Thread: Various Islands in the North Atlantic Board: Oblivion / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Welcome to the UK thread - come along and chat about the weather!

[Big Grin]

(Title edited)

[ 31. December 2014, 16:10: Message edited by: Firenze ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, it's a lovely warm evening here, windows open, ceiling fan gently wafting the air about. The temple is making a racket and doubtless lots of kids will be round soon to wish us a happy new year and beg sweets from us.

I am supposed to be out at a sort of celebration but, frankly, can't be bothered. I will do a walk later instead then have an early night.
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
IN the meantime I've been wondering what the new title should be for the Scottish thread or (shock horror) if there should be a separate one at all.
Better together , etc etc.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
IN the meantime I've been wondering what the new title should be for the Scottish thread or (shock horror) if there should be a separate one at all.
Better together , etc etc.

You could have a separate thread for those who voted "NO" and let those who voted "YES" join ours!
[Devil]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wet Kipper:
IN the meantime I've been wondering what the new title should be for the Scottish thread or (shock horror) if there should be a separate one at all.
Better together , etc etc.

It would be good to have a generic North Atlantic thread, though the UK bit in the title would need to go if it's to include Ireland. How about renaming it "North Atlantic Islands"? It would have a broader scope, and people can then sort out for themselves whether they want to be on it or not.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I got the title form Wiki - I rather liked the 'various' as it covered all bases, I thought [Smile]

"Britannia was used by the Romans from the 1st century BC for the British Isles taken together. It is derived from the travel writings of the ancient Greek Pytheas around 320 BC, which described various islands in the North Atlantic as far north as Thule (probably Norway)."
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I too would favour an all-inclusive thread for England, Ireland, Scotland, the Faroes, Greenland, Iceland and sweet Rockall.

Mind if I edit the title, Boogie?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I too would favour an all-inclusive thread for England, Ireland, Scotland, the Faroes, Greenland, Iceland and sweet Rockall.

Mind if I edit the title, Boogie?

Not at all [Smile]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
There was me wondering why there was a thread for Madeira, the Azores and the Canaries.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
There was me wondering why there was a thread for Madeira, the Azores and the Canaries.

Well, those islands are chock-full of pensioners, n'est-ce pas?
 
Posted by Arethosemyfeet (# 17047) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I too would favour an all-inclusive thread for England, Ireland, Scotland, the Faroes, Greenland, Iceland and sweet Rockall.

Surely everyone knows that Rockall is part of Scotland? [/canofworms] [Biased]
 
Posted by Lucia (# 15201) on :
 
Weather here today? Howling wind, pouring rain, thunderstorms, hail and about 5 deg.

Did I mention that I'm actually in North Africa?! [Ultra confused] Clearly the weather wants to remind me of what I have to look forward to when we eventually move back to the UK!

[ 31. December 2014, 16:57: Message edited by: Lucia ]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
We are watching Jools Holland, and are thankful we didn't get tickets for Stirling's Hogmanay bash as it got cancelled at 8.30 this evening due to the weather - high winds meaning the stage was unsafe, portaloos were being blown over, etc. It's also too windy for the official fireworks.

I have had half a glass of pink bubbly (which has been in the cupboard since our wedding 7 years ago). That, combined with my cold, and the fact that so far Jools's programme has been a bit underwhelming, means I might well be fast asleep before 12...
 
Posted by Doublethink. (# 1984) on :
 
I have celebrated with new pjs, furry slipper boots and a slug of baileys - plus afternoon / early evening party with small people & an assassins creed club competition mission and crap telly. Now goong out to first foot myself.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Happy New Year all, from chez Arachnid.

Am currently under a duvet in front of the telly watching Skyfall with a glass of Kir Royale and a packet of crisps, and listening to fireworks going off in all four directions. Not exactly partying the night away, but there are worse places to be.
 
Posted by Doublethink. (# 1984) on :
 
Preach it, insectivore !
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
I have discovered Tenessee Honey. There could be worse starts to the new year.

Jengie
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Just back from ringing out the old year and ringing in the new - happy new year, erveryone!

M.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Happy new year! [Smile]
We've just had a party of 8 adults and 9 children, I'm surprised we all managed to last past midnight. All good friends so great fun eating and chatting and the kids played games together happily. I'm just polishing off some champagne before bed.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
It's half past two. I am definitely going to bed. Any minute. Soon as I can get out of this armchair. The fireworks were particularly pretty this year. Just check one or two more sites. Then go to bed. Oh look, it's twenty to three.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I was in bed by 10 last night then up and out walking before 6 this morning - another lovely dawn. Just as I was heading back home I met two local lads heading off to work and the sensible one went to bed at 8 last night whilst the other, who looked like death warmed up, partied the night away and went to bed at 2 a.m. for a 6 a.m. start!

Silly boy!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's coming on for 2 a.m. here in Newfoundland (can that be an honorary North Atlantic Island?), and I'm not long in from taking in the new year with friends from the choir.

I wish everyone back in Blighty (and associated islands [Big Grin] ) a happy new year.

quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
You could have a separate thread for those who voted "NO" and let those who voted "YES" join ours!


I think you may have got your "yesses" and "noes" a bit mixed up there, Nicodemia! [Eek!]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Just as I was heading back home I met two local lads heading off to work and the sensible one went to bed at 8 last night whilst the other, who looked like death warmed up, partied the night away and went to bed at 2 a.m. for a 6 a.m. start!

Silly boy!

Yes, but youth needs memories like that to look back on later. "Remember that New Year's Eve where we stayed up almost all night and still went to work the next morning?"

Went to bed shortly before midnight. The fireworks burst out and went on for some time - they were quite close, possibly in someone's garden, so I got up to have a look but unlike the organized displays of 5 November which I can see from my window, this time there was nothing at all to be seen, just "noises off".

Still dark and the world is silent and, for the time being, peaceful. Happy New Year!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
I think you may have got your "yesses" and "noes" a bit mixed up there, Nicodemia! [Eek!]

Er, yes! [Hot and Hormonal]

Put it down to post-Christmas lethargy and too many mince pies!!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A long time ago Uncle Pete introduced me to a reputable dealer in secondhand books and I have just been on their website again.

Poor, poor credit card!

Delivery to my best mate's address as he will be out in March and it looks as if half his baggage weight will be stuff for me!

Thanks Steve!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Happy New Year everyone!

I give you the 31st December menu from Château en rouge:

Aperitif: grapefruit liqueur/pink champagne kir royal, foie gras, a delicious crab/bacon paste that someone brought round and petits fours

Entrée: home-made pork and chicken liver paté and salad

Plat de résistance: pigeon flambéed in cognac, roast potatoes and beans

Cheese: let it be known that there was one French cheese that we got off the Christmas market on account of its being bright blue (i.e. blue food colouring, not blue from mouldiness. It was flavoured with lavender). The rest of the cheese was BRITISH - two Welsh cheeses that my auntie gave us for Christmas and some Stilton. There was universal agreement that the British cheese was nicer than the French cheese [Big Grin] . Some Brazilian guests also brought "Romeo and Juliet", slices of cheese wrapped around guava paste.

For all the above, a bottle of 2003 Bordeaux that we found on the market for the princely sum of 3€.

Dessert: Brazilian dulce de lecche and apple/calvados tart. More pink champagne.

Coffee and chocolates

I am feeling rather delicate this morning and no longer wish to look at food or alcohol for at least a week. Unfortunately our fridge is full of leftovers...
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by M.:
Just back from ringing out the old year and ringing in the new

Half muffled before midnight I hope.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
New Year's Eve cocktails were easy. Instead of pratting about mixing one or two at a time, prepared two-litre pitchers of Blue Lagoon, Sex on the Beach, Gin Sling and other firm favourites.

It's quite fun mixing cocktails using 8oz measures, even though it does go through the bottles.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Very quiet here. My husband took his dodgy tummy off to bed at about 10.00, leaving our son and I to play table tennis on the kitchen table. I toasted the New Year in tea, while son had some grappa.

I thought the fireworks from Big Ben were even more spectacular than last year.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Just watching the Vienna New Year's Day Concert - lovely, with some beautiful scenes from the city.

quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Plat de résistance: pigeon flambéed in cognac, roast potatoes and beans

That (together with the rest of your menu) would not have met with much, if any, resistance from me.

I do enjoy your dinners (vicariously) [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
After all these years I have just had a Kingfisher stay still on a branch whilst I was able to photograph it. The shots ain't perfect at 42x [1000mm 35mm equiv] but they are not too bad.

Very chuffed.

In other news desperately hoping that Uncle Pete will be wanting a haircut almost as soon as he arrives - mine is really bugging me as it is so scraggy but am trying to hang on one more week so we can go together - I have to go with him anyway.

But I might give in tomorrow, no promises.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Just tie it back in a pony tail Welease Woderwick [Biased]

I went and had a posh hair do for our New Year party for 16 people last night. I have grown it really, really long so that I have a choice of styles for my son's wedding in June.

Yesterday's 'updo' was quite nice but didn't last the course (the party ended at 3am [Snore] ) So I will have to find another occasion to get a posh 'do' as another practice.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Wodders!

Let me know if you give in - I pass the barber on Monday and hair is driving me nuts.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
This new year was the first in a while that we've been at a party and it was great fun - about the only people we knew were the hostess and one other, but we soon got to know everyone else and managed to stay up till about half past four chatting about fantasy books, computer games, face paints (I got flowers on my face) and various other of our favourite things. Our heads are somewhat fuzzy today...
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Very quiet hereabouts...a few fireworks but not as many as last year. Mug of tea...and to bed. As a result of which, I now feel quite awake...but then, it is after midday!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
Wodders!

Let me know if you give in - I pass the barber on Monday and hair is driving me nuts.

Wonderful, I have an excuse! I may go on my walk this evening or in the morning. If you wait until you get here then no problem but I can't stand it much longer! [That's why I want it shorter!]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Ooh, Spike, no, we've never done that, at least as long as I've been ringing. Doesn't it take a while to get the muffles off? We ring for a bit and then drop out one by one so that on the stroke of midnight only the tenor is still ringing - the tenor does 12 dongs and then we start up again.

M.
 
Posted by Chamois (# 16204) on :
 
Originally posted by M.
quote:
Doesn't it take a while to get the muffles off?
Yes. It takes ages to put the muffles on, then ages to remove them and to reach the muffles you have to ring the bells down first and then up again and it's all a complete pain.

I'm not ringing at present but we used to ring the minor 5 bells before midnight and then the major 6 (or all 8 if we had enough ringers) afterwards. That sounded nice.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Surfaced about 10 am to a day of wind and rain. The first cooked meal of 2015 was a stew of chickpeas and tomato topped with ginger, green chilli, raw onion and lemon juice. Then I had a little nap. Meal two is going to be steak'n'chips.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Happy New Year!

Unexpected treat yesterday evening in the shape of a pantomime. Plenty of boo-hissing, it's behind you, oh no it isn't, and a really good Welsh dame ("When I say 'Alright or wha?' you've gotta say 'alright!' Alright?"), and jokes and songs about farting ("Let it go"). Unfortunately no girl dressed up as a boy, but nothing's perfect.

P.S. My top tip is buy up any M&S Spicy Christmas bacon you may find being sold at a discount. Though maybe not if you're not keen on cloves.

[ 01. January 2015, 16:11: Message edited by: QLib ]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
We managed to stay awake to see in the new year, and had a fairly late morning. I had my cold as an excuse to veg out till about 9.30. We did our usual New Years Day trip to the cinema, this year to see The Hobbit. We were supposed to see it in 2D, but the cinema got it wrong, and showed the 3D version, so had to provide everyone with complimentary 3D glasses. [Smile]
Goiod thing we had taken coats though - we came out into torrential rain [Frown]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Having renewed our season tickets for a local attraction a couple of days ago, we went for another walk around the lake this afternoon. A two mile circuit, followed by a cuppa and a massive although very flat toasted teacake. It was dull and drizzly.

Edited to say that the weather was dull...the teacake was very nice!

[ 01. January 2015, 17:53: Message edited by: St Everild ]
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
Happy New Year, everyone!

I've had a sofa day today, after being out till about 3a.m. this morning - the first time in years I've really "done" New Year. Weather's wet and windy here, so a quiet day of drinking tea and snacking on festive leftovers has been just the ticket for me.

Back to work tomorrow.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
We're just waiting for a takeaway to be delivered after being up early to take part in the London New Year Day Parade.

We decided it was deserved after a busy few days getting things ready then up there for the parade today. It was good, and the weather was much better than it could have been, and certainly better than the pouring rain of last year!

Feeling very [Snore] now though.
 
Posted by Qoheleth. (# 9265) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chamois:
... we used to ring the minor 5 bells before midnight and then the major 6 (or all 8 if we had enough ringers) afterwards.

We are fortunate to have nine bells, so we ring on the front (Dorian) eight before midnight, then gradually drop one out in sequence, slowing gently. Stand. All take one step to the left. Time check from Westminster, twelve blows on the tenor and pull off on the back (major) eight. Very nice too. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Bene Gesserit (# 14718) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Just watching the Vienna New Year's Day Concert - lovely, with some beautiful scenes from the city.

As did I - it was wonderful as always and I do so enjoy the views of the city and countryside - my Other Half and I keep saying we must go back to Austria for a very long holiday!
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
We spent 3 weeks in Vienna last January, and despite the cold enjoyed it. Rather than stay in an hotel, we took a couple of serviced apartments right on Stefansplatz, each one bedroom with a larger one for us and the smaller for Dlet. Not expensive and we had the enjoyments and trials of living as a resident.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... Plat de résistance: pigeon flambéed in cognac, roast potatoes and beans ...

Résistance is futile ... [Smile] **drool**

After a very lazy morning, we had a first-footer (not really something you get around these parts): a friend from the choir turned up on our doorstep in the afternoon, and we spent a pleasant couple of hours chatting, drinking* and eating biscuits and cheese.

* In honour of the occasion, D. even had a wee dram - his first in Heaven only knows how long.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Another walk this morning but a slightly varied route, I think it is doing me good and I certainly enjoy it once I get out there.

Haircut last night which was both a relief and a disappointment - I knew Saheer had moved to work in the Gulf but his nephew had taken over, nice lad, so no qualms but he has now sold the business on, or leased it off, to this really grumpy guy so I won't be going back, nor taking Pete there, so now have to find an alternative. Several ideas, one even closer! My spies are out and will report back.

Off to see a friend this weekend so no walk now until Tuesday [I leave crack of dawn tomorrow and back Monday evening] unless I walk from Hotel, as I may do.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Happy new haircut, Wodders, and have a good trip away. [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
A new year a new routine here.

I walk both dogs separately most of the time as Gypsy's training is so specific. My first walk used to be 9:30 but that's really a bit late - so I have moved the day forward an hour.

Gypsy's walk will now be 8:30 then Tatze's 11:30 then Gypsy's afternoon shopping/rain/bus/tram/socialising session at 3pm and Tatze's lead walk 5pm.

Do I spend most of my day walking?

Yes! And I love it!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
We are off to Zimababwe tomorrow and going to spend a week on an island in Lake Kariba. Nothing there except crocs and mosquitos and elephant and all manner of buck. Then to Capetown for 10 days. Should be good.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Went to Chipping Campden this morning, "Jewel of the Cotswolds". It still is, but hopelessly clogged with cars and finding anywhere to park was almost impossible until I found a side lane with a space.

It was cold enough for my fingers to go numb within a few minutes of arrival, but a beautiful sunny day none the less. Lots of pretty Christmas wreaths on the cottage doors, and amazingly, roses still blooming in the front gardens, though they looked a bit frostbitten. The town is lovely, but every square inch of possible road space seems to be packed with as many cars as it can hold, which did rather detract from the beauty of the place.

I'd originally thought about going to London as there are some interesting exhibitions on, and Rembrandt at the National Gallery finishes on the 18th, but that will have to wait for a bit. Has anyone seen the Rembrandt yet?
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
No - but I saw the Late Turner at Tate Britain - absolutely amazing. I would go again if I could. But an essential part of the deal is to see the free ones upstairs as well. Sorry to miss the Rembrandt, though - that doesn't seem to have had as much publicity.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
I passed a poster for the Rembrandt today. I hadn't really taken in it was on, I'll have to try to get to see it before it closes.
We went for a walk today, not that long, but I felt rather ill by the end of it - obviously toally out of practice.
The weather has been lovely here in South London. Hope it's the same tomorrow as we're off to see the view from the top of the Shard as my husband's belated birthday treat.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
The weather here has been vile: wind rain and sleet. It has exposed the fact that the repairs the roofer did on Christmas Eve still haven't rendering the house watertight. I can only get the door of this room to stay shut by jamming the footstool and a pile of cushions against it. I would put the heating up another notch, but the bill for this quarter will already be roughly equal to the GDP of Ecuador.

I want Spring and I want it now.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by shamwari:
We are off to Zimababwe tomorrow and going to spend a week on an island in Lake Kariba. Nothing there except crocs and mosquitos and elephant and all manner of buck. Then to Capetown for 10 days. Should be good.

Have a wonderful time [Smile]
Another lazy day here, my bil and his wife visited earlier for homemade crumpets and cake and we've just watched Wuthering Heights (Ralph Fiennes and Juliete Binoche version).
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by shamwari:
Nothing there except crocs and mosquitos and elephant and all manner of buck.

Make sure you don't get eaten by the crocodiles or the mosquitos!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I want Spring and I want it now.

You need to move further south. This morning was full of sunlight; blackbirds were chasing each other flirtatiously along the top of a hedge, a ram was mounting sheep in a field, the buds are already starting to show on some of the trees, and the snowdrop shoots are coming up. It didn't feel a lot like January.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
First Day Back today...a day of desk work. Don't feel as though I have accomplished very much, though. Can't see the surface of the desk yet...

Ah well...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
What does the surface of a desk look like? [Confused]

It's a wee bit less chilly here today - it got up to 0° this afternoon. [Smile]

I started prepping things for a chicken casserole for lunch (stripping meat from a cooked chicken, chopping veggies, defrosting stock) when I discovered that we didn't have any bacon, which is part of what makes it so nice.

So D., suggested going out for lunch today and doing the casserole for tomorrow, and as he got a couple of vouchers for Milestones for Christmas, we spent one of them: a shared goat cheese, roasted garlic and flatbread platter to start, then an absolutely delicious chicken and mushroom thing with thin pasta and seriously good roasted red peppers and courgettes* for me, and an equally good chicken burger (actually two huge pieces of chicken breast in a bun with usual garnishes) for him.

Then, while I went to the Cathedral office to produce the bulletin for Sunday, he finished off making the casserole for tomorrow.

* I don't often put the words "seriously good" and "courgettes" in the same sentence, but these seemed to have taken on the flavour of the sauce, but kept a bit of "bite", and they were lovely.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I have just set up mynew birdtable 5(thank you Mr D for putting it together) with fat balls & seeds. Hopefully it is far enough away from the trees to deter cats from stealth attacks but not so far that tthe birds feel too exposed.
I am typing this on my new tablet hybrid - I've never had a laptop before so this is a new experience. Hence the random words-joined-together. It's odd using the touch pad not a mouse too.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Getting ready to go. I have warned my Churches that any attempt to mount a coup while I am away will be met with severe reprisals.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I want Spring and I want it now.

You need to move further south. This morning was full of sunlight; blackbirds were chasing each other flirtatiously along the top of a hedge, a ram was mounting sheep in a field, the buds are already starting to show on some of the trees, and the snowdrop shoots are coming up. It didn't feel a lot like January.
Yes, it definitely felt more like March in the morning, though in my neck of the woods we were back to January by mid afternoon. And so dark this morning! I managed to get into town and get most of my shopping down before the rain started up again :smug:
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
Heavy rain here this morning. I'd hoped for a day of general mooching around, going for a nice healthy walk, that kind of thing - but not until the rain stops. If it ever does. So it's been a morning of random internetting and a bit of reading (J.H.Newman and St Benedict - pretty darned spiritual, huh?)
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Or Gosford Park is on ITV3 in a bit.

It's wet down this way too, on the plus side following windowsill replacement a few months ago it seems to have sorted the leak (a.k.a. The indoor water feature) that we had had in heavy rain. We weren't entirely sure where it was getting in so tried a few things but this seems to have sorted it. As much as the cats enjoyed watching the drips!
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
After a few days of lovely clear weather it was very cloudy and rainy here, which was a bit of a pain as I'd booked to take my husband up to the top of the Shard as a birthday treat. We went anyway, couldn't see a thing, but were given tickets to come back another time. Having looked at the photos we've decided that sunset will be the best time rather than midday.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I've definitely had a "mooching around" day - apart from loading the dishwasher after lunch, I've done the square-root of bugger-all today.

According to the Weather Channel, the temperature's going down to -13°, but feeling like -25 with the wind-chill overnight and tomorrow morning.

Even by my standards, that's a bit "brrrrrr" ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Last day of the holiday, back to work tomorrow. At the time of writing the view from my window's completely disappeared into thick fog, the cars beneath are covered in frost and it's cold outside.

I'm going to miss having the time to watch television, the pleasure of not having to get up while it's still dark, and the Christmas decorations, which will come down during the week. That's the point when you realize that Christmas is done, and Easter's a long way off yet.

Oh, and watching "Tudor Monastery Farm", which is a cracking series. If ever I'm stranded in the Tudor era, I'll have a fund of useful knowledge to see me through.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:

I'm going to miss having the time to watch television, the pleasure of not having to get up while it's still dark ...

Now you can count the days to retirement, when life is one long holiday!

[Big Grin]

I have been 'head hunted' to work one day a week (Friday) which actually means I'll also work a bit every day (preparation, marking) but I am looking forward to it. Although I never thought I'd be starting at a new school at this stage of my career - all those names to learn!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Now you can count the days to retirement, when life is one long holiday!

I wish. But to keep a roof over my head, I'll need to stay in employment as long as I can, which is currently 67 instead of 60 as it was when I first started work.

Could be worse: today's generation will probably have to work for even longer.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I had only the bank holidays off so already been back at work a week, minus New Year's day. They'd have to pay me to go to the top of the Shard though, as I am not good with heights. I've got some Tesco vouchers and was planning to use them to go to London zoo yesterday but it was too cold and rainy.

On the bright side though I went to a different parkrun from normal, at Osterley Park, a national trust place in West London, and a vegetable stall there was selling brussel tops. I don't like sprouts at all but the leaves are lovely and you never see them in the shops round here so I got as many as I could fit in the cycle pannier. I wonder what happens to them normally, maybe livestock get them to eat.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I wish. But to keep a roof over my head, I'll need to stay in employment as long as I can, which is currently 67 instead of 60 as it was when I first started work.

Could be worse: today's generation will probably have to work for even longer.

Too bloody true. The retirement age at my employer is already 68, giving me another 25 years, and I can't imagine that it'll be much less than 30 years by the time I've actually done it. This is not a good time to be stuck in a long-standing career crisis... (which reminds me, I should go and poke the Job Search thread back onto the front page).

AG
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Increased retirement age is one way of cutting the pensions bill. [Mad] In some ways, I'm glad I took ill health retirement. The pensions bill muight decrease, but I suspect the NHS bill will increase.
Talking of which, our house is a bit like a plague pit at the moment - all three of us have colds, Lord P has a really bad cough, I feel like I'm wrapped in fog with a head full of cotton wool - my cold has gone to cattargh.
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Increased retirement age is one way of cutting the pensions bill. [Mad] In some ways, I'm glad I took ill health retirement. The pensions bill muight decrease, but I suspect the NHS bill will increase.
Talking of which, our house is a bit like a plague pit at the moment - all three of us have colds, Lord P has a really bad cough, I feel like I'm wrapped in fog with a head full of cotton wool - my cold has gone to cattargh.

Just a word on the NHS pension (as someone who'll be retiring, early, later this year) - it's actually been in surplus for about the past twenty years. Yes, employers and employees between them are paying more into it than retirees are getting out of it. What's more, the surplus doesn't get saved up to go into future pensions. No, no, this is the UK government we're talking about here - the surplus on the NHS pension "fund" gets skimmed off into what's called the "Treasury Contingency Fund", i.e. the pot of money that the Chancellor can spend on what he likes, such as funding wars or - ooh, I don't know - buying votes.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Adeodatus:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Increased retirement age is one way of cutting the pensions bill. [Mad] In some ways, I'm glad I took ill health retirement. The pensions bill muight decrease, but I suspect the NHS bill will increase.
Talking of which, our house is a bit like a plague pit at the moment - all three of us have colds, Lord P has a really bad cough, I feel like I'm wrapped in fog with a head full of cotton wool - my cold has gone to cattargh.

