Easter, staying by the river Rhine, so I'm looking forward to that very much.

[Smile]
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
I have a whole weekend free from marking and students in general. So far I have siphoned and stabilised some wine and made almond croissants. I might make some cheese later [Smile]

I made gin soaked de-stoned sloes in chocolate and egg/chick/bunny shaped Easter biscuits. The ears tended to break off the bunnies, so they were my all day nibbles.
[Biased]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
... The ears tended to break off the bunnies ...

Poor bunnies. [Frown] That's why I can't eat chocolate bunnies/piggies/bears - I'm too soft-hearted.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
... The ears tended to break off the bunnies ...

Poor bunnies. [Frown] That's why I can't eat chocolate bunnies/piggies/bears - I'm too soft-hearted.
It was like that in our house, piglet - util I de-cluttered them years later we had endless chocolate hedgehogs/bears/bunnies/reindeer in the cupboard in the kitchen as neither Master S nor The Intrepid Miss S was able to bring themselves to EAT them [Eek!]

(this in spite of the fact that they were teenagers, Master S nudging 6 foot [Killing me] )

Mrs. S, who couldn't actually eat them herself, of course
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
And what about biting the heads off jelly-babies (the only way to eat them IMO)?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Well, I certainly don't have a problem with eating chocolate bunny ears!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Went to our monthly Treacle Market (please don't ask,. its a long mythological story!) which was fantastic. Came home with a lovely loaf of sourdough bread with linseed in, plus sokme really gorgeous blue Cheshire cheese. Creamy, but not too cloying, and just the right amount of blue in. Plus Morecombe Bay shrimps, Isle of Man scallops and probably the same, dressed crab.

Luckily the last two were frozen, or we'd be growing fins here! I don't like crab much, but there is the right amount for one greedy person - Mr.N loves crab!

I've never had scallops, so hope I like them. Do you eat those orange bits?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Went to our monthly Treacle Market ...

Link needed!!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Went to our monthly Treacle Market ...

Link needed!!

[Smile]

Link provided but you need to scroll down.

Jengie
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:


I've never had scallops, so hope I like them. Do you eat those orange bits?

The best bit. Requires even less cooking than the main part - which just needs to be seared for a minute or two either side. Team with slices of black pudding or crispy bacon. (Or both).
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:


I've never had scallops, so hope I like them. Do you eat those orange bits?

The best bit. Requires even less cooking than the main part - which just needs to be seared for a minute or two either side. Team with slices of black pudding or crispy bacon. (Or both).
Sear quickly with some ginger, garlic, lime zest and finely chopped chilli. Or whatever combination of these which appeals to you. Serve with lime juice. Or lemon if no limes but I prefer lime.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I once gave my daughter a button that showed a sad-looking chocolate bunny with an ear missing. The button said, THIS KIND OF SENSELESS VIOLENCE MUST BE STOPPED

Moo
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Scallops need very quick cooking and careful watching while they cook. Literally only something like 130 seconds. If you overdo it they go rubbery. They have a delicate flavour so I'd suggest just lightly pan-frying them in a mild garlic butter and adding a squeeze of lemon once on the plate.

The orange bit is the "coral" - not everybody likes it, but give it a go and see what you think. Good luck! It sounds as if you came home with some delicious purchases - I could very happily snack on all the things you mentioned.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
On a holiday to Ostend, years ago, I found a pick-and-mix that had sweets in the shape of the BVM, pastel-coloured foam like sweet shrimp, and took them back to church to hand round after mass. Everyone was happy to take one, including one of the priests, except one lady, the gran of a friend. She took one, but couldn't bring herself to eat Our Lady. She died 5-6 years ago, and on clearing out the house her daughters found the sweet on a shelf, still uneaten.

Jelly babies should always be eaten head first as it's cruel to start at the feet. They can see what's coming [Eek!]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
One of the nicest dishes I've ever eaten was prawns and scallops in a divine creamy, tomatoey rosé sauce with red and green peppers and pasta.

I'm salivating just thinking about it ... [Hot and Hormonal]

I made some chicken stock last night, and as the weather boffins are forecasting a storm (which may even result in a sn*w-day), soup might ensue.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
The only way to eat jelly babies (if you do - I'm not keen and will only have them if I'm desperate for something sweet and there's nothing else available) is to put them into your mouth whole and chew. It's a mercifully swift, warm end which they can't see coming. Nenlet2 gave me pink foam shrimps for Mother's Day and I use the same method for them.

I find it hard to eat anything that looks as though it could be alive, even by a long stretch of the imagination. I eat fish, but not if it arrives with the head and fins still attached. [Eek!] As for the idea of a pig's head being brought to the table... [Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!]

In other news, it's raining.

Nen - probably vegetarian at heart.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Ah, well we occasionally slaughter our own chickens so that might explain my ambivalence to chocolate bunny ears. We've actually given up meat for Lent though so the chickens are currently safe.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Soup has indeed ensued, and should be ready for virtual tasting by the time you read this.

As for the sn*w-day - although it sn*wed all day, we didn't close, and despite the fact that they're still forecasting about another foot of the bloody stuff, we probably won't get one tomorrow either.

Bugger. [Frown]
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
I find it hard to eat anything that looks as though it could be alive, even by a long stretch of the imagination. I eat fish, but not if it arrives with the head and fins still attached. [Eek!]

Hah, I once got served a plate of prawns in a factory in China that were still moving. Even after having been stir fried. I admit that whilst I will eat almost anything, I do rather prefer my food actually dead before it goes in my mouth.

It was very disconcerting seeing my fellow diners pop them in their mouths and sort of suck out the flesh from the 'shell' [Chinese preferred method of de-shelling, no use of dirty fingers] whilst the tail was sticking out of their mouths and still waving around.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
**shudder**

That sounds scary, Yangtze - I'll definitely go along with the "actually dead" option! [Eek!]

Well, we did get a sn*w-day - on 1st April! [Roll Eyes]

It was really only a sn*w-morning - the university opened again at 1 o'clock, but as I'd have only been in until 2 anyway, after consultation with my boss I didn't have to go in at all. There was about a foot of sn*w on the front step when we opened the door this afternoon, and although D. ventured forth, I decided that indoors was a really good place to be, so I had a nice lazy day.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
piglet, I really feel for you - though of course sn*w at Easter isn't unknown here, eek. Yesterday was so beautiful [Cool] , though, that I was gardening in just a T-shirt (yes, yes, and my jeans [Biased] ) hacking down shrubs and giving the lavender a haircut.

The hellebores and the tulips are out, and the magnolia stellata, and the purple magnolia I bought two years ago is just starting to flower. And the woodpeckers are toiling away in the trees at the back - when I went to work, there used to be one here AND one at work, and it used to make me laugh to think that someone else was working for their breakfast!

Not so sunny today, but as I'm off to the dentist that probably won't matter [Ultra confused]

The Apprehensive Mrs. S
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Mrs Sioni's birthday yesterday so we went to the Kaffe Fassett 50th Anniversary Exhibition at The American Museum at Claverton Manor just outside Bath.

It isn't just colourful cardigans: some of the textiles are amazing and there are pen & ink drawings, ceramics and a couple of paintings.

If you have no soul, don't go, otherwise get there midday, have a look round, do some of the main museum, then back to the exhibition when your retinas have recovered.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I was put off fish when I went with my French penfriend to the fishmongers, and she picked out our fish from the tank.

They kept flicking their tails all the way home... I don't think I've eaten fish since.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
There used to be a Chinese restaurant in London that I sometimes went to with friends, where they had a large fish tank full of large, ugly black fish. As I soon realized, it wasn't for decoration: if you ordered a particular dish on the menu (I never did) the waiter would take you out to the tank so you could choose your fish. It would then be scooped out with a net and taken off to the kitchens, reappearing, cooked and with a sauce, on your plate some minutes later.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Staying with a friend in Beijing we went to the local equivalent of Sainsbury's - as you say, live fish in tanks. Your chosen is netted, wapped on the floor, gutted and bagged in less than a minute.

All the seafood restaurants in Hong Kong had the menu in tanks, variously waving their fins, tentacles, feelers, pseudopods etc. Trot out the Cantonese for 'that one' - and on your plate crispy fried very shortly thereafter.

I don't myself have a problem with this. I eat things killed specially all the time: in these instances I can see it is done extremely quickly and, up until then, the animal was not particularly uncomfortable.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The supermarkets here have tanks of live lobsters with their claws tied in rubber bands. Although I love shrimps and prawns, crab and lobster have never appealed to me, which is probably just as well, as the idea of either killing them myself ( [Eek!] ) or even just having to pick out a live one from a tank appeals even less.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
An American colleague of Mr. S's went on a three-week business trip to S. Korea once. The first evening, her hosts took her out to a very expensive restaurant.

She said it looked more like a pet shop than anything else
[Eek!]
In desperation she turned to her hosts and said 'Oh, didn't my PA tell you I was vegetarian?'
[Overused]
and vegetarian she stayed for the next three weeks.

Mrs. S, shuddering
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:

I don't myself have a problem with this. I eat things killed specially all the time: in these instances I can see it is done extremely quickly and, up until then, the animal was not particularly uncomfortable.

Same here, whilst I couldn't eat anything still moving I don't have a problem with it being freshly and quickly killed. But, like, I said before, we kill and eat the cockerels when we hatch chickens.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
An American colleague of Mr. S's went on a three-week business trip to S. Korea once. The first evening, her hosts took her out to a very expensive restaurant.

She said it looked more like a pet shop than anything else
[Eek!]
In desperation she turned to her hosts and said 'Oh, didn't my PA tell you I was vegetarian?'
[Overused]
and vegetarian she stayed for the next three weeks.

Mrs. S, shuddering

...but did you realise that runner beans are tied up 24 hours a day?

* * * *

Yesterday, when the alarm went off, I did the fatal "I'll have just 5 more minutes" thing and woke up two and a half hours later!

The immediate result was that PeteC didn't get his morning walk [but thankfully didn't make a mess in the house! [Roll Eyes] ] - I had my breakfast later still then lunch not long enough after that. Himself and Herself both are hearty eaters and really don't understand that I rarely feel really hungry and can happily go a day without food - but if food is there, particularly snack type food, I will happily munch away - actually it is more like I will automatically munch away. What a sad character I am.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I was up until past midnight marking essays but, on the positive side, I have no more to mark for a month. I'm having a day off today and am having my first try at making cheddar, using Jersey Gold. The milk is so scrumptious I'm tempted to drink it instead.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
If you want to eat fish or meat then be prepared to face the fact of the living creature being killed, and also with the method used.

Should you find the method off-putting then maybe the food item isn't for you?

As for not buying anything live: in-shell shellfish and crustaceans must be alive at the point of sale otherwise you'll be very unwell.

I agree about the pet-shop thing in the Far East: I had an extremely unpleasant experience in a restaurant in HK 30 years ago involving a monkey... [Projectile] [Projectile] I was unable to eat anything other than breadsticks for the rest of my stay.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
What WW said.

After seeing a series of Sam Shepard plays in the early eighties, it was hard to face vegetables without feeling queasy about the fate of the gentle creations that we were eating.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
I am currently working with a dog curled up on my feet..... as I began to drive my car to the garage this morning for some minor work, I came across my neighbour's dog taking herself for a walk - they are out at work so I think she must have escaped. My feline housemates aren't too impressed, although they each bravely came to investigate - both feline & canine have behaved remarkably well. Maybe she could come here more often.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Is anyone noticing the much-talked about smog and pollution? It hasn’t seemed any different here, except that earlier this week my car was covered in Sahara (which I cleaned only to have it almost immediately re-covered in bird droppings). It doesn’t seem particularly misty otherwise but reports (and photos) suggest that London and other cities are covered in smog.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Yes, fog wrong time of year for most of the week here. More coughs and hayfever as well.

Jengie

[ 03. April 2014, 12:51: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Didn't notice anymore c**p on windscreen than is usual from the lorries that leave the nearby quarry and hurtle down the road at a good 10mph over the speed limit.

No smog either: walked dogs in glorious sunshine. Sods law, because I could have done with something to blunt the technicolour glory of the terrier catching and killing a rabbit before he and his lurcher friend scrapped over the carcase. Having sorted that out, lurcher then went off after a deer...

Joy completed when walker (member of the RA, according to their badge) had a go at me for "your animals butchering wildlife - I'll report you for hunting with dogs" - as if I or anyone else can stop a terrier and a lurcher doing what comes naturally.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I rarely feel really hungry and can happily go a day without food ...

Really? [Killing me]

quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... my car was covered in Sahara ...

A Facebook friend in Ireland said the same of his beloved Jaguar (or "Shaguar" as he calls it [Big Grin] ).

Talking of FB, I had a message today from someone whose sister used to go out with my brother (aeons ago) attaching a photograph of me with my mum and dad that must have been taken getting on for 45 years ago. I'm not sure what it says about me and my memory, but when I looked at the clothes that Mum and I were wearing, I could remember them ...

[Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... I rarely feel really hungry and can happily go a day without food ...

Really? [Killing me]
...

You see, I have hidden and unsuspected depths - I am a Man of Mystery [Eek!]

Seriously though, I love food AND I can do without it - unless it is right in front of me [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Good morning all. Time to smarten up and head for work, having just posted on the 'uniform' thread.

I certainly only wear my school 'uniform' to school! (Smart suit). Jeans and T shirts all the way otherwise [Smile]

[ 04. April 2014, 06:17: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I am off on a retreat day today and very much looking forward to some time and space to think. [Smile]

Nen - must remember to leave enough time to clear the car windscreen of sand. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
It's the Easter holidays! Rather peculiar timeing means that Easter weekend is the one before the Wednesday we go back to school...
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I seem to have wasted the morning dyeing wool cloth and staring at pictures of tudor clothing [Big Grin] I must actually do some work at some point.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
It's the Easter holidays! Rather peculiar timeing means that Easter weekend is the one before the Wednesday we go back to school...

Ooh the roads wills be clearer in the mornings, little lie in!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
We've been trying to get our living room kitten vandalism proof. Thankfully, most of our visitors know we are having an Abyssinian kitten, and collecting her from her breeder tomorrow, so won't be that shocked to see chair legs covered in packing tape and soft furniture covered with fleece blankets that hopefully Gwenny won't be interested in scratching. We will be trying to get a water pistol before we collect her though - I've been told a quick shot with a water pistol is a very effective deterrant!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
... a quick shot with a water pistol is a very effective deterrant!

My father-in-law used to keep a catapult (groan) to keep cats out of his garden; my father had a slug-gun for the same purpose.

Beautiful day here today, and it even got above freezing! [Yipee]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
We use a heavy duty spray bottle to keep the cats at bay (and out of the house, to which the younger cats seem to think that they have a right of entry.) It works for about 10 minutes until they have dried themselves off again.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Add orange squash to the water - they don't like being sticky but it won't harm them [Biased]

Good luck with Gwenny, too - is she named from 'Under Milk Wood'?

Mrs. S, no cats to worry about now [Frown]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
It's the Easter holidays! Rather peculiar timing means that Easter weekend is the one before the Wednesday we go back to school...

Our lot go back to school on Easter Monday.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Have a lovely time getting to know your new addition St Gwladys. She may be nervy to start with and hopefully sprays etc won't be needed.

Enjoy it, it's a very special time
[Axe murder]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Took all my remaining videos off to the charity shop this afternoon - the end of an era. But my VCR doesn't work any more, so no point in keeping them.

I carried on having a good clearout then managed to drop the VCR on my foot while shifting furniture. By coincidence, it fell exactly on the part where someone had already trodden heavily weeks ago and the black marks still haven't gone. Ho hum.
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Spent a happy hour moving my winter clothes to storage and hanging up the summer ones I haven't seen for six months. Hope I don't regret it in the coming weeks. One of the downsides of donsizing is that I don't have room to have them all hanging up in the same place at the same time.
I'm on my Easter holidays. Not back till the 23rd and as I don't work Frodays that means nearly three weeks off. I'm determined to not waste it!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Easter Holidays for me too.

I need to recover from last week and last weekend. Entirely coincidentally, nothing to do with Mothering Sunday, my daughter came down as I had tickets to the BBC Character Invasion. (Yes, it was us interviewed on Saturday Live.) So we were in the audience for the Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy recording, the playing and discussion around the radio play version of (Fritz Lang's) Metropolis and a rehearsed reading of Goldfish Girl followed by a discussion (these two weren't broadcast). We also went to Spamalot on cheap tickets in the evening. Sunday morning brought church parade for Guides where the service was so awful I told them they should be glad I couldn't Mystery Worship it, and then delivering my daughter back to her train.

I noticed the smog. Not particularly visually where it was just a grey, dull mistiness and not spectacular enough to look interesting on photographs, although I might have a night shot that shows it. I really noticed it moving around carrying stuff* made it a real effort to do much because my asthmatic lungs were struggling.

* Stuff = a backpack full of teaching stuff plus a old and heavy laptop, plus the flaky student's folder and stuff. The guys I work with all wince when they pick up the backpack, it really is that heavy. And flaky student wants me to carry a second laptop for him - so he can play on a computer unsupervised and do even less work.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I can't imagine a radio play of Metropolis! I would have loved listening to hitchhikers though.
First day of the holidays here, and I've done little except laundry and household shopping [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Meh... SOME of us have got to keep going until Friday before our holidays begin. Then as soon as I am off, I launch into Holy Week and all that entails as organist.

On the plus side, I'm off from my main paid employment for another week after most people, so I am looking forwards to a very lazy week the week after Easter.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Metropolis radio play - directed by Toby Swift, won the Prix Italia. Goldfish Girl won the Tinniswood Award - for Saturday it was performed by different actors.

This is all you can see of the Hitch Hikers now, sadly. They filmed it, and us, did the whole thing in one take with the sound guys on stage, Marvin as a puppet, Arthur Dent in his dressing gown, Trillion changing jackets, John Lloyd in the corner reading the book and a certain amount of acting along with the live broadcast.

Japes, I do have to work next week and will hopefully actually get paid for it. I'm trying to build up teaching resources for the team of tutors I work with, as the only one with a teaching background. I don't have to schlep in on the Tube hauling heavy bags and wander around Bow waiting for a recalcitrant teenager to surface or not (it's about 50:50)
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Has anyone seen George W Bush's paintings of other world leaders ? I am very taken with his portrait of Vladimir Putin.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I have a copy of the 1926 film here, so silent with music but a visual masterpiece for its time. I studied inter-war culture as part of my 'Total war and social change' course. It would be fascinating to listen to the audio version [Smile]
Alas, I have to work next week too (part time from home) but it is holiday time for the children. They're old enough to get on by themselves though and won't disturb me as long as I feed them.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:
... SOME of us have got to keep going until Friday before our holidays begin ...

... and SOME of us don't get any paid holidays at all, except a load of useless "stat" holidays. Good Friday is one of them, but I think I'm going to be a heathen and work it, as I need to work up a whole shed-load of extra hours in order to be able to take proper holidays. I love Canada, but their attitude to holidays for everyone except schoolteachers is positively barbaric.

Never mind - I've made a beef casserole for tomorrow's lunch, to which D. has just added some dumplings, ready to go into the oven before I head out for church in the morning.

[Smile]

[ 06. April 2014, 03:26: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by ExclamationMark (# 14715) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... as if I or anyone else can stop a terrier and a lurcher doing what comes naturally.

Keeping them on a lead usually works or failing that, if you are on a farm with sheep, a farmer with a 12 bore shotgun.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ExclamationMark:
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... as if I or anyone else can stop a terrier and a lurcher doing what comes naturally.

Keeping them on a lead usually works or failing that, if you are on a farm with sheep, a farmer with a 12 bore shotgun.
I have been lucky with Tatze. Her first wildlife chases were squirrels which, of course, she never caught. So this disappointment has caused her to have a very weak prey drive. She chased 3 deer yesterday for a few seconds the gave up *knowing* for sure they'd be off up the nearest tree any second!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
posted by ExclamationMark
quote:
Keeping them on a lead usually works or failing that, if you are on a farm with sheep, a farmer with a 12 bore shotgun.
A lurcher on a lead requires an owner who can run with the speed of Usain Bolt and the stamina of Mo Farah.

Of course we weren't near any sheep, or any other domesticated livestock, come to that, because its not just sheep that can find dogs unsettling; there have been several instances recently of walkers injured or killed by dairy cattle.

These hounds are walked in an area with no livestock and lots of heathland and wild meadow.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Confirmation this morning, when we discovered that our new Bishop can sing rather nicely*. We also sang some v. nice music - Batten's Short Service, Morley's Out of the deep (with solo piglet) and Tallis's O sacrum convivium - gosh, that's a mind-bogglingly good piece. There was Decanal Grinning™.

More Tudoralia at Evensong - Morley responses and Ayleward canticles - and Crux fidelis, which purports to be by King John IV of Portugal. Well, if he said he wrote it ... [Big Grin]

* He has a lovely speaking voice, which his predecessor sort of didn't.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
For days [well, weeks possibly months] I have noticed that the mirror doors on my wardrobe/closet are desperately in need of cleaning and finally yesterday morning I Had Had Enough so grabbed the spray stuff and a rag and cleaned them - I happened to glance at the clock as I finished the task and realised it had taken all of TWO MINUTES!

The only way to do it is to DO IT!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Ah, but did what you saw in the bright mirror please or shock you?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Erm, well, I was naked at the time...
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
So you replaced the dust?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Erm, well, I was naked at the time...

I have a feeling they show films depicting that sort of thing very late on Fridays on Channel 5 ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My beauty is as that of Gilbert & Sullivan's Katisha - in my case my left ankle is generally admired.

[speeling]

[ 08. April 2014, 16:36: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Delightful day today, weather-wise.

Pity I have broken a largish chunk off a tooth. To be fair, the tooth was more filling than actual tooth, and it has survived surprisingly well of a very long time is such a state. Nevertheless it came as a bit of a surprise to be eating a soft cookie and suddenly discover something rather hard in it...
And I can't get an appointment with my dentist until the end of the month, what with Easter, bank holidays and work and all.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I bought a box of grass seed to repair some patches on the lawn. It calls itself "Multi-purpose" grass seed - but I can't think of many other things one can do with it, except feed the birds. Does anyone have any suggestions?
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
I bought a box of grass seed to repair some patches on the lawn. It calls itself "Multi-purpose" grass seed - but I can't think of many other things one can do with it, except feed the birds. Does anyone have any suggestions?

I suspect that what you have are in fact seeds for multi-purpose grass. With that in mind, I suggest you grow some and try smoking it.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Alongside the salmon and the haddock?
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
I bought a box of grass seed to repair some patches on the lawn. It calls itself "Multi-purpose" grass seed - but I can't think of many other things one can do with it, except feed the birds. Does anyone have any suggestions?

I suspect that what you have are in fact seeds for multi-purpose grass. With that in mind, I suggest you grow some and try smoking it.
Many years ago my big brother and I spent ages picking the hemp out of budgie seed, so I can therefore tell you from personal experience that smoking hemp seed is a complete waste of time.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
[Killing me]

Other uses:

Use it to grit your driveway in winter.
Spray it gold, spread it around in the garden, and tell the neighbor kids to dig for more gold. With luck you'll get your garden well tilled.
Throw it at a zombie.
Pour it between the sheets of somebody you hate.
Target a neighbor who annoys you and stealthily drop it in their rose beds.
Scatter it on the floor of the church hall and watch all the kids go Wheee! at coffee hour as their feet go out from under them.
Stick it in a clear spice grinder, label it "Italian herbs," and give it to someone you don't like at Christmas.
Freak your spouse/parent/child out by stealthily dropping bits of it to float in the toilet several times a day. See how long it takes them to suggest you have a medical problem.
Use it like breadcrumbs to leave a trail the next time your loving family abandons you in the grim forest.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I once had a distinctive hemp plant grow underneath the bird feeder [Smile]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
So your garden was full of spaced-out sparrows and starlings then?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I could do with the starlings being spaced out, they're an aggressive bunch.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I am working hard to restore my lawn.

I now take the dog out to the green for all her wees. I planted grass seed in the scorched patches in November - it is now growing. I have ordered some mesh stuff so that the grass will be protected when she hoolies around with her labrador friend. The mesh stuff will just go in the places where they churn the grass up into a mud bath.

(The green is big and doesn't suffer from wee scorch [Smile] )

When the puppy comes it will have a designated, fenced off weeing area as guide dogs can't go just anywhere - the owner needs to know where they are walking!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
I could do with the starlings being spaced out, they're an aggressive bunch.

I agree about the aggression but I was up close and personal with one once and they are very beautiful!
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Wondering if anyone knows anyone who can help. We are on holiday in Sidmouth and our time here comes to an end on Saturday morning. But I'm not well (at all) and am afraid I might not be fit to drive. I'd happily pay train fare for someone to come to Sidmouth and drive us and the car home to Surbiton if anyone feels they could do that. Any ideas? Prayer for the journey also gratefully received.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Wow, talk about speedy answers to prayer. A friend of a friend has just contacted me and offered to do the drive overnight tomorrow night. What a Godsend.
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Sorry to hear you are ill Smudgie. WHat a pain when you're supposed to be on holiday. Is it the curse of end-of-termitus, when the body having lept going at school for a term, gives up in the holidays.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Prayers for you anyway, Smudgiekins - and for Smudgelet as well, of course.