Just a word on the NHS pension (as someone who'll be retiring, early, later this year) - it's actually been in surplus for about the past twenty years. Yes, employers and employees between them are paying more into it than retirees are getting out of it. What's more, the surplus doesn't get saved up to go into future pensions. No, no, this is the UK government we're talking about here - the surplus on the NHS pension "fund" gets skimmed off into what's called the "Treasury Contingency Fund", i.e. the pot of money that the Chancellor can spend on what he likes, such as funding wars or - ooh, I don't know - buying votes.
[Mad]
What?! So, they've up'ed our contributions, reduced what we get out at the end, and are making us work longer to get it and they're taking the surplus?! Words don't fail me, but I'd be planked if I put them here.
Man I miss TICTH.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Over here people seem to either retire quite early (one of the other altos in our choir retired at 51, having got her 30 years in as a school-teacher, with a good pension) or very late - I've known doctors and surgeons who carry on well into their 70s or 80s if they're able. I even have a friend whose father came to Newfoundland to do an extra 5 years because he'd reached the retirement age in Ontario but wanted to carry on ...

If I had the choice I'd probably go at 60, as D. is 6 years older than me, and we'd have a chance of a bit of retirement time together, but I wouldn't blame him if he wanted to go on as long as he's able. As he puts it, he gets paid for doing what he loves doing, so he probably won't want to give it up if he doesn't need to.

After Evensong today we had a v. nice evening at the house of one of the tenors in the choir, and when we came out there was quite definite sn*w - about 4 inches and falling steadily.

Pretty, and difficult to negotiate the hills, but probably not enough for a sn*w-day tomorrow.

Better head off to bed soon - need to get used to waking up again. It's amazing how only a week-and-a-half can get you completely out of kilter ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I retired early. When I did the Maths, so long as I live to 82, it made little difference to the amount as getting it early meant I was getting it longer.

Well, well worth the drop in monthly income!

[Smile]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Those of you who went back to work this morning: believe me, you’re better off starting work today. I was in the office on Friday and it was like the Marie-Celeste. I have never been so bored in my whole entire life.

The HR insist on at least one of us being here to man the fort so I agreed to do Friday and let the others take the day off. In one way it suited me to come in, because I want to keep my holiday days for later on, but man it was slow. Normally my secretarial pool has four people in it. I was the only one in the office, so the phones of the other three were all redirecting to mine. It rang ONCE the entire day.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
My kids are still home but I've decided to start back at work today just so I can sort out a routine again (I work flexibly, part time, from home). It also means I can get the urgent things out of the way (like work emails) to allay my normal anxiety issues and reassure my students of my presence. Then hopefully tomorrow will be free to plan tutorials and other work with a clean slate.
I started back at my yoga class today and am now feeling exhausted but very relaxed [Smile]
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
I retired early. When I did the Maths, so long as I live to 82, it made little difference to the amount as getting it early meant I was getting it longer.

Well, well worth the drop in monthly income!

[Smile]

That's how the NHS does it. Roughly speaking, you get the same amount of money between the day you retire and the date of your average life expectancy - so early retirement doesn't put any more burden on the pension provider. As a system, it has a certain entertaining Grim-Reaper-ishness about it.

I'll be 53 when I retire (if the Lord spares me). I realise just how lucky I am to be able to, being debt-free and dependent-free, and I already have some plans to make the best of it by applying myself to Good Works. I won't have much to live on, so there won't be much lying around on Caribbean islands sipping Pina Coladas, but I'll probably invest in a new pair of slippers and study the art of being a sort of benign curmudgeon.

Meanwhile, it's a pleasantly busy day in my place of work - let's call it the Adeodatarium - and I'm typing this while nibbling on a rather good seafood salad sandwich.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
I haven't yet retired and still work full-time (although working part-time and taking some pension early does look attractive!), but my friends who have retired don't seem to have much more time on their hands. So long as one is basically debt-free, or paying a modest rent, the finance aspects look pretty neutral.

It's keeping the grey matter ticking over that looks more necessary. I think we'll put some kind of timelocks on the TV and the 'puter.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I get the impression that some people are much better at retirement than others.

My dad (who's now nearly 90) retired at 61, while still in rude good health. He and my mum (who was a housewife) had a wonderful 10 years or so of jetting about all over Europe in their dormobile and doing the odd Exotic Place as well, before the gradual onset of Mum's dementia took over. If he'd gone on to 65 they'd have had that much less time to enjoy themselves, so I think he did the right thing.

His next-door neighbour, on the other hand, took early retirement/redundancy at 55, spent most of his time mooching around the 19th hole of the local golf club, and died about a year later.

Retirement seems to be what you make it.

I'm not yet retired, so now that I'm back at w*rk, I'd better go and do some ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Those of you who went back to work this morning: believe me, you’re better off starting work today. I was in the office on Friday and it was like the Marie-Celeste.

I thought it probably would be. Almost all of us came back today; the decorations are being taken down bit by bit, the Christmas chocolates being finished up equally slowly (we've all had a surfeit over the season).

A bit of a shock to the system to have to leave home before dawn again, though (and I've been awake since about half two this morning anyway) instead of going back to sleep and surfacing around 8-ish for a leisurely breakfast and Christmas television.

But I knew Christmas had to be over once the fairy lights on the tree blew up.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I was retired on ill-health grounds [I was offered the chance of appealing the decision but didn't] when I was just 48 and headed out here to live and it has been pretty much great. Last year my State Pension kicked in which has made life a little easier financially.

For me it has been great.

* * * *

Having read through the job search thread earlier it reminded me somehow of the other day when I was at the Foreigners' Regional Registration Office and a young guy came in all cocky about having arrived in India with no money and needing some registration help [so he may not have had sufficient visa] and trying to push for them to make an exception in his case. The office is staffed by some really nice folks BUT they are all experienced police officers, probably seconded from Special Branch. They remained courteous, which I would have found a struggle, but just put a few blocks in his way. It was a joy to watch. He was a very silly boy! With the attitude he had I'm surprised he wasn't put on the next plane out of the country!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Mrs Sioni was at work on New Year's Day. It ws a very quiet day, few were in the market for cross-stitch kits, sewing machines, wool or anything like that and the next day she totted the tills from NYD and they had taken just over £500 in cash. Generally that's about a third of the total take. Why bother opening?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:

Having read through the job search thread earlier it reminded me somehow of the other day when I was at the Foreigners' Regional Registration Office and a young guy came in all cocky about having arrived in India with no money and needing some registration help [so he may not have had sufficient visa] and trying to push for them to make an exception in his case. The office is staffed by some really nice folks BUT they are all experienced police officers, probably seconded from Special Branch. They remained courteous, which I would have found a struggle, but just put a few blocks in his way. It was a joy to watch. He was a very silly boy! With the attitude he had I'm surprised he wasn't put on the next plane out of the country!

I expect they will play the 'long game' such that even this silly boy will learn a lesson. Like cricket, India learned administration from the British and has added some classy touches of its own.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm hoping my husband will set up his own business this year so that we can retire early on the proceeds. I'm an ex-nurse so was due to retire aged 55 (I'm 45) but the goal posts have now moved to 60 for me, I believe. Not much of an issue, as I can work flexibly for the OU for a good few years, but my husband is younger than me and it would be nice to retire together and travel.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
I have just gone through a whirl-wind voluntary redundancy (a month ago I had no idea!!), and apart from a week's pre-booked vacation, I still have plenty to keep my busy until I officially finish on the 5th Feb.
I've been thinking of the things I want to do on a daily/weekly/monthly basis, and of the things that I could do to generate a little income before my pension kicks in (a few years yet) without having to go back full-time to what I do now, although I'm open to the idea of going freelance over the winter. I've some sessions with a career consultancy, and will have more of an idea after that.
But I am really looking forward to at least a few months of not having to set the alarm unless I really want to.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
... they had taken ... about a third of the total take. Why bother opening?

A few years ago I worked in a shop in a mall over the Christmas/New Year period, and on the really slow days after Christmas I wondered the same thing, until it was pointed out that my employers (a ladies' clothes chain) would be charged a "fine" by the shopping centre if they didn't open.
quote:
Originally posted by Daisydaisy:
... a few months of not having to set the alarm ...

I had seven years of what I called "practice for retirement" when we moved here, as I wasn't eligible to work. At first there was a certain luxury in not setting the alarm (after 20-odd years of having to set it), but it was more than offset by the lack of funds that could be used for actual, tangible luxuries, and the novelty rather wore off ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:

But I knew Christmas had to be over once the fairy lights on the tree blew up.

That sounds… exciting [Eek!] . We badly wanted to dispose of our Christmas tree by throwing it out of the (fifth floor) window at the end of our New Year’s party. Would have been so much easier and more fun that getting it in a Christmas tree disposal bag and down the stairs. However there was a car parked right underneath and we didn’t dare.

Among our guests were a Brazilian couple having their first Christmas in Paris. We were going to tell them that defenestration of Christmas trees was a Parisian tradition and see if they believed us. [Snigger]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Apparently the lions at the zoo regard Christmas trees as a wonderful treat. It makes them as happy as catnip.

Alternatively, here are some New Year traditions for your consideration. Your plan of throwing the Christmas tree out of the window would fit right in with some of these.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Iceland is perhaps the most worrying, since NYE apparently brings on talking cows, seals taking on human form, the dead rising from their graves and elves moving house. The place sounds like an eldritch Piccadilly Circus.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Iceland is perhaps the most worrying, since NYE apparently brings on talking cows.

Just as long as there are no talking donkeys I'm OK with that.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
I was at work a few days last week and up to Christmas Eve but it was much quieter and so a good chance to catch up on stuff, and the roads are so much quieter I got a little lie in (15 minutes is still 15 minutes!). And I get to use the annual leave later on [Smile]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I went back to work today after a fortnight's break and there's so much correspondence to catch up on that I wish I'd gone in for a day or so after Christmas to keep on top of it a bit. I've always taken the fortnight as leave to be around when the kids are on holiday too, Nenlet1 is married to a teacher so she tends to take as much time off as she can, and up until this year Nenlet2 has studied locally and lived at home. This year he was home for Christmas but abroad with friends for New Year and as Mr Nen was working most of last week, but doing it from home and being grumpy when it wasn't going well [Roll Eyes] , I would have been better out at work, at least for some of the time.

I love my job and have no plans to retire any time soon. Mr Nen is planning for his retirement although how that will turn out is anyone's guess. [Biased] He went "part time" in the autumn but still spends a lot of evenings and weekends (as well as daytime hours) working. Last week that included (but was not limited to) New Year's Eve till after 11pm and most of New Year's Day. So it's going really well. [Roll Eyes] [Killing me]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Iceland is perhaps the most worrying, since NYE apparently brings on talking cows, seals taking on human form, the dead rising from their graves and elves moving house. The place sounds like an eldritch Piccadilly Circus.

That might be easier to handle than the South African custom of cheerily hurling old appliances out of the window, presumably without even shouting "Gardyloo".

Actually, that could be the parting gesture of the house-moving elves, I suppose. "We're not taking that fridge to Iceland with us. One, two, three, heeeeave."
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
I have just gone through a whirl-wind voluntary redundancy (a month ago I had no idea!!),

Much the same thing happened to me 18 months ago, daisydaisy, though I was already of pensionable age*. And Mr. S, who will have been retired 5 years at the end of this month, is officially old enough to draw his pension in July [Killing me] His employer - an American company - decided he was no longer 'on the bus' and paid him handsomely to stay away - result!

The issue we have is how much routinely to schedule in a week. When the weather is horrible and you can't go out and walk, or garden, it's great to have something to get out of bed for. However last year we missed the chance of a cheap sailing holiday at short notice because we had too much Stuff to reschedule, which is ironic (not good, but ironic).

Mr. S seems to work almost as hard as he ever did fixing people's IT issues, especially among the older members of our church!

* I had gone to work one Monday morning, knowing that I had to leave again late morning to go to a funeral. This led me to consider retirement, and giving my manager time to reorganise my job etc, so I decided I'd go in a year. Got back from the funeral to find my desk covered in notices - mandatory all-hands call at 2 pm. Voluntary redundancies, yippee [Yipee]

Mrs. S, retired but by no means retiring!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
...Actually, that could be the parting gesture of the house-moving elves, I suppose. "We're not taking that fridge to Iceland with us. One, two, three, heeeeave."

Last time I was in Iceland it was full of freezers!

Okay, sorry about that, I'll leave now before I'm pushed.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
They've swopped the geysers for the freezers? I hope the flagon with the dragon still holds the brew that is true.

[ 06. January 2015, 10:59: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I do puppy walking (as you know!), which I decided I wanted to do long before I retired.

It fulfils many needs for me.

It gets me out of bed in the morning (literally!)

It keeps the brain working - lots of problem solving and training to think through.

It gets me meeting lots of lovely like minded people.

Gypsy is boarded when we go away and costs us nothing to keep/insure/feed etc.

win win win!

(I know the down side will be saying goodbye in June, but that's also a positive as she will be moving on to do excellent, useful, enjoyable work)

[Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
When Gypsy starts work, will you know who her new human is, and be able to stay in touch, or is that a Big No-no?

It's colder and a bit blusterous here today - apparently it went up to +9° yesterday, but it's back to -5° now.

Bloody January again ... [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Reading all these retirement/post retirement threads got me to thinking. When I retired, I spent the first year at home waiting to see if my fragile health would strengthen, Then I got bored, and looking around I thought my old friend Wodders would enjoy a visit. And so I discovered India (and by extension the rest of the world) And now on Friday Wodders will discover me again.

[Yipee]

And at Easter Smudgiekins will have the pleasure of my company, [Yipee] [Yipee]

[ 06. January 2015, 14:50: Message edited by: Uncle Pete ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
When Gypsy starts work, will you know who her new human is, and be able to stay in touch, or is that a Big No-no?

We will get lots of updates from her trainer when she's at Big School (assuming she makes the grade, 1 in 3 don't)

Then her owner will be given our details and encouraged to keep in touch, but it's up to them.

I was given the Brood Bitch keeper's details and we keep in touch every week - she's very keen to know how 'her' pups are getting on.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
I hope Tatze will be able to visit with her as well.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
We will get lots of updates from her trainer when she's at Big School (assuming she makes the grade, 1 in 3 don't)

I heard a talk by the Saint Francis Service Dog trainers, who train dogs to do things for the physically handicapped. The dogs who make it partway through training and then wash out make wonderful pets. They are very well-behaved. There is a long waiting list of people wanting to adopt.

Moo
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
...And now on Friday Wodders will discover me again...

I thought it was next week!

[Razz]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Sudden flurry of activity at Woddering Heights? [Big Grin]

Christmas decorations taken down (without any explosions), except the candle-bridges and the Nativity scene, which will stay up until Candlemas.

It always makes me feel a little sad, as everything's going back to normal and the place looks so empty. [Frown]

In other news, I've booked my flights to go to Orkney in February for Dad's 90th birthday. The mob from Edinburgh are all going, but D. isn't going to be able to come, as he can't find anyone to cover for him on the Sunday. If I'm honest, it's filling me with dread: I absolutely hate travelling alone, but I feel that I should, as it may be the last time we'll all be together.

Added bonus: I get to see my great-niece, who is deeply cute. [Yipee]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
I have just gone through a whirl-wind voluntary redundancy (a month ago I had no idea!!),

The issue we have is how much routinely to schedule in a week. When the weather is horrible and you can't go out and walk, or garden, it's great to have something to get out of bed for. However last year we missed the chance of a cheap sailing holiday at short notice because we had too much Stuff to reschedule, which is ironic (not good, but ironic).
Fortunately all the activities I'm planning are not commitments but more the things I wished I'd had time for. So impromptu holidays are not impossible - apart from all the holidays I'm planning !
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Laundry done and sorted, French sticks (hopefully) rising and almost ready to go in the oven, and festive teddies* (which I forgot about when I was taking down the tree last night) returned to their window-sill in the spare bedroom.

* assorted small bears with Father Christmas hats and suchlike, who live along the back of the sofa during the Christmas season.

Domestic Goddess Piglet is back ... [Big Grin]

[ 07. January 2015, 20:55: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
As she's a regular poster on here sending La Vie En Rouge best wishes to her, her friends and family.
Also to any other posters living in Paris.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Yea and amen, Chocoholic. [Votive]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Thirded from me as well.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Piglet - I met you in a book I am reading by Ronald Blythe. It was such a surprise, and like meeting an old friend suddenly!

Grey, cold and dank here. Just waiting for the fierce gales and rain threatened for tomorrow. Time to batten down the hatches, I think!

Made an interesting Moroccan cardoman and orange cake yesterday. Very yummy - there is a bit left for anyone who wants it!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Thanks all. It’s raining here at the minute. Feels like it should be somehow.

People here are very shocked, but in another way seem to be carrying on pretty much as normal. OTOH, as long as the perpetrators are still at large, our new goodbye to each other on the way out of the office is going to be “Are you getting the metro? Be careful.” [Votive]

I have to get a flight tomorrow (to foie gras land for a pointless interview at the Town Hall before they’ll accept our marriage file) and I’m expecting a long wait to get through airport security.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
So pleased to hear you are okay, LVER!

Mrs. S, just plain grateful for a change [Smile]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Safe journey, LVER
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Glad to hear you're safe, La Vie - take care on your travels. [Votive]
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Piglet - I met you in a book I am reading by Ronald Blythe. It was such a surprise, and like meeting an old friend suddenly!

Really? [Smile]

Ronnie Blythe is an old friend of D's mother - they worked together when they were young - but I had no idea I featured in any of his books; I only met him once as far as I remember.

He's a nice old boy, and AFAIK still going strong at over 90.

In other news, we've got sn*w. [Frown] Lots of it. [Waterworks]

On the up-side, we've also got a sn*w-day - first of the season. [Yipee]

[ 08. January 2015, 18:21: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Yes, really, piglet! He was talking about organists, mainly your D, but mentioned you by name, as being àn Orcadian. He was at the same time referring to the northern parts of the world - positively I might say [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
When I told D. about your post he said he recalled that we were mentioned in one of Ronnie's books after he'd visited Orkney. I didn't remember meeting him up there, but I suppose I must have done.

After a completely lazy day, I'd better think about turning in - I'll have to w*rk tomorrow, and do the Cathedral bulletin, which I would have done today but didn't ...

[Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The [bald] Eagle Has Landed!

Collected from the airport about on time this morning and now sorting himself out in his bedroom, if he hasn't already fallen asleep. He told me at breakfast how he wanted to stay up all day so sleep well tonight - I have to say that even when he is not jetlagged he never goes a day without a nap so I am expecting the snores to resonate all the way up here shortly.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Hope you both enjoy his stay WW [Smile]

I have w*rk today at a new school - all those new names to learn, and I mean the staff, I'm fine at learning the children's names. I just have a chart of them where they sit and soon get to know their names.

It's every Friday so I will have the rest of the week to recover/prepare/mark etc. Ideal!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Uneasy night last night. Strong winds - 90 mph - roaring in the chimneys, car alarms going off, unidentifiable thumps and bangs. The memory that past storms of this ilk took down our 40ft cherry tree, and tore up part of the roof...

However, all seems still standing this morning. More gales forecast for tonight and tomorrow though.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
[Votive] to all shipmates in Scotland- keep safe.
A bit blowy here but nowhere near as bad. I've got a dull day ahead of me giving telephone tutorials and sorting out tomorrow's study day. I need to go for my daily walk too but am trying to predict when it will be less blowy/no chance of rain.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
The [bald] Eagle Has Landed!

I suspect you mean that the Maple Tree has been planted?

Bald eagle indeed! Is outrage! Probably just as well he's asleep ... [Devil]

Back to the coal-face after the sn*w-day yesterday, and of course, because there was a sn*w-day yesterday I now have no idea what day it is ...

At least I haven't got the sort of job where things pile up if you miss a day, and D. reckoned that doing the square-root of bugger-all yesterday probably did us no harm at all. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Just managed to get a replacement monitor for my pc, the previous one having displayed the Black Screen of Chittering Death. For several days I've had to resort to the old CRT I had about 25 years ago, 800x600, 2.5 tons in weight, and looks like an old-fashioned television set, though not quite as many buttons. I don't know how I managed all those years.

I now have a nice secondhand one that's actually better than the one that just died, thanks to my local repair shop. Lovely and clear and more fits on the screen. [Big Grin] If only all problems could be sorted out as quickly.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Turns out my son has been in Paris all week. I'm glad I didn't know.

He has to do flight simulator assessments every 4 months or so (practicing fires in the hold/losing engines/undercarriage not working etc etc - stuff that can't be practiced on the real thing), and that's what he was there for. He said the whole place felt very subdued [Frown]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Having had a spot of rain and quite a lot of wind on Friday, by this morning it was sn*wing like buggery again, so we're kind of back to square one. Temperatures set to plummet somewhat tomorrow, so not much chance of getting rid of it either ... [Frown]

I decided to express my solidarity with the people of Paris by adapting a French recipe for a lamb-chop casserole, which we're going to have for tomorrow's lunch. If it's any good I'll post the recipe upstairs.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I've been prompted to improve my French, which I haven't spoken for years. Reading publications is surprisingly easy, with only a few words needing to be looked up, but listening to radio broadcasts is proving quite challenging. It is just practice, I suppose. I'm recognizing more words now than I did when I started, but a lot of the high-speed stuff passes me by.

Fingers crossed that today's marches pass without incident.

On a lighter note, my Christmas tree has now been taken down and put away. Other people in the neighbourhood still have theirs up, including the flashing lights on the outside of houses. It's quite nice actually. It always seems a bit abrupt and bleak when everything's whisked away on 6 January, and Easter seems remote.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
My money i on Easter Eggs going on sale for next weekend.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Chocolate Easter bunnies and MaltEasters have already been on sale since December 26. I haven't looked for Easter eggs as such, but expect they're already there.
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Chocolate Easter bunnies and MaltEasters have already been on sale since December 26. I haven't looked for Easter eggs as such, but expect they're already there.

I have inbuilt chocolate-dar, and I sense a great disturbance in the Force. The eggs are here! (Cadbury's creme eggs, anyway - I haven't seen anything more egg-regious yet.)
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
There are dairy Milk eggs which you eat with a spoon in the shops already (well in Boots).

Jengie
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Creme Eggs have been sold in my local CoOp since the day after Christmas...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The lamb-chops "Je suis Charlie" worked out quite well: although there was more sauce than it needed, it really tasted nice - once I've tweaked the recipe a bit I'll post it.

Byrd's Second Service (with solo piglet) at Evensong today, which was v. enjoyable.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The chocolate Easter Dinosaurs have appeared on the shelves. Easter must only be just around the corner.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I just checked the catalogue of shop where I do online orders.

There are about a dozen types of Easter eggs, mostly small, already on sale. I think I saw them last year on Boxing Day.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
*****craves a crème egg*****
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I bought a bag of Cadbury's Mini Eggs yesterday (you know the little ones that look like birds' eggs but are really chocolate in a speckled sugar coating shell). I originally intended to bring it in for the office but you know, sometimes you have to do quality control on something you haven't had for a while, to make sure it's fit for consumption.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
*****craves a crème egg*****

No, no, no. The things are so revoltingly sweet the very thought makes my teeth itch.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I bought a bag of Cadbury's Mini Eggs yesterday (you know the little ones that look like birds' eggs but are really chocolate in a speckled sugar coating shell). I originally intended to bring it in for the office but you know, sometimes you have to do quality control on something you haven't had for a while, to make sure it's fit for consumption.

I was going to offer help with the quality control, but it looks as if I'm too late ... [Snigger]

Karl, I'm absolutely with you on the proxy-toothache brought on by Crème Eggs. Boogie, dear, you can have my share. [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

Karl, I'm absolutely with you on the proxy-toothache brought on by Crème Eggs. Boogie, dear, you can have my share.

Thank you!

There is no such thing as too sweet.

(News flash - they have just said on the radio that crème eggs are changing the recipe!)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If they're going to be less sugary, the chocolate will be darker, and the size bigger, I could be interested. Otherwise I'll join the toothache club and stick with what's left of the mini eggs.

[ 12. January 2015, 15:00: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'd rather have a piece of cheese than one of those yukky, over-sweet things - and anyway I'm allergic to chocolate so I'm spared the Creme Egg thing.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I'm with Karl - I can't stand Cadbury's cream eggs.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Finished the Mini Eggs. I'm sure they must have doubled the sugar content since last year - don't fancy buying those again.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
*****craves a crème egg*****

Shall I let you know when they start deep frying them round here. A chip shop has been doing that for the last 20 years, but only near Easter.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I rather fancy deep fried creme egg! (Though not today as I'm fasting).
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
It is amazing what food people crave when they're fasting.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Another one passing on the cream eggs. When I've been given them in the past I've tended to get rid of the central sugary muck (rinse it out with cool water) and eat the chocolate. The news that the chocolate is no longer proper Cadbury's because Kraft decided poorer quality chocolate would fine means that it isn't going to be worth eating the chocolate any more either.

I wonder if the sugar coated eggs have had the Cadbury's chocolate downgraded too? That might explain them tasting nastier.
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
I can't bear the thought or the sight of creme eggs. Now offer me a caramel egg and I wouldn't resist!
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
All this talk of creme eggs is making me hungry! But surely everyone knows that eggs come in sixes and twelves not fives! (The other news being that they've changed the boxes of size you used to be able to get, to five in a box)
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Changing the topic, I wonder if, since this thread apparently includes Newfoundland, it would also, by default, include Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton, not to mention Iles de la Madeleine?

Pete, cheerfully sending back bits of Canada.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
How about Iceland and Saint Pierre & Michelon? [Smile]

I suspect that Newfoundland gets in, not just for geographical accuracy (one can hardly deny it's an Island in the North Atlantic) but, dare I say it, for my dual loyalty.*

That and the fact that we're always talking about the weather ... [Big Grin]

* which I hope will become dual citizenship one day.

PS Pete, how was your trip across the planet?

[ 13. January 2015, 00:46: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by marzipan:
All this talk of creme eggs is making me hungry! But surely everyone knows that eggs come in sixes and twelves not fives! (The other news being that they've changed the boxes of size you used to be able to get, to five in a box)

Blame metrication.

Five is a stupid number to put in a box, because you're always going to have one over to rattle around unless you either put in padding to fill the gap, which will look obvious, or change the shape of the box, which is extra expense with repackaging. They could have gone for four and made them slightly bigger i.e. to weigh the same as five, though perhaps it might have complicated the pricing a bit.

[ 13. January 2015, 04:52: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Can't bear creme eggs - or anything with milk chocolate in or on!

But we should definitely include Newfoundland (would love to go there one day) and Iceland, and any other odd islands hanging around.

Any Faroese out there?
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Back from foie gras land where I spent the weekend holed up among the ducks far away from all the excitement in Paris.

We flew out of Orly where it was surprisingly quiet – although if we’d left a bit later on, I think we would have a lot of trouble because they closed down the Boulevard Périphérique (the ring road that goes round the outside of the city) and I don’t know if we’d have been able to get there.

We had to go for a pointless fifteen-minute meeting which the right-wing foie gras land Town Hall imposes on all foreigners to make sure you’re not getting married just to get a French passport. Yes really [Eek!] OTOH, the sun was shining and we made the most of it to go and see the florist, who I am reassured to discover is lovely, and (IMO of far more interest to the fine folks of this thread) The Caterer™.

So here it is: the most keenly awaited culinary announcement of the year… <trumpet fanfare> …Ladies and gentlemen, I invite you to affix your virtual napkins as I give you… <drumroll>… The Menu™

Apéritif: Champagne and hot and cold canapés

Entrée: Duo of foie gras (I mean, of course there’s foie gras. This is the South-West. We’ll have a revolution on our hands if there isn’t [Biased] ), fruit chutney, toast and mesclun salad.

Meat: Veal steak with white vermouth sauce, parcel of seasonal vegetables and new potatoes

Cheese: Assortment of Roquefort, Cantal and Brie.

Dessert: Champagne Gourmand. This is based on café gourmand which is a popular confection consisting of several miniature desserts and a cup of coffee. A while back we came across a brasserie which has a version replacing the coffee with Champagne, which in our opinion turns it from very nice into flippin’ amazing. Not sure what all of the desserts are going to be, but we have made it clear that if the caterer doesn’t include her moelleux au pain d’épices (a gingerbread flavoured cake with a gooey centre which we tried in her restaurant), we aren’t signing the contract. It is the most delicious thing ever.

Coffee

The knees-up is being knees-upped in a vineyard. Because it’s out of season, the nice man has given us 40% off his price and thrown in the wine for free. So with the exception of the Champagne, the wine is Château Shindig all the way (a sweet white for the foie gras and red for the meat and cheese).
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Just excuse me while I drool, LVER. It sounds wonderful!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... and thrown in the wine for free ...

Now you're talking!

That all sounds utterly divine, La Vie; glad to hear you've got everything sorted.

Now, do you need an organist?*

* who will obviously need a page-turner [Big Grin]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
LVER, that sounds amazing!
On a very different tack, we're having our first snow of the year. Darllenwr has been outside and says it's very wet stuff, but it's starting to cover the car. The forcast says heavy snow all night. I'm so glad I don't have to drive to work in Merthyr tomorrow. There are definite advantages to early retirement.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Lovely food and free wine too, I'll book the train tickets [Big Grin]

We're having a bit of a gourmet evening here too. I've adapted Rick Stein's Cambodian fried fish in garlic and ginger (I've steamed some Tilapia fillets over the coconut rice as a nod to health instead of frying) and turned his fried aloo matar samosas into baked filo parcels. I'm currently downing a gin and tonic whilst waiting for it to be ready.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
A delicious menu! and especially the Roquefort.

Cold night here - came out of the supermarket to find the car's windscreen half covered in melting snow. Can't be bothered to cook dinner, so I'm just finishing off the rest of the lobster bisque and some bread and cheese with sundried tomatoes. Sometimes all you want is just soup and a sandwich.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
Here we've had snowy showers (plus some hail) today. I spotted a girl on my way home trying to remove snow from her car with a can of de icer... I think a scraper might have been more effective.
I'm hoping the snow will have dispersed by Thursday when I have my driving test. (Eek)
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
The menu sounds lovely LVER - and one can never have too much champagne.

When I eventually got round to marrying (there comes a time when a girl's most attractive feature is her pension plan), the reception venue was a friend's back yard, and the food run up the day before BUT we had a case of vintage champagne (and white and red of course). People still enquire wistfully whether we're going to do it again.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by marzipan:
...I'm hoping the snow will have dispersed by Thursday when I have my driving test. (Eek)

Good Luck, Marzipan. Everything crossed for better weather on Thursday.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
No organist, piglet, although there will be a grand piano [Big Grin] *

Heavenly Anarchist, you're better off flying. Paris to foie gras land takes 7 or 8 hours on the train. It's a big rip off because the TGV only goes as far as Bordeaux and then from Bordeaux to Toulouse it goes down to the normal speed, and then you still have to get another train... It is the journey from hell and I hate it with all of my heart [Ultra confused] .

*Played principally by fiancé en rouge's Dad, who is a retired concert pianist. If everything works out, someone else is going to play it to accompany my cello teacher, who is going to play Elgar's Salut d'Amour in honour of Ingerland.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
No organist, piglet, although there will be a grand piano ...

Heretick! [Big Grin]

We've still got most of the snow we got last Thursday, plus a few extra inches that arrived at the weekend, and a light splat from this morning. As the temperature's currently -12° and falling, it's not likely to be going anywhere .. [Frown]

Good luck with your driving test, Marzipan! [Votive]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
We've got snow here this morning, so I hope you don't live in these parts, Marzipan! Good luck with your driving test!

Its also a lovely sunny morning, but icy cold. Best viewed from indoors, I think!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
It's sunny here [Confused] I'm about to go for a nice walk. we seldom ever get snow these days.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Don't knock it, HA - when you get it in January and it doesn't go away until April, the prospect of "no snow" is very appealing. [Big Grin]

It's a beautiful day here (apart from the snow) - clear blue skies, bright sunshine and the temperature hovering around -10°, but feeling more like -20 with the wind-chill.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I was chatting to a Polish friend on Monday about the lack of snow here. Even 10 years ago I remember heavy snow for building snowmen and tobogganing. now it is rare and only lasts a day or so when it does come.
She loves the mild winters here, compared with Poland [Smile]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
Well, my father, who was born in St.Petersburg and survived two post-revolution winters when they were burning books to try and keep warm, used to say that - leaving aside consideration of repressive regimes - he would rather spend a winter in Peter than a winter in Lancashire. The damp means the cold gets into your bones, was his theory.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Good luck, Marzipan! [Axe murder]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by QLib:
... he would rather spend a winter in Peter than a winter in Lancashire. The damp means the cold gets into your bones, was his theory.

Yes.

When I get home from a warm, dry country everything feels damp, even wet - indoors as well. Towels, sheets, everything damp damp damp!

(It's a kind of cold humidity - brrrrrrr!)
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That's very true: in Labrador and out west on the Prairies they get far more impressive minus numbers: the other day in Labrador City it was -45°C, but feeling like -54 with the wind-chill, but as I understand it, it's a much drier cold than we have here on the island.

I've heard people say the inverse about places like Egypt and Tunisia: it may be 40°C, but when it's a dry heat, it's much easier to cope with.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I've heard people say the inverse about places like Egypt and Tunisia: it may be 40°C, but when it's a dry heat, it's much easier to cope with.

When it's dry heat your sweat evaporates and cools you.

Moo
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I've heard people say the inverse about places like Egypt and Tunisia: it may be 40°C, but when it's a dry heat, it's much easier to cope with.

When it's dry heat your sweat evaporates and cools you.

Moo

I've been in Corralejo on the island of Fuerteventura when the temperature was somewhere around 38-40C, and I loved it. I felt very energised. By contrast, I'm here now in damp, not-too-cold Lancashire and it's horrid.

Darwin was wrong. Some of us are descended from iguanas.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Another survivor of Lancashire weather here. When you can see Darwen tower, its about to rain and all that. Its so different in the rest of the country (since leaving Lancashire I've been in the north east, and various bits of the south).

Anyway, I've just booked a few a few days holiday at keilder water, in march. Clearly the weather doesn't scare me. Any suggestions (apart from appropriate clothing and star gazing stuff) welcomed.

Anyone made cake recently?
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
There's a plate of my Mum's fresh black pasty (like a cut-and-come-again eccles cake). Please help yourself; just the thing to keep out the cold.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I've got some cherry CAKE in the freezer, and my Better Half also pointed out today that we have four eggs left, which is the number required* for making some more (and the ones in the freezer will keep, whereas the eggs won't last for ever.

* Four shall be the number of the eggs. Three eggs shalt thou not count, excepting that thou then proceed to four. Five is RIGHT OUT.

Sorry - had a bit of a Monty Python moment there ... [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Bob Two-Owls (# 9680) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
Any suggestions (apart from appropriate clothing and star gazing stuff) welcomed.

Anyone made cake recently?

Blasting round the trails on a mountain bike would see me happy there for a week [Big Grin]

I made a proper parkin, like a brick made from oats and black treacle. Better than expensive yoghurt for clearing your backlog!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
No cake here as I'm dieting [Waterworks] but it is our Friday Feast day so I do have some exciting food to cook. We are having a Caribbean feast courtesy of a recipe and spices purchased from the lucky dip at The Spicery; Trinidad Tomato curry (I'm adding squash and sweet potato as I'm not a big tomato fan), curried chick peas, bara bread (alas not fried but griddled) and some sauces in the form of mango chow, hot pepper sauce and green sauce.
First though, I need to get a little work done and then I'm going to make a golden snitch bow tie for my other half to wear to a posh Harry Potter themed do tomorrow.
 
Posted by Sipech (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
Anyone made cake recently?

Different people have different callings in life. Some people are called to make cake. I am called to eat it. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Mrs Sioni has made Nigella's easy almond cake a couple of times recently. It really is a doddle of a recipe.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I made a gorgeous Moroccan Orange and almond cake, gluten-free. Fat free too, it uses a whole cooked orange whizzed up to a pulp instead of fat.
Am going to look up Nigella's easy almond cake now.

Good day for cooking, its sleeting hard outside. [Frown]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
CAKE may ensue later, depending on how tired I feel when I get home from w*rk.

The Cathedral vestry had their annual pot-luck last night, and very nice it was too, with a good variety of dishes. My contribution was a paella, which seemed to go down quite well, although there was enough left over that with a bit of augmentation it'll feed us for lunch tomorrow.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Not cake exactly, but this weekend I have a longing to have a go at making a tarte tatin. I saw one on the TV last weekend and have itching to try ever since. I’ll let you know how it goes.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Tarte tatin is easier than it looks.

Best tip I was given: blanche apple slices before arranging in the pretty pattern - this removes the time pressure and ensures they stay a uniform colour when the whole thing is cooked and turned out.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Not cake exactly, but this weekend I have a longing to have a go at making a tarte tatin. I saw one on the TV last weekend and have itching to try ever since. I’ll let you know how it goes.

Best. Thing. Ever.

Mrs Sioni made this a few weeks after we returned from a holiday in France and, having enjoyed Tarte Tatin there, she made it here.

It worked. Oh my it worked. "This pastry's good" I said. "It should be. It's made with double cream and butter". Everything else was right too.

We have never repeated it. Having got something that good once, you know it won't ever be that good again.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
I keep having cravings for chocolate based cake when it is too late at night to begin baking (as in, half past ten or so), so i might need to make some tonight... I'd better make sure the kitchen is clear first otherwise the washing up mountain will be too big!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I should have followed my instincts and gone out for a Chinese takeaway this evening. I could have been enjoying roast duck with plum sauce and rice. Instead, as it's blisteringly cold outside, I opted for opening a tin of cassoulet which has proved so unappetizing that I am now reduced to eating a large chunk of Christmas Pud well past its sell-by date but which seems fine otherwise. I should have known better than to buy tinned cassoulet, but a triumph of hope over experience I suppose.

La Vie, can you recommend a recipe for the moelleux au pain d’épices? It sounds like something I'd be interested in making. I don't mind if the recipe's in French.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
marzipan - you can make chocolate cake in the microwave, you know. It only takes five minutes. At the bottom of the recipe I have, it says how dangerous this is, because now you will never be more than five minutes away from cake!
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
I love the fact that you are all still talking about cake. Will naw this weekend, despite having to w*rk.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eigon:
marzipan - you can make chocolate cake in the microwave, you know. It only takes five minutes. At the bottom of the recipe I have, it says how dangerous this is, because now you will never be more than five minutes away from cake!

See what you've done, now I've gone and promised to teach my youngest how to make mug cake in the microwave tomorrow morning - they'll be no end to it.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Make sure he sticks to time suggested. Cake continues to cook and if too long in microwave, it becomes dry or burnt.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and I still haven't made that bread that I've been promising to make for ages - perhaps today?

Hmmm, we'll see.

Fabulous walk round the villages this morning just as the sky was lightening with the waning crescent moon peeping out from behind the palm trees. On my evening walks this week I have noticed Orion nearly overhead - if I was still awake at 22.00 I'm sure it would be directly overhead then.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Felt moderately snoozy after w*rk, so CAKE didn't materialise, but chicken stock is currently bubbling, and I'm off in a minute or two to strain it and put it in containers for freezing.

Then BBC Canada's beginning to screen the second series of Broadchurch.

Talking of such things, did any of you watch The Widower when it was shown in the UK? We've had the first two episodes here, and I found it quite compelling (even more so when I discovered it was based on a true story).
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
La Vie, can you recommend a recipe for the moelleux au pain d’épices? It sounds like something I'd be interested in making. I don't mind if the recipe's in French.

Unfortunately I'm not sure any such recipe exists in the public domain - I think it's the caterer's invention. I've never seen it anywhere else. You'll have to take a trip to foie gras land and go to her restaurant [Biased]

If you wanted to make something like it, I think you would need to look for a basic moelleux/fondant recipe (not the chocolate one - something like a moelleux aux pommes or moelleux au citron) and add the appropriate spices from a pain d'épices recipe. Last time we went there, I saw she had some on the counter that hadn't gone in the oven yet. She had made a sort of well in the middle and filled it with orange sauce and dark chocolate chips, which is what gives it the gooey centre.

Don't know if that helps...
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yes, thanks very much. Like a melting middle gingerbread - could be a lot of fun to experiment with recipes [Biased]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Talking of recipes, cherry CAKE is baking as I type this, and should be ready for virtual tasting soon.

The choir turned out in force this morning for the funeral of the mother of one of our tenors (she was 90 and had been in a home for some time). The service went very nicely, and the tenor concerned was very pleased.

May she rest in peace and rise in glory. [Votive]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Another cold, bright, sunny day here.

D. and I had a v. good (although v. slow - there was something not quite functioning in the kitchen) lunch at Milestones today (using the second gift card he got at Christmas).

Who knew that adding grilled prawns and avocado salsa to Eggs Benedict would knock it into the next league?

Well worth the wait.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Bee Vomit!

For some months, possibly for a year, there has been a hugumungous bees nest hanging from a branch of a tree in Himself's mum's garden and then this morning the bees all upped and left - I didn't see it but apparently it was quite a sight, like a big cloud heading off south from here - I presume the queen was dead and the new queen wanted to relocate to a better neighbourhood, or something.

Anyway Himself and Herself and mum and everyone decided to get the nest down, which wasn't quite as easy as it sounds but was managed eventually. Have you ever tasted fresh honey, I mean straight from the comb? Delicious doesn't cover it, it was/is wonderful!
 
Posted by Bob Two-Owls (# 9680) on :
 
Yes, I used to have beehives at the bottom of the garden. It really makes you wonder what they do to the stuff between collecting and putting it in a jar for the supermarket shelf.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Oh yes! When we lived in South Africa a friend kept bees. He's give us combs dripping in honey - lovely!

The high school near us has bee hives as a project for the kids, so we get lots and lots of honey bees in our garden [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
...and the few remaining bees didn't even attempt to sting any of us!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
It’s brass monkeys in gai Paris at the minute. They’re forecasting snow for later in the week.

Busy weekend for me. On Friday night and Sunday afternoon we played a concert with the orchestra – the Grieg piano concerto by Grieg, which went down very well.

On Saturday afternoon I organised an afternoon tea with my witnesses/bridesmaids to take the measurements for their frocks, which gave me the excuse for producing my tarte tatin. I made my own pastry and everything because I was feeling that virtuous. It looked quite triumphant when I turned out, although it kind of fell apart when I cut it into slices, so I think I need to have another go. I think my apples were too big so I couldn’t pack them together tightly enough. Also it could have done with being a bit more caramelised. I shall have to make another one at some point to perfect it.

On honey - a while back I saw a programme on the BBC about natural wonders of the Commonwealth. One segment featured men in India (I think – although it might have been Sri Lanka) trekking through a forest in search of honey. Said forest is home to a not inconsiderable number of man-eating tigers. I guess it’s got to be quite something if it’s worth the risk of getting torn limb from limb by a tiger.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
mmm honey... My grandad used to have hives so we would have lots of honey and 'sections' of honeycomb to put on toast. One day I want to have bees but probably will never have a big enough place for them in reality.

It's very cold here today (for here, anyway) - frosty this morning, colder than last week when it snowed. I'm wearing two jumpers at work today (the heating's not great though at least we have some)
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Many moons ago my dad was the science teacher in a village school, and he kept a beehive as a school project, although I was too young at the time to know anything about it.

I remember someone giving us proper honeycomb honey once in Orkney and yes - it was absolutely delicious. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It's the perfect night for finishing off the Christmas Pud and mulled wine I've been saving for sub-zero temperatures.

I caved in and bought heat-active thermal leggings (to wear under trousers) and a long-sleeved thermal vest last week. I may go back and get a second set, they're very comfortable and light and worth it.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Timely reminder. Tomorrow I am leaving Scotland (which is cold) for northern Germany - which is even colder. Think it may be time to strike out the thermal long johns I bought for Canada last year.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Sorry, Firenze, but that brought to mind a vision of a pair of long-johns big enough to cover the whole of Canada ... [Killing me]

In this little corner of a Rather Large Country, the temperature has soared to +2°, and there's melting snow gushing merrily down the hill outside Château Piglet. It's forecast to go up to 5° tomorrow morning, but it probably won't stay that warm for long enough to get rid of that much snow.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Beautifully sunny here this morning with a lovely crisp frost - my favourite kind of morning [Smile]
Boring day of admin here, I need to gather together my paperwork for my tax return, compile a file of stuff for CE testing some soft toys I'm making, check up on one of my students and then I need to catch up on my own studies. I might make tandoori-ish chicken this afternoon though.
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:


On honey - a while back I saw a programme on the BBC about natural wonders of the Commonwealth. One segment featured men in India (I think – although it might have been Sri Lanka) trekking through a forest in search of honey. Said forest is home to a not inconsiderable number of man-eating tigers. I guess it’s got to be quite something if it’s worth the risk of getting torn limb from limb by a tiger.

yes, I saw that too. Was it not made even more risky in that the smoke which they used to placate the bees also made it harder to spot if a tiger was coming ?
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
... it probably won't stay that warm for long enough to get rid of that much snow.

It's cleared most of the snow from the roads, but the pavements are covered in serious Patches of Treachery™. A council lorry pulled up on the other side of our road this morning and started putting down salt, but they didn't bother with our side.

We pay the civic taxes with the same sort of dollars* as they do (probably more so, as most of them are on benefits of some sort or another).

[Mad]

* i.e. too many. Further [Mad]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It's snowing now, after a day when the monkeys completely abandoned their brass ball and hurried off in search of hot drinks, baked bananas, etc. But not settling, so far.

The cold cut effortlessly through the four layers I was wearing today, including the thermals. I need to rethink for tomorrow.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
In the interests of research, we tried out a new Vietnamese restaurant just up the road from our house today, and it was very good indeed. D. had a pork/vermicelli concoction with a spring roll, which was very subtle but with a little bit of a kick; I had a quarter duck with steamed rice, decorated with an apple sliced in the shape or a swan (sounds odd, but the sweetness offset the salty duck skin beautifully). The only thing that could have improved it would have been the removal of the rather awkward bones.

Maybe not somewhere to eat every day, but excellent when we fancy Oriental-but-a-wee-bit-different.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Piglet, I do love reading your posts! You have a wonderful time cooking, eating and singing, and sometimes going to work!

Not being rude, but do you have time to do anything else?? Wish I was as good a cook as you are! Forget the singing, I can't read music and croak like a frog!

Saw a photo of St. Johns yesterday - is it really as colourful as it said??
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Piglet, I do love reading your posts! You have a wonderful time cooking, eating and singing, and sometimes going to work!

That's one of the many reasons I enjoy this thread - the glimpses you get into the moments of other people's lives and the mental picture it gives you of them. When I think of Piglet I see her singing in her church or cooking in her kitchen with whales and icebergs floating past outside the window. I see Ariel in the Cotswold lavender farms and in the country pubs. I see Boogie out walking with various labradors. I see WW enjoying the shade of a verandah, clad in not a great deal, or taking a gentle walk along a dusty road. I see la vie en rouge eating cheese and drinking wine.

I, meanwhile, have been to work, had coffee with a friend and am now home trying to feel enthusiastic about this evening's Pilates class. Mr Nen and I have signed up for a series of 6 and I'm counting them down. This is week 3. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - who would be interested in the mental pictures other people have of various posters.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
I see WW enjoying the shade of a verandah, clad in not a great deal, or taking a gentle walk along a dusty road.

I have had the great pleasure of being on that verandah with WW wearing not a great deal. Hmm, that came out a bit wrong.

On the subject of honey, there's a great travel book by someone whose name I can't remember at the moment who goes around the world exploring honey producers and 'hunters' and looking into the history of honey. Those Indian jungle honey collectors have nothing on the Nepali ones who abseil down treacherous cliffs.

(I'll keep searching my brain and google and if I find it will post a link, it's well worth a read.)
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Aha, here you go: Honey and Dust.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Were you ever on the veranda with Welease Woderwick not eating a great deal ?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Nah, it'll never happen!

Strangely it was only yesterday that I was lying in the hammock, just over the border in mum's garden, gazing up at a clear, cloudless blue sky through the silhouettes of the fronds of the coconut and areca palms and enjoying the balmy early evening air and I was thinking about January on Merseyside and what it used to be like to commute through the Birkenhead tunnel twice a day from my home in Tuebrook to my office near Hamilton Square. The early morning excitement of scraping the ice off the windscreen, running the gauntlet of the mad driving travelling down Islington to the tunnel entrance - ah, happy days!

Not!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Piglet, I do love reading your posts! You have a wonderful time cooking, eating and singing, and sometimes going to work!

You make me sound far more accomplished than I really am (it's just as well that technology hasn't yet found a way of you being able to taste things via the interweb). [Big Grin]

Having said that, I'm competent enough at singing and cooking that they give me lots of enjoyment, and I count myself lucky to live where I do - as D. says, coming here was really the best thing we've done.

I think Nenya has a point - my vision of WW involves a verandah and a sort of toga arrangement ...

We're having a couple of the chaps* in the choir round for supper on Friday, so extra cooking will ensue (I'm thinking beef casserole and possibly a very simple chocolate mousse I saw someone do on TV a while ago).