Himself's birthday today so there will be much jollification at various times during the day.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Gussie - a neck injury combined with a sickness bug and resulting high blood pressure doesn't make for a very comfortable body and head, alas. Not exactly the restful holiday I had planned. But at least I had perfect company, have been able to see the sunshine, and did manage two nice days out, even if one of them was shopping.

Hope everyone else is managing to enjoy the good weather. Anyone want my share of the cake?
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I am coming to the Hotel Parents in Birmingham tonight until Tuesday. I believe there is a chance we might actually see that sun thing. Indeed I very much hope so because I want to play the tourists in Stratford and make boyfriend in rouge row me down the river in a boat (I shall not be rowing the boat because a gentleman leaves the young lady sitting in the back looking picturesque [Snigger] )
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
That's reminded me that we haven't been punting in ages (and we even have a season ticket!). If the weather is good I might convince hubby that a day on the water is in order.
No pressure for me to punt though as dh used to do speed punting when he was at Oxford and my teenager needs lots of practice [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Himself and Herself have gone off for a drive together - they always ask me and, I think, really like the idea of me tagging along, but I think it is good for them to do things together, just the two of them, without taking the old duffer along as well.

Lovely, sunshiny day here but we are all hoping for another evening storm as we build up towards monsoon in 6 or so weeks time.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I think (whisper it!) that spring might be finally on its way here: the sun was splitting the rocks this morning, temperatures have been in plus numbers and for part of next week they're forecasting double digits!!! ...

... and it's Friday! [Yipee]

Busy weekend ahead - making palm crosses, and making soup to feed the people making palm crosses.

No rest for the wicked, eh? [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...or: your sins will find you out.

No palm crosses here, just bits of palm frond will be given out before mass on Sunday then folks process a bit through the village and then back again.

It's a bit late here, having been chatting on Skype with a friend in Dubai, so now am off to bed.

[Snore]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Himself and Herself have gone off for a drive together - they always ask me and, I think, really like the idea of me tagging along, but I think it is good for them to do things together, just the two of them, without taking the old duffer along as well.

I'm so fascinated by your domestic arrangements, WW. Who are Himself and Herself? Are they family members or friends of yours?

I'm in an end of week mood (no, not a euphemism for anything [Biased] ) and hoping for some quality time with Mr Nen this evening. But he has texted to say he is delayed with work so he may be stressed and hassled, I fear. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - heading off to put the wine in the fridge.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Mister Anarchist will also be late, he didn't get in until nearly 1am last night [Roll Eyes] I'm going to be sewing a Tudor shift whilst watching history programmes on iPlayer. I might have a glass or two of wine as well.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Had a fun afternoon at the allotment. I have two new friends there now, a robin and a blackbird, who watch me dig and then jump in when anything juicy comes to the fore. The robin is quite fearless - it tried to land on my head twice this afternoon.

(I suppose I should be grateful it wasn't the blackbird or a passing pigeon.)
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Robins are very friendly, we had some nesting in our shed for a few years and they perch nearby on the patio. I love to hear them sing.
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
After five days of recovery from term, friends came for the weekend and started me on the gardening thing. The back garden is now WEEDED (pause for applause) and new summer annuals planted. Got a firm in to mow the grass, and the place looks amazingly tidy, colourful and nice to be in. The downside - weeding needs to be done more than once a year.... this binge resulted in the garden waste bin full of apple tree prunings, and five black sacks of garden waste taken to the recycling centre. Oxfordshire collects household waste and green waste on alternate weeks, so those black sacks couldn't hang about for another three weeks making the place look untidy.

And, there are robins nesting in the back garden hedge. It will have to stay shaggy until the young ones are fledged.

[ 11. April 2014, 22:33: Message edited by: jacobsen ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
...I'm so fascinated by your domestic arrangements, WW. Who are Himself and Herself? Are they family members or friends of yours?...

I get confused as well!

The simplified version is that Himself [who used to be known here as HWMBO or He Who Must Be Obeyed] is my friend, now married to Herself. The house belongs to Himself though I assisted financially in its construction, etc. so I get a room rent-free in perpetuity or for my lifetime if, as seems likely, I turn out not to be immortal.

Immorality I can manage but it looks as if immortality may be a tad more difficult.

There are lots of other factors which complicate the picture but I don't think it is useful, in any sense, to share them here.

Himself and Herself are both excellent cooks, as am I when I am allowed in the kitchen. We eat well.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
I'm going to be sewing a Tudor shift whilst watching history programmes on iPlayer.

This sounds such a charming way to spent an evening. [Smile] Do you do Tudor enactments?

Thanks for the clarification, WW, I hope you didn't mind me asking.

Just been discussing plans for the weekend with Mr Nen, sounds like he has a lot to try and fit in to a short space of time.

Nen - plans for sorting the spare room going to the back of the queue. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:

Himself and Herself are both excellent cooks, as am I when I am allowed in the kitchen. We eat well.

Hurrah!

I can smell the lovely aroma from here [Big Grin]

Today I am tackling the back kitchen (utility room) I woke up with a clear idea of how I want it to look when I have finished. I got tired of Tatze pinching pegs and underwear, so I have installed a baby gate - it's a long room - so that one end is dog friendly and the other is MINE!!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
I'm going to be sewing a Tudor shift whilst watching history programmes on iPlayer.

This sounds such a charming way to spent an evening. [Smile] Do you do Tudor enactments?

I am doing Kentwell Hall for the first time this year, though I've wanted to do it for years. We are going as a family, so I have a lot of sewing to do! I am hoping to be in the still room (herbs, ointments etc) but, failing that, a seamstress. Hubby will be either an archer or coppiceman, my eldest a page and my youngest at barn school/pedlar. I am unbelievably excited and a little bit scared.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Dragged Mr. S (weary from a long day feeding the hungry) out to Romsey Abbey last night to see Riding Lights perform Inheritance, their passion play. It was ... well, I'm struggling to find the right words.
[Axe murder]
Staggering/amazing/inspiring/uplifting, not exactly centring on Jesus' untypical attitude towards women, but emphasising this through his relationship with Jairus and his daughter, plus the woman taken in adultery (who was conflated with the woman who poured perfume on his feet). Sorry if this is confusing - but it was a wonderful retelling of the story. And only four actors, I'm in awe.
[Angel]
The young girl who played Jairus' daughter told me they were on the road for another week, so any Shippies thinking of going - do please go, it is really not to be missed.

(I said to Mr. S, they've come all the way from York, you can manage a few miles!)

Mrs. S, duly uplifted [Overused]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
I agree with you [Smile] it was very thought provoking and a good way to start Holy Week. Do see it if you can.
( Jairus's daughter stayed the night at daisydaisy b&b)

[ 12. April 2014, 21:46: Message edited by: daisydaisy ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Palm crosses duly manufactured - it's really quite therapeutic once I remember from the previous year which direction to make the folds.

My soup seemed to be appreciated - it's a sort of spicy* lentil-and-veggie number whizzed with a whizzy-whizz and finished with cream. They don't seem to understand lentils here ( [Ultra confused] ) but they seem to like it.

* probably not really spicy by WW standards - it's got cinnamon, nutmeg, mixed spice and a little cayenne or chilli - this time I used cayenne, but may have overdone it a bit, as it was noticeably spicier than usual ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I switched on the machine this morning after mass and then breakfast and I had No Internet!!!

[Eek!]

I worked out that I had lost track of time and needed to buy a bit of bandwidth as the previous batch had expired. Happily there is one shop open locally that sells bandwidth on a Sunday so I went and bought a box and all is now working. That was a relief.
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
What colour was your bandwidth, and does it come in elasticated form?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
This time I went for the Shocking Pink rather than my usual Olive Green. Sadly not elasticated but I hope they'll get the new design soon.
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
Back from spending yesterday walking around Kew Gardens taking many photos - well, Sandemaniac and most of the others were! I took a camera along so as not to be left out, but didn't take that many (and need to get the films developed). It's a gorgeous place, and every time I go there I wonder why I don't go more often. Then I remember that it's almost 3 hours travel to get there! [Eek!]

At some point today I have to head out to the allotment, dig a section, and plant out the survivors from the coldframe. Think that can wait till after an early lunch though. [Smile]

Have a sort of spiced eggs in vinegar & onions recipe to cook later today. Not very hot, mostly cumin, cinnamon and paprika. I've made it before, and it works very nicely as a cold side dish the next day when all the flavours have had time to soak in.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Tip of the day.

Don't go on Amazon when you've had a few glasses of red.

I seem to have ordered a lurid lime green collar for Tatze [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'm sure she'll look very chic.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Beautiful warm sun-drenched day - went out this morning to see the new lambs scampering round the park with their mothers. The lambs are old enough to eat grass now, but still young enough to suckle from time to time. Just beyond the park, the land is full of daffodils against some ancient Tudor surroundings, so a really pretty backdrop.

The warmth and sunlight seem to bring out the same in people - cheery greetings and smiles from people passing by, complete strangers, but all clearly enjoying the April morning.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Dogs don't see the red green distinction properly so if she doesn't look chic, she won't realise.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
A quiet day here, this afternoon we had a leisurely lunch in the garden and I have just waxed my handmade cheeses. These are my first goes at making hard cheese so I can't wait to sample them in a few weeks.
Haven't done much else, I need to start packing now as we are off to Minehead tomorrow for Spring Harvest with the inlaws. I also need to chat to a student tonight.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Quite a busy day here: Palm Sunday procession in the morning (Hassler Missa secunda and Weelkes' Hosanna to the Son of David) - much Decanal Grinning™.

Evensong with Meditation for Palm Sunday (Gibbons' Short Service), and our first performance of Tallis's Sancte Deus, which despite our under-rehearsedness (we missed two full rehearsals because of snow) went off really rather well. More grinning.

And Domestic Goddess Piglet has been in action - I made pancetta pasta for lunch, and when we came home after Evensong I put together coronation chicken sandwiches with the remains of a Costco chicken. The bones are now merrily turning into stock, and I've got a leg of lamb with garlic and coriander waiting in the oven to be cooked tomorrow for lunch - we decided it would be less hassle to cook it then than try faffing about on Sunday.

I really ought to bugger off now and strain that stock ... I don't think I'm going to need rocking tonight. [Snore]
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
The descriptions of what you are cooking Piglet are so tempting I could alnost give up being a vegetarian.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I had a go at cooking jollof rice last night - it's essentially a West African version of risotto; you start with a tomato, peppers, onion and spice base, add stock and let the rice cook in that. You can add chicken or crayfish as well. The end result is a tasty, colourful rice dish. To be really authentic you need to put a lot of chillies in it: I wimped out on reading "add two chopped scotch bonnets" and the alternative addition of an entire teaspoon of chilli powder, but nobody’s going to know. Serve with fried plantains (I had a job finding any in the supermarket: banana is too sweet) and green salad, so that’s lunch for today.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We are off to Köln (Cologne) today, meeting my son and his GF, staying on the banks of the Rhine. We are taking the Hull-Rotterdam ferry, then it's only three hours drive to Köln from there.

My son is enjoying his nursing course very much. His GF is on the same course so they help each other revising - in fact they are very competitive! Both are learning in their second language so that's an extra challenge, but they are both B+ pupils aiming for A+.
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
My daffodils are still out, and the tulips are starting to show their colours. Also it is opera season once again and I shall be chatted up by Colline in the streets of Paris on stage at Haddo next weekend. Learning the score in Italian has taken us all a fair amount of effort!

Cattyish, sunshine and showers.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gussie:
The descriptions of what you are cooking Piglet are so tempting I could alnost give up being a vegetarian.

Go on - you know you want to ... [Devil]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
I was just looking at the rotating mouthpiece thingy at the nozzle of a bottle of mineral water and its clearly a laser-gun turret from a high-tech space fortress.

Or is that just me?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
I was just looking at the rotating mouthpiece thingy at the nozzle of a bottle of mineral water and its clearly a laser-gun turret from a high-tech space fortress.

Or is that just me?

I gather you have been in hospital recently. Are you still on medication?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Vishu asamsakal! Wishing you all a very happy Vishu.

It is a BIG feast day here and we had a BIG feast! Looking at the photo I took I can count 21 dishes.

Afterwards I headed off across the paddy fields to see the young sons of a friend, I had promised to turn up in the proper cream coloured mund [sarong type thing] with a white shirt. When I got their the older of the two boys was in bed - he had gorged himself at the Feast and had retired hurt after eating rather too much - he's 13 so it is hardly surprising. A few photos of the family and I came home as I knew Pete wanted a walk.

Pete and I duly headed off around the block and then sat on the wall by the temple to chat as the sun set - one of the local 6 or 7 year olds came up and just plonked himself in my lap. I get the impression that the kids have sort of accepted me as a fixture.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I wondered how far down that Vishu link I'd have to read before the word feast turned up ... [Snigger]

Glad to hear you had a good one! [Smile]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Now back after four days in the Midlands. There was sun (really, there was! It's true!). There was balti (with what I believe Wodders would consider a respectable quantity of spice. Mmmmmm tasty). There was a Grandad. There was a boat ride down the Avon during which I looked very picturesque sitting in the back of the vessel and not rowing.

All in all it was a very pleasant holiday. [Axe murder]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
I've had a couple of excellent days in Morecambe, which included a visit to Sambo's grave and Arnside. All suitably soul-restoring, though I am now a bit restless and hankering (again) to live nearer the sea.
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
A bit envious of people's mini-holidays, though I've been enjoying a holiday at home these last ten days, catching up with friends, finishing projects etc.

I was fitted with new hearing aids today, still getting used to them, everything sounds a bit odd.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Now back after four days in the Midlands ...

IMHO the Midlands are one of Britain's best-kept secrets. We were at a wedding in Bridgenorth in the early 1990s and came back thinking "who knew that the bit between Liverpool and Birmingham was so pretty?"

We made a bit of a weekend of it: my parents were down from Orkney for the wedding, D's parents came up from Essex and joined us the next day and we all spent the day going to an open-air market and the Ironbridge museum.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We delivered Unca Pete to the airport last night and he was whisked away into the bowels of the Domestic Terminal for his flight to Bangalore and will now, presumably, be about 3 hours this side of Frankfurt on his onward Lufthansa flight - a few hours there and on to London Heathrow. He heads off home to Canada on Tuesday of next week.

It was bliss this morning not to be woken by the alarm at 05.45 for our morning walk, though I woke anyway; but knew I could just turn over and go back to sleep. However I didn't really need the rather bizarre dream about being lost in Knutsford - I haven't lived there for several decades and doubt I'll ever visit there again as I understand it has become very chi-chi.

Ah well, loads to do so I'm off to town to visit the nice lady in the bank who promised to ring me back with some information a couple of weeks and had signally failed to do so.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Now back after four days in the Midlands ...

IMHO the Midlands are one of Britain's best-kept secrets. We were at a wedding in Bridgenorth in the early 1990s and came back thinking "who knew that the bit between Liverpool and Birmingham was so pretty?"


Very true. Once out of earshot of the M6 (or whichever motorway is nearest) most of Shropshire and Cheshire are a delight. Even parts of Staffordshire are worth a look.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
However I didn't really need the rather bizarre dream about being lost in Knutsford - I haven't lived there for several decades and doubt I'll ever visit there again as I understand it has become very chi-chi.

We never drive past on the M6 without a rendition of "Knutsford City limits"...

AG


[coding]

[ 17. April 2014, 13:17: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
"Knutsford City limits"...

[Killing me]

Whenever we're driving in the south of Scotland, D. breaks into metrical psalm tunes - Glasgow, Kilmarnock - and of course Ye gates, lift up your heads on high for Edinburgh.

[Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
I've just booked my ticket for Greece - 2 weeks at Whit. Looking forward to retsina. In the meantime, it's Yorkshire till Easter Tuesday. I've almost forgotten what work was like, what with gardening etc. Still-an-all, work will be good when I get back to it. Happy Easter to all! [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
From observation it seems to me that, here at least, the jeans falling off the bum fashion for young men is fast passing into history - surely this can only be a good thing.

Skinnies are back! Not quite to the extreme that I remember from observing my brother and his cronies in the 1950s where they would buy fairly tight non-shrunk jeans and then, wearing them, lie in a hot bath to shrink them to fit like they were painted on - but not far off!

Is this happening elsewhere or is it a purely Indian phenomenon?
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
From observation it seems to me that, here at least, the jeans falling off the bum fashion for young men is fast passing into history - surely this can only be a good thing.

Skinnies are back! Not quite to the extreme that I remember from observing my brother and his cronies in the 1950s where they would buy fairly tight non-shrunk jeans and then, wearing them, lie in a hot bath to shrink them to fit like they were painted on - but not far off!

Is this happening elsewhere or is it a purely Indian phenomenon?

From my limited observations at the scooter/skateboard park recently (I was minding small people, is the reason I was there) I think it is a global trend. I spent some time wondering how one young man got his jeans past his feet. And having got them on, if he would ever be able to take them off!
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Chilly day here.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Got back from Spring Harvest last night and am completely exhausted today, with a sore throat from singing. We had a lovely week, there was an excellent morning bible study series on the Apostles' Creed, great speakers in the evening (especially a beautiful sermon on trusting God from a Cambodian pastor who survived a labour camp during the killing fields) and I went to daily seminars looking at the Creed from a justice perspective. All that combined with several hours each day in a fabulous swimming pool and even a walk on the beach.
Today I've hardly moved. I made cheesy filo parcels for brunch, lemon curd tarts for snacks and I've just started brewing some Barolla wine [Smile]
I've found out my role at Kentwell and I got my third choice which was the dairy, so all the cheese making I've been doing will be put to good use. Now I've got a frantic few weeks kitting out myself and the two boys in authentic costume.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Not surprised you are tired after several hours swimming a day. But you'll be well placed to get a role if they stage a Tudor triathlon at Kentwell Hall. Cycling would be replaced by horse riding I think.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
From observation it seems to me that, here at least, the jeans falling off the bum fashion for young men is fast passing into history - surely this can only be a good thing.




 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
From observation it seems to me that, here at least, the jeans falling off the bum fashion for young men is fast passing into history - surely this can only be a good thing.



I wish it were. The young man who fitted shelving in our church hall last week was showing at least 6" of his underwear. I suppose we should have been so gratetful he was weaing underwear!. His trousers were also very tight, so we had both "fashions"
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
My teenage godson has a pair of jeans which have a fake "underwear" bit of material sewn above the waistband, like a sort of non-frilly frill. So it looks as though he has the top of his underpants showing but it's actually part of the jeans themselves.

[Disappointed]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I shall be very glad to see the back (as it were) of the droopy-trousers fashion - I think it's hideous. Skinny jeans seem to be quite the thing here (for young women anyway), usually tucked into long boots. Sadly they don't seem to make them in piglet-shape (or more to the point, piglet-size) ... [Frown]

I'm off downstairs now to take a couple of raisin CAKES out of the oven, so by the time you read this, they'll be ready for virtual tasting.

Shortly after that I'm heading off to bed, as we've got a Eucharist and the New Fire service at six o'clock in the ******* morning, followed by breakfast at the house of a couple in the choir.

Can't people understand that some of us just weren't made for mornings?

[Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I am certainly not made for getting home at 02:45!

Or not these days.

We went to mass last night at the Syro-Malabar church we sometimes go to - it really is a gorgeous old building. What we didn't realise is that after midnight, and the BIG and quite dramatic resurrection tableau thing, there was a procession round the village [complete with fireworks, incense, candles, etc.] which took about an hour so mass didn't really get going until after 01:00 - and the Syro-Malabar Rite is anyway quite a lengthy business. We didn't join the procession but stayed in church watching it being readied for the mass - my heart was in my mouth when one of our friends had to clamber up the reredos to remove the shrouds from various statues in their niches. The reredos is stone and has stood for several centuries but even so...

I did not get up particularly early this morning and Himself has only just appeared - I think we'll skip breakfast and move right on to lunch!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
My teenage godson has a pair of jeans which have a fake "underwear" bit of material sewn above the waistband, like a sort of non-frilly frill. So it looks as though he has the top of his underpants showing but it's actually part of the jeans themselves.

Well!

I am so glad my sons missed the trend - they are far too mature for all that now, PTL.

A famous footballer came to school last week to talk to the children about giving Racism the boot. He was great - but his jeans started below his bum! 100% distracting!

[ 20. April 2014, 08:59: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Being creative here this afternoon - I've just made my first ever skirt,with guidance from my son who is making a pair of trousers ( very wide legged but no droopy bum) in between my novice atempts with his sewing machine.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
we've got a Eucharist and the New Fire service at six o'clock in the ******* morning, followed by breakfast at the house of a couple in the choir.

I heard about this service for the first time on Good Friday when I was talking to some Anglican friends of mine after our local Walk of Witness. Consequently Mr Nen and I got up at 5.15am to attend at our local Anglican church. I was unprepared for how long it was, with the renewal of baptismal vows, full sung Eucharist and a sermon as well. [Eek!]

Then croissants and coffee at the back of the church, home to shower and change and off to family service at the Baptist church we're members of - me to sing in the choir, Mr Nen to manage the projection.

Nen - now exhausted from the early start and changing denominations in one day, particularly before 9am.
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
I sang in the choir for our Maunday Thursday service. As the altar was cleared the lights were extinguished, leaving us unable to see our music! Fortunately the other cantor and I had a torch and the accompanying's mobile torch, while the choir had the underlying Taizé chant from memory. Fun and games, but wouldn't' you think the powers that be could have predicted the problem? [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gussie:
Being creative here this afternoon - I've just made my first ever skirt,with guidance from my son who is making a pair of trousers ( very wide legged but no droopy bum) in between my novice atempts with his sewing machine.

How did the skirt turn out?
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Heavenly Anarchist said:

quote:
How did the skirt turn out?
I'm wearing it at the moment, along with a home made jumper. Think I'm much better at knitting than sewing, but it looks OK as long as you don't look too closely! I'm going to have another go, now I've got the idea.

edited because I've had a bottle of wine which means I'm not good at proof-reading.

[ 20. April 2014, 20:50: Message edited by: Gussie ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
... the lights were extinguished, leaving us unable to see our music ...

One year they put some blithering idiot in charge of extinguishing the lights and we had to sing the Allegri Miserere in almost complete darkness. [Eek!] These days we process to the Baptistry and sing it from there, where there's a light switch over which we can have control ...

Our New Fire service isn't long at all - just lighting the fire, straight Eucharist (sung to the Merbecke chants), no sermon. As there was about 2" of sn*w on the ground when we got up*, there were only about half-a-dozen in the congregation, and about a dozen in the choir, so communion didn't take very long. Then off for breakfast, after which D. dropped me off at home for a bit of shut-eye before the main 11:00 service (the full works - procession, Bishop, Hallelujah Chorus after the Gospel). Then some more sleep in the afternoon before Evensong, but I still feel sleep-deprived, so I'm heading for another early-ish night.

* By lunch-time most of it had gone and there was brilliant sunshine, and what they call a "silver thaw" - every branch and twiglet coated in ice, and the sun shining through it making it sparkle like diamonds - a stunningly beautiful sight.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
I inadvertently attended 2 Vigils - one at my regular church where we processed outside to a small fire where the Easter candle was blessed & prepared, then inside where we sang to the light of candles (the choir had little clip-on torches) - the service included renewal of baptism promises and Eucharist. All led by the choir,with a few ancient hymns for us to join in with.

Then at 5am I went to the one at a nearby cathedral city (I have 2 close by) where we started outside with a big FIRE and the Easter candle stuff, and then went inside where not only did we have an actual baptism (baby wasn't phased by this early hour) but confirmation and then communion. It was very participatory, with contemporary hymns. This is the one I will come to again - and not just because of the champagne breakfast afterwards [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A fFriend [and ex-] of mine is just moving to one of your local cathedral cities, he has bought a retirement flat in the city centre so will be further out of London than his current home in Farnham. Although he is a Friend I think he also quite likes the idea of the occasional Evensong in the cathedral. Champagne breakfasts would encourage him even further!


eta: What I actually meant to say, but couldn't remember at the time was that HMG sent me my Old Age Pension a day early this time! What kind people they are in Newcastle!

[ 21. April 2014, 12:12: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
One year they put some blithering idiot in charge of extinguishing the lights and we had to sing the Allegri Miserere in almost complete darkness. [Eek!] These days we process to the Baptistry and sing it from there, where there's a light switch over which we can have control ...

At our church the choir have clipboards with battery-powered lights. It's nice because the light is only where it is needed.

Moo
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:



eta: What I actually meant to say, but couldn't remember at the time was that HMG sent me my Old Age Pension a day early this time! What kind people they are in Newcastle!

I doubt they were being kind: it's probably a consequence of our bank holidays (Good Friday and Easter Monday)!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
You're almost certainly right but it is kind of nice to believe in a benign government computer!
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I have never been offered sparkling wine at breakfast time but I think I would like to have it packaged up to take away for later, the way you can with leftover food in certain restaurants.

How did you manage to attend that service inadvertently Daisydaisy ? The only thing I would be doing inadvertently at 5 am is sleeping, anything else would require some definite advertence.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Easter breakfast at our friends' house always involves the option of Buck's Fizz, which I find is just the ticket when you've been dragged from your bed at 4:30.

Moo - as it happens, the Baptistry is also a very nice place to sing, and the light there doesn't really extend far enough to spoil the feeling of darkness at the front of the church.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Nothing to do with Easter. But I noticed on Saturday that our local fish-and-chip shop is being renovated. The contractor's name (displayed prominently in the window) is "John Fryatt". [Cool]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:

How did you manage to attend that service inadvertently Daisydaisy ? The only thing I would be doing inadvertently at 5 am is sleeping, anything else would require some definite advertence.