* One of them is a grass-widower at the moment - his wife's gone to visit her mum, and he's a bit lost, as his culinary skills only extend to making cups of tea.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I can't remember what it was called but when I was still carnivorous I used to make a Belgian style beef casserole with beer and then, about 20/30 minutes before the end, slice some baton's of "French" bread into rounds and spread it on one side with mustard and push them into the casserole, mustard side up, then a sprinkle of herbs over the top and then back in the oven - the bread would rise to the top and be crispy on top and soft and gooey underneath. It worked rather well.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Carbonnade of beef. My mother used to make that too, and it is very good on a winter's night.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
That's the word I was looking for, thanks Ariel.

It goes well with something simple like carrots and broccoli.

Yum, yum.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
[QUOTE]
I, meanwhile, have been to work, had coffee with a friend and am now home trying to feel enthusiastic about this evening's Pilates class. Mr Nen and I have signed up for a series of 6 and I'm counting them down. This is week 3. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - who would be interested in the mental pictures other people have of various posters.

Nen, aren't you enjoying the Pilates? I love mine, but nearly missed it on Tuesday when I got so engrossed in a jigsaw I was doing that I mistook the time and had to go to the later class. [Hot and Hormonal] It'll be a long time before Mr. S lets me forget that *sigh*

I do t'ai chi as well, and was very relieved to get my instructor back from sick leave yesterday, albeit with a chemo pack attached. His replacement was so fussy about finger positions and yet ignored people's foot placement, which - given that most of us were there to address balance/stability issues - seemed perverse to me [Disappointed] .

Sorry about the rant, but my main theme is to wish people would take up this sort of stuff earlier in life, rather than waiting till they can't move their shoulders properly, or they've had hip replacements. Use it or lose it, I suppose, and then when you've lost it, wish you could get it back (see Aging Parents thread!)

Mrs. S, fat but flexible [Yipee]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
As a representative antique T'ai Chi-er - yes, I should have kept it up over the years and not let the 20 year gaps develop. But, as you mention, it can be difficult if your teacher disappears for a while, or moves away entirely. In one instance, the entire organisation relocated all its classes to a distant part of the city.

I'm hoping my present class/teacher lasts at least until I have the short Form down pat. There's still the problem though of keeping up practice between times if you don't happen to have access to a few square yards of unobserved open space.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I can't remember what it was called but when I was still carnivorous I used to make a Belgian style beef casserole with beer and then, about 20/30 minutes before the end, slice some baton's of "French" bread into rounds and spread it on one side with mustard and push them into the casserole, mustard side up, then a sprinkle of herbs over the top and then back in the oven - the bread would rise to the top and be crispy on top and soft and gooey underneath. It worked rather well.

I've made something similar before but the kids complain of eating soggy bread [Roll Eyes] This I find very strange as my parents were working class Lancastrians and several times a week as children we had hot pot type dishes of which the highlight was soaking up the gravy at the end with a slice of cheap white bread.
I have a fast day today on my 5:2 diet and I might make pease pudding as a low cal meal. Everyone else can have flat breads with theirs.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I used to do Pilates but now go to Iyengar yoga with a fantastic teacher who is friendly but very hands on. I really like her, she corrects everyone constantly but isn't showy like some yoga teachers. The class is 90mins long and on a Monday morning and I feel it really sets me up for the week, both mentally and physically. Iyengar uses lots of stretching poses and props so I feel I get a good workout too.
 
Posted by Beethoven (# 114) on :
 
I tried Pilates in the next village along from here and really enjoyed it (quite to my surprise!) - but then the instructor moved to Italy, which somehow limited the options to continue! There's now a weekly session in the village where I live, but it's during the day while I'm at work. [Frown]

It's a cold, damp, grey and misty morning here. Perfect for sitting in front of a blazing fire with a hot drink and a slice of something freshly baked. And I'm in the office. [Disappointed]
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
I used to go to Pilates too and loved it. I started the classes to get in tip top shape for cb's wedding and kept going until a family crisis meant my time and energy was needed elsewhere.
The class I used to attend is still running but an hour earlier which is too early for me.
It intrigues me how each Pilates teacher has a completely different way of teaching it.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I've long wanted to do Pilates and Mr Nen and I did a taster session when we were away in December which we both enjoyed and I felt it exercised lots of muscles I didn't know I had but that needed exercising. In these sessions now we spend all the time on the floor contorting ourselves into extraordinary positions that make my neck ache and leave me thinking - "Just... why...?" [Confused]

I've heard a number of t'ai chi recommendations and might look into whether there are any sessions round here.

Nen - fat and not particularly flexible but willing to try. [Biased]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm v. excited to find that I'm going to be Great-Auntie Piglet again - my nephew and his wife are expecting their second baby at the beginning of August.

Gives us a good idea of when to take our holidays ... [Big Grin]

[Yipee]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Congratulations [Smile] I started my own great auntyness early, what with having 7 siblings. I was an aunty aged 6 and a great aunty aged about 27. Mind you, my sister wasn't that impressed at becoming a grandmother at 39 (though that was her own fault for getting pregnant aged 17).
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Nen, this term we are using Swiss balls, and some weeks we get to bounce on them, which is surprisingly hard work but good exercise for the pelvic floor muscles [Biased] The sight of 12 mainly middle-aged people bouncing like kids on spacehoppers is a real treat [Smile]

On the other hand, sometimes we lie with our spines aligned along solid foam rollers, which our instructor says have the amazing effect of making a hard floor feel like a posh mattress when you finally fall off them [Ultra confused]

Mrs. S, aka Roo -'look at me bouncing!'
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
I am so looking forward to Pilates - it's high on the list of what I'll be able to do when I am no longer tied to a desk, which will start in 2 weeks time [Yipee] . Joining an orchestra is also high on the list - for the last 16 years or so I've not been able to commit to evenings, so later today I'm visiting one to see if they like me and I like them. I think I'll adapt easily to my new life [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Daisydaisy, there is a local flute choir you may want to check out, if you've not come across it yet...
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Yay for orchestras! I play in an amateur Symphony Orchestra. I am principal cellist, which is not quite so impressive as it sounds. I probably do play a bit better than the rest of the section, but (amateur) cellists tend to be distinctly unambitious. AIUI, if I am not there, my colleagues argue among themselves for the right not to sit in my chair. [Big Grin] Anyway, orchestras are awesome.

Funny Nenya pictures me with cheese and wine – this pretty much sums up how yesterday evening panned out. Neither fiancé en rouge nor I are really meant to eat large amounts of cheese (high cholesterol and sore joints respectively) but we figure if you binge out on a whole week’s worth of cheese all in one go, you must absorb less of it, right? [Biased]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
Daisydaisy, there is a local flute choir you may want to check out, if you've not come across it yet...

I think that's the one I'm going to [Cool]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Well what a cold morning! All the cars in the car park turned grey overnight. Delays on the railway this morning, and by the time I got to work it was a balmy 18°F which is several degrees below freezing.

It didn't stop us going out to, yes you guessed it, a country pub with log fires, for lunch. I had a very nice venison pie.

It's been a good week for eating out - Tuesday saw one of the best lunches I've ever had, with grilled lobster, grilled king prawns and scallops with lemon butter and fries, a delicious glass of sparkling rose, and a chocolate fondant pudding with amaretto cherries, plus a glass of amaretto to finish off with. It really doesn't get much better than that.

(Sorry, I don't have anything orchestral to contribute.)
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Cold here too and I realise that I haven't gone for my daily walk [Hot and Hormonal] Lamb and spinach curry in the slow cooker though, so that'll warm us up later.
A lazy day here, I did some work earlier but really should be studying now.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Yes, this morning's cycle into work was distinctly chilly! My max-min thermometer made it -5/6C (helpfully, the two sides are a degree out) when we left the house. Port Meadow was beautiful... but bloomin' cold!

AG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We got about 6" of wet, splatty snow last night - enough to make it messy and awkward, but not enough for a snow-day. [Frown]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Another lovely day here, I thought I'd better say that in case you were worried, and I am just back from my evening walk to the post office and back to post a letter for Pete. Himself and Herself are off to some sort of local extravaganza in town but Pete and I declined - I reckon I'll be sound asleep before they get home.

Tomorrow no morning walk with Pete so I'll get up early, I hope, and do a brisk walk round the villages before breakfast. It's a good start to the day.

...and I bought myself a Smartphone today! I can't use it until next week* as I'm porting my current to it and that takes a little while as it will be with another provider - I couldn't face having to learn a new number and change all my stationery so I decided to go the shower route.

*I'm not convinced that I will be able to use it at all but then I look at some of the guys around here who manage stuff like that and reckon I should be able to get away with it, given time.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
Yes, this morning's cycle into work was distinctly chilly! My max-min thermometer made it -5/6C (helpfully, the two sides are a degree out) when we left the house. Port Meadow was beautiful... but bloomin' cold!

Yes, my colleagues were saying their car temperatures showed the same. While waiting for a bus at the station, I noticed a young lady on her way to catch a train who appeared to be wearing bare legs, high-heeled, light, strappy beige summer shoes and a not particularly substantial jacket and skirt.

I've been wondering whether she was just one of those hardy types, or whether they're still defrosting her after this morning's commute.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We went to the supermarket last night at about 8:30 (when the temperature was -4°C) to get in some bits and bobs for this evening, and there was a woman behind us at the check-out with the shortest dress* either of us had ever seen, bare legs and high-heeled peep-toe shoes.

In Newfoundland. In January. [Eek!]

I'm now at the just-about-post-swearing stage of preparation - the casserole's in the slow-cooker where I hope it's going to cook, and the chocolate mousse (which I've never tried before) is chilling in the fridge, which is why I'm messing about on here, while the iron heats up (I suppose I'd better have decent-looking napkins ...)

* Actually the word "dress" is an exaggeration - it was shorter than most of my shirts. [Snigger]

[ 23. January 2015, 18:37: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
On the other hand, sometimes we lie with our spines aligned along solid foam rollers

But - why? [Confused] My back serves me very well and I'm sure I wasn't given it in order to lie on a foam roller. [Ultra confused] See, I'm sure if the Pilates teacher explained why we do things and which muscles we're exercising it would help.

I am not in a good mood, having had an immensely unproductive day at work and feeling bad about that... they don't pay me to sit in their office achieving virtually nothing... [Frown] but on the plus side Mr Nen's going out shortly so I can catch up on the Winterwatch I missed last night. [Biased]

Nen - very taken with the idea of bouncing. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Garasu (# 17152) on :
 
But it feels so good when you stop!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
... the casserole's in the slow-cooker where I hope it's going to cook ...

It did! [Yipee] I've now discovered that about 4½ hours on the high setting of the slow-cooker works just as well as 8 hours on the low. It was generally pronounced to be v. flavoursome, and there was only a tiny little freezer-bagful left over.

The chocolate mousse wasn't bad either, although next time I'll whip up some cream to put on top, so it doesn't look quite so scruffy.

We had a v. nice evening, and I'm now moderately zonked.

Much sleeping tomorrow, I think. [Snore]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
On the other hand, sometimes we lie with our spines aligned along solid foam rollers

But - why? [Confused] My back serves me very well and I'm sure I wasn't given it in order to lie on a foam roller. [Ultra confused] See, I'm sure if the Pilates teacher explained why we do things and which muscles we're exercising it would help.

Nen - very taken with the idea of bouncing. [Big Grin]

According to our teacher, the foam roller - like all Pilates - is all about balance and muscular control (then again, what isn't? especially if you take away the word 'muscular' [Killing me] )

daisydaisy, is it possible I may see you at Pilates in future then? [Yipee]

Mrs. S, working up to a Good Long Walk
 
Posted by jugular (# 4174) on :
 
Hello, fair people of Britain! I will be in the UK during August this year. I am looking forward to ship-meeting where possible. But right now I'm mainly trying to find someone who has experience of the inner workings of Greenbelt. I'd like to put myself forward to do a presentation/workshop/whatever, but as a Greenbelt virgin, it's hard to find out what sorts of submissions they accept and how much support is offered. For those playing at home, it would most likely be about the Love Makes A Way movement, though I have other mad skillz.

Is there anyone who might like to PM about it and help a poor shipmate out? I will pay in egg sandwiches (stale).
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Piglet, I thought you would enjoy seeing how the Swedish chef makes chocolate moose

Moo
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Had a nice morning mooching around with my husband buying random things such as asafoetida, knitting wool and a toilet seat. Came home and booked a pre-Easter break to Sicily.
I still have some walnut and halva cake (an Ottolenghi recipe) left if anyone fancies a slice.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Piglet, I thought you would enjoy seeing how the Swedish chef makes chocolate moose

Obviously, living where I do, I saw that one coming ... [Killing me]
quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:
... random things such as asafoetida, knitting wool and a toilet seat ...

Things don't come much more random that that! [Big Grin]

I indulged in a spot of retail therapy today too: a pair of jeans, a really rather smart jacket for $40 (about £21.50), a couple of ball candles and a 90th birthday card for my dad (I'm going over to Scotland at the beginning of February to join in the celebrations - I'm apparently the "surprise" [Eek!] ).
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs
daisydaisy, is it possible I may see you at Pilates in future [Yipee]

Maybe - although I'm not sure that I'm quite ready for swiss balls or foam rollers - I'm looking for one where I can use arm bands or have a safety harness [Biased]

As I dug up rather a large amount of Jerusalem Artichoke yesterday, today's cooking has featured this. Just waiting for the after effect to kick in, but so far so good. I'm wondering how many of my friends and neighbours would like some - there are plenty more waiting to be dug up - it might provide the alternative to the solar farms that people are muttering about.

Getting ready for a day tomorrow counting birds and making quince jelly (found some windfalls [Yipee] ) and gooseberry chutney.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
...I'm apparently the "surprise" [Eek!] ).

If you are to jump out of a cake be sure to wait until after they have cooked it before you climb in!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
"... four and twenty piglets
Baked into a cake
When the cake was opened
One Piglet began to sing:
Now wasn't that a dainty dish
To set before a king?"

Quiet weekend so far, fine by me. It's been a long, cold week of sub-zero temperatures, but at least some snowdrops and blossoms are now starting to show.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Ariel and WW - [Killing me] [Killing me]

Found out today that Dad's in hospital - nothing life-threatening, just general frailty and being assessed for appropriate "care packages" (horrid expression). When I spoke to my sister and brother they were fairly upbeat about the whole thing, and everyone's still going up to Orkney next week as planned.

Filthy weather here today - it blew a gale this morning, causing quite interesting sound-effects during the morning service, and chucked it down with rain, but at least it's cleared away a good bit of the snow from the roads and pavements.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Squeeee!!

I'm going to see Brian May playing the guitar tonight! [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Wow - "squeeee!!" doesn't really cover it. Lucky you! [Yipee]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I thought you’d be the one interested in that news, Piglet [Big Grin] . He was *phenomenal*.

Roger Taylor was also on good form. I last saw him about ten years ago when I thought he didn’t look all that well (I suspect as a result of doing too many drugs in the 80s), but last night he seemed pretty spry (said drugs have had longer to work their way out of his system [Biased] ). His son has joined them as second drummer. Spike Edney was also back on keys. I don’t remember the name of the new bass player.

I liked their new singer (Adam Lambert). He wasn’t trying to be Freddie, but in some ways I think he’s a lot like him – very flamboyant and camp. He sang Killer Queen lying on a chaise longue fluttering at his face with a golden fan [Smile] . Incredible voice.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jugular:
Hello, fair people of Britain! I will be in the UK during August this year. I am looking forward to ship-meeting where possible. But right now I'm mainly trying to find someone who has experience of the inner workings of Greenbelt. I'd like to put myself forward to do a presentation/workshop/whatever, but as a Greenbelt virgin, it's hard to find out what sorts of submissions they accept and how much support is offered. For those playing at home, it would most likely be about the Love Makes A Way movement, though I have other mad skillz.

Is there anyone who might like to PM about it and help a poor shipmate out? I will pay in egg sandwiches (stale).

I'm not sure I've seen her on the ship recently, but I think Tractor Girl may well have some insights. I'll ask her to check this thread...

There's also usually a GB thread somewhere, I'm sure someone there will know someone with connections.

If you're up for a south coast meet at any point, would love to meet you.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Rush of brains to the head yesterday when I dusted my bedroom and cleaned my bathroom. I didn't do the mirrors which are [already!] looking as if they need it - possibly tomorrow.

It's been a frustrating day with two appointments for taking photos which both fell through for different reasons but it's okay - I have enough to occupy my time. If I get desperate I can always have a nap.

This morning I was trying to explain to a friend in his mid-twenties that worrying about stuff is a waste of time and energy but realise that at that age it is a difficult thing to accept.
 
Posted by Tractor Girl (# 8863) on :
 
Further to Ferijen's post the website lets people know what is happening each year re submissions and how to submit https://www.greenbelt.org.uk/about/
Last year they had an open submissions application process which they selected talks from. Not involved this year and so not sure procedure, other shipmates may be able to help you.

There is normally a Greenbelt thread on the boards and there we tend to have atleast one ship meet over the weekend.

Hope all that helps a bit
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Glad you enjoyed it, La Vie.

Envious? Moi? Too right! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Welcome to the UK thread - come along and chat about the weather!

[Big Grin]

(Title edited)


 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Well, after that invite - it was drizzly here, then sunny but now we appear to be having a sudden storm and it's blowing and hammering down.

Today my eldest turned 14, I can't believe how the time has flown. He requested a spicy stir fry for tea (he's a rather liberal eater and I suspect he made this request as his younger brother is veggie phobic) followed by carrot cake. The carrot cake is currently cooking and I'm just making some chapatis (or possibly Chapstick, as the auto correct keeps insisting [Roll Eyes] ).
I need to get round to doing some study eventually...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
After snow and freezing rain last night, we've now got rivers running down the steeper roads, and more patches of treachery on the pavements.

Apart from that, it's quite a nice day. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
That's it, it's official. We've had all the weathers today. Hail, rain, sleet, bright sunshine, snow in both gentle showers and then driving sheets (in that order) and now thunder and lightning. It's definitely not boring.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That looks fairly familiar, A in E. Are you sure you don't live in Newfoundland? [Big Grin]

Made a batch of French sticks this afternoon and did a bit of adjustment to the jeans I bought last weekend (they never make the ones that fit me in quite the shape I like).

I got a 40%-off birthday voucher in the post today from Addition Elle, the Canadian generously-proportioned ladies' shop. The thing is, it has to be used during February, so if I want to get something that I can take with me when I go away, I'll have to get it on Sunday afternoon, as my flight's on Sunday night, which is a bit of a pain.

I shouldn't really complain - 40% off is better than a slap in the face with a wet fish ... [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We had some less sugar carrot cake last night at supper - it was yummy. Sadly we had no sugar-free ice cream to go with it. Must buy some more. I can eat any but Himself and Pete are both Type 2 so have to be careful.

We all agreed that carrot cake is definitely counted as a serving of vegetable.

Last night, as well as emptying the box of bandwidth so I was forced off-line until I ought some more, I also managed to format my new phone - wasn't that clever? I am happy to give online instructions if anyone else wants to have a go. I shall take it in today and hopefully get it back in a week or so all restored. I shall ask them if it can have a newer OS put on as well as it has Jelly-Bean, superseded yonks ago; hopefully I can get Kitkat.

Luncheon so I'm off to eat.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We are back from our easyJet flight to Glasgow with my youngest son in the pilot's seat. It was my Christmas present - a lovely surprise.

It was surreal! I felt weirdly responsible for all the passengers. Of course, we were also 100% proud. It was a very windy day and he landed it perfectly. We had a cockpit tour after the flight and took lots of photos. Andy is first officer at 25 years old but the captain was only a year or two older!

Glasgow was fun with some Celtic Connections concerts to enjoy. We went on the coldest ever open top bus city tour [Smile]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Glad you had a good time Boogie.

WW, my carrot cake has at least 2 vegetables in it. Sugar is a vegetable, made either from a grass or a root veg (obviously root here, I'm in Silver Spoon territory). Obviously the chocolate bunnies that featured on the top of my cake provided the added benefit of beans as well.

I spent half an hour in my studio today preparing glass for my kiln without a single breakage or hand cut then promptly dropped a full milk bottle on the kitchen floor and spent ages picking up little splinters of glass [Roll Eyes]
I must go and check up on my students (essays due in yesterday and today) and then get back to my own studies as an essay looms for me too.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
HA, how do you find the time to do all that you do?? I am totally amazed - you come up with something new that you are doing/making all the time! [Overused]

Cold, very snowy and a day to stay indoors. So I took the dog out and then have to go out (if I can get the car up the snowy drive) to an appointment at the Medical Centre.

Where is a magic chariot when you need one! [Frown]
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
... better than a slap in the face with a wet fish ... [Smile]

you called ?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
My normal mental state is hypomania - I can juggle an extraordinary amount of things! Bipolars often like creative hobbies and I love things like cooking, sewing and creating glass. It is my therapy.
I only work part time from the OU from home so my work is very flexible (which fits in very well with my bipolar disorder which requires me to have a stress free life) and one of the perks of working for the OU is free study. I've just finished a history degree and have started a masters in education. The free study is a major incentive for me, I came from a poor background and left school to work on a YTS training scheme - no-one from my council estate went to university, no matter what their ability. I did my first degree with the OU in my spare time whilst working full time as a staff nurse and that rather got me hooked on studying, I now have 2 degrees and hope to get faculty funding for a PhD after I finished the Masters. I seem to hunger for the learning I could not get as a child.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wet Kipper:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
... better than a slap in the face with a wet fish ... [Smile]

you called ?
[Killing me]

In Belfast, the usual expression was "better than a slap in the face with a wet [Belfast] Telegraph". [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
There must have been all of 5 minutes of snow in the city centre this evening, none of which settled. Somehow, we all coped with this ferocious blast of winter (to the sound of delighted squeals from a group of Brazilian students: by the time they'd got their phones out to photograph it, it had stopped). It's official: winter has arrived.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Five whole minutes, Ariel? [Eek!]

If that were all the snow we got I'd be a very happy piglet - five months is nearer the mark. [Frown]

Well, not five months of it actually snowing, but once it falls in big enough heaps, it takes a very long time to go away.

[ 30. January 2015, 04:01: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I took my phone back to where I bought it yesterday and saw the man who then called the boy who sold it to me - he cured it in about 90 seconds! Thus no chance to ask for more modern OS - and anyway they didn't charge anything so I'd have felt a bit odd asking for more. It's working fine now and I'm slowly getting used to it - my fingers are still a bit clumsy.

My Right of Residence stuff has taken a temporary tumble as they have just rationalised the system from the previous two parallel schemes to just one scheme, and I won't be eligible to apply until September so they gave back my application papers and the money, which is now back in my account. The single scheme, as it now stands, is the better of the previous two by far so I am not at all unhappy about this, it is worth waiting awhile to get it right. The one drawback is applying for a further visa extension in May to take me to the application date but that is really no big deal and by then the process should be mainly online so it's a win-win.

Plus yesterday afternoon I did something I've been planning for years - I have taken a few photos in for printing as 12x8 and then delivered them to a local framer, collection early next week, and then putting some pictures up around the place. I have 90+ thousand photos in the folder here so I'm happy that a few seem worth exhibiting.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I'm about to set off for work (6:30am) we have about 4 inches of snow, but was very slushy and it's frozen solid overnight. The car park at work is up a steep hill. I'm really not looking forward to -

a) digging the car out
b) negotiating our hill which doesn't get gritted
c) the journey, which usually takes half an hour and will be much longer
d) finding somewhere to park
e) the journey home, which usually takes an hour but will be much longer

Ho hum, pig's bum - moan over!

The actual work I enjoy [Smile]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Just a light snow here, about an inch. My chickens are not impressed though, so extra grain rations for them.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We've got freezing rain and Patches of Treachery™. While I was getting ready for w*rk, I watched a bloke getting out of his car across the road and he was skeetering about all over the place, so when I had to brave it myself, I was walking very gingerly indeed.

[Eek!]

[ 30. January 2015, 14:08: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by kingsfold (# 1726) on :
 
Yaktrax, that's what you need. They're fantastic for stopping you skeetering.
I love mine [Axe murder] (and I never ever expected to need to use that smiley)

[ 30. January 2015, 15:07: Message edited by: kingsfold ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I survived!

It was 4 inches at home - only a dusting at work [Smile]

It's rather nice only working one day a week - you can still have that 'Friday feeling' without any of the weekly graft!

To be fair, I know I'm now to old for teaching full time - it's a young person's game for sure. I am eternally grateful that I could afford to retire.

Now for the weekend - is it WINE O'clock yet?
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
...Now for the weekend - is it WINE O'clock yet?

Don't you know, Boogie: it's always Wine O'clock somewhere in the world [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I'm keeping my bottle of mulled wine for this weekend. If the weather lives up to expectations it'll be just the thing, and if it doesn't, it'll be nice anyway.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm on beer, a home brewed Belgium Christmas beer.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Not much snow here in chilly Bethnei....I feel rather disappointed!
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Rainy sleet that turns to snow for a minute or two then back to rain here. The plan for today included going to our local outdoor lido. it's lovely and warm once you are in the water, but I'm not sure I fancy the walk from the changing rooms.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
There's what looks like a very half-hearted dusting of icing sugar in the car park. The weekend's shopping was done last night in case. Today's forecast has now changed to cold and rain, but I don't fancy going out when the world looks so dismal. I have a pile of historical novels and a supply of chocolate to work through but somehow I think I shall cope.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
It was deep and crisp and even round here yesterday and day before! But its slowly thawing now and getting slushy and slippery. I'm only thankful it didn't freeze last night as it makes it so dangerous for me to walk!

But it was very pretty!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I'm keeping my bottle of mulled wine for this weekend. If the weather lives up to expectations it'll be just the thing, and if it doesn't, it'll be nice anyway.

I like your style. [Smile]

A grey dismal day here too, but the snowdrops are out. Also the daffodils in some places, which is Just Plain Wrong. [Eek!]

Domestics and decorating mainly today for Mr Nen and me, then out this evening to Nenlet1 and son in law for a meal. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We had snow overnight on Thursday. I walked home through it falling at 10:45pm, woke up to a dusting on the roofs and grass, wet pavements. I'd been in the audience for the recording of this week's The Now Show.

This morning we had a couple of hours of snowfall that hasn't settled other than a bit of icing on roofs, here and there. A good day to stay in and do domestic things

I am feeling very pleased with myself. All the news on the deadline for self-assessment tax returns prompted me to check if I was supposed to do one. (I got caught in a funny way of taxing temporary roles through umbrella companies which was explained as working self employed but failed to send me any pay slips, P45 or P60). Apparently I'm due various tax refunds. And sorting out my tax is a whole weight off.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Nenya, I noticed daffodils out on some of the local roundabouts. It was a positively tropical 7.5C in Cardiff!
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
For reasons too complicated to go into, I'd arranged that Mr. S and I would drive 90 miles to the Dowager's to meet Former Miss S and SiL, so we could all go out to lunch together (incidentally celebrating Mr. S's 5 years since retirement - another 6 months and he'll be able to draw his State pension [Yipee] )

Even at the beginning of the week the Dowager was fretting about sn*w, but I pooh-poohed that idea till this morning when I saw a yellow weather warning [Eek!] so I insisted we take a shovel, a blanket, water, food, hiking boots ...and we drove the long way round to avoid the back lanes we usually travel by.

Not a flake of sn*w to be seen all day [Yipee] though the weather was very odd with that strange hectic light that sometimes accompanies very changeable weather. I was very relieved though I think Miss S would have liked some sn*w so they could practise with their new 4x4 [Killing me]

Mrs. S, who also spotted her first daffodils of the year [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
You were obviously the beneficiaries of Piglet's Umbrella Principle, Mrs. S. - if you hadn't taken the shovel, blankets etc., there would probably have been a blizzard. It was a nice day here today - cool but dry - and most of the Patches of Treachery seem to have gone for the moment.

I've had a really quite busy and productive day: I coloured my hair in the morning, made paella for lunch, then went and got my hair cut and copped a couple of bargains at the shops while I was at it - a pair of shoes that I hope will be comfortable enough to cope with chasing round airports, and a decent-sized handbag with lots of compartments - just the sort I like.

Then after much swearing managed to get the computer to print the order of service for tomorrow's Candlemas Procession - it was being decidedly belligerent, but I managed to bring it to heel, which made D. think that I'm a very clever piglet ... [Smile]

I was going to try and check in for my flights on-line, but discovered that you can't do it more than 24 hours before your flight, so that'll have to wait until tomorrow afternoon.

There will probably be more swearing*. [Devil]

* although possibly not as much as is engendered by those hateful check-in machines at the airport. [Mad]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
1st February! In 4 weeks it will be the first day of spring. Meanwhile, you might still have time to say "Rabbits", if you're quick...

Still no snow here, just the cold, not helped by an east wind that seems to be enjoying flattening any plumes of chimney smoke into the horizontal.

[ 01. February 2015, 07:46: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Snow disappearing slowly, but all crisp this morning which makes the slush slippery [Frown]

Still beautifully white on the tops and hills though. Probably still white in Boogie Land??

Seems a long time until Spring. The daffodil we had that bloomed on the 27th December has just died. [Frown]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We still have quite thick snow on the grass but the roads are clear.

I took the dogs on the moors today as the sheep are all tucked up inside - they loved it, so did I.

Gypsy found an unfrozen bog, of course and needed hosing down when we got home as she's off to Church with me soon [Smile]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Sadly, Piglet's Umbrella Principle let us down badly for The Wedding - we bought three white umbrellas in the sure and certain hope that they would keep the rain away. However we emerged from church to find it drizzling, and by the time we got to the reception it was frankly p*ssing down [Mad]

Never mind, if they didn't stop it raining at least they kept the rain off in the other sense [Smile]

Thought of you this morning, Piglet, while walking near the Solent - it was a toss-up whether my ears were colder than my toes, or vice-versa! Hope all goes well for your trip, too

Mrs. S, quietly tiddly-pomming to herself [Votive]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
The Good News about rain is that it usually comes with an overcast sky, which is better for outdoor photography than bright sunshine which gives awkward, if not devastating shadow.

[ 01. February 2015, 16:09: Message edited by: Sioni Sais ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
(Sigh) I was given a sample of Shropshire Blue Cheese last week, something I haven't tried before. Suffice it to say I bought a large chunk of it and have now gone through an entire packet of crackers as a delicious accompaniment in the past three days. There ought to be a Cheese Addicts Hotline I can ring. [Help] What is it about blue cheese?

In other news, a bitterly cold day. Went to Stratford on Avon this morning as it was supposed to be a bit warmer than where I was, but it wasn't so I gave up and went home again.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
It has indeed been savagely cold this weekend (by Southern UK standards, at least, the Newfoundlanders and Faroese are allowed to laugh). We went to Wantage on Saturday, and popped out to Kingston Lisle and the Blowing Stone. Popped out of the car - quick look - blew into the likeliest hole - popped in the car again!

BBBBBBBBRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!

AG
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
It's due to be very cold over night for the next 2 nights. I do value my windscreen cover to reduce the time needed to scrape the car in the morning. It also means less stretching over the car to reach as I'm not very tall.

I saw some very small flakes of snow earlier which is the first I've seem so far this winter [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Mmmmmmm! Shropshire Blue! Mmmmmmm!

Do the Cheese Addicts people organise tastings?

How do I join?

The other morning for breakfast Herself presented me with croissants stuffed with different cheeses and then warmed so the cheese was just at the point of melting into the bread but without being runny - Pete seemed to think he was entitled to some as well, which was annoying, so I allowed him a tiny morsel. One of the cheeses was some Gorgonzola that had been hanging around for a while and was seriously ripe.

Bliss!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
We get a nice bit of Shropshire Blue nearly every week, from our local Cheese-and-lots-of-lovely-other-things Shop, which is, appropriately enough, called The Cheshire Cat.

Tried some Cheshire Blue last week, but found it just too strong. If you like a very strong, salty blue, then hunt for it!

Tasty Lancashire is good too. [Smile] [Smile]
 
Posted by kingsfold (# 1726) on :
 
Stop it. You're making me hungry. And I don't even like blue cheese (a tasty Lancashire on the other hand...)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
The other morning for breakfast Herself presented me with croissants stuffed with different cheeses and then warmed so the cheese was just at the point of melting into the bread but without being runny...

That sounds like heaven on a plate.

Bitterly cold just now and a landslip on the railway line means that stretch of the line is closed for at least a week, while they shift 350 tons of earth. It also means that my train home is cancelled and I have an hour's wait for the next, on the Platform of Winter, with its frosted metal seats. Ah well.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm on my 5:2 fast today and very jealous of the blue cheese! But I will be content with my bowl of lentil and veg laksa.
I buy Jus-rol croissants sometimes and roll up the pastry with diagonal half slice of cheddar for a lovely oozy cheese croissant. Though sometimes I put in jam, chocolate or marzipan instead. Obviously on non-fast days [Razz]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I'm not good with dogs. [Frown] We're looking after Nenlet1's in-laws' dog while they're out for a long day. She had a long walk this morning before they went, so I've taken her for a couple of short ones. She's had her tea. She has a bowl of water. She's had lots of fuss. Now she's just sitting about sighing heavily every so often and getting tremendously excited when I get up to do something mundane like go to the loo. I feel I'm an immense disappointment to her. [Roll Eyes]

Mr Nen and I occasionally toy with the idea of having a dog; indeed he was so keen to see her when he got in from work that he marched straight through without giving me a kiss. [Killing me] He then sounded very surprised that she had not yet been for her second walk and when I offered him the lead and the poo bags he immediately announced that he had work to do this evening. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - cat person.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I've arrived safely in Edinburgh, no major hiccups despite the flight from St. John's being a bit late in leaving, making me panicky that I wouldn't have enough time to change terminals, but everything went just fine. [Smile]

Had v. nice supper - veggie chilli cooked by my niece, who's a vegetablist - who knew that quorn could be that good? Also got lovely cuddles from my great-niece, who is the cutest two-year-old on the planet.

[Axe murder]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Currently the world is prettily iced with snow. I suspect that means a slushy walk to the tube later and sadly I've got too much to do to bundle up and take the camera out.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
A light covering of snow where I live turned gradually into a good 2-3" by the time I reached the office. Hadn't expected that, but got some pictures anyway. Railway stations always look better in the snow, especially country stations and old-fashioned trains.

I just hope it all melts by tonight because the pavements will be lethal otherwise.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
An inch or two here but no road problems. I chose today to start wearing a pedometer so I suppose I'm going to have to go and take a walk in it before I start work.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I've arrived safely in Edinburgh, no major hiccups despite the flight from St. John's being a bit late in leaving, making me panicky that I wouldn't have enough time to change terminals, but everything went just fine. [Smile]


Welcome to the UK Piglet - enjoy your stay!


[Smile]
 
Posted by Beethoven (# 114) on :
 
A couple of inches of snow here, and you'd think the world was ending! School buses an hour late, cars sliding off the road, kids having a day off school because their parents didn't want to trust the bus driver, or take the car out themselves... Me, I'm relieved both DDs made it to school eventually, and enjoying the pretty [Biased]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
A light covering of snow where I live turned gradually into a good 2-3" ...

Where I come from 2-3 inches is a light covering ... [Devil]

When I was flying up to Edinburgh yesterday, once we came down below the clouds I looked out of the window and thought, "ooh, snow!", not really having much idea of where we were. Then, all of a sudden, the snow just stopped. It was as if a borderline had been drawn (it may indeed have been the Scottish border, or a bit north of it), and south of the line the fields were white, and north of it they were green.

Once I was back at ground-level I realised that there were still patches of snow on the ground, but they're just that - patchy.

Having been very good and not slept until normal bed-time (early for me, but more-or-less normal), I slept like a log until about 7 a.m., woke briefly and slept like another log* until about noon. I suspect that's the right way to sort one's jet-lag.

[Snore]

well-rested piglet [Smile]

* actually it may have been the same log - I didn't notice, as I was asleep. [Big Grin]

[ 03. February 2015, 13:42: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Pilates night again. [Frown] [Roll Eyes]

But only one more after this one. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Pilates not floating your boat, Nenya? I wouldn't know - I'm not even sure what a pilate is. [Big Grin]

I'm just back from my very first Ship-meet, and a very nice one it was - thank you Cottontail, North East Quine and Wet Kipper. [Yipee]

Then a nice mosey along Princes Street (well, a wee bit of it) and back out to my sister's place.

No real plans for the rest of the day, although I may do a bit of dozing off - I could feel my eyes closing on the bus, but had to stay awake in case I missed my stop and ended up in Kilmarnock or somewhere ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
Were you able to procure and safely deliver the cake, Piglet?
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
There are primroses out in our church grounds and a daffodil in bu and other daffodil shoots in the flower beds. OK, the church grounds are quite sheltered, but I can see daffodil shoots starting to appear on the bank below our house. Spring might just be on it's way!
Meanwhile, it's so cold, I've been really glad of the knitted shawl a friend gave me wich I can wrap around my neck like a cowl.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Pilates not floating your boat, Nenya? I wouldn't know - I'm not even sure what a pilate is. [Big Grin]

Something best kept between the covers of a Bible, Piglet, and occasionally preceded by the word "Pontius."

Sounds as though you're having a great time in Scotland. [Smile]

Nen - worn out and off to bed. [Snore]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Pilates not floating your boat, Nenya? I wouldn't know - I'm not even sure what a pilate is. [Big Grin]

Something best kept between the covers of a Bible, Piglet, and occasionally preceded by the word "Pontius."

I tried it on Monday morning and I must be even unfitter than I thought because I felt really unwell afterwards and have spent the rest of the week recovering. Maybe I'll stick to walking & allotmenteering. After tomorrow I'll have plenty of time to experiment - I hand in the tools of my trade and walk free.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
There are primroses out in our church grounds and a daffodil in bu and other daffodil shoots in the flower beds...

Me too. We have flowering primrose next to some snowdrops!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
After tomorrow I'll have plenty of time to experiment - I hand in the tools of my trade and walk free.

Retirement? [Smile]

My day off today - grocery shopping, lunch with Mr Nen who is working from home, coffee with a friend this afternoon. Also hoping to shake off the Post Pilates Backache. It took my zumba class on Tuesday to sort out last week's. [Roll Eyes] Fear not, my friends - this time next week I'll have done my last Pilates class and the moaning will stop.

Nen - loves part time working. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Alas, today is a heap of marking and studying, with an online tutorial to teach this evening too. I'm just off for a walk in the snow first.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Over there - beyond the plate glass - the sleet is falling as steadily on the Viale Vittorio Emanuele as it has been for some hours. I've been to the Duomo, and the church where St Augustine is buried and the market and the shops selling posh handbags and expensive perfumes. This bench seat is not that comfortable, but the one in the room is no better. Ah well, this time tomorrow, in transit...
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Cold, miserable and grey here, and walking the dog across the park is like trudging across the Russian tundra!

Definitely not a 'me' day [Frown]
 
Posted by Beethoven (# 114) on :
 
For the second time this week, I went for a run in the evening, and less than twelve hours later white stuff was falling from the sky. I don't think there's a connection, but... [Biased] So far today though it's gone away as quickly as it's arrived, so it's just grey and damp. But the snowdrops and aconites are looking lovely, and hinting that the cold grey damp may at some distant future point give way to mild grey and damp. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Trip to the Hypermarket in the Mall today where, after a mega shop, Pete consumed a meal big enough for a family - but he's not a quitter and soldiered on until it was almost all gone - then he manned up and forced down an ice cream sundae as well!

What a Star that man is!!

We spent about 90 something quid and I have to remind myself that in UK that amount of money on a supermarket trip is not at all unusual.

Yes, we did buy some cheese but not a huge amount - some Gouda with Wild Garlic - I think it is really chopped Ransom but it still tastes just fine.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
After tomorrow I'll have plenty of time to experiment - I hand in the tools of my trade and walk free.

Retirement? [Smile] ........

Nen - loves part time working. [Big Grin]

Not yet - voluntary redundancy. So at some point I'll be looking for something light-weight and enjoyable, but not until I've had some fun first [Razz]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wet Kipper:
Were you able to procure and safely deliver the cake, Piglet?

I was able to procure a cake, although it wasn't the exact one that had been asked for, as the shelf marked "extremely chocolatey birthday cake" was notable for its emptiness. Getting it home was a breeze, as it was a long, loaf-shape and easy to carry in one of their carrier-bags; my brother's taking it up to Orkney, as he's going by car and the rest of us are flying.

It's a beautiful, sunny day here in Edinburgh, although I've missed most of it so far - whenever I woke up I kept dozing off again ... [Snore]

I'm almost packed and organised, and just messing about here waiting for my sister and niece to get back from w*rk, at which point we'll get a taxi to the airport.

I just took a phone call from the girl in the car-hire office in Orkney, who turned out to be someone who was in my class at school.

Orkney is such a delightfully small place. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Getting it home was a breeze, as it was a long, loaf-shape and easy to carry in one of their carrier-bags; my brother's taking it up to Orkney, as he's going by car and the rest of us are flying.

This reminds me of the evening when I was going up the stairs at the station when someone in front of me tripped and dropped the box she was carrying, which fell on the stairs and split open. A huge cookie the size of a large pizza, with the personalized message "Happy Birthday [name]", shot out and shattered on impact with the steps.

A real cake is altogether easier to transport, and fingers crossed it arrives just as intended.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Confessions time - I got really stroppy today. I was driving my pavement scooter through town and found that a delivery van had
patked on the pavement in such a way that I couldn't get through. I ended up calling the company's number, which was on the back of the van - they rang the driver's mobile and a young man dashed up to the van a couple of minuites later, said sorry, and drove off.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
For anyone looking for an alternative to Pilates, I recommend not trying spinning. I attempted a spinning class a couple of weeks ago, thinking that as I cycle every day and run three times a week, I would be able to manage it.

The next day I could only walk down stairs with the greatest difficulty as my thigh muscles had stiffened up so much. Took a few days to get back to normal.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yes, from what I've heard spinning isn't something most people can just come into, you have to work up to this.

On a completely different and unrelated note, Marine Le Pen is speaking at the Oxford Union this evening. I wish she wasn't, but suppose in the interests of free speech she has the right to be heard. Demo with drums outside: hopefully it'll remain peaceful.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Booo booooo boo Marine le Pen is a very bad person. Booooo.

To me one of the encouraging things following the recent terrorist attacks is that the FN doesn't seem to have done all that well out of it. OTOH, she's still ahead of Nicolas Sarkozy in the opinion polls, assuming he runs.
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Demo with drums outside: hopefully it'll remain peaceful.

Drums.......Peaceful ?? [Confused]
 
Posted by kingsfold (# 1726) on :
 
Better than some of my local ones with drums and fifes.....
.
.
.
.
.... and marchers in orange collars..... [Disappointed]

[ 06. February 2015, 13:18: Message edited by: kingsfold ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Booo booooo boo Marine le Pen is a very bad person. Booooo.

She was on local radio this morning explaining indignantly that she was a true patriot who loved democracy and had been misunderstood.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Looking forward to a nice peaceful day relaxing with a little light housework and baking ... hmmm ... maybe not ... The twins, Jack and Mary, are coming at 3pm - they are 18 months old!

[Two face]
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
We had planned to venture to some mid-sized shops today. The weather is, however, alternating between horizontal drizzle and cold grey overcast, so we've been as far as the local corner shop, then retreated home! Sorting random paperwork and listening to Fairport CDs.

On the much better side, the tub of snowdrops are flowering. I was given a clump of bulbs by Mother Knotweed last spring, and they have managed to survive benign neglect and a north-facing, tree-shadowed driveway. [Yipee] Spring may yet arrive.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
We went over to Abergavenny this afternoon after our monthly tune club, and were amazed how much snow there is alongside the Heads of the Valleys road and also on the Blorenge. Mind, it's a good few hundred feet higher than us.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Spending most of the weekend in bed fending off a cold and chest infection. Catching up on some reading: Anya Seton, William Fiennes and Ian Mortimer's "Time Traveller's Guide to Elizabethan England". I should be digging the allotment but that's going to have to wait until next weekend.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Sunny but cold. A pleasing contrast to yesterday, which began with us dragging wheelie cases through rutted slush - and snow still falling - to the bus stop at a quarter to 7. The view from the coach was of a surreal landscape of grey-white fog punctuated by geometric plantation of spindly poplars. The airport was wet and snowy and our gate changed three times. Eventually a plane showed up and flew us over the Alps to a sunnier Netherlands. And then on, with the Forth Bridges floating in a shimmering mist. Home to a freezing house and the immediate need to go trudge round Morrison's for an hour. A very early night.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Fog here today. More grey [Frown]

Went to see if the snowdrops in the park were out, last year they were spectacular. But this year there are hardly any, and they are still in bud. What has happened to them??

Definitely Grim up North!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Beautiful sunny day - cold but bright.

I'm trying to arrange a Tesco's delivery of food for my elderly mother, who doesn't like answering the phone or the door. It's due this morning and I haven't been able to get through to her to let her know it's on its way, so I'm hoping this will go all right, as she doesn't have much in. I did warn her on Friday that she would have to answer the door and she'd have to sign for it and she seemed happy with that, but - oh, dear, some elderly folk [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yesterday morning a housewarming then yesterday evening the first part of a marriage of a neighbour's daughter [mainly a big nosh up at both events] and today the marriage proper, followed by another nosh up - and it would be impolite to refuse to eat - seriously people would be most offended and they would certainly notice.

Himself and Herself have gone on to the next feast at the groom's place but Pete and I ducked out of that so I've had a little sleep and then got the interweb thing working again - Pete is still sound asleep. Yesterday afternoon he slept for 5 solid hours - he denied this and said it was nearer four and a half!

Ah well, if self-delusion makes him happy...
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
And getting my oar in before Wodders fabricates more lies, today I had but two hours, for 4-6. Woke up at 6 to a dark silent house, and lay quietly until just on 7. Pottered about a bit then decided to see if the Internet was behaving. This is the result.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
And getting my oar in before Wodders fabricates more lies, today I had but two hours, for 4-6. Woke up at 6 to a dark silent house, and lay quietly until just on 7. Pottered about a bit then decided to see if the Internet was behaving. This is the result.

The Kraken wakes!


[Biased]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Inspired by the recent media storm in a teacup about a yellow car "photobombing" Arlington Row in Bibury, a scene so fundamentally British it is now included on the passport (along, no doubt, with "mustn't grumble", stewed tea and petty xenophobia), what else can you do, but go and look for it!

AG
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Nice shot [Biased] That car makes the cottage look quite small.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Back safely in Edinburgh after a nice few days in Orkney and fairly jolly celebrations of Dad's 90th birthday.

I discovered after we'd landed that my sister and I had had the exact same thought just before the plane took off this afternoon: that our entire family (apart from my dad, brother and D.) were all on the same plane, and if anything happened we'd be wiped out - it makes you understand why they don't let too many members of the Royal Family travel together ... [Eek!]

I'm planning a nice lazy day tomorrow, as I've got a disgustingly early start on Tuesday (the first of three flights leaves at 7 in the morning [Snore] ).
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Glad it all went well, piglet.
I've had stomach upset/food poisoning most of the weekend and feel crap. However, I am now about to start on 8-9 hours of essay marking... [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The one thing I really hated was marking! Talking the students through essays was fine but when it came to actually marking them - [Projectile]

Worse than ordinary marking was second marking when a colleague had a problem with a piece from one of their own students and wanted a second opinion.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm very glad my job doesn't involve anything as difficult as marking other people's work, especially if the answers aren't a clear-cut right or wrong.

It's a beautiful day here in Edinburgh - the sun's splitting the trees and there's the merest breeze ruffling the branches.

I suspect it may not be quite like this when I get back to St. John's tomorrow. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Good luck Piglet and have a safe journey. It sounds quite tiring. [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
8 essays down, 6-8 more to go this evening. I don't do second marking but could do if I wanted to for extra pay as the university has a system of random second marking for moderating purposes.
Today's essay subject is the effect of long term health conditions on relationships.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
A lovely day in this suburban garden, at breakfast we were visited by a muntjac deer who obviously hasn't noticed the building site currently being erected behind our house (huge new estate) and I've just seen a group of goldfinches feeding on our dead solidago (a good reason not to weed).
A profitable morning, I've marked another long essay, done some admin, caught up with students online and I've drawn up the marking plan for the next lot of marking - 39 mini essays on subjects ranging from self help groups to diversity in the care system. That'll keep me occupied for the next couple of days.
How's everyone else today? Are you home yet piglet?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well Pete and I both have colds, mine being slightly more advanced than his, so neither of us is madly chuffed but we'll get through it. He has suggested a bowl of soup for supper, not a bad idea even for someone like me who tries to avoid supper wherever possible. I think it will end up with quite a bit of both garlic and ginger in it as a sort of kill-or-cure. I like ginger - we both like ginger - and garlic is a food group all of its own.

My bank has arrived in the 21st Century and now allows requests for Foreign Transfers to be made online - the problem is that I am lacking a piece of hardware to do it so am arranging for it to brought out by my bessy mate next month then I won't have to phone the bank every pay day - today's call for 702 seconds cost just under 22 rupees so about 25 pence - not too bad.

This morning the I asked the lad in Skelmersdale what the weather was like there [at 04.00 GMT when I called] and he said that I didn't want to know and when I suggested that I share with him what the weather was like here at the time [09.30 IST] he said he didn't want to know.