I think it was really the one at my own church on Saturday evening that was the inadvertent one. It hadn't occurred to me that a service on Saturday evening might be celebrating the risen Christ, even though I've been to it once before. It seems a bit early to me - I'm happier celebrating it at dawn on Easter Day itself.
Wodders - I was at the cathedral with the tallest spire rather than the one with the longest nave, in case your friend goes looking for bubbly,
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
Nothing to do with Easter. But I noticed on Saturday that our local fish-and-chip shop is being renovated. The contractor's name (displayed prominently in the window) is "John Fryatt". [Cool]

I have correspondence at work with a funeral director called "Burnham." [Eek!]

The service I found most meaningful this Easter was the Good Friday evening one at our local Baptist church. I'm glad to have experienced the dawn Fire Service but can't say I'm desperate to repeat it.

Back to normal routine tomorrow. I love Tuesdays and like the way the four day weekend precipitates me straight into it. [Yipee]

Nen - pleasantly sleepy after tea and a bottle of wine. [Smile]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
One year they put some blithering idiot in charge of extinguishing the lights and we had to sing the Allegri Miserere in almost complete darkness. [Eek!] These days we process to the Baptistry and sing it from there, where there's a light switch over which we can have control ...

At our church the choir have clipboards with battery-powered lights. It's nice because the light is only where it is needed.

Moo

Although we have a desk lamp, the pianist and I (I'm a guitarist and cantor) are thinking of buying miner's helmet lamps for the next evening mass.

Easter morning was lovely here. We had 3 confirmations. The church was full of families, including a couple sat next to us on the sacristy steps for want of seats. Lots of nice comments from visitors. Definite atmosphere of celebration, followed by the customary bacon sandwiches plus cake.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
I have never been offered sparkling wine at breakfast time....

Ooh, you're missing out - champagne brunches are brilliant. We also have fizz after our dawn service.

Mind you, even I baulked when staying in a Spanish hotel where they had a wine bucket (choice of red or white) at the standard breakfast buffet. Fizz for breakfast is one thing, wine quite another.


[coding]

[ 22. April 2014, 01:45: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
One year they put some blithering idiot in charge of extinguishing the lights and we had to sing the Allegri Miserere in almost complete darkness. [Eek!] These days we process to the Baptistry and sing it from there, where there's a light switch over which we can have control ...

At our church the choir have clipboards with battery-powered lights. It's nice because the light is only where it is needed.

Moo

Although we have a desk lamp, the pianist and I (I'm a guitarist and cantor) are thinking of buying miner's helmet lamps for the next evening mass.

Easter morning was lovely here. We had 3 confirmations. The church was full of families, including a couple sat next to us on the sacristy steps for want of seats. Lots of nice comments from visitors. Definite atmosphere of celebration, followed by the customary bacon sandwiches plus cake.

Have you thought of those clip on battery operated book lights? I have used one to illuminate the legilium at the Easter Vigil...I like to see what I am singing before all the lights go on.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
quote:
assorted luminary musings - snip

Have you thought of those clip on battery operated book lights? I have used one to illuminate the legilium at the Easter Vigil...I like to see what I am singing before all the lights go on.
Since then I've been provided with just such a device which can clip onto a mic or music stand. It has a snaky metal neck to turn the light towards the music. A little fiddly, but not bad.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I've had a bit of a non-day today. I woke up with a filthy headache, probably brought on by a combination of silly hours at the weekend and slight over-indulgence at friends' house for dinner on Monday evening, so I didn't go to w*rk. However, I had a cemetery committee meeting this evening and felt I probably shouldn't leave them in the lurch, so I went to that and typed up the minutes when I got in.

Now I think it's time for bed (said Zebedee). [Snore]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Hope you wake up refreshed Piglet!

Köln was fabulous. The parks were so full of tulips we could have been in Holland.

I started my fitness regime today with a run round the block with the dog. She loved it. She got the lead in her mouth and kept my pace perfectly (which, for her, was sloooooow!) So now I have run, showered, washed up, done the washing and sorted my desk - and it's only 8am!

Now, where is that halo smiley? [Angel]

Lovely sunny day here - hoping to do some work in my garden. It's not too bad, but needs some TLC after the winter.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I hope you're feeling refreshed soon, piglet.
I really need to get into the garden too but have a truckload of sewing to do. I might start on the strawberry patch today though. But first the school run, a trip to Waitrose and then the tedious sewing of a Tudor shirt for my eldest.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thanks, ladies - I felt much better today. As it was the Wednesday after Easter, we didn't have choir practice, but we met up with a couple of the girls in the choir for supper.

When I got home I got stuck into the first draft of an order of service for the up-coming Synod Eucharist when the new Chapter's going to be installed, making me very late in logging in to the Ship (typing those things always takes longer than I expect it to).

Oh well, at least it's started ...
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Glad you feel better, piglet [Smile]

But as a totally non musical not very keen church-goer, I missed out entirely on Easter Day. Having attended the previous Sunday, and sung, for about the 2nd time in 6 weeks or so the old, very old, Graham Kendrick "Make Way" I didn't feel up to a highly evangelical crucicentric Easter Day!

Not too sure where I go from here. Into the swarming atheist or agnostic multitudes, I think. Or Hell, as my church would have it. [Two face]

But hey! Its a lovely sunny morning, and the dog wants a walk, and the lake is sparkling away, and two mallards have just walked across our lawn!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
... Not too sure where I go from here. Into the swarming atheist or agnostic multitudes, I think. Or Hell, as my church would have it. [Two face]

I know I've said this before, but to anyone who's feeling a bit "off" church (for whatever reason) I'd say go to your nearest cathedral for Choral Evensong. Even if you have no musical pretensions whatsoever, you can just absorb the atmosphere, with nice music happening around you, and no-one making any judgements about you.

Just my £0.02. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Things are still a bit sad here, as you might imagine, and Herself is unlikely to be back for some time BUT, as I said to Himself last night, I am really glad that she was at her mum's at the time AND I am glad that I called in to see the boy on the Tuesday morning.

However, life goes on and it now looks as if R, Himself's brother, will be having his angioplasty next week - I know they are quite routine these days but still there will be some anxiety.

I had a day in the Mall yesterday and have to announce that I am not safe to be let out in shops that sell DVDs when I have a VISA card or two [three?] in my pocket - the DVD shops were not on my planned itinerary but I happened to spot a movie I've wanted for ages through the window so what else could I do?

When I got home I had to reorganise my DVD shelves as they wouldn't hold any more - I now have a bit of room for possibly 10 more discs then I'll need to colonise another shelf.

It's all go!
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
WW is unsafe at that mall, period! As am I! [Hot and Hormonal]

Prayers for R. And little A, still. Keep me updated

[ 25. April 2014, 10:02: Message edited by: PeteC ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Prayers for R. And little A, still.

Yea and amen. [Votive]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
For all... [Votive]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Moderately busy day for a Saturday - I got roped into verging for a wedding (the Dean's daughter usually does them, but she's on holiday) which was useful, as $50 never goes amiss. [Big Grin]

I ought to beetle off now and divide up the chicken stock I made earlier now that it's cooled but before it gets jellified.

The next week's going to be a bit mental as we've got the Fête Worse Than Death next Saturday, so I'll have to be all Domestic Goddess-ish and make fudge, carrot-cakes, potato salad ...

Wake me up when it's all over. [Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
To carry on a bit with my tangent re young male fashion the other day - not only do skinnies seem to be back in vogue in the trouser department but highly coloured skinnies too - bright pinks, oranges, yellows, greens and mauves spotted in the last week, as well as white, the usual denim blue and black. I am another one who wonders how they get them on over their feet - I'd swear some of them come in a spray can and get applied fresh each time.

After last week's Syro-Malabar Endurance Test we were back to Latin Rite this morning and back to the usual about an hour from start to finish. I've been going there regularly for years now and yet I still get an occasional look that says what's that strange white guy doing here?
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Piglet - how do you "verge for a wedding??
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
My boys (aged 10 and 13) wear brightly coloured skinnies all the time, I recently bought them pairs in red, turquoise and buttercup yellow. I've never been a fan of denim blue and have always dressed my boys on bright colours so I'm loving this fashion.
Piglet, I really must try making fudge, I've been wanting to make sweets for a while. I spent last week making cream cheese, ricotta and butter for my Tudor dairy maid role.
Yesterday I spent the day learning to tailor bodices for myself and my husband so this afternoon will probably be spent making a boned bodice for my under kirtle. The bodice is a plain linen canvas but the skirt is a lovely red (the favoured colour for Tudor petticoats apparently).
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I can answer how you verge for a service: it's setting up the church with what's needed, organising service sheets, either on pews or handing them out at the door, organising the ushers, clearing away afterwards, dealing with the people who need to be dealt with, counting up the collection, counting the attendees.

Vergers get booked and paid for for weddings and funerals and have cassocks to wear and look smart (same colour as the choir - match the church). I used to voluntarily do all the baptisms.

Nicodemia - I failed to attend church at all at Easter too. Lots of reasons. I think I've slid out of church into the unchurched.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I fear I may have done something silly - now I have space for about 10 more DVDs on my shelves I have just been online shopping [Hot and Hormonal]

But I only bought 3!

So actually I can be proud of myself for showing such restraint, don't you think?
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:


I've been going there regularly for years now and yet I still get an occasional look that says what's that strange white guy doing here?

Well I, for one, can hardly blame them!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
CK's pretty spot-on about verging duties - making sure the ushers have the right service books, smiling at the guests, giving directions to the lavatories ...

As I'm somewhat vertically challenged, usually either the celebrant or D. will light the candles, so all I have to do is let the celebrant know when the bride's arrived, open the great West doors at the end of the ceremony (weather permitting [Big Grin] ) and pick up the books and orders of service left in the pews. I can think of harder ways of earning $50.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I can think of harder ways of earning $50.

I happened to ask why all the pew Bibles were cleared away for weddings. Apparently the verger once had to ask wedding guests to stop their children writing/drawing in them, or tearing them [Mad] , to which the response was 'Well, we've hired the church, haven't we?' or more likely 'ain't we?'

[Mad] [Confused] [Mad] [Confused] [Mad]

So perhaps your $50 are more easily earned than our vergers' payments!

Mrs. S, wholly outraged still [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Curiosity killed posted:
quote:
Nicodemia - I failed to attend church at all at Easter too. Lots of reasons. I think I've slid out of church into the unchurched.
Think I might be semi-churched. Still go to a Ladies Group attached to the church, which is fun and very social, and (so far) still attend my Home Group, which is very churchy/bible study orientated/fairly fundie. Find it unsettling there for reasons I don't care to examine too closely!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I have officially gone native.

The other day boyfriend en rouge and I were in the train when a homeless person came round selling some little magazine things. It’s kind of the same principle as the Big Issue but the titles are things like a cheap restaurant guide or interesting walks round Paris. I bought an old-fashioned French recipe booklet. The seller asks me if I like to cook, to which I reply “Nah – he likes to cook <indicating boyfriend en rouge>, I like to eat.” [Big Grin] *

We flick through the booklet and I spot a recipe for stuffed veal liver (the stuffing is made of liver pate, nuts and mushrooms). My eyes go as big as saucers and I say “I want you to cook that.” Friday night he made it for me and I swear it was the tastiest thing in the world. Since then I have been contemplating what percentage of my compatriots would have been prepared to eat it.

*This is the gospel truth. In the year that we’ve been together, I have cooked dinner a grand total of once.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I would eat that if someone made it for me. I wouldn't make it myself, since I can't think where I would come by veal liver hereabouts.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I've never had veal liver, and I suspect I'd be a bit squeamish about stuffing it. I make my own chicken-liver pâté, but as the livers come in a tub all I have to do is drain it and slap them into a frying-pan - no actual contact ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
We'd eat it here, my husband especially loves delicately cooked livers and we both like gourmet cooking.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Love liver, especially lambs' or calves'. Simply floured and then fried in butter it makes a good breakfast with a fried egg and fresh bread and butter.

Home-made liver pate or terrine is a family favourite, especially for summer picnics; in fact one child has just cleared the last pate from the freezer to take back to uni so I'll be making more in the next couple of weeks.

Stuffed liver sounds delicious - I'm going to have a look at my Larousse and see if I can find a recipe ...
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
That sounds delicious, LVER. I don't suppose you'd share the recipe? Google has not been my friend (although there were some interesting alternative types of stuffing).

I had calves' liver for lunch here in NYC the other day. I almost never see it in Sydney - at the butcher's or on menus.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Can anyone think of an adjective beginning with i that precedes the noun ?
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
illicit? iridescent?
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
Inhumane, irreligious, illegitimate, inverted
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Interesting.

Mrs. S, only pale this morning
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Irritating?

Tatze has taken to barking in the garden at the slightest sound from next door [Roll Eyes]

So I blow the whistle and she comes trotting in - her recall is 100%. Then she goes back in the garden ... rinse ... repeat ...

I shall have to find a way to stop it as we need the doors open on these lovely spring days. If we are outside she's fine - obviously we will deal with the 'intruder', but if she's on her own she feels it's her job!
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
Interesting.

Mrs. S, only pale this morning

Not only pale, but forgetful -

INTREPID!

(why do you need such an adjective, anyway?)

Mrs. S, at a loss for once
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Indigenous and indigent - 2 that go together all too often here.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Kittyville:
That sounds delicious, LVER. I don't suppose you'd share the recipe? Google has not been my friend (although there were some interesting alternative types of stuffing).

I can’t give you the exact recipe because it wasn’t me cooking it (like I said, he cooks, I eat [Big Grin] ) but I can give you the broad outlines and you’ll have to do your best with it I guess.

Slice the liver in half lengthwise (i.e. to make two thin strips). The stuffing is a mixture of smooth liver pate and finely chopped mushrooms and nuts. Put a layer of the stuffing on top of one slice of liver, put the other slice on top and then coat the whole thing in egg and breadcrumb. Seal it in a frying pan then put it in the oven for 20 minutes (sorry, don’t know how hot).

Serve with a mushroom and madeira sauce (and for proper French effect, green beans and potatoes with persillade).

Serve with a nice red while singing La Marseillaise.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
It sounds delicious BUT for the fact that I "don't do liver" - It's usually served in slabs (or delicate slices) but I still know it's liver...Maybe if it was served without telling me I would gobble it up and demand more!

I do love a good snail-y dish though. Salivates remembering snails in a cream sauce with a puff pastry hat. That was wonderful!
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
(why do you need such an adjective, anyway?

I'm assuming it's so that la vie en rouge can be appropriately acronymed to LIVER [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We took R to the hospital today then I left and came home, leaving Himself and Herself there. Later we learnt that this time they are only doing an Angiogram, which should be happening as I type this and not tomorrow - so are they still going to keep him in until Friday? As I understand it the Angioplasty will now follow later when more consultations have taken place.

All very odd.

The power has been on and off and on and off ever since I got home and the computer man is supposed to be coming to update our operating systems on the two PCs, the laptop and the notebook - I think I'll settle for just the two PCs today and he can do the others later on a day when the power is a tad more reliable as their batteries are currently flat. He was going to arrive at 15.00 then phoned at 15.08 to say he would be here by 15.30 - it is now 15.43...
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
quote:

posted by Jack the Lass

I'm assuming it's so that la vie en rouge can be appropriately acronymed to LIVER

just so, and as most adjectives in French go after the noun, I am having trouble thinking of one which goes before it that begins with i.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, I am on a new OS and am full of confusion BUT it is getting better. The guy was here for about 6 hours last night [nearly 22.00 when he left] and managed to get the 2 PCs up and running on Windows 7, I shall take the laptop and the notebook to his office sometime in the next week as it will be easier for him to do them there and to do other stuff during the long waiting periods.

R sees consultant again today then decisions can be made on where we go from here. I know that the angiogram did not give good news.

My M-i-L keeps trying to feed me, she doesn't seem to think that a man is capable of looking after himself! Ah well, she means well, I suppose.

Which reminds of something I've been meaning to tell for a few weeks now - much of the TV advertising here is pretty sexist, like most places I suspect, but there is a great new series of adverts with the women making a bit of a point - most refreshing. Sadly they are not yet on youtube™ but I'll try to let you know when they are. There is a great line in one where the woman introduces herself to hubby's friend saying "I'm his wife, he thinks I'm a kitchen appliance" then puts in her ear buds and goes off for a jog.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
Can anyone think of an adjective beginning with i that precedes the noun ?

Adjectives generally do precede the noun in English anyway, unless you're going poetic like A. A. Milne's "The Dormouse and the Doctor" - "There once was a Dormouse who lived in a bed Of delphiniums (blue) and geraniums (red)..."

Foggy here this morning and Mr Nen has just set off on a long motorway drive... [Eek!]

Nenlet2 has an exam today so I'm a bit on edge for him and it's going to be a busy one at work... I'll be glad when this evening comes.

Nen. - impatient, industrious and probably slightly insane.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Did you know that my memory is like a sieve? Well, it is.

Yesterday I met a young man of Pete's acquaintance when I was heading home from The Big City and he had his arm in a sling - I told him off saying that that was my trick! His right hand was bound from fingers to about 4 inches above the wrist. Apparently he had been playing cricket with the other local lads and went to take a catch but hadn't positioned himself right so it caught the end of the little finger on his right hand pushing it back and fracturing one of the bones so he now has a month of being one-handed to endure. He was a bit upset as it has meant he has had to miss an exam as well as sundry other things - he and his mates were all heading to the river yesterday for a swim and he was going to have to just sit and watch.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
A mate of mine, keeping at school, went to take the ball, miscalculate a bit, and the ball hit the end of his middle full on. Bones and joints shattered, and the finger is not right to this day.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
May he resit the missed exam? (Assuming he can write, of course) Or is it his left hand, equally vital for personal reasons?? [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Right hand and I presume he can do a Supplementary in September but I'm not sure. I failed to ask what his mum said but I can imagine!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I hope he mends quickly [Votive]

Our minister has sliced her thumb on the right hand - the one she uses. She had a long operation because tendons etc were sliced too. She is off work for eight weeks and is allowed to do nothing with that hand. She is a keen piano player [Frown]

She slipped and fell down a step with a coffee mug in her hand.
 
Posted by BessHiggs (# 15176) on :
 
Howdy y'all, I've got a question I'm hoping one of you nice folks can give me sone info about.

My father died yesterday on a flight from Rome to JFK. The plane was diverted to Shannon, Ireland and it seems that the irish authorities have to do a post-mortem (?) and such before my dad's body can be returned to the States. Do any of you know about how long this process takes? I'm trying to get a grip on things and I'm pretty much at sea with this...

PM me if you can shed any light on this for me please....
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Bess - I'm sorry, but you need someone from the Irish Republic for this. I'll go pm someone and see if they can answer for you.
 
Posted by BessHiggs (# 15176) on :
 
Thanks, I really appreciate it!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Oh Bess - what awful news, so sorry to hear this [Frown] [Votive]

[ 30. April 2014, 16:18: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
My sincere condolences, this must be very stressful for you.
As pointed out, you need to seek information from the Irish Republic but in the UK it takes 2-3 working days. I imagine it will be similar there.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
The Irish information is similar, though it doesn't state how many days, you should get the result in 3-8 weeks.
These links are to government advice to relatives and have practical information on the situation but please do not look at them if they will cause you further distress. I know it must be difficult to take it all in.
[Votive]

[ 30. April 2014, 16:54: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
So sorry Bess. I hope you find someone to help with practical matters and do look after yourself. [Votive]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Oh, Bess, I am so sorry for your loss.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Bess -my sympathies: the situation with him dying while on the journey home make it especially difficult.

I hope by now your mother has been given some practical help in Shannon but if not the number of the US Embassy in Dublin is 01
630 6200; the Special Consular Services section will be the people on the ground who can help your mother.

A post mortem should have been carried out by now, if not then tomorrow. Unless the pathologist finds something unusual he will then release your father's body to next-of-kin (your mother?). The Embassy people will be able to give advice on repatriation, etc.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I'm so sorry, Bess.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
So sorry to hear about your dad, Bess.

"Post mortem" is just another term for an autopsy, and IANAD but I understand it's more-or-less standard procedure after a sudden death.

[Votive] for you and your mum, and for you getting everything sorted out as smoothly as possible.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I am so sorry to hear about your Dad, Bess. So traumatic for you.
[Votive] for you and your mother
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Very sorry, Bess - what a nightmare.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
jacobsen posted this on another thread but I think it sits better here:

quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:

I have a delightful Hungarian lady who cleans for me. A godsend, given that practically all my energy has to be prioritised for my job, and arthritis makes housework unbelievably tiring - I quite literally take to my bed for a few hours after doing it! But neither of us clean the windows, so the spring sun is somewhat filtered at the moment...


 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
jacobsen, I hope you don't mind me moving your post AND I agree with you about windows - although I am able to do it, just about, it is a job I loathe and detest and hence it gets done Very Rarely!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Last night I opened some homemade berry vodka liqueur, which was rather nice. So today I am making some delightful boozy berry chocolate slabs [Smile]
My youngest is home owing to a school training day and has already thrown a major strop as I wanted him to get dressed [Roll Eyes] I might make a jam cake with him later.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
jacobsen, I hope you don't mind me moving your post AND I agree with you about windows - although I am able to do it, just about, it is a job I loathe and detest and hence it gets done Very Rarely!

I live on a busy road and the windows get filthy easily. I am several floors up and the windows are hopper windows, hinged at the top. Just the thing for the pigeons which sit on the gutter above and leave calling cards sliding down the windows.

I can do the balcony doors easily and they are done regularly, but the windows are nearly impossible for me to do. Like Jacobsen, I have arthritis, quite severe in some joints, especially one should. Movement is very limited and painful.
 
Posted by BessHiggs (# 15176) on :
 
Thanks everyone for your kind words. My mother told me that the Irish coronor was incredibly kind to her. The post was finished quickly, the coronor even made sure my dad's clothes were laundered before giving them back to my mom, and she (the coronor) had her daughter act as impromptu tour guide for my mother while she was waiting for things to progress. It was a great comfort to me knowing that folks were taking such good care of my mom during this awful time.

I will say, it was very odd to read the news accounts of the incident on-line in some of the Irish papers. Hearing my dad described as "an elderly American tourist" was odd, because in my mind he wasn't elderly (even though he was in his early 80's).

Again, thank you all so very much...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think going to a game is a GREAT way to celebrate his life! I hope the Sox win it for him.

* * * *

A complete pig's breakfast of an afternoon! We went out to do a major shop and when we came to pay the banking system net thingy was down, none of my cards would let me pay. So I walk up to a local ATM, not my bank, and that wouldn't cooperate either so in the end we left Herself at the supermarket whilst Himself drove me up to my bank, a fair distance away, I got cash from their machine then he drove me back to the shop to pay the bill and pick up his wife. It was a right pain!

I also had a strange phone call from the internet shopping site where I ordered the DVDs a few days ago - the price of one of the items had dropped, should they still send it together with a credit note for the difference?

Erm, yes. I never mind prices going down, it's when they go up that I complain!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Prices going down??? [Confused]

BH, glad to hear your mum was so well-treated and things got sorted quickly.

I had quite a productive evening yesterday: carrot-loaves and tablet made for the dreaded sale (why don't carrot-loaves smell nice when they're cooking?). Just the potato salad for the turkey suppers to be made tonight and then once more into the breach, dear friends ...

[Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by BessHiggs:
I will say, it was very odd to read the news accounts of the incident on-line in some of the Irish papers. Hearing my dad described as "an elderly American tourist" was odd, because in my mind he wasn't elderly (even though he was in his early 80's).

Bess, please don't be offended at this tangent, I do sincerely feel for your loss and am so very pleased to hear of the coroner's kindness.

BUT, I am 62, so I can't describe myself as middle-aged any more (having no intention of living to be 124 or anywhere near it). My mother the Dowager doesn't like to think of herself as old - she'll hit 90 this June, God willing.

So what are we, if we aren't 'elderly'? Anyone got any better words? Please?

Mrs. S, at a loss for the mot juste
[Confused]
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
I recently hit 70, which I always used to think was "old": amazing how one's viewpoint can change. I hate "elderly" which sounds even older.

I don't mind "senior".
 
Posted by BessHiggs (# 15176) on :
 
I've come to embrace "Lady of a Certin Age". It fits...who know what my ceratin age really is...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
At 52 I suppose I have to accept that I'm past my prime, but I can't really say I feel it. It's all relative though - when I was in the Cathedral Altar Guild I was the youngest by miles, but at w*rk I sometimes feel quite old, as many of my colleagues are post-grad students.

One thing that's made me feel rather ancient recently is the replacement of my old school. In my first year I was one of the last cohort to be educated in the old Grammar School (which was built in the 1870s and now houses the local council offices), and I played in the orchestra at the official opening of its replacement in 1976. Now that building has been superseded by a shiny new one, and the one where I spent most of my teenage years has been flattened, which makes me feel old, and a little sad.

Potato salad now made for tomorrow and cooling; must go and root out our aprons (it's a tradition that the servers wear aprons ...) and then contemplate having an early-ish night.