[Snigger]

In case any of you are worried it has been a lovely warm clear day with hardly a cloud in the sky though it was only about 23C on our morning walk so no hanging about.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Garlic and ginger soup sounds heavenly. I hope the colds get better soon.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I went to a painting demonstration today by Carl Jacobs - excellent, I'm inspired!

But I forgot my phone at home - then lost my car! Gypsy had an extra walk while we wandered round the streets looking for it! I was beginning to feel sure it had been stolen and to wonder what to do with no mobile.

[Roll Eyes]

In my defence, all these Lancashire stone terraced streets look the same, we found it eventually.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Well Pete and I both have colds, mine being slightly more advanced than his, so neither of us is madly chuffed but we'll get through it.

Good luck. It's my first day up after 3 days in bed with a delightful cold which has lasted a week. The main feature was finding it impossible to get warm. It must have been at least 90° at a conservative estimate in my room and it still didn't help. I went right off food but, strangely, had cravings for apple pie and ginger drinks.

Going back to work was good. I was getting fed up with being at home all day. We had a power cut halfway through this afternoon which knocked out the entire area and resulted in all the offices in the vicinity being closed and everyone being sent home early, and a huge traffic jam as everybody tried to leave at once.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
... Are you home yet piglet?

I am - I left Edinburgh at 7 this morning and arrived safely in St. John's at about 9 this evening (12:30 am UK time). No hitches at all on the way - I reckon St. Christopher must have been keeping an eye on me!

I ought to have a relatively early night though - I'm back to w*rk tomorrow (luckily Wednesday's my shortest working day). Apparently there's a Bit Of A Do after choir practice on Wednesday to celebrate 12 years since D. moved here.

Oh yes, and they're forecasting about a foot and a half of sn*w for Thursday ... [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
...Oh yes, and they're forecasting about a foot and a half of sn*w for Thursday ... [Waterworks]

We still haven't had any this winter [Big Grin]

Colds progressing. The soup last night was wonderful and certainly made me sweat a bit - garlic, ginger and mushroom with lashings of black pepper!

I'm now in the I feel lousy and would be happy to pop my clogs at this very minute stage but know it will pass in a day or two and I'll then be fine but right now I'm heading back to bed with my misery. I am widely known to be a lousy patient, like most men.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Back online again after a Small Domestic Issue ie. Mr S managing to wreck both the USB ports on my laptop. He desperately wanted to scan something, the scanner wouldn't work and he borrowed the laptop to test it out, in case it was the desktop playing up. A combination of haste and poor lighting (I told him to put the top light on) led to the following exchange:

Him: which USB port do you use for your mouse?
Me: either, they both work.
Him: not any more they don't.
Me: £$%^&*()!!!!! [Mad]

Adding insult to injury, he then plugged the scanner into a mouldy old laptop that was lurking under the stairs, and it worked straight off. [Mad] Then he plugged it back into the desktop and - you guessed it - it worked first time. [Mad] [Mad] [Mad]

To be absolutely fair, by lunchtime he'd tracked down (not an easy task) and ordered a new Windows 7 laptop, and it was delivered Monday afternoon. And because, mirabile dictu*, I had done a back-up at the beginning of the month (years working at the Big Corporation of which daisydaisy speaks will do that for you!) it was remarkably easy to get up and running again [Overused]

* wonderful to relate

I feel a bit like the guitarist in Spinal Tap - this one has four USB ports!

Anyway the moral of the story, as construed by Mr. S - 'next time I ask to borrow your laptop, Just Say No' [Killing me] Oh, and do regular back-ups!

Mrs. S, feeling smug
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Another 10 hour marking day today but this should be the last for a couple of weeks, with the exception of a couple of late submissions. I'm already over my work hours for this week [Roll Eyes]
Alas, I have an essay of my own to submit in 2 weeks so it'll be back to studying on Friday.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
My cold of the end of last week seems to be pretty much better. I can’t fight with garlic (doesn’t like me) but suitable amounts of chili were consumed. More to the point, I went in all guns blazing right at the start and nuked it with lots of (over-the-counter, legal from the pharmacy [Biased] ) drugs so it never got really horrible.

Fiancé en rouge, OTOH, decided he wanted to tough it out and let his immune system fight it off all by its little self sans my copious supply of drugs. A week later he’s still full of cold. Fine, be ill if you want to. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... garlic doesn’t like me ...

Crikey - you live in France* and can't eat garlic??? [Waterworks]

In other news, I'm now back at w*rk, but thinking I'd be sensible and take my keys out of my handbag before I went away, I forgot that I had, so had to be let into my office by the nice Campus Enforcement bloke.

brainless piglet [brick wall]

* Actually living anywhere and not being able to eat garlic would make me [Waterworks] .
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Lunch today faced me with the dilemma of choosing between French onion soup, which I love, and a really delicious-looking, rich golden-brown and piping hot ham, tomato and mushroom lasagne, which has never featured on the specials board before as far as I know. I went for the soup as it was cheaper.

It certainly was. It turned out to be glutinous, tasted largely of salt, and had two whole particles of onion in it. It was then that I remembered I'd encountered this particular soup months before and it was still revolting. It went down the sink in the end - I hate doing that but it really was awful.

I've spent the afternoon regretting my lunch choice - first world problem but the mental image of that lasagne and the beautiful rich golden-brown colour of the cheese on top bubbling away still haunts me. Missed opportunities that might never recur for a second chance, sigh.
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
Inspired by the recent media storm in a teacup about a yellow car "photobombing" Arlington Row in Bibury, a scene so fundamentally British it is now included on the passport (along, no doubt, with "mustn't grumble", stewed tea and petty xenophobia), what else can you do, but go and look for it!

AG

That's a nice shade of yellow - just about my favourite. I'd like a car like that and I'd be very happy to park it outside our stone house.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Some of you like the Intrepid Mrs S seem to have been very unlucky with your computers.

Mine was made in 1999, I bought it in August 2008 when it was 9 years old, and it's still working fine after another 6 1/2 years. Mind you, I have never tried to scan anything.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
quote:
That's a nice shade of yellow - just about my favourite. I'd like a car like that and I'd be very happy to park it outside our stone house.
My wife's car is an even brighter shade of yellow, which she deliberately ordered because it means she can find it easily in busy carparks.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... choosing between French onion soup ... and a really delicious-looking, rich golden-brown and piping hot ham, tomato and mushroom lasagne ...

There would have been no contest - French onion soup is always something that I can either take or leave (and would as soon leave), but the lasagne sounds lovely.

I hope they put it on again so that you get the chance to try it.

The post-choir-practice bash was quite jolly - lots of nice nibbly food, and everyone was welcoming me back and asking after my dad, and they sang "Happy Birthday" to me for yesterday, which was kind of them.

Bracing ourselves for a big snow-day tomorrow - if it's going to come, I hope it does so in time for the University to be closed before I go to w*rk ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Barnabas Aus:
quote:
That's a nice shade of yellow - just about my favourite. I'd like a car like that and I'd be very happy to park it outside our stone house.
My wife's car is an even brighter shade of yellow, which she deliberately ordered because it means she can find it easily in busy carparks.
Now that's a great idea!

We only have one car now since we retired - and we are having talks about getting a new one. I will put it to OH that we have a super unusual colour. Noooo chance of him going for any other colour than grey I'm afraid. We have had cars in all fifty shades!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
One of my brothers had one of those FIAT frog-like things in bright orange for the exact same reason - it really was hideous but quite distinctive.


...and nobody ever tried to steal it!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
... Bracing ourselves for a big snow-day tomorrow ...

Big snow-day has duly arrived - although the snow hadn't started when I went to bed, D. had a look out at about 7 o'clock and said it was just beginning. I looked out about 5 minutes later and it was blowing around nicely, so I checked the web-site and sure enough we're closed.

[Yipee]

Re: silly-coloured cars, ISTM that small, cute cars like Beetles (especially original ones) and FIAT 500s can look good in any colour.

I've always fancied getting a red original Beetle and painting black spots on it, or giving a pink one a piggy's nose and a curly tail ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by kingsfold (# 1726) on :
 
I have a bright blue Fiat 500 (like this ). There are a number round my way, but not so many... And yes, it's relatively easy to spot in a car park, except when overshadowed by much larger cars.

[ 12. February 2015, 14:42: Message edited by: kingsfold ]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I've always fancied getting a red original Beetle and painting black spots on it... [Big Grin]

That's something I've wanted to do for many years -- since the original Beetles were new.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I picked mine partly because it was a distinctive colour and sure enough it's instantly recognizable in a supermarket car park, in amidst a sea of grey cars interspersed with red or dark colours. However, take it out to the countryside and it looks perfectly at home in rural surroundings, whereas the grey and red ones are the ones that suddenly look really out of place and artificial.

I don't know why anybody buys grey cars when they could have a splash of colour and a bit of style, instead of what often fails to look sleekly, metallically elegant and just looks like a tin box on wheels with no personality.

I quite like seeing cars with distinctive colours and wondering what it would be like to test-drive them. There was one parked nearby recently that made me think it must be a lot like driving an aubergine.

[ 12. February 2015, 18:26: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The only car of which I've ever been the official owner (handed on to me by my dad when he replaced it, but after 15 years couldn't quite bear to part with it) was a David Icke-turquoise Volvo 145 estate like this.

Losing it in car-parks was virtually impossible, as was having it stolen, as it was the only one in that colour in the county and everybody (including all 12* policemen and the crew of the ferry off the island) knew whose it was.

* I suspect the Orkney constabulary may have expanded since then. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
What is this 'choice' of car colour?

IME you buy the car you find in the small ads/ at a reliable second-hand dealer and it comes in the colour it comes in.

My present vehicle is a bronze-ish colour: the one before was a spectacular bilious yellow-green.

If I had a choice I'd quite like a red car.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Anything but silver.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:

If I had a choice I'd quite like a red car.

My husband's car is a beautiful metallic ruby red called 'lava'. It is one of the most attractive car colours I've ever seen.
If I had a car (I don't drive) I'd quite like an aubergine one or possibly custard.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
... I'd quite like an aubergine one or possibly custard.

You could have both. [Big Grin]

I've just printed the order of service for Sunday's ordination (about which we're v.v. cross because it's depriving us of Evensong [Mad] ), and despite the vagaries of our word-processing system, it appears to have done it in the right order at the first attempt, which makes me feel just a tad smug.

As it snowed* for most of the day, I decided on a spot of therapeutic soup-making. I made a big pot of bacon, lentil and tomato soup, which I really like, but wasn't sure if D. would (he prefers his soup chunky, and this one's whizzy-whizzed), but he had a mug of it and pronounced it very nice.

* We got at least a foot, most of it on our front steps, with the imprint of the front door panels clearly visible in the drift when we opened the door.

[ 13. February 2015, 00:07: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I've always fancied getting a red original Beetle and painting black spots on it... [Big Grin]

That's something I've wanted to do for many years -- since the original Beetles were new.
What, since 1938?

[Razz]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
What is this 'choice' of car colour?

IME you buy the car you find in the small ads/ at a reliable second-hand dealer and it comes in the colour it comes in.

Noooo. Colour is personality. I have to feel comfortable with what I'm going to be driving for the next few years. I need to feel a sense of pleasure, anticipation and pride when I look at my car, not gloom, indifference or embarrassment. Or wondering how I'm going to tell it apart from all the rest.

I found mine online in the small ads of a reliable secondhand dealer and first glance at the photo, I knew immediately that this was the one for me. Five years later it still gives me that sense of wonder when I look at it, now mixed with memories of many minor but enjoyable adventures.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Noooo. Colour is personality. I have to feel comfortable with what I'm going to be driving for the next few years. I need to feel a sense of pleasure, anticipation and pride when I look at my car, not gloom, indifference or embarrassment. Or wondering how I'm going to tell it apart from all the rest.

So, now that I have a shared car is it worth the fight to get the next one with my choice of colour??

Probably not - but I love the idea of it standing out in a car park.

We have had VW Passats for years. I said I'd hate driving it when we got rid of mine, as I loved my little cars. Nope, wrong - I really like it, especially the cruise control which I use a lot.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
So, now that I have a shared car is it worth the fight to get the next one with my choice of colour??

Yes. Life is short. Do it!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
So, now that I have a shared car is it worth the fight to get the next one with my choice of colour??

Yes. Life is short. Do it!
[Killing me] [Killing me]
 
Posted by kingsfold (# 1726) on :
 
quote:
posted by Boogie:
So, now that I have a shared car is it worth the fight to get the next one with my choice of colour??

Oh yes. Definitely. I looked at the fiat 500 based on having driven a couple as hire cars and liking it, but when I saw the possible colours I fell completely in love with blue one, and nothing else would do... (This was the first and possibly last time in my life I've ever bought a car from new so really had the choice)
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
posted by piglet
quote:
I've always fancied getting a red original Beetle and painting black spots on it...
In fact Ford produced the Ka 'Ladybird' around 1996 - mainly in red but a few were produced in yellow as well.

It was seen as an answer to the VW Polo 'Harlequin' of which it was said that no 2 were the same.

[ 13. February 2015, 10:06: Message edited by: L'organist ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
... I'd quite like an aubergine one or possibly custard.

You could have both. [Big Grin]


I'd love a Citreon Dolly, we once fell in love with a neighbour's Dolly while camping. My Dad had a Citreon Dyanne Cabanne in Prussian Blue when I was a teenager, a lovely bouncy car. People kept leaving him notes on the windscreen offering to buy it.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Oops, spelling is wrong it is Dyane Caban
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I didn't know what a Volkswagen Passat was like so have just looked on the Volkswagen website. Either they have a lot of customers with the same taste as Boogie's husband, or else they don't offer much choice. All of the cars shown are gray !

I am generally looking for a car for under £500 so colour has to give precedence to things like having a long MOT and not too much rust, but have never had to have a gray one.

A few years back I bought a 1993 Fiat Cinquecento metallic blue, with a sticker saying 'Powered by fairy dust' in pink letters on the side. A few people did ask me why I didn't take the sticker off, but it seemed like part of the car's character to me, so I thought it deserved to keep it.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:

A few years back I bought a 1993 Fiat Cinquecento metallic blue, with a sticker saying 'Powered by fairy dust' in pink letters on the side. A few people did ask me why I didn't take the sticker off, but it seemed like part of the car's character to me, so I thought it deserved to keep it.

[Killing me]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
... I am generally looking for a car for under £500 ...

A whole one? [Big Grin]

In other news, back to the grind today - the snow-heaps are making getting about a total pain. And why couldn't the Almighty occasionally make the drifts gravitate to the other side of our road? They're piled up to the top of the railings of our front steps (about 6 feet) but on the other side of the road you can actually see the pavement.

disgruntled piglet

[ 13. February 2015, 13:43: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
I didn't know what a Volkswagen Passat was like so have just looked on the Volkswagen website. Either they have a lot of customers with the same taste as Boogie's husband, or else they don't offer much choice. All of the cars shown are gray !

Do they offer 50 different shades? [Devil]

To be fair, I did spy a dark red one: it made a cameo appearance at the bottom of the page.

[ 13. February 2015, 13:50: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
I would appear to have made Lord P.'s day. His birthday is coming up (a couple of weeks away yet) and he pointed out that his bass guitar was showing signs of disintegrating (true enough, I'm afraid), was there any chance of a new one?

I told him that he could have a budget of [I won't say quite how much] and it was up to him to find what he liked within that. I also suggested that he should not buy the first instrument he saw.

We took a trip to Hereford today, to the most cluttered music shop I know (Nilam Music, for those of you who know Hereford). Lord P came away clutching a Cort B5 electric bass - for £300. I think that I may have trouble persuading him to put it down for long enough to go to bed tonight ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I wish Lord P. health to enjoy his new guitar (not knowing anything about guitars, I have no idea whether or not you got a bargain).

Moderately busy day, for a Saturday, here: we sang for the funeral of an old lady from the congregation, where the pre-service tribute took 20 minutes.

I've heard Baptist sermons that were shorter than that (pace BT!). [Devil]

Then D. and I went to a place called Wingin' It for a bit to eat (messy but nice). When I got home, I finished what had better be the final draft of the order of service for tomorrow night, and D's away down the road to print it off.

Fortunately, so far nobody has asked me to provide anything for the post-ordination bun-fight, and I haven't offered ... [Devil]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Slight pain in right groin this morning so was tempted to use it as excuse for not walking but within half a kilometre the pain had gone and I had an excellent walk then home to face neighbour boy [his mum told him I was passing outside] and his angst about the equivalent of A Levels starting tomorrow with the practicals then the full exams in March. Poor lad gets himself so wound up that he can't perform to best advantage. He's coming here later to get some photos transferred to his phone so I'll try and work on him then. When he gets a consistent 80% on his term work but down in the 20s and 30s for exams it surely shows something.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
WW - Bach's Rescue Remedy was suggested to get me through my driving test when I was doing something similar. It worked so well that the driving instructor started recommending to others who were failing for no apparent reason. You have to play around with it for a bit to find out how long it takes to act, but it worked to just take the edge off for me.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Before I clicked your link, I imagined Bach's Rescue Remedy was going to be something like this. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I knew there was a reason that I had to give the link [Big Grin] Much though I love Bach's Toccata and Fugues the one you linked to really wouldn't rescue me from anything.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Darllenwr:
We took a trip to Hereford today, to the most cluttered music shop I know (Nilam Music, for those of you who know Hereford).

I've been to that shop! I'll probably be there again this summer.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Ooh... now I'm getting ideas for a Day Out - Hereford being only a few stops along a train line.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Made my own ham, tomato and mushroom lasagne tonight, with tomato and roast garlic sauce instead of the traditional white sauce. I'll be making that again.

Lots of snowdrops out this afternoon and the first crocuses looking as if they'll open later this week. Nice to see some signs of spring.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:
Ooh... now I'm getting ideas for a Day Out - Hereford being only a few stops along a train line.

Hey! Let's have a meet!

And check out the Borderlines film festival.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Hereford Meet sounds like an idea.

[Smile]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
We'd probably be in for a Hereford meet, as long as it's a Saturday. we keep forgetting to contacty Qlib when we know we are going to Hereford.
I'll post in a seperate thread, but we're going to the Cotswolds for a week in April. Anyone fancy a meet?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My son lives in Bristol, so Gypsy and I may be able to visit him and come along [Smile]

In other news, I was fed up of my (too long) sleeves on my jumper getting wet when washing up. So this morning I simply chopped them off to the right length! Now I have comfortable, but frayed sleeves.

Impulsive? Who me?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I was put in my place last night - one of the neighbour boys [17 years old now] came round to get some photos loaded on his new MicroSD card, his previous one having succumbed to some dreadful plague or other. As we were sitting letting the computer do its stuff I said to him:

You don't have to call me uncle, you know, you can call me by my name or chetan [big brother] if you want.

He replied quite simply

I like calling you uncle.

Fair enough.

Then this morning I lost a shop! I went into the city to buy some new bedding and couldn't find the shop I have used for such things for the last nearly 20 years - I had managed to walk right past it without noticing.

DUH!!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
It's half-term week for most schools in England and Wales so the journey to work was far smoother than usual. OTOH, we're at about half-strength because so many staff are at home looking after their kids.

Anyone else in this situation?
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
St Gwladys, when are you going to the Cotswolds?

WW, perhaps he should be calling you Grandad instead! [Big Grin]

SS, I am relaxing in the knowledge that my boy is up in Scotland skiing with him uncle, so I am a freeeeeeee woman. On the other hand, whilst my broken shoulder is mending I am unable to drive, so my journey anywhere is rather more difficult than usual whilst my chauffeur is away.

How half terms change as your kids (if you have them) get a bit older!

[ 16. February 2015, 12:06: Message edited by: Smudgie ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm in the situation of having to work at home (as I usually do) and look after the kids. Luckily their computer games are usually far more interesting than me and they keep out of the way if they are regularly supplied with food. Just as long as they aren't fighting about whose go it is...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
When we lived in Carrickfergus (about 13 miles from Belfast) we used to notice a hell of a difference in the traffic when the schools were off.

Strange that, because when they weren't, the cars didn't seem to have any schoolchildren in them ...

[Confused]

We seem to be getting a slight thaw before the next snow-storm (scheduled for Wednesday, which could have an adverse effect on the Ash Wednesday service); there was melting snow cascading down the hill outside Château Piglet this morning, but I doubt that it'll last long enough to make a huge difference.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
As there are a number of teachers in our congregation, we can always tell when it's half term. That, and the fact we don't get cars blocking our street and back lane at school delivery and pick up times - we have a school at the other end of our street.
(Smudgie, we're off to Charlbury on 18th April - I've started a seperate thread)
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
When we lived in Carrickfergus (about 13 miles from Belfast) we used to notice a hell of a difference in the traffic when the schools were off.

Strange that, because when they weren't, the cars didn't seem to have any schoolchildren in them ...

[Confused]


I believe the heavy traffic before school opens is caused only in part by parents taking children to school. Far more is caused by parents getting their little darlings* up, washed, dressed, fed and equipped before they themselves hurry to work at exactly the same time children go to school.

*little darlings can be between four and 19.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I think you've probably hit it, SS. The strange thing we noticed was that we could leave home a minute or two before or after our "usual" time, and it could make all the difference between being early or just making it - we referred to it as "hitting the right minute".

Considering that it was only 13 miles, and the last 5 were on a motorway, you wouldn't think that you'd need 45 minutes* for the journey.

* not allowing for hold-ups arising from bomb-scares ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
If there's going to be a Hereford Meet, I'd be quite interested, too
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Eigon - there's more about the Cotswold meet on this thread.

As a newbie to Ship-meets (I was at my first one a couple of weeks ago) I can heartily recommend them. [Smile]
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
When we lived in Carrickfergus (about 13 miles from Belfast) we used to notice a hell of a difference in the traffic when the schools were off.

Strange that, because when they weren't, the cars didn't seem to have any schoolchildren in them ...

[Confused]


I believe the heavy traffic before school opens is caused only in part by parents taking children to school. Far more is caused by parents getting their little darlings* up, washed, dressed, fed and equipped before they themselves hurry to work at exactly the same time children go to school.

*little darlings can be between four and 19.

Schools are on half term this week and the roads are clear. I think schools should be on holiday every week.

[ 18. February 2015, 14:07: Message edited by: Spike ]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Eigon - there's more about the Cotswold meet on this thread.

As a newbie to Ship-meets (I was at my first one a couple of weeks ago) I can heartily recommend them. [Smile]

I think Hereford doesn't count as the Cotswolds.

Charlbury and Hereford are about 70 miles apart.

Shall I start a Hereford Meet thread, as there seems to be some enthusiasm for it?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:

Shall I start a Hereford Meet thread, as there seems to be some enthusiasm for it?

That would be a 'Beef' thread then [Razz]

(picks up coat, leaves room)
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:
... Charlbury and Hereford are about 70 miles apart ...

[Hot and Hormonal] geographically-challenged piglet [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I think once you're west of the M5 you aren't in the Cotswolds any more, and this is where the Malverns take over, but the exact boundaries generally are a bit elastic.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Ashes have been imposed; Allegri and Byrd have been sung.

Roll on Maundy Thursday, when we're singing the first part of Tallis' Lamentations during the stripping of the altar.

We tend to do quite a lot of unaccompanied stuff during Lent, much of which is Tudor or Renaissance and makes me a very happy piglet.

Who can feel miserable while singing the music of Byrd, Tallis or Gibbons? [Smile]

Oh, and it's been snowing again, although it's now turning to rain (no bad thing).
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
I'm with you there, Piglet.

Wash me throughly from my wickedness is delighting another generation of youngsters at my place, while the adults get their teeth into the better bits of Batten, Farrant, etc. And Henry Purcell's Hear my Prayer is always a useful standby at this time of year.

But Tallis Lamentations? We'll be using the Bairstow.

[ 19. February 2015, 11:16: Message edited by: L'organist ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Tallis Lamentations. It's sublime (the version we're doing has been re-voiced and re-pitched for SAATB).

I noticed when the You-tube link came up that fairly near the top of the side-links was the soundtrack of Fifty Shades of Grey; as a Facebook friend pointed out, it was odd that it took a film like that to make people aware of Tallis's music.

[Killing me]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Tallis really is sublime - Piglet have you got any of the Eton Choirbook discs? Glorious!

The last two days we have had a security guard with us on our walks - well, actually a 7 year old neighbour boy who walks along with us - and what a little sweetie! 7 year olds delight in everything, don't they?

I checked with his mum and he had asked if it was okay so it would have been churlish to refuse him but by the time we got back to the house yesterday we felt like a pair of Pied Pipers with a little group of littlies following us.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Our current CD in the car is a collection of Tallis's music, including the first part of the Lamentations (the men's voices version) and Spem in alium - I'd need to look to see who the singers are.

I think it's really nice that the kids round your way can join you and Pete for your walk without anyone thinking anything amiss; it's awfully sad that in so many places an adult (especially a bloke) who as much as says hello to a child who isn't their own is viewed with suspicion.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Having been in social work for 26 years I have had to unlearn a lot of the stuff I learned, particularly in the 1990s - but it is good.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I usually work on Fridays but it's half term so Gypsy and I are off to puppy class.

She is doing her KC silver test, she is nine months old today so pretty young for silver - and we are not allowed to use treats for the test!

Fingers and paws crossed [Smile]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Good luck Gypsy!

I'm not having the greatest day today. I have to call the plumber at 12 to sort out a time for him to come round and look at our poor possibly-dead boiler (it is old, we were just hoping to get a bit more time out of it before the inevitable happened, but of course it packed up just before the weekend's predicted cold snap). And I am also having to get onto the support services for my new laptop (bought at new year) as the USB ports don't work. So far they have talked me through refreshing the PC to try and sort the drivers out, but if not then it will probably end up having to be a return and replace job. Luckily for me my old laptop still works, although I have to have the keyboard propped up nearest to me as if I have the screen back in a normal position it goes black (which is why I bought the new one - TME couldn't find anything obviously wrong when he took the old one to bits so I think it's also just showing signs of old age, but at least it's still functioning).

Maybe we should all just go back to sleeping under the stars and washing in streams and communicating by smoke signals. The joys of technology (ancient and modern...).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My doctor hit me!

Well, he gave me a little slap on the thigh because I have a chest infection and treated myself to an ice cream the other day and apparently that is a no-no with chest infections. He said I can have some to celebrate when the infection is gone.

Three more days of these horse pills and this dreadful strawberry flavoured muck - it is getting tolerable after so many days of it and it isn't as bad as some of the stuff I was given from Great Ormond Street when I was a little lad. A quick swig of medicine and then a Fisherman's Friend to take the taste away.

Good luck Gypsy - remember, no piddling on the floor!
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Amazingly, the refresh might just have worked - the laptop has just recognised my phone, for the first time. Muted hooray (still need to check it sees the eReader).

Somehow I don't suppose the boiler will be so easy to fix. Sigh.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
After all the fun we had when Mr. S wrecked the USB ports on my old laptop and then bought me a replacement, we actually found someone to replace them for a relatively modest sum [Mad]

Still, in accordance with Piglet's Umbrella Law, if we'd tried to get the ports sorted out *without* buying a replacement, you know for sure the motherboard would also have gone [Roll Eyes] so now we have three laptops, a tablet, a netbook and (I think) two desktops cluttering up the place.

So good luck, JtL!

Mrs. S, busy dusting computers [Confused]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
...it isn't as bad as some of the stuff I was given from Great Ormond Street when I was a little lad.

My daughters learned to swallow pills at a very young age because they couldn't stand the taste of orange-flavored penicillin liquid.

My husband, who grew up in Florida and South Carolina, was given sweetened quinine liquid for malaria at the ages of three and five. (This was in the 1930s.) As an adult, he could not stand the combination of sweet and bitter tastes.

Moo
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
The children were hospitalised with bad gastroenteritis when they were 2 and I remember telling a nurse that the sons wouldn't tolerate the sweetened versions of Dioralite and suggesting she use either the plain version alone or mix it with some warm Bovril.

When I arrived back on the ward (having left for 30 minutes for fresh air and to make calls) it was to see oldest son biting nurse and drawing blood as she tried to force him to down so-called blackcurrant-flavour stuff.

Felt both proud and mortified: as I said, I had warned them...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Good luck Gypsy, and good luck with the boiler and computer JtL! [Smile]

quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... treated myself to an ice cream the other day and apparently that is a no-no with chest infections ...

Really? [Confused] I'd have thought the ice-cream would act like a gentle anaesthetic on your sore throat.
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... A quick swig of medicine and then a Fisherman's Friend to take the taste away.

Crikey - if a Fisherman's Friend is an improvement, the medicine must be really foul ... [Projectile]

In other news, the city council came and took away large amounts of snow from our road (making large amounts of noise in the process, at five o'clock in the bl**dy morning [Mad] ), but left most of the heaps on the pavement on our side. How come they can navigate round the lamp-posts on the other side but not on ours?

[Mad] [brick wall] [Mad]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
It's Rhubarb Festival time again! I've just come back from town with rhubarb (obviously), rhubarb and ginger brack, rhubarb pork pie, black pudding and goat, kangaroo and moose sausages. Should see us right for a bit. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
...it isn't as bad as some of the stuff I was given from Great Ormond Street when I was a little lad.

My daughters learned to swallow pills at a very young age because they couldn't stand the taste of orange-flavored penicillin liquid.
I remember the orange stuff <shudders> With my eldest it was banana-flavoured penicillin - straight down and straight back up again. And neither of them coped well with paracetamol syrup either - we got the tablets and powdered them up with Ribena.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
It's Rhubarb Festival time again! I've just come back from town with rhubarb (obviously), rhubarb and ginger brack, rhubarb pork pie, black pudding and goat, kangaroo and moose sausages. Should see us right for a bit. [Big Grin]

We'll be there tomorrow.

What I don't understand is why it is a Food, Drink and Rhubarb Festival. Is rhubarb not food?
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
My husband, who grew up in Florida and South Carolina, was given sweetened quinine liquid for malaria at the ages of three and five. (This was in the 1930s.) As an adult, he could not stand the combination of sweet and bitter tastes.

Quinine (in tonic water) and sugar (in dry ginger) makes a very refreshing drink.

Mocktails, delicious.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
It's Rhubarb Festival time again! I've just come back from town with rhubarb (obviously), rhubarb and ginger brack, rhubarb pork pie, black pudding and goat, kangaroo and moose sausages. Should see us right for a bit. [Big Grin]

We'll be there tomorrow.

What I don't understand is why it is a Food, Drink and Rhubarb Festival. Is rhubarb not food?

Good question. I guess it's to explain away all the food and drink that didn't contain rhubarb?

FYI, the Farmer Copley's rhubarb and ginger pork pie I had for tea was very tasty.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Quinine (in tonic water) and sugar (in dry ginger) makes a very refreshing drink ...

So does quinine (in tonic water) and GIN. [Big Grin]

I don't imagine that I'm in grave danger of developing malaria in Newfoundland, but I have a GIN and tonic every so often, just in case. [Biased]

I must confess that I can live very easily without rhubarb; there's a patch of it in a corner of my dad's garden, and we were always subjected to it for a couple of weeks in the spring when I was a kid, but I never developed a taste for it.

Moose sausages, on the other hand, can be very nice indeed.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I love rhubarb in any shape but it has to be straight rhubarb, unadulterated with apple or such which dilutes the flavour. Plain rhubarb, rhubarb crumble, rhubarb and cream. I chop the stalks, give a good wash, shake off excess water. Microwave for 3-5 minutes depeniding on quantity. Then I stir through just enough sugar to takeaway the strongest part of the tart taste. I do this in several goes as I like it still fairly tart.

Using the microwave means I don't lose yet another saucepan to burnt on rhubarb.

[ 21. February 2015, 05:26: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I'm another rhubarb fan. I like to cook it with preserved ginger, the sort that comes in syrup. I chop the ginger up finely, sprinkle it in and pour some of the ginger-flavoured syrup over the rhubarb in place of sugar. Works a treat.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I'm another rhubarb fan. I like to cook it with preserved ginger, the sort that comes in syrup. I chop the ginger up finely, sprinkle it in and pour some of the ginger-flavoured syrup over the rhubarb in place of sugar. Works a treat.

H
I love ginger too so that sounds good. I was given a large amount of fresh ginger a while ago, so chopped it into smaller pieces and put in jar. Covered it with sherry. I have used it in sweet and savoyry dishes with success,
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I'm another rhubarb fan. I like to cook it with preserved ginger, the sort that comes in syrup. I chop the ginger up finely, sprinkle it in and pour some of the ginger-flavoured syrup over the rhubarb in place of sugar. Works a treat.

H
I love ginger too so that sounds good. I was given a large amount of fresh ginger a while ago, so chopped it into smaller pieces and put in jar. Covered it with sherry. I have used it in sweet and savoyry dishes with success,

I love rhubarb and ginger too, and last year discovered that rhubarb tastes good with rose syrup. As well as the usual rhubarb & ginger jam, I made rhubarb and rose jam - yum.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
I'm another rhubarb fan. I like to cook it with preserved ginger, the sort that comes in syrup. I chop the ginger up finely, sprinkle it in and pour some of the ginger-flavoured syrup over the rhubarb in place of sugar. Works a treat.

H
I love ginger too so that sounds good. I was given a large amount of fresh ginger a while ago, so chopped it into smaller pieces and put in jar. Covered it with sherry. I have used it in sweet and savoyry dishes with success,

I love rhubarb and ginger too, and last year discovered that rhubarb tastes good with rose syrup. As well as the usual rhubarb & ginger jam, I made rhubarb and rose jam - yum.
It's worth adding rhubarb cooking liquid, with or without ginger or rose, to sparkling wine, a la Kir Royale or Bellini.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Definite signs of Spring today - we saw quite a lot of catkins and the trees alonside the main road are getting that slight fuzziness that comes before the leaf buds. On the other hand, we had what can best be described as "wintry showers" on the way back from Cardiff except one was definitely snow.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
We had snow today, very white this morning, but it didn't last, though the tops (of the moors) are still white.

And I roast my rhubarb. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
It seems that I am in a minority here, but I can't stand rhubarb. School dinners put me off for life. Ugh ugh ugh. Horrible stuff.

Our boiler is now an ex-boiler, shuffled off this mortal coil etc. Thankfully we are getting a new shiny one on Monday, so not too long to wait, although I'm not looking forward to the next couple of nights till we get it. Thank goodness for the electric blanket. We've not seen snow yet (although earlier today in Glasgow there was a brief sleety shower) but the forecast for tomorrow isn't very promising [Frown]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Rhubarb is an abomination unto God, and is not a food but an instrument of torture, so that is your answer, balaam.

I had asked the little guy whether he wanted to go for a walk. He said ok, but I suggested he go ask his mummy first. He was back before we got to the road. Not too many kids I would tolerate on my morning walk, but he is a total sweetie and he walked!

The first day, big brother (and I mean BIG*) and mummy and granny were all waiting in the forecourt for him (with all the other kids trailing, they must have heard us the minute we turned on their road.) The second day, he had to unlatch the gate and open the front door...

* he can rest his arms on the wall when he talks to us. I fear for when he hits his growth spurt (he's only 15!) [Eek!]

[ 21. February 2015, 23:48: Message edited by: Uncle Pete ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I love rhubarb, even the tinned stuff - it doesn't grow here so tinned is the best we can get, but with everyone around me being diabetic, or in danger thereof, the tins on the shelf [all rich in sugar] are in danger of running past their use-by date.

The wall of which Uncle Pete speaks is about level with eyes so it is not just a little wall and Big Brother is a big lad - in this Land of Hobbits he certainly stands out. Lovely lad.

I'm sure there was more I was going to say but the breakfast bell has just gone and if I don't get down there soon that Canadian will eat it all!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It was a bright, sunny but v. windy and cold day here; I did a spot of Retail Therapy in the afternoon and was more-or-less blown across the shopping-centre car-park (and I'm fairly well-planted ... [Big Grin] ).

I love the habit shops here have of sending you a voucher for your birthday (especially as mine falls when a lot of things have been drastically reduced in the winter sales). I got a rather smart pair of shoes in one shop: they were already less than half-price, and the $15 voucher made them quite affordable; and a sort of tunic thing in another: with the sale reduction and a 40%-off voucher I only paid about $11! You couldn't be bad to that.
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
Happy memories of my grandmother's rhubarb wine. At a tender age and unknown to my parents, it was the first time I ever experienced mild inebriation, and found it to be quite agreeable.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
My dad tried his hand at making rhubarb wine, and most of it exploded. The bottles that survived were OK, in a fizzy sort of way, but it wasn't really a success, and the shed where he'd kept it stank like a brewery for months afterwards.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
I had a lovely day yesterday. One of my closest friends lievs in York and we rarely see each other. She suggested we meet half-way, so I travelled up and she travalled down to Newark where we had a jolly day of shopping, eating and catching up. We intend to do it again in the summer when it's warmer.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Another anti-rhubarb vote from here, too - honestly, what do you folk see in the horrible stringly slushy sweetly sharp but sharply sweet greeny red concoction?

Had a lovely day in the big city yesterday with my sister who had come down from the Midlands for the day. Far more sitting drinking coffee and chatting than actually sightseeing, of course. Just how a day should be.

The weather today looks cold but is enticing me out for a walk in a bit.......... coffee and a good book whilst soaking in a bubble bath seems essential beforehand as it would be wrong to go out before getting clean and shiny, wouldn't it?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Out today but there were so many cyclists on the roads that driving was really slow going - at least two Sunday cycle clubs out in force, labouring up some seriously steep hills and clearly struggling with it. They didn't look as if they were enjoying it much. Then it started to rain increasingly heavily so I gave up at that point and went home again.

quote:
Originally posted by Smudgie:
Another anti-rhubarb vote from here, too - honestly, what do you folk see in the horrible stringly slushy sweetly sharp but sharply sweet greeny red concoction?

Rhubarb cooked to mush can be horrible, with little fibres in amongst the glop. Any stewed fruit is unpleasant at the best of times anyway - the flavour may be fine but the texture isn't. It needs pastry, sponge or crumble topping to make it work.

Cook it properly in a crumble with ginger and there's the pleasure of the tanginess offset by the right amount of sweetness, the fire of the ginger, and the crumble topping. A pie is good too. A tart fruit sauce on a sweet sponge pudding can be wonderful.

The stalks of uncooked rhubarb can also be pretty, especially when you slice the long stalks and end up with a palette of subtly different shades of red, from pink to near purple, some speckled with green.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
You have hit the rhubarb nail on the head Ariel!

(Was anyone given raw rhubarb and a pot of sugar as a child? I loved it!)
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Today I have phoned UK three times.

I love my new mobile phone service provider - the third call was 1889 seconds, which is about thirty one and a half minutes and cost an enormous nearly 60 pence! I don't know what costs are like phoning within UK these days but even by those standards I'd think this was reasonable - and I am 5,500 miles away from sunny Birkenhead! When I was first here it cost over 2 quid a minute to phone my dad!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
You phoned the UK from India on a mobile??? We can't even use our mobiles in the UK without it costing a fortune - when we asked our provider about getting them to work over there the girl said, "well, you could, but it'd be $70 just to make them work." (and God knows how much per minute). I think it may be a Pond thing - North American providers don't seem to make their phones work outside North America.

Quite a busy day at the Cathedral today - the Great Litany in procession at the morning service, then a bit of a farewell bash for the interim priest who's been with us for the last six months while the Curate and then the Dean had sabbaticals - the Dean comes back next week, so with any luck there'll be a re-commencement of grinning.

Then a really nice Tudor evensong - Morley responses and canticles and anthem by Gibbons.

contented piglet [Smile]
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
You phoned the UK from India on a mobile??? We can't even use our mobiles in the UK without it costing a fortune

Buy a cheap PAYG phone and SIM card at the airport when you arrive. You can probably pay 20 quid or so for a cheap phone + SIM + some minutes.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Pete is undisputed King of the SIM cards except sometimes they run out of validity if not used. His Indian one died when he was in Canada so he is giving his new one to me to keep in a spare slot in my phone whilst he is away then I'll use it for a local call once a month and give it back when he comes back next time. As he leaves here and gives me that SIM he will be loading his UK SIM and then as he leaves Heathrow later he will load his Canadian SIM - specially toughened to survive the permafrost.

My old phone took 2 SIMs and a UIM [CDMA equivalent] and at one point I had Indian UIM and both UK and Sri Lankan SIM loaded. It makes sense when travelling and if you can get in the back of the phone then you can change your SIM. Some phones have preloaded stuff that you can't change which is when you need to do as LC suggests and buy a cheapo phone on arrival. I'd advise against buying anything at an airport as the prices are a complete rip-off - lots of great cheap deals available in UK on pay-as-you-go, just ask the newsagent or whoever.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
A lovely day here, bright but chilly. I've just got back from my yoga class and am about to start writing the most dull essay I've ever had the misfortune to have been set [Roll Eyes]
Oh, and there were redwings in the park which has cheered me up a bit.

[ 23. February 2015, 10:34: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I am a Party Animal™

Saturday night was my best friend’s birthday party. It was fancy dress and the theme was things or people beginning with A (which is the first letter of her name). I went as Wednesday Addams (I thank my favourite second-hand shop for providing me with the ugliest enormous-collared blouse in the universe). My best friend is a professional fashionista so the party only really got going at about ten o’clock at which point the *karaoke* began. After which, being the highly spiritual person I am ( [Biased] ) I got up and went to church yesterday morning (yes, I was on the rota for something or I might have stayed in bed a bit later…). I then spent the afternoon crashed out napping on the sofa in order that the fiesta might continue...

Yesterday was fiancé en rouge’s birthday, so in the evening I arranged festivities of a different kind at a restaurant called Au pied de cochon (“The pig’s foot”), where the speciality, unsurprisingly, is… pig’s trotter and other random bits of the beast. Being, as he is, the Frenchest French person in the whole of France, he thought this was awesome.

They also have a dish called “the temptation of Saint Antony” which consists of the snout, trotter, tail and ear of the pig. I wasn’t all that surprised to see fiancé en rouge’s best mate order this (also a ridiculously French French person – there’s a reason why they get on so well), or one of our friends who is Chinese. OTOH, I was extremely surprised to see an American friend go for the pig’s foot. I think he now has the picture on his facebook to scare his family back home in Texas. I ordered a more conventional bit of the pig, but it wasn’t all that special and on reflection I probably should have gone for the trotters as well.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Pete not feeling so well and talking of a possible visit to the doctor sometime tomorrow. I suggested instead that I might take him to see the local priest for an exorcism but he seemed to think this idea flippant.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Will somebody please make La Vie and her un-piglet-friendly fiancé go away? [Waterworks]

LC - D's sister bought a couple of v. basic PAYG mobiles which we can usually borrow when we're home. It just rather annoys (and puzzles) us that British mobile companies manage to make their phones work more-or-less anywhere* without it costing an arm and a leg, and ours doesn't.

* When my niece was travelling in the Far East she had no problem phoning home.

PS I hope Pete feels better soon. [Votive]

[ 23. February 2015, 13:05: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
You phoned the UK from India on a mobile??? We can't even use our mobiles in the UK without it costing a fortune

Buy a cheap PAYG phone and SIM card at the airport when you arrive. You can probably pay 20 quid or so for a cheap phone + SIM + some minutes.
Actually less -- 18 months ago the mobile cost just over 10 quid and the rest was PAYG.

John
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
D. made a lovely variation on the paella theme for lunch with chicken, sausages, red peppers, tomatoes and saffron, and after a nice, snoozy sort of afternoon, I made an industrial quantity of chicken stock.

Am now feeling moderately virtuous. [Angel]
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
what is it with birthdays at this time of year? last night in the pub there were four people with birthdays either yesterday or today (two of the four being me and Mr Marzipan), I know two more people whose birthdays were yesterday and another friend has one tomorrow!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Dunno, but it's an odd coincidence that all the people born in March that I've ever knowingly met have all had birthdays in the same week of March, 14-21st.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My friend is 60 on Sunday - what on earth do I buy her?

My budget is £50 - any ideas?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by marzipan:
what is it with birthdays at this time of year? last night in the pub there were four people with birthdays either yesterday or today (two of the four being me and Mr Marzipan), I know two more people whose birthdays were yesterday and another friend has one tomorrow!

Is there a possible correlation [at least in UK] with the late May Bank Holiday? I think that is where my parents decided I came from [another March baby] and I was a little late.

Amazingly sex never seems to go out of fashion.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Dunno, but it's an odd coincidence that all the people born in March that I've ever knowingly met have all had birthdays in the same week of March, 14-21st.

It makes you wonder whether there are not some interesting Summer solstice celebrations going on.

Jengie
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I was meant to be a March Piglet*, but I was a few weeks early and arrived in February. I do seem to have a lot of FB friends with birthdays in March though; maybe the post-midsummer theory isn't so daft ...

Many happy returns to Marzipan and Mr. Marzipan. [Smile]

* sort of like a March Hare, but not quite so mad [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
In the United States weddings and honeymoons traditionally take place in June...
[Biased]

That doesn't explain when a second, third, etc. child arrives in March.

I've worked in two parishes -- both had a far higher number of March birthdays than any other month.
 
Posted by JB (# 1776) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
My friend is 60 on Sunday - what on earth do I buy her?

My budget is £50 - any ideas?

An over-60 rail card?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
In the United States weddings and honeymoons traditionally take place in June...
[Biased]

That doesn't explain when a second, third, etc. child arrives in March.

I've worked in two parishes -- both had a far higher number of March birthdays than any other month.

In Britain in the Good Old Days, February & March were favoured for birthdays because one got a tax allowance for each child. Your child might only be a week old on April 5th but you got a full year's tax allowance. Is there anything similar where you are?
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
(Was anyone given raw rhubarb and a pot of sugar as a child? I loved it!)

Yes! Om nom nom nom nom! [Big Grin]

Would your friend appreciate one of your lovely paintings? [Smile]

It's been a pleasant, if cold, day here but the wind and rain are starting up again now. I'm off to my zumba class shortly, which I really enjoy; some of you may remember me moaning about Pilates but fear not, my friends - I have not signed up for the next course. [Biased]

Nen - Pilates-free.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
]In Britain in the Good Old Days, February & March were favoured for birthdays because one got a tax allowance for each child. Your child might only be a week old on April 5th but you got a full year's tax allowance. Is there anything similar where you are?

Our deadline for tax deductions is December 31st, so a little one who comes along at 11:59 p.m. on December 31st is deductible for that year's taxes, but if his/her twin were to arrive at 1:01 a.m. on January 1st, no deduction for that one.
 
Posted by Zacchaeus (# 14454) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
In the United States weddings and honeymoons traditionally take place in June...
[Biased]

That doesn't explain when a second, third, etc. child arrives in March.

I've worked in two parishes -- both had a far higher number of March birthdays than any other month.

In Britain in the Good Old Days, February & March were favoured for birthdays because one got a tax allowance for each child. Your child might only be a week old on April 5th but you got a full year's tax allowance. Is there anything similar where you are?
It used to apply to marriage too, so get your wedding in before the end of march and you got the whole years married man's allowance..
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
Our deadline for tax deductions is December 31st, so a little one who comes along at 11:59 p.m. on December 31st is deductible for that year's taxes, but if his/her twin were to arrive at 1:01 a.m. on January 1st, no deduction for that one.

Along those lines, here's a distribution of American birthdays. You see a few features - a clear excess of births nine months after those snuggly winters, a shortage of births at Christmas (nobody schedules an induction or c-section for Christmas), and what looks like a small excess of births in the last few days of December and a corresponding lack of births in the first few days of January (tax credit inductions?)
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Good year for garden bird spotting so far. The blue tits have already arrived in our bird box, last week there were goldfinches on the dead golden rod in the garden and redwings in the park and today a long tailed tit has made several attempts to get in the conservatory (presumably after my embroidery threads for nest material.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Morning, all (well actually for most of you it's probably afternoon).

Life seems to have been very quiet round here lately - anyone got any exciting plans for the weekend?

We're going round to a friend's for a curry this evening - and I'm hoping his heat tolerance is more in line with mine than (say) with WW's - when it comes to spices I'm a total wuss ... [Hot and Hormonal]

I'll let you know (assuming that my computer doesn't melt when I breathe on it). [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I have bought some champagne and put it in the fridge as I'm hoping my husband will be bringing home some good news to celebrate [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Tell them in advance that you are a wuss with spices and ask for a small dish of plain yoghurt with the main meal to either mix in or to take the odd spoonful. Also lemon/lime juice squeezed on to spicy hot food will bring it down quite a bit.

Here the usual food is generally mild with one or two hot dishes on the table then people can self-regulate. To serve all the dishes spicy hot is thought of here as just weird and also as bad manners if you don't know other people's taste.

eta: We went to the mall today and bought quite a lot of lovely cheese then Pete and I ate several quids worth of a rather nice [but not wonderful] Brie with crackers for our supper. Not good for my arteries but it tasted fab!

We are on our own for lunch tomorrow so I have promised him a cheese and onion omelette, which might also include a little soupcon of garlic. I have some mature Cheddar which will fit the bill nicely.

For several days I had been thinking that the little lad that walks with us round the lanes in the morning was very [extraordinarily?] well co-ordinated for 7+ - then I found out that he is 8+ so it all made sense.

Off to bed now, no afternoon nap was enjoyed so it is all catching up with me.

Goodnight.