Memo to self: do not start playing 2048 ... [Hot and Hormonal]

[ 03. May 2014, 00:32: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
What gets to me in the nomenclature about age is when people suggest that age automatically brings wisdom!

Erm, NO!

Or not that I have noticed.
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Have you checked trouser and jacket pockets for your card WW? I lost my work key last summer, which meant having to send a grovelling email apologising for my carelessmness before I was given a new one. I got out a summer jacket for the first time since then yesterday, and found the keys in the pocket. Now I'm sure I checked there when I mislaid them in the first place, odd.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I walked into the bank just after it opened this morning and the Senior Customer Adviser [?Deputy Manager?] saw me, smiled, waved me over, opened her desk drawer then handed me both my card and yesterday's ATM receipt [which I had requested NOT to have] but I was a happy little bunny. No paperwork, no nothing, just prompt and courteous service.

Magic!
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
How so very unlike me retrieving my card back in the dark ages from a Kochi area bank!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
[Hot and Hormonal] - [Hot and Hormonal] - [Hot and Hormonal]

So I cycled down to the temple festival a few kilometres away and took a load of pictures then headed into town for a minute then getting on my bike to come home I squatted down to put the key in the cycle lock and my trousers split right across my backside! They were old and a bit tatty but very comfortable.

Happily cycling home in the dark nobody was able to see my embarrassment, or anything else, I hope!

[Hot and Hormonal] - [Hot and Hormonal] - [Hot and Hormonal]

[Pete, it was the beige pair, same pattern as your old mustard ones.]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
A sort of beige-àvu for Uncle Pete?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
We've been punting. We decided to go down the Backs (we usually go to Grantchester) as it is still out of tourist season. We had a quick picnic on Jesus Green, having eventually got rid of the aggressive swan who tried to remove our food from the rucksack and attacked my husband's shoes [Roll Eyes] a lovely day to punt, reasonably warm with a bit of sun.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
HA, you're making me envious. Not that I've ever been punting - I just love Cambridge! **sigh**

Wodders, your trouser tragedy reminds me of an incident during a rather lively Strip the Willow at a school dance several aeons ago. I put out my hand to turn with my partner, and my blouse ripped from armpit to waist. Clutching my arm to my side I muttered "sorry - must go!" and hot-footed it home to change (I only lived about 10 minutes' walk from the school). I can't remember now whether I ever got the chance to apologise to him for disappearing, but the last I heard of him was years later when he featured in the BBC's Crimewatch for holding up a bank ... [Eek!]

Cathedral sale over for another six months, Deo gratias. Despite the fact that it was snowing in the morning ( [Ultra confused] ), our bit felt quite busy, and there seemed to be a goodly crowd at the turkey supper (by that time it was a lovely sunny evening).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
...Despite the fact that it was snowing in the morning ( [Ultra confused] )...

Doesn't it snow all year there?

The priest was a bit amused that I cycled to and from church this morning - it is only 15 minutes each way, it's hardly the Tour de France! I could have driven but not really worth it for one and it takes about as long.

Off to first birthday party now and have broken with tradition, instead of a Teddy I am taking a bright red soft toy elephant!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My youngest son is visiting with his GF this weekend and they have just got engaged - hurrah! He is 26 and started going out with her when he was 16. She's a lovely girl and a high flyer in the world of finance. The wedding will be June next year, just enough time for me to buy a hat!

Busy day today - dog walk, then Church, then family coming for lunch as a little celebration.

Better get moving then!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The Red Elephant seems to have been a success - Kichu was in tears when I got there but stopped crying when either he saw me or he saw the elephant and, frankly, I think the latter the more likely.

Usually the birthday cakes here are impossibly sweet but today was a fruit cake [no comments necessary] and I managed to get a piece with not too much icing. The lunch was excellent as well - I shall now sleep all afternoon.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Bravo! Kichu. You were almost walking when I left, so by now, you should be hiking about. Hugs and kisses to you and big brother Achu!

[ 04. May 2014, 11:19: Message edited by: PeteC ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
HA, you're making me envious. Not that I've ever been punting - I just love Cambridge!

You should visit and go punting, the trip to Grantchester is lovely. We have an annual pass, my husband used to do speed punting at Oxford and is currently teaching our eldest. Because he went to Oxford he punts from the opposite end of the punt to the Cambridge set and the pros shout at him!
Congratulations, Boogie, a good excuse for some shopping too.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
Mrs Spike & I have just spent a lovely weekend in the delightful little town of Rye in East Sussex for our wedding anniversary. It's a quirky place with a long and fascinating history. Well worth a visit.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... have broken with tradition, instead of a Teddy I am taking a bright red soft toy elephant!

When my great-niece was born, we gave her a teddy (as D. says, everyone ought to have at least one Small Bear). My nephew looked at it and (knowing our fondness for piggies*) said "oh, it's not a piggy". So for her first birthday she got a Piglet, which seemed to go down quite well.

I'm beginning to get my throat back: I had to sing soprano at Evensong as we were v. short, and of course it would be when the music was somewhat demanding ... [Eek!]

D. was so grateful he made me a GIN and tonic when we got home. [Cool]

* We have a Piglet that D's sister knitted for me 25 years ago when she was expecting her daughter (and fed up with knitting little boots), and he's become a sort of mascot: where we go, he goes.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spike:
Mrs Spike & I have just spent a lovely weekend in the delightful little town of Rye in East Sussex for our wedding anniversary. It's a quirky place with a long and fascinating history. Well worth a visit.

It's a great place to visit, with all those literary connections - Henry James, and E F Benson for starters. Then lunch at The Mermaid Inn was great on our 3 visits. But each of those times has fallen in that glorious English summer weather in July when the gale from the Channel is blowing the rain horizontally, and the temperature's is hovering somewhere around 10.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Today was One Of Those Mornings. It kind of destabilises me that after almost ten years here, I can still have these moments of major culture shock. Today’s extreme culture shock came about (as they usually do) dealing with the behemoth which is the French Administration.

I play in an orchestra. For any kind of voluntary organisation in France you have to form an association which you register with the authorities. We needed to change the registered address of our association, so I get the paperwork together and toddle off to the Prefecture.

I had an appointment for 9 a.m. but I should have known that they wouldn’t feel like getting started that early on a Monday morning. Silly me. When they finally deign to deal with me, the mean lady tells me that they can’t accept my file because the bylaws are a photocopy and it has to be an original. Personally I think this is quite ridiculous in itself, but here’s the really ridiculous bit – they have a system where you can send the documents by email. So it’s fine to scan the document and send it electronically, but if you go in person it has to be an original.

Yes, that sound you just heard was my head exploding. Like I said, sometimes I just never get over the culture shock. I keep trying to remind myself that the mean lady at the Prefecture thought that this was all perfectly normal.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Oh I can so empathise with that - I have been here about 17 years and still hit that wall of shock quite regularly.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
So it’s fine to scan the document and send it electronically, but if you go in person it has to be an original.

It could only have been sillier if it had been the other way round!

It's not just Abroad, though - we went to the Planning Office to discuss some bits we wanted doing to the house, i.e. change a door for a window in the utility, and make a window into a door in the breakfast room. Get this - you can take bricks away without planning permission, but you can't add them - because you are altering the appearance of the house. As if both activities didn't alter the appearance, etc etc.

[Ultra confused]

So, we could cut away the bricks in the breakfast room to make a door, but the simplest thing to do in the utility was just to box off the door internally, so you can't actually TELL that it's different. The poor lady advising us couldn't actually justify it, either. [Confused]

Mrs. S, deeply confused - but happy with the result!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Going back a few days to talking about skinnies, as in trousers - some people just shouldn't follow fashion! One of the guys donating blood yesterday is a big, fit bloke with a big [muscular, not fat] butt and, quite honestly, lime green skinnies did NOT add to the look at all!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
IMHO wearing anything in lime green, let alone skinny jeans, is a sartorial brainfart.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
There is a partner in the law firm where I work who is pathologically superstitious. One of his things is about the colour green. His secretary has learned never to come into the office wearing green clothes or he will make a big fuss about it.

Most of the rest of us think this is nonsense. Actually there is a reason for this superstition – back in the day the dye they used to make green theatrical costumes was poisonous, so you could effectively get sick from wearing them. OTOH, this clearly has no bearing on wearing green clothes today as far as most of us are concerned.

The librarian in particular thinks this particular phobia is absurd. If ever she has documents to send down to S---------, she therefore makes a point of putting them in a green folder [Snigger] .
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
What is this partner's reaction to green ink? Apart from its legendary use by the unhinged it is used officially by auditors!

I'm not sure who used it first.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Going back a few days to talking about skinnies, as in trousers - some people just shouldn't follow fashion! One of the guys donating blood yesterday is a big, fit bloke with a big [muscular, not fat] butt and, quite honestly, lime green skinnies did NOT add to the look at all!

Lime green skinnies were never in fashion, as opposed to the lime green and salmon pink flares I had in the '70s. There is a reason that the '70s are referred to as the decade that taste forgot.

Or was that the '80s? Probably both.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Lime green skinnies were never in fashion, as opposed to the lime green and salmon pink flares I had in the '70s. There is a reason that the '70s are referred to as the decade that taste forgot.

Or was that the '80s? Probably both.

It was the eighties. I wore plenty of seventies clothese, in that era and since but I have never worn eighties clothes (except a pair of red braces, but I wore those ironically).
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
There is a partner in the law firm where I work who is pathologically superstitious. One of his things is about the colour green. His secretary has learned never to come into the office wearing green clothes or he will make a big fuss about it.

My mother also had a superstition about green, which became a problem for her when I went to a school with a green uniform (yuck) so she changed her superstition to purple - which is now the colour that I wear most [Snigger] (but usually without a red hat).
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
A bit of rejoicing here - my stepbrother just rang to say we have had a cash offer on my late stepmother's house! Yay! It's been on sale since September.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It started raining yesterday and I don't think it has stopped since although I may well have missed a pause overnight. It has been great. It is not monsoon for a few weeks yet but at least we know it is on the way.

A side effect is a power failure - during the dry season the transformers get dust in all sorts of places then the rains turn dust trails into conductors and the things blow - hopefully we will get it back before too long.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
... the '70s are referred to as the decade that taste forgot.

Or was that the '80s? Probably both.

Definitely the 70s. I actually rather liked the style of the 80s, especially the New Romantics - big, baggy, ruffly shirts, tight black trousers, pixie boots, flying suits ...

I'll get my (long, baggy) coat. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Talking of the '70s, This surfaced recently on Facebook. I'm the one in the silver shirt. Should I defriend the person who posted it?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Sorry balaam, your link doesn't work for me - under the circumstances you might feel grateful!
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
There can be a blurring between decades. Growing up in a none-too-well-off family in the 80s, most of our clothes came from charity shops, which were largely populated by 70s fashion and paperback copies of Jaws.

In some ways, then, we did retro before it was fashionable to do retro. Though I mostly remember the intensely itchy jumpers.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TheAlethiophile:
There can be a blurring between decades. Growing up in a none-too-well-off family in the 80s, most of our clothes came from charity shops, which were largely populated by 70s fashion and paperback copies of Jaws.

In some ways, then, we did retro before it was fashionable to do retro. Though I mostly remember the intensely itchy jumpers.

We did pretty well for hand-me-downs in the 1980s. m-i-l was a volunteer in an Oxfam shop in Ringwood, between Bournemouth and Southampton.

Things have changed, but charity shops in smarter towns are still the places to go.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Sorry balaam, your link doesn't work for me - under the circumstances you might feel grateful!

I think it might be set to members of a group, Just as well as the reality is more hideous than the description.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
... charity shops in smarter towns are still the places to go.

I remember people in Northern Ireland saying that Oxfam in Ballymena* was the place to shop, as all the mega-rich Co. Antrim farmers' wives would only wear their expensive posh frocks once, and then give them, almost as good as new, to the charity.

* Not that Ballymena itself was that smart, just that the people living round there were rather well-off.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I lurve me some 80s retro. My absolute favourite piece in my collection is a completely over the top taffeta party dress which I found in a second hand shop for the princely sum of 10€. The bodice is a black corsety affair covered all over in fuschia pink sequins. The skirt is in a couple of layers – a load of froofy black net underneath, and on top about 50 yards of shiny fuschia pink taffeta, the whole shebang longer in the back than in the front. Don’t get the chance to wear it very often, mind.

I also have a rather classier 80s frock in my collection – a midnight blue ball dress. Asymmetric velvet bodice (off the shoulder one side, ruffled short sleeve on the other) that comes down over the hips then full ankle length taffeta skirt. It is the most glamorous and fabulous thing I own and makes me feel like a movie star. I paid quite a lot of money for it but it was completely worth it – I would have paid far more for a new dress of anything like the same quality, and no one else has one anything like it.

I sometimes wonder who originally owned them. The original owner of the shocking pink taffeta (shocking in every way!) must have been so proud of it [Big Grin] . The dark blue velvet cost an arm and a leg to a classy lady who must have bought it to wear to some extremely posh black tie event.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
The Guide dog puppy walker assessor is coming on Monday for TWO HOURS! They are bringing a puppy with them - so I have no idea if we will pass. I know me and Mr Boogs and the house and garden will pass - but I don't know about Tatze. She is lovely but very lively.

We'll see - I desperately want to pass as this is what I have decided to do with my retirement. I will be completely thrown if we fail [Frown]

Here she is hoolying and having fun on my brother's farm with gundog, Bryn.

[Smile]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I can't get over how quickly Tatze seems to have become a whole, grown-up dog.

Her liveliness may be an advantage: if Trainee Guide Puppy can cope with her, it may show that he'll be unfazed by being a Working Dog, and be good practice for him for Unexpected Situations.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Tatze is gorgeous! So is Bryn, of course. My daughter's in-laws have a Springer, she's a lovely dog but completely loopy! I wish you, Mr Boogs and Boogiehound every success on Monday. [Smile] [Votive]

Nenlet2 is away for the weekend so Mr Nen and I are getting a brief taste of Empty Nest Syndrome. [Biased]

Nen - coping so far.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
I have envy leaking out of my ears at such lovely dogs! We used to have a dog when Macarius worked from home, but can't now as we're both out of the house all day.

Roll on retirement!

M.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Domestic Goddess Piglet has been in action today: I made paella for lunch, and then finally got round to making my first French stick. I'd always been put off by the resting and rising stages; there really isn't anywhere chez Piglet that could honestly be described as "warm and draught-free".

I decided that on top of the water-heater in the cupboard under the stairs would do, and it did. I made the slashes in the top a bit too deep, so one end was rather more splat than stick, but other than that it worked very well, and tasted v. nice, though I say it what shouldn't. Sales of Costco ciabatta may be set to take a bit of a dive ... [Big Grin]

While we were tasting the bread, the subject of tomorrow's lunch came up and I couldn't really not make soup to go with it, so there's a pot of bacon, lentil and tomato soup bubbling merrily on the stove.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Springer spaniels always seem to me to be all heart and no brain - lovely, lovely dogs but...

piglet, do you spend all day in the kitchen? You seem to cook far more than most. Most impressive.

I overslept this morning so no church but I doubt that it will imperil my immortal soul any more than it is already. Now is the time to upset piglet by saying that I am taking to the kitchen to make a big bowl of porage and a cup of hot almond milk.

Yummy!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Springer spaniels always seem to me to be all heart and no brain - lovely, lovely dogs but...

They are amazingly intelligent if you see them in action as gundogs, quartering a field. Trouble is, all they want to do is work and need instructions. They never pootle around and amuse themselves like labs do. Bryn is constantly in the "ok - done that, now what's neeeeexxxxt, what's neeexxxxt??? mode!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
We used to have a gorgeous springer spaniel/border collie cross. Wonderful, loving dog, but she never quite knew whether to round us up or fetch us back! Very intelligent, too.

I still miss her.........
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Millie-cat, who most definitely is NOT allowed into my bedroom under any circumstances whatsoever (a rule which is most consistently applied without waver), is currenty using my bed as a trampoline. The last leap, from the top of the wardrobe onto the area just alongside my knees, was particularly impressive.

My friend has just contacted me to see if I'm going to church with the lure of doughnuts. Sadly I am going to stay in bed with the Smudgelet's apple, cinnamon and sultana loaf and work on my own sermon for two weeks' time. I like having a son who's discovered the appeal of baking. Now all I need is for him to discover the delight of cleaning the kitchen when he's finished! Anyone want a slice of apple, cinnamon and sultana loaf? It's rather scrummy.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
We used to have a gorgeous springer spaniel/border collie cross. Wonderful, loving dog, but she never quite knew whether to round us up or fetch us back!

My daughter had a dog that was a border collie/terrier mix. Sometimes she appeared to be genuinely confused about how she should behave.

Moo
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Springer spaniels always seem to me to be all heart and no brain - lovely, lovely dogs but...

They are amazingly intelligent if you see them in action as gundogs, quartering a field. Trouble is, all they want to do is work and need instructions. They never pootle around and amuse themselves like labs do. Bryn is constantly in the "ok - done that, now what's neeeeexxxxt, what's neeexxxxt??? mode!
Exactly. The in-laws' Springer is never happier than when given tasks such as balls hidden in the garden to find or agility obstacles to overcome. Nenlet1's in-laws have been really good about training and stimulating her. I looked after her one day. She stuck to my side like a burr and was ready for action every time I moved. I felt she was deeply disappointed when all I was doing was getting up to visit the loo. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - who is really more of a cat person but would probably have a black Labrador if she ever did have a dog.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
They're called springers because they are constructed from high-tensile springs, you know!

We took in a three-year-old pedigree springer who was under threat of being put down, because his owner had never really trained him *sigh* and said owner's wife Put Her Foot Down.

We had him three weeks and he nearly killed me - I had no job and no children but just walking him was an absolute nightmare. He had to sleep on the cold floor in the kitchen because he would eat any bedding you gave him *double sigh* and the cat moved out and took up residence in the flowerbed at the bottom of the garden.

However we advertised him in the local paper as 'free to a good home' and were overwhelmed with responses - the last I saw of him he was happy as a sandboy in the back of a car, with a little girl who adored him (I was in the pantry in floods of tears [Waterworks] )

Mrs. S, who, if ever she has a dog, will NOT have a springer [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... piglet, do you spend all day in the kitchen? You seem to cook far more than most.

Not really - I just brag about it to you lot. [Big Grin] During the week D. does most of the cooking as I work most days from 10 until 2 or 3, and as he's more-or-less a free agent, it's more practical. But I like cooking too, so I tend to do my share at the weekend.
quote:

... time to upset piglet by saying that I am taking to the kitchen to make a big bowl of porage and a cup of hot almond milk.

You're on the other side of the planet - you can't scare me with your porage and hot milk ...

... well, maybe you can ... [Eek!] [Projectile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Internet stopped working yesterday as the PC said the dongle was not receiving a signal [Eek!]

After several hours [spent watching a couple of movies I've wanted to watch for ages] I suddenly had an idea and tried a high tech solution by taking out the SIM card, rubbing it on my lunghi [sort of sarong thing] and put it back in and suddenly there was signal!

Internet restored and all is right with the world - or at least my little bit of it.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Thank you so much for all your kind words - we passed to be guide dog puppy walkers!

Hurrah!!

The supervisor was here for two and a half hours with a puppy (a gorgoeus GS / golden retriever cross, 12 weeks old) and his puppy walker. Tatze was a star, she played really nicely with the puppy, it was his first off lead encounter with another dog, so he was quite hesitant at first, but she soon had him jumping on her and playing chase and tuggy. I am 100% proud of her. Then we all went for a walk and Mr Boogs and I had a practice with the pup.

Now the long wait 'till mid July when the puppy arrives - it will be being born soon and they'll let me know what breed, sex and colour then. Meanwhile we have to build a 'spending area' which is a fenced off bit of the patio for poos and wees.

I simply can't wait!

[Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Yay, Boogie, that's wonderful news! [Yipee] Congratulations to you all! [Yipee] Keep us informed of developments. [Big Grin]

Is it called a spending area from the old expression "spending a penny" from the days when it really did cost only a penny to use the public toilets?

Nen - vicariously basking in Boogie's success after an unproductive day at work. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Thank you so much for all your kind words - we passed to be guide dog puppy walkers!


[Yipee] [Yipee]

[Yipee] indeed!
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Congratulations Boogie and family.
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
Congratulations Boogie!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Congratulations, Boogie! [Yipee] Are you going to change your name to Boogie Woodhouse at the next name amnesty?

Walkies! [Big Grin]

Had a v. nice lunch today with the mob from w*rk, partly to celebrate N's successful defence of her PhD (she was already a doctor of medicine, so now she's Dr.² N), and partly to say farewell to our Project Manager who's been promoted. Just above where we w*rk there's a little restaurant run by the Autistic Society and they do v. nice soup/salad/sandwich combos - I had a chicken and aioli sandwich with spinach and walnut salad, which were excellent.

Got home to find that D. had made some more French sticks - they're so yummy that if I'm not careful I'm going to be the size of a small country before I know it.

I wouldn't mind, but I never used to eat all that much bread ... [Help]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Oh well done Boogie! I'm sure you will make an absolutely splendid Puppy Walker!

Piglet - your life seems full of simply delicious food, mostly cooked by you, together with what I am sure is wonderful singing.

Do you sing as you cook? Or even cook as you sing?
[Smile]
I am so envious of you!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Congratulations Boogie!
My day is a mass of marking followed by teaching an online tutorial this evening - I could weep [Waterworks]
But it'll be soon be over and this year I have the summer off, having given up one of my teaching contracts. I might even get to join Piglet in the baking/cooking fest [Smile]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Congratulations Boogie and Tatze [Smile]

Now my c.a.t.s have passed their dog-tolerance test I'll be having a local pooch around more often for the canine equivalent of coffee-and-biscuits or tea-and-cake while her humans are out. She is a darling and pays no attention to the c.a.t.s.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
... Do you sing as you cook?

Sometimes, although TBH I'm more likely to swear ... [Hot and Hormonal]

D. sometimes puts a CD on while he's cooking, and I do if I'm making foodie Christmas presents, when The Best CD Of All Time™* comes into season.

* Praetorius' Christmas Mass, sung by the Gabrieli Consort.
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
Does anyone else feel a little unwell after mowing? I was wearing my hat. The lawn is now trimmed, and I'm actually quite impressed that the old petrol lawnmower coped. I had somewhat let grass grow... [Hot and Hormonal]

Now to cook, and maybe sing. Piglet, care to join me?

Cattyish, "Ave Maria..."
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cattyish:
Does anyone else feel a little unwell after mowing?

I feel a little unwell just thinking about mowing ... [Big Grin]

I'll be delighted to join you in a song, Cattyish, just not that one (I'm assuming you mean the awful dirge they get wobbly soloists to sing at weddings and funerals).

A Good Day was had today - some work has finally been done on the upstairs bathroom, and I got a letter at w*rk confirming my job until the end of October. My boss had told me informally (and that she's going to fight to keep me on after that), but now, like Chamberlain, I have in my hand A Piece Of Paper.

[Yipee]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Everyone is coming back today so I will lose my peaceful solitude [Frown] I love them all but I also love just my own company.

I suppose I'd better clean up a bit before they arrive - sweep a few floors, clean the stove, etc. But I might finish the online story I'm reading first.


eta: ...and if anyone wants to refer to me as an antisocial bastard I can only reply "Yup."

[ 14. May 2014, 04:29: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
At least they're coming back for a Good Reason. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
So there I was, earlier today, at the bus stop with the Elf Lass in the pram. A little girl was also there with her mum, and the girl was happily peering in the pram, chattering away about her baby brother and her entire extended family (I did say to her mum I was glad there wasn't a test), and asking me questions about the Elf Lass, when she came out with the immortal line:

"So are you the baby's granny, or her mummy?"

Sigh. I suppose I should be pleased it's taken this long for someone to ask (and at least I can take comfort from the fact that her mum was more embarrassed than I was!).
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Darllenwr has been watching 70's cartoons on Youtube. I now have "Catch the pigeon" as an earworm [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Cara (# 16966) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
So there I was, earlier today, at the bus stop with the Elf Lass in the pram. A little girl was also there with her mum, and the girl was happily peering in the pram, chattering away about her baby brother and her entire extended family (I did say to her mum I was glad there wasn't a test), and asking me questions about the Elf Lass, when she came out with the immortal line:

"So are you the baby's granny, or her mummy?"

Sigh. I suppose I should be pleased it's taken this long for someone to ask (and at least I can take comfort from the fact that her mum was more embarrassed than I was!).

Oh dear, poor jack the lass, how disconcerting! But remember a very small girl is unlikely to be very discerning at guessing the apparent age of adults...

I posit that it was Much Worse when I went with my sister to pick up her children from their school. My sister is 11 years younger than me. One of my sister's acquaintances (she swore not an actual friend, just as well!!) saw me with her and said,
"Oh, is your mother visiting you?"
[Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!]

I still don't think I've got over it.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cara:
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
So there I was, earlier today, at the bus stop with the Elf Lass in the pram. A little girl was also there with her mum, and the girl was happily peering in the pram, chattering away about her baby brother and her entire extended family (I did say to her mum I was glad there wasn't a test), and asking me questions about the Elf Lass, when she came out with the immortal line:

"So are you the baby's granny, or her mummy?"

Sigh. I suppose I should be pleased it's taken this long for someone to ask (and at least I can take comfort from the fact that her mum was more embarrassed than I was!).

Oh dear, poor jack the lass, how disconcerting! But remember a very small girl is unlikely to be very discerning at guessing the apparent age of adults...

I posit that it was Much Worse when I went with my sister to pick up her children from their school. My sister is 11 years younger than me. One of my sister's acquaintances (she swore not an actual friend, just as well!!) saw me with her and said,
"Oh, is your mother visiting you?"
[Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!]

I still don't think I've got over it.

Long ago and far away, I was pushing my brother in his pushchair (rather than over a cliff, which might have been my preference) and a woman asked if I was his mother.

I was 13 [Mad] and a young-looking 13 at that [Mad]

(and let me tell you that in those days, if a 13-year-old had had a child, they would NOT have been out in public together!)

Mrs. S, who waited another 17 years for her own little boy [Yipee]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
You're right about kids not having a clue about how old adults are. Just after I left school (aged 18) I arranged to go into my old primary school to do "observation" as I was (then) planning on a career in teaching. On the last day of term I had a P.7 class (12-year-olds) and we were having a fairly random discussion - the way you do at the end of term. One of the girls inevitably asked me, "Miss Piglet, how old are you?" I asked her how old she thought I was - she started at 40 and worked her way down. [Eek!]

On another occasion, D's organ scholar met my sister and asked if we were twins. We do look quite alike, but as she's 6½ years older than me I was not amused.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Yes!

When I was 11 I went to stay with a lovely lady called Eileen for six weeks (we had returned from South Africa, where I was brought up, but our house was not ready)

When I was chatting to Mum about her afterwards Mum said "How old do you think Eileen is?" I said "25". She was 60! But she was so bubbly and lively I simply assumed she was as young as she acted.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cara:

I posit that it was Much Worse when I went with my sister to pick up her children from their school. My sister is 11 years younger than me. One of my sister's acquaintances (she swore not an actual friend, just as well!!) saw me with her and said,
"Oh, is your mother visiting you?"
[Eek!] [Eek!] [Eek!]

I still don't think I've got over it.

I'm the joint youngest of 8 children and my sisters were aged 11 and 12 when I was born. They spent their teens being tutted at for being teenaged mothers to us twins [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
After my mum died we spent several days installing my eldest brother in an alms house flat. He is 13 years my senior and looks older. He was chatting to someone there as we were unloading the van and when I went across to say hello he was asked, "And is this your little girl?" [Big Grin]

(His response - "My sister." [Roll Eyes] )

Nen - possessed of both smooth complexion and youthful exuberance.
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
My Mum had me at 21 and has always looked youthful. She's 81 now and looks at least 10 years younger.
As a result she has been assumed to be my sister all my life.
This is great, for her! [Disappointed]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
There's almost 14 years between my niece and nephew. People often assumed that my niece was the teenage mother of her wee brother and their mother was the granny. This was often accompanied by tuts and general disapproval. I'm not sure who hated it more - my niece or her mum.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
When my younger nephew was a baby, and they were home in Orkney on holiday, my sister suggested that as I was going shopping (the main street is about 10 minutes' walk from the Piglet ancestral pile), I should take him in his pram "to give him a bit of air".

I was 20 and single, and in Orkney everyone knows everyone else: how I wish I'd had the wit to put a sign on the pram saying "IT'S MY SISTER'S".

In other news, things are beginning to happen with getting the renovations chez Piglet finished - as it was a lovely day today (and an even better forecast for tomorrow) Bill's been finishing off the outside work that's been waiting for ever (and finally took away his 20-foot ladder that's been cluttering up our living/dining room). [Yipee]

An old university friend of D's is coming over from Bristol on Sunday and stopping here en route to somewhere in Canada so at least we should be able to have him round for dinner (he's staying in a hotel which is just as well, as the spare room's in bits). As Monday's a holiday here we'll be able to take him round and show him the place a bit - there's a good crop of icebergs this year which should impress ... [Smile]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Just back from an exhausting - but ultimately satisfying - day kitting out a friend for her only daughter's wedding in July. She isn't very interested in clothes, but her sister would always drag her out and make her try on things - only her sister died of brain cancer not very long ago [Eek!]

So my friend F. and I dragged her all round closest Big City and managed to get a complete outfit, dress, pashmina, bag and shoes (which were the hardest part [Ultra confused] ), plus a few additional bits. Not sure she's ever bought so many clothes in one fell swoop!

She's delighted and we are happy but footsore!

Mrs. S, stylist to the stars [Cool]
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Sounds like a great day Intrepid Mrs S. I had a very happy day taking my mother in law out to buy an outfit for my wedding. We went into every shop in posh small town , going back in the end to the most friendly and asking their advice. MiL is only about 4' 7' so finding somethign was tricky, but we got her a geat shift dress and jacket in the end. I also ended up with a dress I liked rather better than my actual wedding dress, but that's by the by.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I always enjoy an excuse to go clothes shopping. [Hot and Hormonal] I've had a couple of v. enjoyable shopping trips with my m-i-l, including the one to kit me out for my s-i-l's wedding.

We're going to a wedding when we're in Orkney in early September; I saw a dress that looked rather appealing on the Monsoon web-site, and I'm wondering if I dare leave actually buying it until we get over there. I'm trying to balance the possible outcomes:

(a) it'll be sold out [Frown]
(b) it'll be there but not in my size [Waterworks]
(c) it'll be reduced in price [Cool]
(d) it'll be reduced in price and fit me [Yipee]


In other news, the temperature reached 18°C here today. [Yipee]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Might Monsoon reserve you one, piglet?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I don't know - We're not going to be over until the end of August, which might be a bit of a stretch for a "layaway" as they call it here.

Also, I've never bought anything there before, so I don't know whether their sizes are generous or mean*. I toyed with the idea of getting my sister or sister-in-law to go and try one on and use their judgement as to whether they thought it'd fit me! Their web-site has a rather complicated-looking dress-measuring link on it - I might see if I can get that to work.

Much Tidying* has been done chez Piglet today, and the top-floor bathroom is coming on slowly; Bill says he'll be back in the morning to finish it, but I'll believe that when I see it. At least the place is just about civilised enough now that I won't be mortified to ask anyone in ...

* which sounds as if it ought to be a village in Gloucestershire. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My niece here, the one who got married last year, is 6 months pregnant so there was a little get together today which, you will not be too surprised to hear, also included quite a lot of rather nice food. Niece cooked the payasam [pudding]. Her hubby's sister and hubby were there complete with their 10 month old little one, who was a bit of a sweetie - he contemplated this strange white guy for while then gave me a big smile. Quite often kids see me and scream so it was a bit of a relief.

Niece's hubby's sister is already pregnant again so it looks as if there will be plenty of playmates around for my ninth great-nephew/niece* when the time comes.

*my first Indian one, the others are all in UK.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Well, I, for one don't blame him if he does scream. Did you bribe him with a toy?
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Piglet, Daughter Erin used to work for Monsoon so I was in there any chance I got to use her friends and family discount! [Big Grin]
I used to go down a size in their clothes as they are slightly generous.
By the end of August this season will have gone into sale, so I say go for it and place your order!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Presumably if I placed an order now I'd have to pay whatever the current price is. It's not horrendously expensive, but obviously the less I have to pay the happier I'll be - I am Scottish after all ... [Big Grin]

D's friend arrived this afternoon for a few days but sadly summer was yesterday. St. John's was living up to its nickname of Fog City, and you could see the end of your nose, but not much else.

We took him to the Irish Loop coffee house for a late lunch, and then he came and sang with the choir for Evensong, which was nice (we were a bit short-handed with it being a long weekend, and I had to sing soprano, which was fun).

We'll take him out and about somewhere tomorrow - we'll decide where depending on the weather. We're feeding him in the evening - I'll set a beef casserole going in the slow-cooker before we set out and it should be ready when we get back.

I'm heading off to bed now as I didn't get my usual Sunday afternoon snooze ... [Snore]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Trying to madly catch up after a weekend on Guide Camp - straight from w*rk on Friday, home Sunday afternoon at 5:30pm and started on the washing and clearing away.

We were doing I'm a Guide Get Me Out of Here based on the Celebrity thing that I never watch, so I wasn't a lot of use when we had borderline decisions to make. However, we learned a few things: edible poo floats very realistically, stars in balloons with jelly fly a long way and are much harder to find than those in balloons with flour or bird seed (and getting the stars into the balloons in the first place is a real fiddle), some Guides love cleaning and others are a challenge to "persuade" to take their turn ...

Some of the girls were very happy to go to bed at 9:30pm on Saturday after a full day of activities and a really late night on Friday night, but there was a little group who were determined to stay up all night. I was evil enough to tell them that hostel manners mean that dorms are for sleeping and partying and noise has to happen in communal areas. I don't think I'd have been quite so mean if we hadn't had a couple not feeling brilliant. One is very allergic to cats, and although the dorms were allocated to give a cat free dorm, keeping that segregation wasn't working, so I was having to dose her with anti-histamine fairly regularly and limit the damage, plus a girl being pretty unpleasant to several others out of sight, so we were getting stricter about dorms not being places to go and hang out in. There were 5 or 6 who I kept up until their eyes drooped, then fed them one at a time into the dorms where the girls who had gone to bed willingly were sleeping, gave them 10-15 minutes to fall asleep before I put another to bed, but it still took until 11:30pm until the last keeled over.
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
Dear Lord, thank for the sunshine, but could you please turn the thermostat down a bit? Yesterday was a 3 t-shirt day and today, wearing a suit & tie, is rather less than comfortable.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
It's going to be generally cooler tomorrow, I think.

In other news, yesterday I decided to wash a silk dressing gown I own but seldom wore as it was rather too big. I washed it on 40 degrees, higher than recommended [Eek!] and it's now the ideal size. [Big Grin]

Nen - enjoying an evening Home Alone and feeling decadently luxurious in silk. [Biased]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Did the colour run, Nen? I washed a bright pink silk shirt, by mistake I must add, at 40C, with the result that I had an interesting collection of shocking pink undies! [Eek!]

Wet today, but I must say the garden looks better for it!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I indulged in a trip to the second hand and remainders bookshop today, it's a treat I give myself two or three times a year, and I only spent about founds pounds and came away with two absolutely mint book, one a well illustrated guide to photography and the other a rather nicely bound hardcover Wind in the Willows to replace the paperback I bought in 1968 for 3 shillings and 6 pence, which has been past it's best before date for decades.

A most satisfying little expedition.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... and the other a rather nicely bound hardcover Wind in the Willows to replace the paperback I bought in 1968 for 3 shillings and 6 pence, which has been past it's best before date for decades.

I still have my copy from the 60s as well, with those lovely illustrations. The pages are a bit yellowed now but it has been much loved over the years.

In fact I still have quite a few of my childhood books from the 60s, including the boxed set of Narnia Chronicles and the Alan Garners, that still get read from time to time.

(And you won't be able to do that with an e-reader, 50 years on.)
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I have few of my original childhood books as space was precious at home with eight children. When my sons were younger I bought them a lot of my childhood favourites but now I buy what I can on my kindle and my eldest son reads them on his one as we share the account (luckily I like Asimov and Huxley). My youngest is currently reading the Phoenix and the Carpet on the school issued kindle. The kindle has revolutionised my boys' reading habits, they love reading on it.
I still buy a lot of paper books, often history tomes and craft books but I love the convenience of my kindle, especially when on holiday as I can browse various holiday guides, take several reading books and read the paper, all in one location. I am about to buy a new Kindle cover, which looks like a classic Alice in wonderland cover.
I'm having a relaxing day today, my marking is finished until October and I set revision activities online yesterday so have little to do today. I've pottered around doing a little housework and bottling some wine and now I'm going to do some recreational sewing. Tonight we will start sewing my eldest's Tudor costume for Kentwell, he is a page so needs a formal doublet and some rather dashing paned and padded trunk hose [Big Grin]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
After a foggy start yesterday we took off "round the bay" to a rather pretty cataract called the Cascades, with boardwalks and steps where you can cross them, and while we were there the sun came out. [Yipee]

Then back to ours for dinner - we had a change of plan because the shops were closed by the time D. went to look for beef, so we did casserole with a ready-cooked chicken we had in the fridge.

He's taking us out for dinner this evening - probably to Bacalao, a really good restaurant that specialises in local cuisine, but with a modern twist, and situated just up the road from our house.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
When I lived in Birkenhead I had several pretty good restaurants in staggering distance - it is a wonderful luxury.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Did the colour run, Nen?

Yes. Fortunately I washed it with reds and pinks and it's just a shade or two lighter than it was. [Biased]

Ah, The Wind in the Willows. I've got a copy of that lovely hardback edition too, and a small paperback one which I take with me when abroad (which is fortunately not often as I dislike travelling). I always get very homesick for England when I'm away, and it's so quintessentially English.

I also love it because it's about friendship, and about finding your way back home.

Nen - home-lover. [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
When I lived in Birkenhead I had several pretty good restaurants in staggering distance - it is a wonderful luxury.

We have one - run by Sri Lankans and it is just excellent!

[Smile]

Note to self - must go soon!
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
May I chime in re Wind in the Willows? I am thinking of getting an audiobook version but can't decide which.

I sleep badly and I find it comforting to have a well-known audiobook burbling away. I've gone through 'Little Women' loads now and always seem to wake up at the same bits ...! So thinking of adding Wind in the Willows.

It must be unabridged - with books I know that well, the missing bits will annoy me. It must be read by a male voice - partly because it's a very male story, but also because my dad used to read it to me.

I have listened to a few previews on iTunes. Richard Briers could be good but I wasn't sure about his Mole voice. Michael Hordern possibly, although in my head he is always Paddington! Alan Bennet would be great but I can't find an unabridged version on there.

Any ideas welcome!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
What a lovely idea Gill H! No suggestions - but keep us posted [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
It must be unabridged - with books I know that well, the missing bits will annoy me.

This is the clincher. It's surprising how many audiobooks are abridged - I don't know why, it feels like a real con and can take the heart out of a book. It's also unfair on people who might be unable to read the printed book for themselves and get a sanitized version.

A while ago I bought a copy of John Masefield's "The Box of Delights" which was actually a printed version, but turned out to be an abridged one. All the beautiful bits I'd enjoyed, the little digressions, had all been axed. What was left was straightforward narrative, which had lost all the poetic bits so characteristic of the author that had made the book a pleasure to read. Audiobooks strike me as similar, which is why I stopped trying to buy them.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Exactly! If I wanted the abridged version I've bought the Reader's Digest Condensed Books version! I hate abridgements with a passion.

[Although there are bits of the Bible which might benefit from a bit of precis-ing!]
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
Unabridged audio versions are often available from online shops. I have lots. I still prefer the dramatised BBC version of The Lord of the Rings though.

Cattyish, off to walk the dog and go see friends.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Rather nice juxtaposition in this morning's financial pages - there is an article about how call rates on mobile phones need to rise as the companies are having such a hard time and right next is an article about how Vodaphone™ made a 26% increase on profit. I know there are other issues and I also know that if they make increases we won't have much choice but to pay up but...

[Mad]

[edited for clarity]

[ 21. May 2014, 09:18: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Personally I can’t imagine the Wind in the Willows being read by anyone other than Alan Bennett (unabridged and everything). Any other voice for Mole just sounds wrong to me.
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
Ah, but for me Rik Mayall is the best Mr Toad.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Vodafone profits in India may have been up 26% but worldwide they were sharply down and forecast to be poor the next couple of years, see for example http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/markets/article-2634063/Vodafone-issue-profits-warning-financial-crisis.html?ito=feeds-new sxml

Not sure if that is any consolation.

I like William Horwood's book The Willows in Winter, has anyone else read it ?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I know some clergy whose sermons would benefit from a bit of abridging. [Big Grin]

I remember the BBC doing a Sunday-afternoon dramatisation of Alice in Wonderland, which was one of my very favourite books as a child, and being very impressed that the script was pretty much verbatim; I had read the book so often I'd have noticed if it hadn't been, and it would have jarred like having the Christmas lessons read from the Wrong Version™ of the Bible.

D's friend took us out for an absolutely stellar dinner last night - Bacalao were definitely on form. The food and service were excellent, and the ice in the pre-dinner GIN came from an actual, real iceberg.

How cool is that? [Cool]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
D's friend took us out for an absolutely stellar dinner last night - Bacalao were definitely on form. The food and service were excellent, and the ice in the pre-dinner GIN came from an actual, real iceberg.

I've just looked at the menu and fallen foul of the 10th Commandment (Bible's, not Ship's).
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
I like William Horwood's book The Willows in Winter, has anyone else read it ?

No, but I quite enjoyed Skallgrigg and the extract I've read from The Boy with No Shoes (which Wikipedia says is a novel, but I understood it was autobiographical) so I'll look out for this.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
and the ice in the pre-dinner GIN came from an actual, real iceberg.

How cool is that? [Cool]

I hope around 0° C

Jengie
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
I've just looked at the menu and fallen foul of the 10th Commandment (Bible's, not Ship's).

So have I. That's gastroporn, that menu.

It's also the second time that Piglet has posted about a menu that makes me want to get a plane ticket and sample the wonders of Newfoundland cuisine for myself.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I don't normally eat very many sweet things but last night I had 4 laddu [a particularly wonderful Indian sweet] and then this morning I was wondering for a while why my stomach felt so off.

[Roll Eyes]

In other news my mobile phone has finally died so I have brought the new one, already purchased in anticipation of this event, into service. Now I'm into the usual faff about choosing wallpaper and screensaver and all that - I imagine that in a week or so I'll be back to the pictures I used on the old phone. I've already selected the same ringtone!

Sad or what?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
I've just looked at the menu and fallen foul of the 10th Commandment (Bible's, not Ship's).

So have I. That's gastroporn, that menu.

It's also the second time that Piglet has posted about a menu that makes me want to get a plane ticket and sample the wonders of Newfoundland cuisine for myself.

Please do - I can feel a foodie ship-meet coming on ... [Smile]

Some Newfoundland cuisine is not for the faint-hearted - seal-flipper pie springs to mind. As it happens, they had it as an addition to the menu (as a starter); our friend had it and quite enjoyed it.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I did wonder about the cods' tongues. You'd need an awful lot for any recipe. But you do seem to be blessed with good places to eat.

Out of interest, what's the easiest way of getting to Newfoundland by plane from here? (And please don't say "Well, I wouldn't start from here if I were you..." [Biased] )
 
Posted by jacobsen (# 14998) on :
 
If you move from Platform 3 to Platform 9 3/4 you should find the Hogwarts Express. At the terminal, transfer to broomstick or thestral, but do wrap up warmly.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
During the summer months, Air Canada does direct flights from Heathrow, which take about 5½ hours, but like all "routes less travelled", especially when the carrier has a monopoly, they're relatively expensive. For most of the year you have to go via Halifax, Ottawa, Toronto or wherever, thereby adding a couple of thousand miles in the wrong direction to your journey. [Mad]

West Jet have recently started offering a direct flight from St. John's to Dublin much more cheaply than AC, which may well be worth investigating in conjunction with a cheapie to Stansted or wherever.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
For most of the year you have to go via Halifax, Ottawa, Toronto or wherever, thereby adding a couple of thousand miles in the wrong direction to your journey. [Mad]

Yes, I had wondered about that as that came up in internet searches which cheerfully added, "Halifax is 613 miles from St John's" (so, not really walking distance then) and "The flying time from Halifax to St. John's is typically hours" which is undoubtedly very true.

Ah well. Maybe one day; for now I'll console myself with looking at your menus. Thanks for the info!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Busy day today - orders of service for the Synod service* tomorrow night done, ordinary bulletins for Sunday done, batch of French sticks made (joint effort with D.) and soup made for Saturday's lunch.

Night-night. [Snore]

* We're also installing the new Chapter - all thirteen of them - we're going to be there all night. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm enjoying having very little work to worry about, for the first time in 6 years! [Big Grin] my students are still around but are busy revising for their exams and I have no Feb-Oct module to teach. It did mean a pay cut but it is such a relief to have a break from relentless marking.
Yesterday I managed to bake bread and cake and make Red Leicester cheese and ricotta, before pootling into the craft room to cut glass for the kiln. Today I am going to make meringues and sew.
I should possibly be doing some housework though...
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Synod service and installation of chapter successfully done and dusted, incurring much Decanal Grinning™ - he thought the music was absolutely wonderful and made a point of saying so.

The service took just about 2 hours, but it really didn't feel too bad - everything seemed to go very smoothly and there was fairly minimal faffing-about.

Nice lazy day tomorrow I think, although reading of Heavenly Anarchist's burst of Domestic Goddessishness is making me feel woefully inadequate ...

[Overused]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My puppy obsession continues. I don't think I could be more ready for the pupster to arrive!

The Spending Area is now ready (as in 'spending a penny' - Guide Dogs have to be trained to go in a small area as blind people will need to know where it is, and they can't 'go' when out working)

Here is Tatze trying it out for size. I am hoping to train her to use it too - no luck so far!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Good luck with the puppy, Boogie! It's an excellent work to be doing, and some of my students could well be very grateful to you and other puppy walkers in the future!

We seem to have crammed a seven week half term into four weeks!! Not only that, two of my four weeks have been four day weeks, what with Bank Holidays, and a funeral.. Been a very good half term though, and all parents really satisfied with their off-springs' progress in all areas of life and work. It often doesn't seem like there is any progress at all in the kind of work I do, but it was very clear from the formal and informal conversations I've had with several of them lately, that they are seeing very positive changes that they are liking. Hooray!!! [Yipee]

Now for a much needed nine-day relax and catch up on my life.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:


Nice lazy day tomorrow I think, although reading of Heavenly Anarchist's burst of Domestic Goddessishness is making me feel woefully inadequate ...

[Overused]

I wouldn't bother, I never got round to making the meringues [Hot and Hormonal] I did sew though. Perhaps I should make them with my youngest today, we have lots of eggs to use up (hens are performing well). Thinking that, I might make Rick Stein's egg coconut masala for lunch to use some up. I'll make flatbreads too (dough is in the breadmaker already).
Half term next week and I need to make some linens for the Kentwell Tudor recreation. My husband is currently at the sewing machine making my eldest a doublet for his page role.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Lazy day duly had.

Having been threatening for ages to make my own hummus (to quote Jeremy Clarkson, how hard can it be?) I finally did it, and the result is in the fridge, hopefully developing some flavour, as when I tasted it, it seemed a bit bland. Not quite sure where I've gone wrong - I put two huge garlic cloves in it - maybe not enough lemon juice?

The choir's going on a bit of a jaunt tomorrow evening - we're singing Evensong at a church about an hour's drive "round the bay". Pity the weather forecast says it's going to rain - it could be a nice wee trip.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Just two?
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Sounds like an insufficient amount of garlic to me, piglet, but I've not got the recipe I used to use to hand to check.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
Just two?

More garlic, more lemon. Taste as you go.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The garlic should be fine - 2-3 cloves are usually enough. Are you using tinned chickpeas? They can sometimes be a bit blander than dried ones, but do save time if you don't want to wait a few hours while the dried ones soak and then have to be cooked.

Pop in a pinch of cumin and a tiny pinch of salt; that should help.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
And some chilli powder. With a swirl of Harissa on top.
 
Posted by FooloftheShip (# 15579) on :
 
Take it out of the fridge. This may sound weird, but I have come to the conclusion that home-made hummus needs a good few hours out of the fridge to work.

Otherwise, it is indeed bland.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Be wary of going too far into the extra garlic trap, piglet - it was in making hummus that I posted a few years ago about finding something had too much garlic at which you expressed such shock, consternation and dismay - I was pretty amazed as well. I like the idea of a pinch of chilli, a pinch of salt and a little more lemon juice.

Have you put tahini in it? Some recipes have it and some don't and sometimes it can add a lift but too much tahini makes it no longer like hummus at all.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The authentic Middle Eastern recipe does need tahini (as well as the chickpeas, lemon and garlic, obviously). In the Levant and Egypt, a pinch of cumin and salt would be a typical regional flavouring to add to the mixture. In North Africa, chillies and harissa would be more likely.

Of course you can add what you like - they sell jalapeno flavour here in one of the supermarkets - but just mentioning it in case anyone was interested.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
When I introduced an Egyptian friend to Harissa the look on his face was pure bliss! It is excellent stuff.
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
Oh yes! I discovered harissa from my housemates having a fridge clearout. They don't like to eat things past the use-by date, even though they are in unopened jars. And they like to buy in bulk...

I don't think I've bought a jar of pesto for myself for the last 2 years!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
After about 15 hours in the fridge, the flavour did seem to have developed a bit. The recipe I used was from Delia Smith's original Cookery Course from the 1970s - it called for dried chickpeas, which was what I had, and 2 "fat cloves of garlic" (plus tahini, lemon juice,* olive oil, salt and a pinch of cayenne but no cumin). I think Wodders is right - any more garlic and it would have too much of that "raw" flavour. I might try roasting the garlic first next time - I don't think roasted garlic had been invented** when those books came out ... [Hot and Hormonal]

We had a very nice jaunt round the bay - as is the habit, they fed us royally before the service, and it went off very well, especially after they turned down the heating, which had been on "bust". [Eek!]

* It specified the juice of 2 lemons - I only had about half a fresh lemon and added bottled lemon juice, but maybe not enough.

** not in Britain anyway. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Cayenne would have been easier to get in Britain in the 70s than cumin. But glad it worked for you.

Looks like a drizzly, overcast, cool Bank Holiday Monday so far, i.e. traditional weather. Feeling disincentivised to go anywhere.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Just got back from a great session at Hay Festival: Jung Chang talking about her latest book, which was fascinating. Also saw Lynn Barber who was predictably good value, talking about her Curious Career. I would have bought Jung Chang's book on the spot, and queued for a signing, if I hadn't had to hurry on the next thing.

It's going to be a very expensive week: seeing the Great Budapest Hotel on Wednesday, the Matisse exhibition and 'The Curious Incident ....' on Thursday. I shall be all cultured-out by the weekend. And broke. Just as well I missed the book purchase opportunity really.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
A quiet day, spend pottering and pootling. Cleaned some copper. And some silver. Feel quite virtuous, considering....
How's everyone else's day been?
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Home based doing jobs and clearing paperwork, which feels like a never ending task at present. [Roll Eyes]

But tomorrow's Tuesday, my favourite day of the week. [Yipee]

Nen - shortly to make a mug of hot chocolate before heading for bed. [Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Decisions, decisions - I don't like going to the dentist but have some discomfort in the jaw, lower right side - should I go and get it checked out early just in case or should I wait until I'm in screaming agony and have no choice?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Wait - it could be simple neuralgia [Smile]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I have spent the last 2 days virtuously visiting relatives [Angel] today I get to play with my glass though. The children are home but they're old enough to amuse themselves.

I quite fancy some hot chocolate now though! I might go and make myself a mocha.

[ 27. May 2014, 08:13: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I hope so, Boogie - he found nothing obviously wrong but has given me some medication to take for 3 days then he'll have another look.

Of course it could be Galloping Hypochondria, but there's no cure for that.

[Eek!]
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
In between planning & phone lessons I'm cooking up dhal, potato-and-chard curry and mushroom bhaji for a Anglo-French curry night tonight. I have already cooked a lamb madras which is maturing nicely in the fridge.

The starter is not Indian-themed (courgette and bean salad with tahini dressing) nor is the dessert (chocolate banana cake with ice cream) but I hope it will all go down well.

We had to do a major (and I mean major !) clean of the downstairs room where we'll be sitting and eating as one of our guests is mega allergic to cats. We cleaned, steam cleaned, vacuumed and mopped, and then covered all the furniture with sheets etc that can be whipped off tonight when the cats are all confined to barracks.
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Decisions, decisions - I don't like going to the dentist but have some discomfort in the jaw, lower right side - should I go and get it checked out early just in case or should I wait until I'm in screaming agony and have no choice?

I always just ignore it. Haven't been to the dentist in about 14 years. I haven't died yet.
 
Posted by Starbug (# 15917) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Wait - it could be simple neuralgia [Smile]

Or try using interdental brushes. You may have a tiny bit of food stuck between your teeth, which can cause gingivitis. I've averted many a trip to the dentist by using an interdental brush followed by mouthwash.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
It's been a long day today, Mr Boog's father's funeral. He has a complicated family so none of it was easy. But the Minister was brilliant - Unitarian. Mr Boogs had completely lost touch with his Dad (from 9 years old) 'till twelve years ago. Now we are getting ready to go out with them for a meal - it was such a surprise to be asked we couldn't really refuse.

Never mind, it's a posh restaurant so the food will be good [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
The food was good [Smile]

Today was the day that I sat on the edge of a family drama which has lasted for 30 years.

Lots of reconciliation, lots of explanation and forgiveness.

All good. For sure.

But I sat on the edge and observed and nodded.

All is well with Mr Boogs an his new Sister and his new Step Mum.

Me? I am glad for them all, but still just an observer really.

Never mind [Smile]

GBY all [Votive]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
That sounds good, Boogie. [Smile] Nowhere near as dramatic as Mr Boog's sounds but I was vaguely aware of a family issue which came to light rather more clearly at Mr Nen's father's funeral some years ago. Funny how funerals can be the catalyst. Like you I feel very much the observer but it's still a sensitive point with Mr Nen if we talk about it.

When does the puppy arrive? [Big Grin]

Nen - who misses the welcome home a pet gives, especially on depressingly wet and overcast days like this one.
 
Posted by Caissa (# 16710) on :
 
My father and his siblings had a falling out the last for years over the payment of their mother's funeral. The youngest reneged on his 20% of the cost requiring the other 4 to cover his portion of the costs.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
BIG storm last night with a flash of lightning that produced a few horrors, like knocking out my computer and caused some sort of induction thingy damaging Pete's brass crucifix - I'll send you a picture Pete when my PC is back working.

But the good news is that my team won the cricket match and goes into the semi-final on Friday.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Wodders, that sounds like a right nuisance, with which I can sympathise - my w*rk computer got a virus yesterday. I innocently clicked on a link on the interweb (can't remember now whether it was SOF or FB) and started getting scary messages like "alas, if you do not do XYZ you will lose everything on your computer". [Eek!]

When I phoned the geek department to say that something was wrong, they already knew. [Paranoid] They came and took it away and I'm hoping it'll be back by the time I get in tomorrow, or I'll have to tackle that pile of filing that I've been ignoring in the hope that it might go away ...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Sadly filing rarely goes away of its own accord.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
The computer issues sound a nightmare. As does the filing.

I'm off to the opticians to pick up my new varificals, the old single lens glasses weren't up to the task and I also now need some near vision help with needle threading [Eek!]
My children have been at the inlaws for 2 days but come back today, the peace has been nice.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Just walked back from the station; suddenly the heavens split open, water cascaded down and the streets became rivers with rain bouncing back up off the pavement and mini waterfalls splashing down the hillier streets. Within two minutes my shoes and trousers were completely soaked and I squelched home. Hadn't expected that.

Looks as if it might be moving north. [Devil]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I saw that on TV - not you being soaked - but the weatherman pointing out a crescent of rain moving across Southern England with the strobey green bits, and saying it would deliver 'heavy showers' on home going traffic.

We had that last weekend: you can still see the little mounds of debris that built up behind the tyres of parked cars as the gutters flooded.
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Had an appointment today with the consultant that did my cataract operation four years ago. Booked in for other eye to be done in a couple of weeks, but also had lens in already done eye cleaned. Everything looks so much brighter, and I feel a lot happier even though I can now see the bathroom floor needs cleaning.

The weather has been vile this week, but it looks like it's getting better.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gussie:
Had an appointment today with the consultant that did my cataract operation four years ago. Booked in for other eye to be done in a couple of weeks, but also had lens in already done eye cleaned. Everything looks so much brighter, and I feel a lot happier even though I can now see the bathroom floor needs cleaning.

The weather has been vile this week, but it looks like it's getting better.

I was an ophthalmic nurse for about 15 years, specialising in casualty and clinic, and the patients often came back after cataract surgery and complained about that they could now see the dust in their house [Smile] had your lens capsule clouded over at the back? That's very common and the laser quickly does the trick - glad it's all clear again.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Apparently the first thing my m-i-l said on coming home after her cataract operation was "goodness, don't those curtains need cleaning?"

Computer virus turned out to be pretty catastrophic - it was a "ransom" virus, where the perpetrators (or "scumbags" as I like to call them) tell you that all your files have been de-crypted and will be lost if you don't give them money (which my bosses don't, on principle). Fortunately the two main programs I use are from a remote computer and weren't affected, but I've lost a shed-load of ordinary word and spreadsheet stuff.

[Mad]
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Yep, the lens had become cloudy. The fact it's lightened my mood, makes me feel awful for my poor mum who has macular degeneration and can't see a great deal at all now.

Pain about the computer Piglet, I once did mine in by clicking on what I thought was a library suppliers website but wasn't. I don't think I lost any files, but it took our IT guys ages to make the computer happy again.
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
I have one more day of holiday. It's sunny in Scotland. The dog is currently snoozing and will only want a short walk. Perhaps I'll garden, cycle and get the washing done. Bliss. Then this evening I shall sing When Daisies Pied at our little summer concert.

Cattyish, free, free as a bird.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:

When does the puppy arrive? [Big Grin]

Early July, we haven't got a date yet but that's the earliest I can start - as I go away to Palma de Mallorca with five girlie friends at the end of June [Yipee]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I apologise to anyone who gets rain today... it's my fault for cleaning all the inside windows and some of the more obviously dirty outside ones.

I've also moved all the furniture and hoovered and dusted everywhere.

All because I needed to move a piece of furniture for the meter person to get to the gas meter, (I did not want another stern letter in about six months time about needing to see my meter at least once every two years - if they will call when I'm out at work...) and one thing led to another.

Oh, and I did all the ironing whilst I was waiting for the meter person.

Anyone for some light refreshments to help me recover!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
You, Japes, are an angel! [Angel]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
What is this 'ironing'?

I dimly recall a strange appliance unearthed in a clear out some years ago with a flat plate with holes but, finding no sensible use for it, donated it to recycling. [Snigger]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I quite like ironing, occasionally. It's relatively mindless, and quite relaxing, and makes me feel I've done something productive and useful whilst I'm waiting around for something to happen, and it would be foolish to do something that I don't want to be interrupted doing.

Probably happens about six times a year...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think that going as a gang to the biggest mall in South Asia on the last Friday afternoon before the new school year starts on Monday may not have been the wisest thing! It was heaving in there!

We splashed out a couple of quid on an autorickshaw for the trip home - the buses would have been pure hell.

The ice creams were good.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Wodders, that reminds me of Bank Holiday Monday - we had gone to Taurus at Lydney, and Jophn wanted to call into the bookshop at the Dean Forest Railway. We didn't realise it was going to be a "Thomas" weekend. The chap on the gatet advised us that it wouldn't be a good idea to go into the bookshop - he reckoned it was wall-to-wall kids!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm not sure that going anywhere on a Bank Holiday is a good idea ...

I really can't express my gratitude to the kind gentleman from the geekery at w*rk who mended as much of my computer as possible and kept reassuring me that it wasn't my fault, and it really could have happened to anyone. Also, one of my "lost" files turned up as an e-mail attachment, so isn't lost after all.

And it's the weekend, the weather forecast's getting better and le boulangerie Piglet* has just produced some more French sticks.

[Yipee]

* It was a joint effort - D. did the measuring, and I did the rest.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
My idea of producing French sticks is going to the supermarket and bringing them home in a bag. [Biased]

Well, the sun is shining at last and if the grass has dried out a bit tomorrow I'll get the lawns cut. Meanwhile, it's stir fry for tea and the red wine bottle is already open to let the wine breathe. [Big Grin]

Nen - lover of Saturday evenings in with the family.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I cut the grass Thursday, so today was digging over a bit which will one day be an extension of the lawn. Unfortunately at the moment it's a highly fork-resistant tangle of couch grass, buttercup, bindweed, dandelion etc.

There should also be a bottle of red somewhere in the offing here as well. And a couple of steaks. I just need to go conjure a sauce out of whatever's in the fridge - at the moment I'm thinking of roasting any tomatoes, chillies, peppers and onions I find and then putting the results in a blender.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
This particular batch of French sticks is partly wholemeal, as there was a collective brainfart re the purchase of white flour when D. went to Costco (and when he phoned me at w*rk to say he'd lost the list I'd made and could I remember anything we needed?), so he substituted wholemeal when he ran out of white. However, it turned out really nicely - slightly heavier than white, but v. good and with a lovely soft texture.

This afternoon I made a batch of red-pepper jelly which is cooling and will be ready for consumption fairly soon.

contented, domesticated piglet
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
A relaxed lunch of bread and cheese here, including our first ever taste of homemade hard cheese. It was a 6 week old Caerphilly made from Duchy organic milk and it actually tasted like real cheese! [Big Grin] I was a bit nervous in case I poisoned everyone but all is fine.
My husband is finishing the sewing of my son's Tudor puffed trunk hose and then we all need to get dressed up in Tudor gear for photos so we can submit our costumes for approval. Only 2 weeks until Kentwell and I have a stack of linens to sew; shirts and shifts, aprons and linen cloths. I am beginning to get excited now.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
If you add vital gluten when you bake with wholemeal flour, it will rise higher.

Moo
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Our standard practice is to add a tablespoon of gluten flour for every cup of wholemeal/rye/soy/etc flour. Another virtue is that when used with rye flour, the dough is less sticky. There's no real need to vary any of the other ingredients, but as noted before a small amount of lemon juice, no more than a teaspoon for a 1 kg loaf, does no harm in producing good bread.

But then, you might like a heavy bread. It often toasts well, and makes a good base for a Sunday lunch of cauliflower cheese.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It wasn't really too heavy; just a little heavier than the white loaves were, and it rose beautifully - I can't believe how easy it is, especially after the faffing-about we had getting the baked-in-the-machine loaves to behave. It tasted lovely, and we've already eaten one-and-a-half of the three loaves we made ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Quite a busy day today - lots of nice Ascensiontide music (why can't Ascension last for six weeks to get in all those lovely anthems?) and a v. successful congregational meeting this afternoon about what to do about the Cathedral hall, when IMHO the right decision was made.

[Smile]
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
will you be Tudors all summer, Heavenly Anarchist, or is all this sewing for one weekend ? I visited Hampton Court at the weekend, it would be very good if they had Tudor characters there.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
will you be Tudors all summer, Heavenly Anarchist, or is all this sewing for one weekend ? I visited Hampton Court at the weekend, it would be very good if they had Tudor characters there.

They do.
See here.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
will you be Tudors all summer, Heavenly Anarchist, or is all this sewing for one weekend ? I visited Hampton Court at the weekend, it would be very good if they had Tudor characters there.

Kentwell has special open weekends with Tudors (and occasionally other history periods) but their main event is a two week period in June. On the weekdays it is open to school groups and at the weekends to the public. I am there for the first week as 2 weeks would be difficult getting time off for my husband and 2 children. Visitors go through a time tunnel and when they come out everything is Tudor. We have to stay completely in period while visitors are there so we even eat our pottage publicly and we just carry out our roles as if it is all normal. I'm in the dairy so will be making butter and soft cheese, my husband is in the coppice doing woodwork, my youngest in barn school and then whatever takes his fancy in the afternoons. My eldest is no longer a member of our family though, he is a page in the manor so gentry class and gets to eat the posh food and have a different background story (he's the younger son of a former Sheriff of Cambridge).
Both my children have new first names too, as their own ones (Zadok and Elijah) are somewhat conspicuous for 1578!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
You have a son called Zadok? How cool is that? [Overused] [Cool]

Had my first (sort of) failure with the French stick recipe today due to a DOS (Dozing Off Situation) after putting them in the oven. [Hot and Hormonal]

Strangely, they were still edible, if somewhat crusty, but as that's the way D. likes his bread, he offered to eat these ones if I make another batch tomorrow (hopefully without falling asleep).
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I'm sat comfortably in a hotel lounge in Potsdam, recuperating from a Frühstück of coffee and exceptionally nice jammy bun. Presently I will go out and sightpotter. No rush.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Piglet, the overcooked sticks would make good breadcrumbes. Break them into the food processor and run on high for just a few moments.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I'm sat comfortably in a hotel lounge in Potsdam, recuperating from a Frühstück of coffee and exceptionally nice jammy bun. Presently I will go out and sightpotter. No rush.

That sounds so wonderful (sigh).

Piglet, Zadok loves his name and having his own piece of very recognisable music [Big Grin]

I've just been on my forums and wished my students good luck for their exams this week and am now having a cup of tea and a browse before I get stuck into the sewing pile.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I'm sat comfortably in a hotel lounge in Potsdam, recuperating from a Frühstück of coffee and exceptionally nice jammy bun. Presently I will go out and sightpotter. No rush.

You really know how to make folks jealous, don't you? I love the No rush bit.
 
Posted by angelica37 (# 8478) on :
 
Hello, having fallen overboard many months ago I've found my way back on to the Ship. I don't live too far from Kentwell and was thinking of making a visit over there at some point to see the Tudors it sounds like fun.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by angelica37:
Hello, having fallen overboard many months ago I've found my way back on to the Ship. I don't live too far from Kentwell and was thinking of making a visit over there at some point to see the Tudors it sounds like fun.

Do visit [Smile] I'm in the dairy, I'm the middle aged of the two Annies there (though I'm afraid I'm not allowed to acknowledge you from the 21st century!).
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
It must be quite hard to stay in character. It's all right as long as the conversation is restricted to milk and cheese but without an encyclopaedic knowledge of the 16th century, the potential topics are quite limited.

Is it supposed to be any particular year ?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
It must be quite hard to stay in character. It's all right as long as the conversation is restricted to milk and cheese but without an encyclopaedic knowledge of the 16th century, the potential topics are quite limited.

Is it supposed to be any particular year ?

1578. This is my first year and speech will be the hardest thing for me. That's why newbies get working class roles, so their work gives them something practical to do and talk about. I know where I live in the village and when the market is, what I buy, etc.
This summer Elizabeth planned to visit our small town and we live in anticipation that she might visit us. So we talk about that, make plans. The colonising of America is also topical. And discussing cheese can take up time, how many visitors would have made cheese at home and know how rennet is made? Yet I need to be incredulous that they do not know how to do such a basic womanly task.
I am a history graduate (as of last year) and rather obsessed with the social history of women so subject matter isn't so much of an issue as I can discuss family and home life easily and I can always have fun discussing the role of women. I'm no actress, I'd hate a gentry role where acting is needed, but I was a nurse for 20 years so talking to people comes easy to me. The role I'd really like is in the still room making medicines as I lecture in health theory and I've studied the history of medicine. I would love to explore this further.

[ 03. June 2014, 11:48: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Help! We've been invaded by a host of children!

Herself & Himself seem to have taken on the role of tutors to some of the local kids - they have 7 of them on the verandah now doing all sorts of things from basic alphabets [in Roman, Hindi and Malayalam] to bits of maths and history and all sorts. The group compromises a couple of first standards, a couple of second standards and one each of fourth, fifth and seventh! Just one girl surrounded by six boys. All good kids and all very local. The least local has all of hundred metres to home from here!

One of the first standards has had to give up his Too cool for school t-shirt.

I've never made cheese apart from paneer and I doubt that rennet is easily available here - how tough is it? Actually we don't have anywhere cool enough for it to mature so it is probably a non-starter here. All the cheese produced in India [precious little] seems to come from the mountains.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Poor Prabad! No longer cool? Who is the poor girl?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I buy rennet from Lakeland here. From what I've just read the stomach used to produce the enzyme needs to be milk specific, ie the same animal, which explains why my normal rennet didn't work on goats' milk the other day but works fine with cows milk. So I suppose goat rennet could be used in India with goats' milk. I'm guessing it is the use of animal rennet that restricts cheese making in India. Cheese might come from the mountains because they keep goats there?
I do have vegetarian rennet here in tablet form, no idea what they make that from, wiki suggests fungi. But I also make paneer type and various curd cheeses with cider vinegar or lemon juice.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Piglet, the overcooked sticks would make good breadcrumbs ...

You don't think they're going to last that long, do you? [Big Grin]

HA, I started getting an earworm last night, and it really hasn't gone away ...

**Zadok the priest, and Nathan the prophet ...**
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We normally use lemon juice for paneer although commercial producers normally use coconut vinegar. We have yet to try cider vinegar which we get for my mild cholesterol issues - it's quite nice with a drop of honey and some hot water first thing in the morning - this was something that a shipmate advised years ago and it seems to work.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
IIRC from my biology GCSE, vegetarian rennet comes from genetically engineered bacteria. As does the insulin that is used to treat diabetes.

They do something magic to the bacteria* that makes them behave like the cells that produce the rennet/insulin.

*that biology GCSE was a while ago [Hot and Hormonal] [Biased]
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Dramatic end to the day for me! 5 minutes before we close and I go on 3 weeks' leave, a teenage girl was attacked by 3 other teens.
While calling the police I developed a migraine aura but managed to drive home.
Really need my holiday!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Goodness, TB, that sounds scary - hope she's going to be OK.

Have a good holiday - it looks as if you deserve it!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
One of my neighbours has just finished cleaning his car. He does it every weekend. And it takes him four (4) hours. Every inch of the thing meticulously cleaned, polished, inspected, gone over, inside and out.

I don't know whether to feel ashamed that I complete the whole thing in about 20-30 minutes (though I don't polish mine) and I don't do it every weekend, either.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
We have no shame, we pay the children to clean ours once in a blue moon [Smile]
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
I pay the hand car wash & valet firm. [Devil]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's funny you should mention car cleanliness (or the lack of it) - we went out this evening to see if there were still any icebergs about (there was - a huge one with an archway like the Arc de Triomphe in the bay just before you come to Cape Spear), and the windscreen was so manky on the inside that D. had a go at it with window-cleaning fluid when we got home.

I'm inclined to agree with Thyme though - those "show-room-ready" valet services are worth every penny once in a while.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
It's funny you should mention car cleanliness (or the lack of it) - we went out this evening to see if there were still any icebergs about (there was - a huge one with an archway like the Arc de Triomphe in the bay just before you come to Cape Spear), and the windscreen was so manky on the inside that D. had a go at it with window-cleaning fluid when we got home.

I'm inclined to agree with Thyme though - those "show-room-ready" valet services are worth every penny once in a while.

Piglet - a post like that makes me realise what a very different world you live in. Icebergs! - I have never even seen one.

[Smile]

<ETA context for top of page>

[ 08. June 2014, 06:28: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Well, certainly not in the distance of an afternoon drive from home. I remember a post of yours around this time last year: "a smell of icebergs in the air", something we just don't think of experiencing.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
As a slight tangent from car cleaning and icebergs, I give you the middle of the night car drama outside the Japes' abode around 2.30 a.m..

Here was I sleeping the sleep of the organist who wants to be on reasonably cheerful and bouncy form for Pentecost, when - Boom, Crash, slamming of car door, yelling, running footsteps - I was not asleep anymore, but bolt upright, wondering what had just happened.

It took a minute or two to orientate myself, as I was looking the wrong way down the road, at first, then as I looked to the houses opposite, (small two up, two down, terraced housing both sides of this road for the first 15 or so houses, all with a tiny bit of garden in front) they appeared to be missing a front fence or two, and by the fourth house, the mystery was solved - one car had driven along, knocking down all four fences, and came to a halt at the first house with a brick wall. People were gathering round to investigate, phone calls were being made, photographs being taken, driver had taken off...

Police were great, on the scene very fast, and quickly caught up with the driver, who was definitely not hurt, but obviously in no state to be out anywhere, and very vocal about not wanting to be taken anywhere to be questioned, and free with kicks and punches to the interior of the police van, which could be heard for quite a way after the van had driven off.

Think I eventually settled down to sleep again around 5.00 a.m. after the police had then spent another bit of time looking at the gardens, and surrounding area, and securing the garage from which the car had been taken. Oh, and the tow truck had been to remove the damaged car from the front garden where it had come to rest.

I am now off for an afternoon nap.

[ 08. June 2014, 13:39: Message edited by: Japes ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
That certainly does sound like an eventful night! It must have been a shocker for those whose houses had been driven at.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
There was an item on the local news the other week about someone who actually drove into a lady's living-room - wooden or plastic siding and gyprock aren't really a match for a ton of metal being propelled by a blithering idiot. In that particular case, an uninsured blithering idiot. [Eek!]

Safely dispatched Hodie completi sunt by Gabrieli this morning - the first time we'd done it - and considering how short-handed we are at the moment, not a bad achievement.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Walking two dogs on the lead - I think I've got it sorted!

I had no car today so had to walk to the park with Zaba and Tatze on the lead, it's a ten minute walk. We usually go to the res or the lake or the woods, where leads are hardly needed.

We did it!! - zero pulling - hurrah!! Followed by a lovely off-lead hoolie round the park. Of course, no training was required on the way back, both exhaused!

Zaba has always been a bit of a puller, but I can't stand it as I have sore hands with arthritis.

So this is what we did -

I used one lead that splits in two, with the loop at the end on my left hand, one dog each side - me holding the bits that divide, so dogs were both on short lengths. Two treats in right hand. Lots of praise for Zaba for walking on a loose lead and treats for both when we've done 10 metres. Repeat.

It worked - woooohoooo! I really was dreading this morning's walk, but I feel elated now!

(note to self, show Zaba's Mum when she gets back from holiday - but don't show off too much!)


Two happy dogs
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Is it wrong that I want it to get a bit colder? For entirely selfish reasons - the Elf Lass was given some really lovely 3-6month old jumpers, and at 3 months it would have been February so perfect weather for them. However, because she is so dinky she is only now the size for them (she was 6 months old a couple of weeks ago), and the sun is shining! Oh well, we're mainly staying in today so I have put her in one anyway (and lovely she looks too).

Beautiful dogs Boogie - they look so pleased with themselves! (not surprised after all those treats. Well done Zaba!)
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
Is it wrong that I want it to get a bit colder?

Not at all. Yesterday was a 3 t-shirt day and I've had to put on deo twice already today, it's so hot. This is supposed to be a temperate climate. I regard anything about 20 degrees in the daytime as being too hot for doing anything reasonable.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
When I got up this morning, the Weather Channel said it was 5°C - is that cool enough for you?

Having said that, socks have not been applied. [Big Grin]

Those are two lovely dogs, Boogie - are they sisters?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:

Those are two lovely dogs, Boogie - are they sisters?

Thank you piglet.

No, they are the same age, but from different litters, and Zaba is a boy [Smile]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I went to Florence this weekend.

For the major event of the trip, please kindly to be clicking --> [Yipee] <-- here

[ 10. June 2014, 08:52: Message edited by: la vie en rouge ]
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Oooh! Rouge, very pretty [Smile] Congratulations
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Very pretty indeed - congratulations [Big Grin]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Lovely ring - congratulations!
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Lovely, lovely!
May I ask if the Fiancé-en-Rouge is French or English?
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
Congratulations!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yes, very nice ice!

[is that showing my age or what?]

* * * *

So there I was this morning happily turning the jeep round to park it so that I could go and meet a friend and some guy in a posh car drives up as I am halfway across the road so I stop to let him pass - he stops, winds down his window and says "Do you need any help?"

Very nice of him and all that but I bit my tongue and declined to say the first words that came into my head which were "Well you could get out of the beep-beep-beep road!"

I don't live in inner city Liverpool any more but sometimes the memories come flooding back!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
May I ask if the Fiancé-en-Rouge is French or English?

Fiancé en rouge is French. Really, really French.

He is from the profound South-West, land of old men in flat caps drinking pastis, schismatic popes, and cruelty to ducks. There will be foie gras at the wedding. My mother will look mildly appalled and refuse to eat it but that’s her lookout [Razz] .

(We will be getting married in the South-West, because (a) it’s very pretty and the gastronomy is flippin’ awesome down there, and (b) organising one's nuptials in Paris is absolutely eye-wateringly expensive. You get a whole load more wedding for your money in foie gras land.)

And because I feel like bragging: if anyone wants a ring the same, they can’t have one. Fiancé en rouge worked with a jeweller to have it made to order and there isn’t another one like it in the world [Axe murder] .
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Congratulations, La Vie en Rouge!!

I love your ring - nice to have something unique and specially designed for you and only you.
 
Posted by Persephone Hazard (# 4648) on :
 
I am horrified by our present weather conditions. How can anyone expect me to work like this?!? It was thirty degrees here in London yesterday afternoon. I nearly died. Died, I tell you.

Also, gorgeous ring.

[ 10. June 2014, 15:55: Message edited by: Persephone Hazard ]
 
Posted by mrs whibley (# 4798) on :
 
I'm sorry to say, piglet, because I know you're not keen, but it is even warm in Orkney at the moment! Of course, there are regular showers to cool one off, so I suppose that's OK. [Biased]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
"Warm" in Orkney is rather different from "warm" in the south of England (or "bleedin' hot" as it's otherwise known). Hope you're having a great holiday! PH, you have my sympathy: 30° is just silly. [Eek!]

Huge congratulations, La Vie and Fiancé en Rouge, and what a lovely ring. I'm getting hunger pangs just thinking about the food you're going to have at your wedding feast. [Smile]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Wedding. South of France. With food. And wine of the region.

Shippies, the fleet of chartered charabancs will leave from the Victoria Embankment.

(It's all right, La Vie en Rouge, we'll bring our own cutlery).
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Congratulations La Vie en Rouge. A lovely ring and what sounds like a wonderful place to get married.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Wedding. South of France. With food. And wine of the region.

Shippies, the fleet of chartered charabancs will leave from the Victoria Embankment.

[Smile]

Congratulations, la Vie.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Congratulations la Vie!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
(We will be getting married in the South-West, because (a) it’s very pretty and the gastronomy is flippin’ awesome down there, and (b) organising one's nuptials in Paris is absolutely eye-wateringly expensive. You get a whole load more wedding for your money in foie gras land.)

Ooo! Congratulations and please post a menu as well as pictures when the time comes!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Persephone Hazard:
I am horrified by our present weather conditions. How can anyone expect me to work like this?!? It was thirty degrees here in London yesterday afternoon. I nearly died. Died, I tell you.


It was stuffy and oppressive in a deeply boring, post-lunch meeting today. Then a thunderstorm broke and everyone was awake! Thank God for the British weather.
quote:

Also, gorgeous ring.

No expert on rings but congratulations. Enjoy planning and the wedding, but do remember the Two Laws of Weddings;

1) Something apparently important will go wrong
2) It won't actually matter

[ 10. June 2014, 18:28: Message edited by: Sioni Sais ]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Oooh, ship meet in the south of France!!!! (Where is the tongue in cheek smiley when you need it?)

But we definitely wants pictures and a menu. Oh yes.....
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Congratulations, la vie en rouge!

[Yipee]
 
Posted by Rev per Minute (# 69) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Wedding. South of France. With food. And wine of the region.

Shippies, the fleet of chartered charabancs will leave from the Victoria Embankment.

(It's all right, La Vie en Rouge, we'll bring our own cutlery).

Félicitations à vous deux - Congratulations! The South-West is also a rugby heartland, so perhaps a tour is in order.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Congratulations, La Vie en Rouge!

Further unsolicited advice on weddings: there are only 2 things you must be sure of.

1. Marrying the right person (sounds like you have that covered)
2. Saying the vows

Everything else is window dressing, though I must say your window dressing sounds exceptionally nice. Hope everything goes well.

[ 10. June 2014, 21:36: Message edited by: Jane R ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Congratulations la vie en rouge - and what a pretty ring he has designed for you.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Something apparently important will go wrong ...

In our case, the absence for the ceremony of D's sister, who was supposed to do the "best man" role, but was fog-bound in Aberdeen and had to come up to Orkney by the long (12-hour) ferry; she made it for the second half of the reception. Her husband, who had been able to take more time off work, had already come up by train and stood in for her, but she had his hired kilt in her suitcase, so my father-in-law (who was about the right size) lent him an old suit he'd brought with him.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
Congratulations, La Vie en Rouge!!

I love your ring - nice to have something unique and specially designed for you and only you.

When SiL went down on one knee and asked The Intrepid Miss S (as she then was) to marry him, he gave her a ring he'd had made in the style he thought she'd like, but using cubic zirconia instead of real ice along with the amethyst. Once he'd established that she loved the ring, they had it made up with the Real Deal - luckily he's related by marriage to a diamond dealer *envy*

I, on the other hand [Roll Eyes] have just broken the (new) setting on the replacement stone in my replacement engagement ring - still, it has been nearly forty years!

Many many congratulations LVER - that's a very lovely ring and I'm sure you'll have a wonderful day! [Yipee]

Mrs. S, reminiscent
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Congratulations to you both, la vie-en-rouge. Your ring is beautiful.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Sioni:
quote:
1) Something apparently important will go wrong...
Oh well, if we're swapping wedding disaster stories...

Two weeks before the wedding we tried to get in touch with the hotel we'd booked into for the wedding night. No response. My mother (who was acting as wedding organiser) took over the task of trying to get in touch with them, and after repeated phone calls discovered that the people who owned the hotel had absconded with all the ready cash (including our deposit, which we never saw again). I think it was one of the bailiffs who answered the phone.

So THEN we had the job of trying to find a hotel room for a single night with two weeks' notice. In the middle of the Lake District. On a Bank Holiday weekend. We ended up in the smallest double room of a very scruffy B&B, though I must say they did a good breakfast.

Oddly enough the part of the honeymoon plan that I didn't think would work (picking up the hire car on a Sunday at a prearranged car park with a key that had been posted to us) went off without a hitch.

That's not the only thing that went wrong, but I won't bore you with all the other pre-wedding disasters...! It did give us plenty of material for the speech at the reception.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I was married from my home. After bridal party and family left for reception, the photographer suddenly realised all doors were shut and there was no access for him to get his gear from inside. A neighbour climbed onto carport roof and broke in through the bathroom window.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A Public Service Announcement:

When expecting an SMS from the bank telling you that an expected transfer from abroad has taken place and that you are now solvent for the next few weeks it really helps if the phone is switched on! Messages, however welcome, can't get through when the phone is switched off.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Nor when the brain is off.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
So. Have broken a bone in my ankle and am in a plaster-of-paris cast with an appointment at the fracture clinic next week. Not being able to get the balance of elbow crutches I have been issued with a zimmer frame. (Mind you, I have been walking around for the past 10 days since I fell over...). So I did not copy Harrison Ford - he copied me.

I am trying to find cover for services, a funeral and other "stuff" because I cannot drive my manual shift car.

At least the weather is kind...and I have plenty of books to read.

How is everyone else?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Ouch, I hope you make a quick recovery.
I'm finally off to Kentwell and feel surprisingly relaxed about it, though I am sure I'll feel less so when we open to the public tomorrow. I'm looking forward to getting away from life, without any goals to meet other than making butter and cheese and the odd bit of sewing, and chatting to people. I hope I get the hang of the language quickly!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Gadzooks and forsooth, Heavenly Anarchist, thou wilt do just fine! [Big Grin]

St. E - that sounds v. nasty and I'm going to resist all temptation to suggest you put more tonic in your GIN.

Take care of yourself, and have as speedy a recovery as possible. [Votive]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I suspect if I start saying Gadzooks people will laugh at me [Big Grin]
At home we keep rehearsing the sketch in Blackadder where he says to the old crone 'Yes it is' not 'That it be'. You don't have to talk in that stupid voice to me. I'm not a tourist.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
What a beautiful afternoon. Hot and sunny, and just right for having a good National Trust lunch at a table outside in the sun, followed by a wander round the grounds.

The resident cat came up and adopted me, much to the amusement of some of the other visitors, and we sat peacefully on the lawn together enjoying the summer afternoon. I don't know how it coped in its little furry coat in the blazing sunlight, but cats being what they are, if it hadn't liked it, it would have made straight for the shade.

Beautiful the way flowers all seem to glow and come to life in the sunlight; and I'd never really stopped to notice it before, but of course, different varieties of rose smell quite different, and with different intensities. Some are delicate and faint, others have a rich, heady perfume that you can smell from a distance and which seems just right for a hot summer's day. The drone of bees drifting in and out of the scented roses and the purple flowers on the borders, and a lovely view of the countryside, basking in the heat and light, stretching away into the distance: these are some of the things that summer days are made of.

quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Good Housekeeping Cookery Book 1944. Minced cold meat, unspecified.

During the war you'd take what you could get.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
...these are the things that summer days are made of ...

Or this. Really big iceberg just off the Narrows (the entrance to the fjord that is St. John's harbour).

We tried to take a drive up Signal Hill early this evening to get a better view, but unfortunately so did half the rest of the population, so we gave up and tried again later (about 11 p.m.). We'd imagined that as it was a brilliantly moonlit night the iceberg would glow white, but it didn't - the angle can't have been quite right (and it was bloody cold up there - icebergs that size can lower the temperature appreciably).

We do, however, have quite a good view of it from the spare bedroom window chez Piglet. [Cool]

eta: As D. says, you could cool a lot of GIN with that. Talking of which, tomorrow (Saturday) is apparently World GIN day.

Better go and get some supplies in ... [Big Grin]

[ 14. June 2014, 03:38: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Ariel, in Chandigarh in northern India there is a rose garden that covers several acres of a public park and when downwind of it the smell is amazing! There is nothing else worth seeing there but the park is great.

Still struggling on with the laptop here, the new PC arrived but can't be used until one more bit of softwary updating stuff is added tomorrow. It will be a huge relief! At the moment I am refusing to think how much this has all cost - sometimes burying one's head in the sand works.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
softwary updating stuff ...

Will you desist from using such technical language WW?!
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:

eta: As D. says, you could cool a lot of GIN with that. Talking of which, tomorrow (Saturday) is apparently World GIN day.

Better go and get some supplies in ... [Big Grin]

It's probably too late to advertise this, but a certain UK supermarket with an orange theme was selling Bombay Sapphire at £18/litre recently.

I may have purchased one or two (or three ...)

St. E, I am so sorry [Frown] - I wrench my ankle regularly, and it takes longer to recover every time, but I've not managed to break it (yet!)

Mrs S, well supplied for World GIN Day
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Ariel, in Chandigarh in northern India there is a rose garden that covers several acres of a public park and when downwind of it the smell is amazing! There is nothing else worth seeing there but the park is great.

Many years ago my mother and I went to the Chelsea Flower Show and I remember a tent with a display of roses. The scent was so strong that it nearly knocked you off your feet - delightful but in a confined space just a touch too much. But if I ever do have a chance to grow roses, I'd like one of those with a deep rich scent that you can smell from a distance. Scent is one thing that's lacking in many gardens; people tend to go for colour and form but a good garden ought to be aromatic (in a good way) as well.

Lavender is one of my other favourites - love walking past a hedge of it and catching the perfume of it in passing.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
I love scented plants and have as many as I can in my garden - sadly you really need warmth to get most benefit from them but the sarcoccas and the viburnum bodnantense 'Dawn' are pretty reliable.

When we re-visited Boughton Monchelsea church (for a service, I should add, and to see their utterly amazing Millennium window) there was a rose outside the back door with the most amazing perfume - not a simple 'rose' scent but something far more mysterious and possibly oriental. Of course the bush was too old to have a label, so I've been reduced to visiting rose gardens and sniffing, hoping to capture that fragrance again [Angel]

Mrs. S, hope (and weeds, sadly) springing eternal
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yes, there was a lavender plant that I bought from a National Trust outlet once which had exactly the kind of scent I was looking for (lavender is another one that can vary a lot). Sadly it died and I'd lost the label that come with the pot, so maybe one day I'll stumble on it again by accident...

Nice morning out in Stratford on Avon but why is it that the sun doesn't come out until you give up and go home?
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Perfumes are so evocative. In the front garden of the house where I grew up there was an old fashioned orange-blossom bush and whenever I smell that smell I am back at the corner of the drive at home. [Axe murder]

A hot sunny day here and everyone's breaking out in summer clothes. Piglet, that iceburg is amazing!
[Eek!]

Nen - about to start cooking stir fry for tea.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I've had a moderately busy day (for a Saturday). I made chicken and tomato pasta for lunch (we'd bought a new casserole pot that I wanted to try out), and then as it was an absolutely beautiful day (20°C but nicely moderated by a wee breeze and the aforementioned iceberg) I took a walk along the main street, giving posters for D's "Last Night of the Proms" concert, which is next Friday, to any shops that would take them - lots did, and those that couldn't because it wasn't their policy were very apologetic about it.

We came back and D. went to get something appropriate with which to toast World GIN Day.

Cheers! [Smile]
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
There's this place on the way to Norwich (I think) that sells lots of different varieties of lavender. After I move house, I want to go and get a bunch to plant. Lavender is one of my favourites!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We have successfully grown cuttings from a few varieties of jasmine and now have some sizeable [waist high] bushes. Recently Himself has taken to putting little steel bowls full of the flowers in my bedroom or here in the office.

I remember back in the early 80s my partner and I had an indoor jasmine [this was in Birkenhead so a tad cool for growing them outside] and it flowered at the same time as our hyacinths - the house smelt amazing!

eta: I think it sad that hibiscus has no real scent - we have a hedgerow of the standard red and lots of bushes of different colours. If that all smelt we would live in a permanent state of olfactory intoxication.

[ 15. June 2014, 04:55: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Trying to do this somewhere relatively unobtrusive but I wonder if someone would organise the thanks offerings for hosts, admins and other grandees this year. I love doing it, but once I start back at thesis I can give up any idea of finishing that. I really did not finish last year and feel it is unfair to try and do it in similar circumstances this.

Jengie

[ 15. June 2014, 08:39: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Trying to do this somewhere relatively unobtrusive but I wonder if someone would organise the thanks offerings for hosts, admins and other grandees this year. I love doing it, but once I start back at thesis I can give up any idea of finishing that. I really did not finish last year and feel it is unfair to try and do it in similar circumstances this.

Jengie

If you give me some help I can probably do this. I'll PM you.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
eta: I think it sad that hibiscus has no real scent - we have a hedgerow of the standard red and lots of bushes of different colours. If that all smelt we would live in a permanent state of olfactory intoxication.

Yes, I often used to think that - all that lovely colour and design but no scent. The frangipani sort of made up for it, though, and is still one of my favourite flowers.

Don't know what's happened to the "heatwave" - cold, grey, dismal day today. Set off this morning to visit a National Trust place I hadn't been to before and got stuck in a diversion/massive traffic jam just outside Stratford on Avon. I took what I thought was a detour to get out of it then got completely lost. Eventually figured out I was even further away than before so gave up and went home via the scenic route instead. It'll be something to try again on a better day.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
There is only one word I have for scented plants -

***attishhhoooo!!***
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Don't know what's happened to the "heatwave" - cold, grey, dismal day today.

Overcast I grant you, but cold??? [Eek!] It's been loose cotton clothes and cold drinks and have-I-really-got-to-mow-the-lawns-in-this-heat here today.

Boogie - antihistamines are your friends. [Smile]

Nen - is it warm in here?
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'll join in the chorus for loving lavender; my m-i-l grows it in her garden, and I love rubbing the flowers between my fingers and getting that wonderful scent.

It was a beautiful, sunny Trinity Sunday here; we were even able to process in through the great West doors*, then up the main aisle singing St. Patrick's Breastplate (or "Paddy's Bra" as it's called in the Church of Ireland).

* To get there you have to walk through the car-park, which is only really feasible in fine weather, when you're all in full fig.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
We did the Breastplate as the processional hymn, with a long procession. It's one of my top 5 hymns and features well on others' lists also.

But not a sunny Sunday at all here - rain blowing in a cold wind, and the temperature felt around 12 or 13. Good hot chocolate and soup weather.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
Overcast I grant you, but cold??? [Eek!] It's been loose cotton clothes and cold drinks and have-I-really-got-to-mow-the-lawns-in-this-heat here today.

Cold enough to have a pullover on and the bar fire on in the evening. It depends where you are, of course. It was still warmer here than in the locality where I work, but some parts of this area always seem to be distinctly colder than other parts.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Definitely chilly here in East Anglia ...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:


Boogie - antihistamines are your friends. [Smile]


and constant companions!

I do quite well with the hayfever, I don't let it keep me in.

But some evenings are spent lying down with cotton wool pads over my eyes. Nose, throat and chest are kept in line with nose spays, antihistamines and inhalers but all the available eye drops seem to make them even worse! So I rinse them with artificial tears and lie down with wet cotton wool pads on them, that calms them down.

At least it keeps me off the Ship for a while - hehe!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
... But not a sunny Sunday at all here - rain blowing in a cold wind, and the temperature felt around 12 or 13 ...

I bragged too soon. It's p*ssing with rain and 7° here today.

[Waterworks]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I had a lovely visit yesterday from a friend I haven't seen for ages - a moderately recent father. We chatted for a while then he fell asleep and slept for over an hour. I woke him in time to catch his bus home. I just hope the rest did him some good, he was VERY tired, poor lad.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I understand that recent fatherhood is not a condition conducive to regular, full-nights' sleep, so I think you probably did the kindest thing.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I am just about to send him an sms to tell him that the photos of him sleeping make him look very cute.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Well that's that sorted. I've just packed off my aunt, uncle and cousin, visiting from far-off tropical climes. We went to the Rail Museum in York and the Royal Armouries and a good time was had by all.

Like speaking to anyone from a different country it's the small things that strike you first. I found my self explaining celeriac, jacket potatoes, train tickets and double decker buses. Very exotic stuff [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Football [Snore]

Worse than that, Mr Boogs is so worked up about it that the dog is all on edge [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Football [Snore]

[Roll Eyes]

I fed the family, set them up with bowls of nibblies and a fridge full of drinks, and went out for the evening. [Yipee]

Work tomorrow though. I love my job but somehow tonight I feel [Disappointed] about it.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I've set our TV so that it doesn't receive anything football related - or rather I just skip those channels. There seems rather a lot of it about at the moment, even my morning paper has several pages every day - even more than the cricket which is just not on!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Despite the CBC (the main national broadcaster) showing wall-to-wall footie (I'm not sure why - it's not as if Canada's in it), I've managed so far not to see a ball kicked in anger. Being married to an Englishman, I'd like to see England do well (oh dear [Frown] ), but I can't be bothered to watch the matches.

Never mind, Windlebum'll be starting soon ... [Smile]

I've been quite a busy little piglet this evening: I made lamb stock with some bones I had in the freezer, and turned it into Scots broth for tomorrow's lunch, and then made a batch of chicken liver pâté.

We've got our Patronal Festival this weekend: D's "Last Night of the Proms" concert on Friday and the Cathedral barbecue and auction on Saturday, so I'm taking a bowl of the pâté as a pre-barbie nibble. I'm going to put a couple of French sticks in the silent auction, but I'll bake them on Saturday afternoon so that they're as fresh as possible.

domesticated piglet
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I guessed England had not done well from the state of the drunken supporters on the tube home. We went to the Peter Maxwell Davies 80th birthday concert broadcast live on Radio 3 last night. He's incredibly spry and alert for an octogenarian - sitting in the audience and walking out to the microphone for the introduction to the pieces completely unaided. He was about to fly to Orkney for a late night concert with the BBC Singers at the Festival tonight and then on to Rome to be 80 there (his phrasing).
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Today's trains seemed full of people dressed for a wedding, including some who looked like bridesmaids. Lots of fascinators, smart summer dresses and hats, men in formal dress, some with top hats. Then the penny dropped - they were all on their way to Royal Ascot. A good day for it, too.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
... We went to the Peter Maxwell Davies 80th birthday concert ...

Max being 80 makes me feel quite old; it seems no time at all since he came to Orkney as a (slightly) Angry Young Man and very avant-garde. Having grown up in Orkney, my musical education was partly shaped by his music; I have fond memories of him teaching me how to produce vibrato on a glockenspiel by flapping your hand over it, and I was the original "Widow Grumble" in his children's opera Cinderella, which was written for my old school.

I very rarely feel homesick, but if I'm going to, it would be at this time of year, as we haven't been able to be there for the St. Magnus Festival since we left in 1988.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
We have started some serious wedding planning. Some of it is fun (looking up venues) and some of it isn’t (negotiating with our parents about the family members we don’t want to invite [Help] ). The forecasted date is in April because the South West of France is waaaaaaaay too hot for getting married in the Summer and also it’s cheaper.

On the way home I going by the Post Office to post my dress pattern to my mother. It’s a 1957 Paris Vogue design. I hate those bustier dresses that are bloody everywhere at the minute (seriously, who has the arms for them?) and also in the 50s it was in fashion to have one of those waist thingies.

I think I am in love with this baby. Also I am totally getting married in red shoes.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Oooh, very stylish! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Absolutely! You will look so elegant! We must have photos as well as the menu too.
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
La Vie en Rouge - Wedding planning is fun. Your idea for a dress sounds great. Red shoes, I like red shoes.

Today has been much better than yesterday. Yesterday my husband's friend had a nasty accident while they were on a biking holiday (he's going to be OK, thank God), my son got turned down for a job somewhere he thought would at least give him an interview and I had a late night at work. Today I had a nice time at my creatve writing class, some wool I thought was lost in the post turned up and my son has an interview somewhere else next week.

This weekend will be odd. Tomorrow I'm off to the closing event of a school I used to be involved with, on Sunday I'm going to the opening event of a new church in our neighbourhood.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Ooh-la-la to the hat!

When some friends got married, second time round for both of them, Jill saw these amazing BRIGHT red shoes before she saw anything else - she never wears heels but these were big stilettos - she bought them and hoiked them round everywhere looking for the dress and accessories to go with them. She also had to learn to walk in them - she'll probably never wear them again but keeps them in a box in her wardrobe.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... negotiating with our parents about the family members we don’t want to invite ...

Bizarrely, with us it was rather the opposite: there were a couple of people who we felt should be invited but my dad sort of didn't. In the end we invited them but (as we'd predicted) they didn't come, so it worked out all right. Good luck!

D's concert went off nicely, to a small but appreciative audience (the publicity machine seems to be a bit broken).

It doesn't look as if we're going to get great weather for the barbecue, but as the eating is all done indoors (and they've got an awning for if the weather's truly awful) it shouldn't make too much difference.

Better get off to bed now - quite tired and have Things To Do tomorrow.

[Snore]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
LVER - Miss S wore a traditional long white dress (yes, it was strapless, but she had a lace shrug over it) but her shoes were Cadbury's Dairy Milk purple. You could only see them if she picked up her skirts, but she said she'd only dye them afterwards so why not have them purple for The Day? [Cool]

And I, very bravely, wore fuchsia pink suede shoes with (for me) very high heels. This meant breaking them in by wearing them to do the ironing, say, and other clean jobs about the place [Help]

They were a wow! [Axe murder] as I'm sure your red ones will be.

Mrs. S, reminiscing again
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
p.s. to my earlier post - I've seen the shoes and they were FAB!!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
LVER - great style!! And red shoes would be just gorgeous!

I wore a red dress for my wedding - but it was in a Register Office and I felt bolshie!

Shoes were beige, I think. Loooong time ago now!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
la vie en rouge - that looks a stunning, stylish dress; really exciting to be planning your wedding.

The violinist at the concert this week was all in black - strapless top and trousers - with very high black stiletto shoes, with red soles. It looked amazing as she walked on and off stage, but didn't show when she stood and performed.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
Miss S wore a traditional long white dress (yes, it was strapless, but she had a lace shrug over it) but her shoes were Cadbury's Dairy Milk purple. You could only see them if she picked up her skirts, but she said she'd only dye them afterwards so why not have them purple for The Day? [Cool]

And I, very bravely, wore fuchsia pink suede shoes with (for me) very high heels. This meant breaking them in by wearing them to do the ironing, say, and other clean jobs about the place [Help]

Similarly, Nenlet1 had a long ivory dress which was strapless. I did at one point during the discussion of The Dress, as tactfully as I could, say how lovely I thought it had been to see Kate Middleton in sleeves on her wedding day, and how I thought that was appropriate and becoming for a young bride, but I was politely ignored and didn't feel it was worth making an issue of.

Nenlet1 wore high heeled shoes in fuchsia pink which went unnoticed until partway through the service when she sat down and crossed her legs - at which point half the congregation did a silent "Wow, look at those!" .

I also had heels which were high for me and practised walking round the house and up and down the stairs beforehand (I never iron [Biased] ). They were beige, but my jacket was fuchsia pink.

In other news, I had a haircut today and in the interests of coolness and easy care told the hairdresser to go short. She did. [Eek!]

Nen - apparently living a parallel life with the Intrepid Family.

[ 21. June 2014, 15:02: Message edited by: Nenya ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Lovely day out at Baddesley Clinton (Tudor moated house in south Warwickshire), one of the nicest and most comfortable National Trust places I've visited. In fact, I'd use the word "magical" - full of charm, beauty and comfort, and little surprises. Will be going back.

Altogether less impressed with Packwood House which is a few minutes away; the gardens are beautiful and the rich scent of roses wafts out of the archway at you on arrival, but the rooms of the house are quite dark, and hung with faded, well-past-their-best tapestries which personally I'd have had no hesitation in throwing out. Not somewhere I'd want to revisit.

Still, a beautiful day for exploring the countryside, walled gardens, orchards, Tudor houses, etc etc.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
Miss S wore a traditional long white dress (yes, it was strapless, but she had a lace shrug over it) but her shoes were Cadbury's Dairy Milk purple. You could only see them if she picked up her skirts, but she said she'd only dye them afterwards so why not have them purple for The Day? [Cool]

And I, very bravely, wore fuchsia pink suede shoes with (for me) very high heels. This meant breaking them in by wearing them to do the ironing, say, and other clean jobs about the place [Help]

Similarly, Nenlet1 had a long ivory dress which was strapless. I did at one point during the discussion of The Dress, as tactfully as I could, say how lovely I thought it had been to see Kate Middleton in sleeves on her wedding day, and how I thought that was appropriate and becoming for a young bride, but I was politely ignored and didn't feel it was worth making an issue of.

Nenlet1 wore high heeled shoes in fuchsia pink which went unnoticed until partway through the service when she sat down and crossed her legs - at which point half the congregation did a silent "Wow, look at those!" .

I also had heels which were high for me and practised walking round the house and up and down the stairs beforehand (I never iron [Biased] ). They were beige, but my jacket was fuchsia pink.

In other news, I had a haircut today and in the interests of coolness and easy care told the hairdresser to go short. She did. [Eek!]

Nen - apparently living a parallel life with the Intrepid Family.

[Killing me]

How bizarre is that!

Mrs. S, soul sister to Nen [Smile]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Definitely in favour of non-standard wedding wear. So many 'traditional' things have only come about recently. I keep trying to persuade my friends to get married in a sari to escape multiple fittings, but so far no one has bitten.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
DIL wore her shoes around the house for days to stretch them a bit. They were vey high. She's 6' tall but my son is 6'5" and she equalled him.

She wore black and white cheongsam with an eye opening split up side. Bridesmaid wore white and black cheongsam. Bouquet was made by her from fancy buttons from a button specialist shop here. Both names were in bouquet, made from letter buttons.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The trouble with the traditional weddings that happen here, with the bride wearing sarees - is that it is sarees in the plural. Travel to the temple, or wherever, in one saree, change into another saree for the ceremony itself, change again into another saree for the reception and often change again before heading off to the grooms place for a snackette and the remainder of the day, before coming back home as the first night is traditionally spent at the bride's home.

But a saree is undoubtedly the most elegant of things to wear and in UK a traditional Kerala saree in white and gold would look fab. Do a web search for images of Kerala Sarees to see what I mean.
 
Posted by ExclamationMark (# 14715) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
a saree is undoubtedly the most elegant of things to wear and in UK a traditional Kerala saree in white and gold would look fab. Do a web search for images of Kerala Sarees to see what I mean.

Mrs M has worn a Saree and looks stunning - she was shown how to put it on by a lady in Kerala. More often she wears a Shalwar Kameez esp. if it's hot - again it looks special and suits her (a freckle faced, light skinned English woman).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and with a saree one size fits all so no wailing and gnashing of teeth at variations in avoirdupois.

About a year ago, possibly more, I bought some new curtain rail for the big window in my bedroom and have been meaning to fit ever since. Well, I have just done it and it may have taken all of 15 minutes!

[codefix - Piglet]

[ 23. June 2014, 02:25: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
Definitely in favour of non-standard wedding wear. So many 'traditional' things have only come about recently. I keep trying to persuade my friends to get married in a sari to escape multiple fittings, but so far no one has bitten.

Surely the multiple fittings are all part of the fun? (we thought so, anyway [Yipee] )

What irritated me were the ads for Mother of the Bride outfits, modelled by girls younger than my daughter! [Mad] and featuring unreasonable amounts of black, or mushroom [Projectile] Seriously, who wants to look like the Black Widow at her daughter's wedding?

Mrs. S, still snarling
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
It's sad, but a sign of the times when the most expensive option is the one marked as cultural.

As if the ordinary people of 100 yeas ago could have afforded a fairy tale wedding dress, or even a honeymoon. But the working classes are being pressured into the style of wedding that the middle classes had back then and the middle classes into the style of the aristocracy.

And there are there are two getting married, both of whom are equally important. Come the revolution the publishers of Bride magazines will be the first against the wall.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Golden rule for weddings:

You invite everyone you want - you should be surrounded by friends, not enemies.

And friends will be happy with a cup of tea afterwards - a bun would be a bonus.

Anything more than that is just frills: some quite nice, but frills nonetheless.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Golden rule for weddings:

You invite everyone you want - you should be surrounded by friends, not enemies.

And friends will be happy with a cup of tea afterwards - a bun would be a bonus.

Anything more than that is just frills: some quite nice, but frills nonetheless.

Well said!

My son gets married on the 20th of June 2015 and I'm glad to say they are keeping it low key. Church wedding, 40 guests and a small venue.

(Soooo - 12 months for me to lose a stone, easy peasy! [Paranoid] )
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I agree, simplicity is the key.

* * * *

In other news the nights will be drawing in...
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Aggh nights drawing in. Always makes me feel a bit sad as I like long light evening and never feel I make the most of them.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
In other news the nights will be drawing in...

Sir Woderwick the Optimistic strikes again ... [Big Grin]

The barbecue and auction went really well: it was well-attended, and although it had rained a bit during the day, the sun came out and it really couldn't have been better. D. made an excellent auctioneer - I think his dad would have been proud - and I acted as a porter.

Patronal Festival services dispatched fairly hitchlessly, especially Evensong featuring (obviously) Gibbons' This is the record of John, with solo piglet.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Shaddup, Wodders and Gussie - and don't encourage them, piglet. The nights don't "draw in" till after the equinox. So there.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
What irritated me were the ads for Mother of the Bride outfits, modelled by girls younger than my daughter! [Mad] and featuring unreasonable amounts of black, or mushroom [Projectile] Seriously, who wants to look like the Black Widow at her daughter's wedding?

Mrs. S, still snarling

Bridezilla alert: women who turn up in black to my wedding will be refused admittance [Snigger] (more seriously, there will be a dress code note in the invite saying no black on women please thank you kindly). I don’t care if it’s fashionable. Where were you people dragged up? YOU DON’T TURN UP TO A WEDDING DRESSED FOR A FUNERAL!! (rant over)

Other exciting news: my cello teacher might be turning up to play the incidental music [Yipee] (I didn’t ask – he offered, but I don’t think he realises just how far away from Paris it’s going to be). He is a national conservatoire teacher and international soloist. If he can make it, I am going to ask him to play Elgar (Salut d’Amour) on account of my being English. Failing that I have another friend who can play it on the violin but… international soloist, baby. He plays the cello like a flippin’ *angel*.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by QLib:
... don't encourage them, piglet. The nights don't "draw in" till after the equinox. So there.

That wasn't meant to be encouragement - it was meant to be ridicule. [Snigger]

I quite agree with you about the equinox. Growing up as far from the equator as I did (59°N), I found that the short winter days were more than compensated for by the long summer ones (and TBH winter isn't quite the same without the short days).

[ 23. June 2014, 14:05: Message edited by: piglet ]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
[QUOTE]Bridezilla alert: women who turn up in black to my wedding will be refused admittance [Snigger] (more seriously, there will be a dress code note in the invite saying no black on women please thank you kindly). I don’t care if it’s fashionable. Where were you people dragged up? YOU DON’T TURN UP TO A WEDDING DRESSED FOR A FUNERAL!! (rant over)

LVER, long ago a very dear friend had her mother-in-law-to-be turn up to the wedding wearing a dark grey suit, black shoes and stockings, and a black hat WITH A VEIL! She really did look like Keep Death Off the Roads!

My friend's charitable explanation was that her MiL was German and maybe they did things differently there [Killing me]

Mrs. S, who would have been much less generous
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I once attended a wedding where the groom's 14-year-old daughter wore black.

Moo
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
This is why teenaged daughters should be pressganged into being bridesmaids and wear a dress of the bride's choosing. [Two face]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
This is why teenaged daughters should be pressganged into being bridesmaids and wear a dress of the bride's choosing. [Two face]

In this particular situation, it was a success that she attended the wedding at all.

Her parents divorced by mutual agreement, and the new wife had nothing to do with the breakup.

Moo
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
This is why teenaged daughters should be pressganged into being bridesmaids and wear a dress of the bride's choosing. [Two face]

of the bride's choosing You think??? and it still wouldn't stop them dyeing their hair orange to go with the pink dress!

Miss S saved a small fortune (and various relationships with her adult friends) by going for two flower girls and leaving it at that - no arguments over colours/styles and no costs in terms of hair, nails, make-up [Yipee] LVER, what bridesmaids are you having?

Mrs. S, who was standing in as matron of honour [Overused]
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:


In other news the nights will be drawing in...

The mornings draw in first. Sunset still gets later for a wee while yet.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
This is why teenaged daughters should be pressganged into being bridesmaids and wear a dress of the bride's choosing. [Two face]

of the bride's choosing You think??? and it still wouldn't stop them dyeing their hair orange to go with the pink dress!

Miss S saved a small fortune (and various relationships with her adult friends) by going for two flower girls and leaving it at that - no arguments over colours/styles and no costs in terms of hair, nails, make-up [Yipee] LVER, what bridesmaids are you having?

Mrs. S, who was standing in as matron of honour [Overused]

Actually now you mention it, there is indeed a teenage daughter to be taken into account. I was joking before, but only partly [Snigger]

It’s fine actually. She and I get on pretty well, considering how she’s going through a major episode of being a teenager right now [Biased] . We told her that if she wants to be a bridesmaid (which she does because it makes her feel important) she needs to be wearing the same colour dress (gold) as the other bridesmaids, because that’s how these things work, and she just sort of went “oh, ok then, if you say so”. Anyway I think she quite likes the idea of having her frock specially made for her.

The chief bridesmaid/witness* is my best friend, who is a professional designer/pattern maker. She is going to make the dresses for herself, the Stroppy Teenager™ and the third bridesmaid/witness, who is my other best friend. There are also two small bridesmaids, my friends’ two little girls. The family is from Madagascar. They will be dressed in red and with their dark skin and black hair and black eyes they are going to look adorable.

*French wedding terminology: because of strict separation of church/state the only marriage that the French authorities recognise is the civil one carried out in your local town hall by the mayor. After that you can go and hold any kind of religious festivities you feel like, anywhere you feel like and with whomever you feel like, but they don’t have any legal value.

For the marriage at the town hall, each partner must have one or two witnesses, or the marriage isn’t valid. “Bridesmaids” are a thing here these days, but the idea is pretty much an Anglo-Saxon import. The really big deal is when you get to be bride’s/groom’s witness.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
I'm reminded of a friend's teenaged brother who announced that if he had to go to her wedding then he would track down and wear powder-blue morning dress.

Friend went berserk of course - weeping, wailing, gnashing teeth, full works. Younger sister, wise beyond her years, did two things: (1) Got his school tails cleaned pdq, and (2) Found and hired powder-blue set.

When brother appeared on day before the wedding in the offending outfit even he had to admit he looked a bit like Peter Rabbit so he worse the same as everyone else.

Of course, what everyone remembers about that wedding is that the bride's mother wore a dress that looked like camouflage netting - in over 40 years of playing for weddings I've never seen a nastier.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I couldn't persuade D. to wear morning dress for our wedding, even when I pointed out that he wore it for his sister's wedding the year before. As he said, "when my sister tells you to jump, you ask what height".

I'm not as bossy as that. [Angel]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I have been dragged, kicking and screaming, into doing more tuition in maths - I have a 11/12 year old [Year 7] lad who I took for an hour or so last night. He is really good and really keen but, like any boy that age, tends to rush things a bit and make silly mistakes - a bit like me, really.

I'm not sure what I can teach him apart from what exams are all about but I think it will be fun.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
In Palma, Majorca with five girl friends. Super hotel with great views. Lots of sightseeing and sunbathing!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Behave yourself, Boogie! [Biased]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Why?

I think she should concentrate on having fun - then go to confession afterwards, if the priest/minister/pastor has a spare few hours/days/weeks to listen to her.

Boogie, don't do the full public confession in front of the congregation, you might shock the old ladies - on second thoughts, they are unshockable but you might shock the youth group!
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Have a great holiday, Boogie! [Smile]

I'm going to have to make a lot of soups and casseroles - I had the bones of two chickens in the freezer and last night turned them into what appears to be gallons of stock - therapeutic soup-making will have to ensue this evening.

In other news, the Weather Channel says it's going to be 27°C on Tuesday, and feel like 30.

[Eek!] [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Make sure to wear a fleece, toque and gloves!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Don't forget to save some of the stock for risottos, particularly if it's on the light but well gelled side. Much better than any bought could be.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I really must try my hand at risotto some time; I do a cracker of a chicken paella, and D. does a magic chicken casserole, both from Save with Jamie by Jamie Oliver, but I've never tried a proper risotto.

I made veggie soup last night which we had for lunch today, to much appreciation from D. (and it was rather good, though I say it what shouldn't).

Lovely sunny day here - the Weather Channel said it was only 12° but I reckon it was a lot warmer than that.
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
I've never understood all the mystique about risotto. I mean, isn't it just a savoury rice pudding???? [Devil]

To be honest all that stirring has put me off in the past. I have done it and it was nice, but not worth spending that amount of time stirring on a regular basis.

I am sure I read somewhere the Blessed Delia (Delia Smith) advocating a cheat's way of just bunging it in the oven just like a rice pudding.

That sounds good.

[ 29. June 2014, 07:18: Message edited by: Thyme ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Provided you use arborio rice, I've found you can cut back on the stirring. Soften the onion and then add the rice and turn for a minute or two, then the glug of white wine/dry vermouth and stir until that is gone - but after that I find you can bung in the rest of the stock and leave it. Bar putting in other ingredients in order of their cooking times, of course.

I use a heavy wok-type pan on top of the stove.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Thyme:
I've never understood all the mystique about risotto. I mean, isn't it just a savoury rice pudding???? [Devil]

Pretty much. I used to make one years ago, with leftover chicken bits, peas, onions, white wine and stock, and some grated cheese on the top, but went off it after a while. Risotto makes the rice a bit too mushy for me; I'd rather have a good pilau instead.

[ 29. June 2014, 07:58: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I fry mine initially and then put it in the oven.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
If doing it on the stove top then I think a heavy pan is part of the answer Le Creuset would be ideal - that and a fairly low heat.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Le creuset is always ideal... [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I know some people like them, but Le Creuset pans are too heavy for me. I'll stick with my trusty lightweight frying pan, in which I've cooked many a good meal.

I used to do a Turkish risotto which involved, amongst other things, chicken livers, tomato puree and a quantity of dill. It takes a bit of care to get it exactly right, but it's quite nice (if rich), when you do.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Thyme:
I am sure I read somewhere the Blessed Delia (Delia Smith) advocating a cheat's way of just bunging it in the oven just like a rice pudding.

That sounds good.

She did, and it is - a risotto carbonara, and it works a treat. I put mushrooms in as well, can't think why she didn't [Roll Eyes]

PM me if you want the recipe [Smile]

Mrs. S, all for an easy life [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
She also does a mushroom one, with Marsala in it. Delicious!
 
Posted by Gussie (# 12271) on :
 
Risotto is my 'signature' dish. I'm rather partial to one with butternut squash, kale and a lot of cream.
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
quote:
Originally posted by Thyme:
I am sure I read somewhere the Blessed Delia (Delia Smith) advocating a cheat's way of just bunging it in the oven just like a rice pudding.

That sounds good.

She did, and it is - a risotto carbonara, and it works a treat. I put mushrooms in as well, can't think why she didn't [Roll Eyes]

PM me if you want the recipe [Smile]

Mrs. S, all for an easy life [Big Grin]

Thank you! PM on its way
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
IME the best rice variety for risotto is Maratelli, but since its virtually impossible to find in the UK I try to use Carnaroli or Vialone Nano.

Yes, Arborio is widely available and described as risotto rice but the grains tend to lose shape and definition in the cooking - and its also pretty tasteless.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
You just can't make risotto in the oven. You can make sweet or savoury rice puddings that way and if you want to beat a couple of eggs into it, it would be a rice custard. If you made it a bit differently, it could be a gratin - a friend flashed a gratin recipe with some suggested variations around recently. But not a risotto.

I'd go along with Firenze about putting all the stock in at once, as long as it's already boiling when you put it in, and you stir it around very well.

Another thing - risotto has to be made freshly. You can't half make it and leave it to finish off when guests arrive. And you can't have leftover risotto either. You can take any leftovers (there won't be leftovers if you've made it properly) and turn them into something else, but it won't be risotto
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Which reminds me, is turkey the single most disappointing meat in existence?

We had a thigh joint for dinner: I stuffed it with onion, lemon and herb, wrapped it in smoky bacon, drenched it in wine and clementine edged gravy - and it was just OK. Nothing to write home about.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I quite enjoy soup made with turkey thigh bones but have often found it fairly bland as a meal in itself.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Turkey is even more boring than chicken, which is often just a vehicle for the sauce or other flavourings that you put with it. Personally, I won't buy it.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Which reminds me, is turkey the single most disappointing meat in existence?

Yes.

I eat it twice a year - Christmas Day and Thanksgiving Day*, because we're guests of friends who Do Things Traditionally.

In other news, the sun seems to have come out - it's a glorious day, with forecasts in the mid-20s for the rest of the week (too hot).

* in Canada this means Harvest Festival, and falls in early October, but turkey-and-the-trimmings is the traditional fare.
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
I never eat turkey if I can help it. Certainly never buy it. It has always seemed tasteless to me.

I don't know if it was ever flavoursome and all the taste got bred out of it in order to provide cheap turkey, or if it was always tasteless but a convenient source of protein for feeding large quantities.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Hey hey Shipmates!

I have returned from fun and sun with five girl friends in Majorca. We had plenty of wine, did some sightseeing and lots of lying reading by the pool. And FAR to much chatting!

I'm home alone now as Mr Boogs is on another Epic Bike Trip (Amsterdam to Salzburg then to Venice over the Alps) so I have peace and quiet to read the Ship and recover!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
You sound to have had a great time, Boogie! We won't ask too many questions about the wine etc.!! [Biased]

Mr. B is a great cyclist! How long is that going to take him? Sounds like a lot of hard work to me!
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
The holiday sounds great Boogie.

[ 01. July 2014, 12:59: Message edited by: Thyme ]
 
Posted by Persephone Hazard (# 4648) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
What irritated me were the ads for Mother of the Bride outfits, modelled by girls younger than my daughter! [Mad] and featuring unreasonable amounts of black, or mushroom [Projectile] Seriously, who wants to look like the Black Widow at her daughter's wedding?

Bridezilla alert: women who turn up in black to my wedding will be refused admittance [Snigger] (more seriously, there will be a dress code note in the invite saying no black on women please thank you kindly). I don’t care if it’s fashionable. Where were you people dragged up? YOU DON’T TURN UP TO A WEDDING DRESSED FOR A FUNERAL!! (rant over)
Whereas at the end of August I will be maid of honour (/chief bridesmaid/bride's witness/etc) at a wedding where the bride has asked me to wear black, because her own dress is black and red and we should match - and because she likes her friends and wants them to look like themselves. I've never been to a wedding where nobody wore any black, and I only own one dress that isn't myself.

If I marry, I shall wear ivory with black accents and my own bridesmaids/tablecloths/etc will all be in black.

Besides, it's only a rule for women - nope, nothing even remotely problematic there, right [Roll Eyes]

[ 01. July 2014, 13:16: Message edited by: Persephone Hazard ]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Nothing at all to do with brides' outfits... when I retired from paid work a year ago, I dispensed with the services of our cleaners, who'd been cleaning the place for years. Honestly, with two healthy adults with nothing to do and all day to do it in, I couldn't justify paying someone else to clean.

Now it's the only thing I know that reminds me what it was like to be young - nothing gets cleaned until visitors heave into view!

With most of the family descending on us at the weekend for the Dowager's 90th birthday celebrations, I'm worn out with the hoovering [Roll Eyes] and lest you should think that Mr. S is slumped in front of the telly throwing beer cans at the football, he's on lawn-mowing detail [Devil]

Mrs. S - you wear your fingers to the bone, and what do you get to show for it? Bony fingers [Killing me]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm delighted to find someone else who subscribes to Piglet's Cleaning Philosophy, i.e. only do it when you have to. And as for hoovering - that's D's job, especially since he invested in a cordless Dyson, which he thinks is the dog's b*ll*cks. [Big Grin]

"lawn-mowing" ... [scratches head] ... [Confused]

V. warm and sunny day here - it's a public holiday (Canada Day), but I'm at w*rk, putting in some extra hours so that I can take holidays later in the summer.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I'm delighted to find someone else who subscribes to Piglet's Cleaning Philosophy, i.e. only do it when you have to.

Nen's is even better - don't do it, even when you should.

I do mow the lawns, though. For the past few years we've had handy professionals who have all the proper equipment (not that sort of equipment [Biased] ) who come and Do Things to the lawns periodically and we have proper grass instead of moss and dandelions. So it's worth looking after. Plus, it's one of the few things I do round the house that Mr Nen notices and thanks me for doing. [Biased]

Nen - housework won't kill you but why take the chance?
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
I'm delighted to find someone else who subscribes to Piglet's Cleaning Philosophy, i.e. only do it when you have to.

Nen's is even better - don't do it, even when you should.
Cleaning needs to meet several criteria before it gets done:

1) It ought to be done.
2) You have time to do it.
3) Any further procrastination begins to pose a health hazard
4) You start to run out of things to cook with or put food on.

However, all these can be superseded by criterion z) Mum's coming to visit.

An interesting corollary of 4) is a variation of Jane Austen's philosophy and is, in my view, far more profound:
quote:
It is a truth universally acknowledged that there is no such thing as too many teaspoons.

 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Persephone Hazard:

Besides, it's only a rule for women - nope, nothing even remotely problematic there, right [Roll Eyes]

What if the women cross-dressed? Then could they wear black? [Two face]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
With regard to cleaning, possibly the only advantage in having MS is that I can justify having a cleaner. Lisa is a lovely lady who keeps our mess under control so that the house looks tidy at least once a week. She also does my ironing. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ecumaniac:
quote:
Originally posted by Persephone Hazard:

Besides, it's only a rule for women - nope, nothing even remotely problematic there, right [Roll Eyes]

What if the women cross-dressed? Then could they wear black? [Two face]
And if the men cross-dress, can they wear black?
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by ecumaniac (# 376) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chocoholic:
quote:
Originally posted by ecumaniac:
quote:
Originally posted by Persephone Hazard:

Besides, it's only a rule for women - nope, nothing even remotely problematic there, right [Roll Eyes]

What if the women cross-dressed? Then could they wear black? [Two face]
And if the men cross-dress, can they wear black?
[Big Grin]

No, no, no! If the men cross-dress, they are NOT allowed to wear black!!
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
With regard to cleaning, possibly the only advantage in having MS is that I can justify having a cleaner. Lisa is a lovely lady who keeps our mess under control so that the house looks tidy at least once a week. She also does my ironing. [Yipee]

Seems a bit extreme, though, St. G! But that's one of the best arguments for decluttering - even if the house isn't clean, at least it can be tidy without too much effort [Smile]

We started off full of good intentions - we'd clean every first Sunday morning (All Age Worship, everywhere! [Projectile] ) and then go out to lunch. Lasted two months, I think. Then the weather improved and we had better things to do - i.e., almost anything [Yipee]

Mrs. S, whose mother, daughter, SoniL, son, son's new-ish girlfriend, brother, SisteriL, niece and nephew are ALL coming [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
So there I was yesterday morning, sitting on the fast bus from here to The Big City. I was sitting near the back in a window seat idly watching the Backwater as we sped along the outside lane of what is probably the fastest bit of the route when there was an almighty bang, a cloud of smoke [?] from under the front of the bus and it all veered a bit then was brought under control by the driver who crossed to the inside and we came to rest on the shoulder. We all piled out of the bus and I started walking. First I had a look at the front nearside tyre, or what was left of it - a blow-out doesn't take prisoners, does it? That was one type completely beyond repair, the out