[ 27. February 2015, 14:24: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
I'm off for a pizza a gossip with work colleagues in a bit. Nice in that we never have time to catch up with each other at work, but a bit of a pain as it means travelling the same journey that I do on the other four days in the week to meet up with them.
Tomorrow we are off to the Shard to try and actually see the view. We went in early January and all we could see was grey, so we were able to swap our tickets for now. It includes champagne which we didn't have in January as my husband wasn't feeling too good. As it was suposed to have been his birthday treat it would have been a shame for our son and me to drink his share. We are then going to dinner in a vegetarian restaurant that a friend highly recommends, so all in all should be a good weekend. It will be even better if I manage to do all the homework for my writing class as well, but I fear that might not happen.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Are people in the British Isles (and parts of Northern Europe) aware of the solar eclipse on March 20th?

Here's hoping for a sunny day. Take care everyone.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Tell them in advance that you are a wuss with spices ...

Oh I already have - and he said he'd go easy, but you never know. I'd have offered to make and bring a dish of raita, but he can't eat either cucumber or mint, so that's not going to work ... actually, I've just googled raita recipes, and found one with onion and tomato. Now that may be a possibility.

quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Are people in the British Isles (and parts of Northern Europe) aware of the solar eclipse on March 20th?

I saw something about it on the Orkney pages of Facebook - it looks as if they're going to get a pretty good chunk of "totality". Wish I could be there ... [Frown]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It's been a surprisingly nice day. Sunlight, a lovely lunch out in a country pub with some colleagues - we enjoyed the last one so much we've decided to do this once a month - and a very timely delayed connecting train home which saved me an hour's wait. After struggling to the top of the stairs at the station we were all unexpectedly offered a large cookie apiece, courtesy of the railway company. Mine is, I think, sultana and spice. Getting home early has meant no queues in the local Chinese for my favourite takeaway (duck with plum sauce), and it's still daylight.

For those wot are keen on food (I'm sure there must be one or two) lunch was Welsh rarebit with Paris mushrooms and and a side order of chips, plus a really nice cider that actually tasted of apples. Eaten at a table in the sun with a view of fields, horses and a sunlit valley. These days I find a starter with a side order of chips is about the right size and usually more appetizing than the larger main courses.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
When the eclipse happened over northern France in 1999 we drove via the tunnel and got a lovely clear view on the coast, my husband (boyfriend then) took some amazing photos.
For supper we are eating sea bream stuffed with peas, broad beans and feta courtesy of the local Waitrose.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I was also in northern France for the 1999 eclipse, in Beauvais town square. But I haven't married any of the people I was with at the time.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Yes, I was aware of the total eclipse and forgot to list it this afternoon in the tutor meeting, damn. (Along with World Book Day, Red Nose Day, National No Smoking Day and Mothering Sunday).

WW - news story here recently on cheese was that the health warnings were all wrong (Torygraph link, to save you from the Daily Mail, which were the links that came up first when I checked, but it was all over the BBC too). Also Canadian research showing the health benefits of eating cheese.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I remember the 1999 eclipse. Everything went eerily quiet, including the birds, as this strange, delicate, lunar kind of light passed over the city. Pretty much the only sound was some bloke in the distance shouting "The end of the world is nigh".

March 20th is a Friday and a lot of us will probably be at work. Hopefully we will see something of it from the windows.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:


WW - news story here recently on cheese was that the health warnings were all wrong (Torygraph link, to save you from the Daily Mail, which were the links that came up first when I checked, but it was all over the BBC too). Also Canadian research showing the health benefits of eating cheese. [/QB]

I knew that having cambozola for lunch today was the right decision.
All is happy in our household tonight, my husband has resigned from his job of 15 years today so as to start a company of his own with a former colleague.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Wonderful news re the health benefits of eating cheese! Thank you. It makes today's omelette lunch all the more appealing.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
WW - news story here recently on cheese was that the health warnings were all wrong ...

[Yipee] [Yipee]

V. enjoyable evening eating quite, but not too, spicy curry; it was a biriyani style, with the chicken pieces, rice and sauce served in separate dishes and mixed on one's plate. It had quite a kick, so I'm glad I brought the tomato-and-onion raita, which cooled it down just nicely.

I may have had slightly more New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc than I should though ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
New Zealand Savignion blanc -hmmm, my favourite white wine, I'm more of a red wine person myself. I had quite a lot last night as I had a couple of glasses early evening with friends from work in a good but very basic pizza place (all tumbles and bare wooden tables, only five sorts of pizza on offer) and then a bit more when I got home.
HA, exciting news about your husband - did you enjoy the champagne?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:

HA, exciting news about your husband - did you enjoy the champagne?

It's great news, as he has been working towards it in his spare time as well as doing his day job for several months and I'm now looking forward to him focussing on only one job again and being a bit more sociable with us as a family (he's actually doing housework today!). He has all the knowledge and experience to make this work well but we were waiting for the financial aspects to fall into place before he made the jump. He's going to be a much happier man now, he wasn't enjoying his job anymore.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
[QUOTE]


All is happy in our household tonight, my husband has resigned from his job of 15 years today so as to start a company of his own with a former colleague.

Excellent - I wish them all the best.

My brother did the same two years ago and hasn't looked back [Smile]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

V. enjoyable evening eating quite, but not too, spicy curry; it was a biriyani style, with the chicken pieces, rice and sauce served in separate dishes and mixed on one's plate. It had quite a kick, so I'm glad I brought the tomato-and-onion raita, which cooled it down just nicely.

I may have had slightly more New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc than I should though ... [Eek!]

I had biryani served like that for the first time a few months ago and it was very civilised. Everyone had rice, then plates of cooked chicken, meat, prawns & garlicky mushrooms to share.

I agree that it's a "wine curry" too.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Does anyone know what percentage of the sun has to be covered in an eclipse for it to get noticeably dark ? I know it's very high as your eyes automatically adjust to the lower light levels, in the same way as they do indoors.

Ryanair has got Stansted to sort of Osloish airport for 9.99 each way. I've got a couple of days off the following week, but wondering about asking on Monday if I can swap them. The eclipse will be about 97% there, the same as Orkney.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Heavenly Anarchist: He has all the knowledge and experience to make this work well but we were waiting for the financial aspects to fall into place before he made the jump.
Does he have potential clients?
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
Does anyone know what percentage of the sun has to be covered in an eclipse for it to get noticeably dark ? I know it's very high as your eyes automatically adjust to the lower light levels, in the same way as they do indoors.

Ryanair has got Stansted to sort of Osloish airport for 9.99 each way. I've got a couple of days off the following week, but wondering about asking on Monday if I can swap them. The eclipse will be about 97% there, the same as Orkney.

What % was it in 1999? I remember it getting a bit darker and eerier, and it going all quiet (apparently eclipses fool the birds into thinking it's night-time, so they quieten down ready to sleep), but I don't remember it being super-dark and I think the % was quite high then too. Although the UK was slightly north of totality (rather than south this time), I'm not sure if that will make a difference.

I have given up cheese for Lent. So I am very glad that when I pig out on Easter Sunday I can know that I am doing so for the good of my health. Now all I need is for similar research to be done re chocolate and my Easter Sunday breakfast of cheese and Easter egg will surely be the equivalent of a good gym session, right?
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Cornwall was on the Path of Totality for the eclipse in 1999. And there was 100% cloud cover, so, apart from getting dark, no one saw anything....

We were in Birmingham, and it got quite dark...the cloud cover was patchy, so you could see a bit of the eclipse. It was eerie...
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
quote:
Heavenly Anarchist: He has all the knowledge and experience to make this work well but we were waiting for the financial aspects to fall into place before he made the jump.
Does he have potential clients?
Yes, they already have work lined up and his business partner is dealing with them as he resigned his job a while ago. He is confident of future business as he is very experienced with lots of patents to his name (he designs sensory technologies), though he needs to be careful who he approaches for a few months as he has some exclusions built into his current contract.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I was at w*rk in Belfast during the 1999 eclipse, and although it was a cloudy day, the sun broke through enough that we could see the shadow clipping the edge of it.

It seems slightly odd to me that I remember knowing from when I was very young that there would be an eclipse in 1999 that was "total" in Cornwall, but I've only recently discovered that there'll be a 97% one in Orkney in a few weeks ...

[Confused]

HA - best of luck to Mr. Anarchist and his colleague in their new venture! [Yipee]
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Heavenly Anarchist: Yes, they already have work lined up and his business partner is dealing with them as he resigned his job a while ago.
That's good. I helped a friend set up a business some years ago, and it's much better starting with a client base you can expand upon than starting from zero. Good luck!
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Mum (Angel*) and I went to see the orchid exhibition at Kew gardens today which was very nice. Obviously we had to have coffee and cake in the cafe as well!
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
That sounds wonderful, Chocoholic! (Do say hi to Angel* from me too, I do remember when she used to post). As I mentioned on the Scotland thread, we went to the Great Tapestry of Scotland which is currently on display in the Great Hall of Stirling Castle. It was wonderful. Brilliant idea, fantastic craftsmanship, and a real community project that totally fulfilled its potential. I loved it.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I finally made it to the farm shop at Charlecote in Warwickshire today. They had a display of hanging baskets of spring flowers - such incredible, vivid colours, so rich and bright, that it really brought it home just how dull the winter palette really can be. A real feast for the eyes.

I bought some seed potatoes there for the allotment. "Kestrel" this time, which are said to be more slug-resistant than other kinds. I hope this is true as the slugs got most of mine last year.

The deer were reclining gracefully on the grass on the walk up to the house. There's even a white stag amongst them, for a little extra touch of enchantment.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chocoholic:
Mum (Angel*) and I went to see the orchid exhibition at Kew gardens today which was very nice. Obviously we had to have coffee and cake in the cafe as well!

Oh, that sounds lovely! I used to keep a variety of orchids in our conservatory but unfortunately they caught a virus (and now the conservatory is full of craft stuff instead!). Cake would be nice too.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The Great Tapestry looks wonderful, JtL - I wonder if it's likely to be anywhere where I'll be the next time I'm home? What an amazing project.

Ariel - what is this "spring" of which you speak? [Confused]

Actually it was a bright and sunny, but cold day here today and although a good bit of the snow's either been cleared or gone of its own accord, I'll be surprised if we've seen the last of it. [Frown]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Dydd gŵyl Dewi hapus!
Happy St David's Day!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Ariel - what is this "spring" of which you speak? [Confused]

It's a gloriously sunny and even mild morning and the first day of spring. The birds are shouting enthusiastically to each other, and when the shops open I'm going to get some daffodils and spring flowers in. Begone dull winter!
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Hmmm! No spring here yet. I have loads of crocuses (?croci) which refuse to open in the absence of sun. I reckon they will keel over before they open, which is a shame, both for me and the bees.

If I see another day of grey overcast I am going to SCREAM very loudly!! [Mad]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Dydd gŵyl Dewi hapus!
Happy St David's Day!

We have daffodils, crocuses and sunshine in Newport of all places!

A very happy St David's Day. I hope supporters of Welsh rugby (ie, all of the Welsh and a fair few besides) are recovering after a pretty dramatic win in Paris yesterday.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Hmmm! No spring here yet. I have loads of crocuses (?croci) which refuse to open in the absence of sun. I reckon they will keel over before they open, which is a shame, both for me and the bees.

Same here - grey, overcast, cold and very windy!

I have 100s of crocuses in the front garden - all tight shut. Humph! We have re-done our back garden to dog proof it (put car park rubber holey stuff all over the grass) the grass seed has been scattered - now we need some SUN!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I might have known. I washed the car, left it there and went shopping, and emerged from the supermarket into icy rain and a chill wind. And I had no umbrella.

March coming in like the proverbial lion. We are due a hot Easter again, though, which will be something to look forward to.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
We had Nenlet1 and son-in-law to a meal yesterday evening. On the menu was Piglet's Curry and sticky toffee pudding - the latter not home made and it showed. Also it turned out they have given up cake and chocolate for Lent so we had to get round the problem by saying it might look like cake but pudding was what it said on the box so pudding was what it was. Note to self, stick to fresh fruit salad for pudding in future - I've never heard of anyone giving that up for Lent, or at any other time. [Roll Eyes]

I meant to get some daffodils for the house for St David's Day but didn't get my act together. [Roll Eyes]

I made several muck-ups at work on Friday so need to get in early tomorrow morning to rectify those. [Roll Eyes]

Finally, I got into a discussion with someone at church this morning and did a particularly poor job of explaining my take on The After Life which left her more confused than when she started. [Roll Eyes]

Currently wondering whether to go to the evening service to get out of Mr Nen's way or to stay in and avoid inflicting more confusion on the world. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - feeling demoralised. [Frown]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
posted by Sioni Sais
quote:
I hope supporters of Welsh rugby (ie, all of the Welsh and a fair few besides) are recovering after a pretty dramatic win in Paris yesterday.
Four on the trot - mae Duw. And I've just watched the match from Dublin which has added interest to the proceedings.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Evening service has it. Mr Nen is In A Mood. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - on the run.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Happy St. David's Day - the daffodils are coming out and we have a Welsh win!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's still St. David's Day here (just) so I'll wish the Welsh contingent a good one and add well done against the French. [Big Grin]

eta: the less said about the Scottish rugby team the better ... [Frown]

[ 02. March 2015, 01:57: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Happy St. David's Day - the daffodils are coming out and we have a Welsh win!

And we had leeks with the roast beef for dinner last night, both cooked along with some carrots in an oven bag. Delicious. David was remembered along with our Patron Saints at the end of theintercessions as well.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
I'm finding it very difficult to concentrate on work today because we've just put an offer in to buy a house and I keep hoping they will call me back about it!
I'm far too excited about it, which means that it will probably fall through in the end
*bounce* *bounce*
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I hope you get good news soon, I'm terrible when waiting for news, I can't do a thing.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Good luck, Marzipan - been there, done that, got the battle-scars. [Smile]

I'm playing a bit of a waiting-game at the moment too, but nothing like as important as yours. On Friday a parcel arrived in the post from Ortak, from whom I'd ordered a pair of earrings when I was home. Unfortunately the earrings in the parcel were not the ones I ordered, so I've e-mailed them and am waiting to find out if they'll let me bring them back with me when I go up in August (to save on international postage). Although we've been customers for ever, I don't know if they'll entertain the idea ...
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
After struggling to the top of the stairs at the station we were all unexpectedly offered a large cookie apiece, courtesy of the railway company.

I thought that would just be a Friday thing but tonight I was presented with a large chocolate muffin. I'm liking this railway company a lot.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
You see, I would be wondering why they were trying to fatten me up.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
... On Friday a parcel arrived in the post from Ortak, from whom I'd ordered a pair of earrings when I was home.

What passes for our local (at Meadowhell shopping centre) Ortak shop has gone [Waterworks] Online shopping is nice but I liked RL window-shopping.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
... Ortak shop has gone ...

Last spring Ortak went into receivership and closed the factory and all their shops, and then in the summer a buyer was found who has re-established the brand with a factory and the original shop in Kirkwall, but I haven't heard any plans for re-opening anywhere else. I suspect that what sent them into receivership in the first place was spreading themselves too thinly; they seemed to have a hell of a lot of outlets, many of them in shopping centres where the rents were probably exorbitant. I had a reply from them today to say that the goof with the earrings was their mistake, they're happy enough to let me bring the "wrong" pair back when I go over in August and they're sending the right pair ASAP.

[Yipee]

I'm being goddessish this evening and am currently waiting for a batch of loaves to prove, and there's a pot of veggie soup bubbling merrily on the stove. Both should be ready for virtual tasting by the time you read this. [Smile]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Baking bread here too, but a seeded cottage loaf (I've been making baguettes recently too, your enthusiasm has obviously caught on).
Quiet day for me as I got my work done yesterday. I might do some sewing and a little housework. This afternoon I have a work appraisal but that shouldn't be too stressful.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
... Ortak shop has gone ...

Last spring Ortak went into receivership and closed the factory and all their shops, and then in the summer a buyer was found who has re-established the brand with a factory and the original shop in Kirkwall, but I haven't heard any plans for re-opening anywhere else. I suspect that what sent them into receivership in the first place was spreading themselves too thinly; they seemed to have a hell of a lot of outlets, many of them in shopping centres where the rents were probably exorbitant. ...
Aha, that makes sense. Am glad they found a buyer for the business but sad for the shop: one of the few worth visiting at Meadowhell.

I won't be too sad though, as I'm just waiting for Mother Arachnid to get ready to go to the cinema to see Shaun the Sheep. [Yipee]

[ 03. March 2015, 11:24: Message edited by: ArachnidinElmet ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Gypsy had her nine month assessment this week and passed with flying colours.

I am now actually teaching her to guide! I didn't expect that, but if they progress well then puppy walkers are given the next stage. So I am now teaching her to walk ahead, with her rump by my leg. I'm teaching her to notice obstacles in our path and to weigh up whether to wait (if it's a group of people) or go round (if it's a sign, dug up path etc)

Here is a You Tube clip of someone being guided by a dog - the dog has sooo much to think about, but the benefits are very clear. The clip shows the route taken using a white stick, then the same route taken with a guide dog.

The benefits of a guide dog.

The down side of Gypsy's progress is that she may go to Big School early, at 11 months, which would be the end of April - next month!

I will be heartbroken when she goes, of course. But the way I see it - I would never have met her if I hadn't puppy walked her, she would have gone to someone else. I just hope she gets a really active owner as she isn't a couch potato at all - she loves working.

If she does leave early the new pup will arrive in June. I have asked for another yellow girl [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
What rewarding work that must be, Boogie [Smile] I worked in Ophthalmology for over 15 years (and my twin is partially sighted) so I know how vital guide dogs are to the visually impaired.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Well done, Boogie, for all your hard work with Gypsy. She's a credit to you! You are a Guide Dog Goddess. [Overused]

To all the Domestic Deities here, Mr Nen and I had a nice soup and bread lunch courtesy of the local supermarket. [Biased]

I am off this afternoon to meet some other ladies about being part of a new small group. Slightly apprehensive as it won't be so easy to keep quiet about my non-con-evo ideas in a small group setting. [Eek!]

Nen - quietly strange.

[ 05. March 2015, 12:21: Message edited by: Nenya ]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Congratulations Boogie and well done Gypsy too!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
...I am off this afternoon to meet some other ladies about being part of a new small group. Slightly apprehensive as it won't be so easy to keep quiet about my non-con-evo ideas in a small group setting. [Eek!]

Nen - quietly strange.

That reminds me of the line from Sir Henry at Rawlinson End about the brother being 42 and still strange.

And some of the other ladies may well be harbouring the same doubts but having the same fears about voicing them.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Congratulations, Boogie and Gypsy! [Yipee]

Of course you'll miss her, but you can console yourself with the thought that (a) she's going to bring a shed-load of happiness and security to somebody who needs it; and (b) you're going to get stuck in again training another dog.

Good on you! [Smile]
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
That's an enlightening video. I'm in awe of these wonderful dogs and of course their trainers.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Guide dogs are not just for the blind. My grand-niece uses a service dog to help her deal with the real world and her autism. Deaf people use service dogs to alert them to sounds. People in wheelchairs use use dogs to help them with physical barriers and many daily tasks. Recently I have seen a dog being trained to help people with PTSD and other anxiety disorders.

Being differently abled myself, I am often approached by trainers walking in malls to help the dogs deal with crutches and canes and chairs.

My grand niece's dog also takes care of me. She is very empathic. One day, when visiting, I fell, very early in the morning. She heard my calls for help and barked until my niece came to see what was wrong. She headed to the stairs but noticed the dog had stopped outside the room I was using .

I am in complete awe at all the various service dogs, and know that the list I put above is by no means exhaustive.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
Recently I have seen a dog being trained to help people with PTSD and other anxiety disorders.

That sounds brilliant. How do the dogs help (other than by being a trusty companion)?
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Well done Boogie and Gypsy! You both have done so very well! [Overused]

And I'm sure Gypsy will be and great blessing to someone, and you will fall in love with and train another puppy!

How did you get on Nen? It can be difficult in a con/evo group, but they've got used to me now and I just keep quiet, or argue gently with another view.

They do tend to say stupid things and then pray for me!!!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I heard somewhere about helping dogs for diabetics and tried to imagine how they'd work, in particular relation to a friend who's a type 2 diabetic but loves his food, particularly sweeties and cookies:

Type 2 Diabetic: I wonder if I should have a cookie?

Dog: WOOF!!!

[Devil]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I heard somewhere about helping dogs for diabetics and tried to imagine how they'd work, in particular relation to a friend who's a type 2 diabetic but loves his food, particularly sweeties and cookies:

Type 2 Diabetic: I wonder if I should have a cookie?

Dog: WOOF!!!

[Devil]

According to Dogs4Diabetics,
quote:
Diabetic Alert Assistance Dogs are a specific type of Medical Assistance Dog that has been trained to use their highly sensitive scent capabilities to identify the changes in blood chemistry that occur during rapid changes in blood sugar levels.
So I guess they don't keep you from eating that cookie, but let you know when you're in danger from having had too many of them.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
perhaps the dog would be willing to eat the cookies for him. I don't think they even require a great deal of training for that.

( it goes against the grain to call biscuits cookies on a British discussion but as piglet has started it ... )
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:

( it goes against the grain to call biscuits cookies on a British discussion but as piglet has started it ... )

Norty piglit!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Some dogs can sense when someone is about to have an epileptic fit. This gives the person warning to get to a safe place.

Moo
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
... it goes against the grain to call biscuits cookies on a British discussion but as piglet has started it ...

Quite right - but the friend I was thinking of is Canadian, and the confection I'm thinking of is what he would call a cookie, and most Brits would call a tray-bake (think of things like tiffin, Nanaimo bars or (Heaven forfend) date-squares).

I usually call them "wee buns". [Big Grin]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
The only cookies in the UK were called Dadd's (I think, not Daddies?) Cookies and you bought them loose in the Home & Colonial (later called International) Stores.

When biscuits were sold loose by the pound you could also get Harvest Biscuits - so-called, I suppose, because they had a picture of wheat stooks on them; whatever, they were wonderful. The nearest I've found is malted milk biscuits but there's still something lacking.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
I remember Harvest Biscuits! But I don't think I liked them very much

If they ever come back, l'organist, you can have mine.

M.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
Recently I have seen a dog being trained to help people with PTSD and other anxiety disorders.

That sounds brilliant. How do the dogs help (other than by being a trusty companion)?
I think they start with a very empathic dog and work with it to pick up cues of stress and anxiety - in some ways not too different from an autism service dog, but there are differences.

ps - re autism service dogs - My great niece Katie had to go to the hospital one night for observation after an an evening of increasing breathing problems. The dog, in harness, lay down on the stretcher with her and we have a wonderful shot of Katie using the dog's butt to prop her laptop (which has 95 million Dora websites bookmarked [Biased] )
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
I've just had what I'd class as a cookie. From the fresh bakery section in M&S which is all soft and chewy in the middle.
I'll let you guess what flavour it was [Big Grin]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chocoholic:
I'll let you guess what flavour it was [Big Grin]

Peanut butter and banana.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chocoholic:

I'll let you guess what flavour it was [Big Grin]

White chocolate?

(yum!)
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I heard somewhere about helping dogs for diabetics

That might have been Eigon and I both mentioning on the Ship that we'd spotting a diabetic dog at last years' World SF Con in London. I saw it sat on it's owner's lap (a much smaller dog than gypsy) during the orchestral concert, completely unflustered by the loud brass, timpani and live Theremin. Very impressive.

There's an excellent article in today's Guardian about the different types of guide dogs, including a bumblebee nest detection dog!
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Double chocolate [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Went out to Anne Hathaway's Cottage today as it was such a beautiful day. A bit too early for spring flowers and blossom, and even tourists, so mostly had the place to myself. Also had the first al fresco meal of the year at a table in the sun: Tudor pottage. Just very nice to get out and to be able to enjoy some warm sunlight. Over the winter months, that sort of thing tends to fade into a distant memory, but hopefully the first of many.

Saw the first butterfly of the year, too: a pale yellow one.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chocoholic:
... what I'd class as a cookie. From the fresh bakery section ...

That sounds more like what I'd have called a cookie, as sold by the bakers at home (and the school refectory at morning break).

They were soft, sweet bread-rolls, and IIRC came in three varieties: "cream" with the top split and filled with baker's cream; "iced" with the top glazed with white icing, and "coconut" - similar to the iced ones but with desiccated coconut mixed into the icing (my favourite).

Rats. Now I want one ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Some of us were stuck in a rehearsal taking a load of rhythmically challenged men through the finer points of Stainer's Crucifixion [Eek!]

I suppose I should be grateful that Alfred Gaul's The Holy City fell out of favour after WWII
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
But Maunder's Olivet to Calvary is still around (I know, I've sung it).
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I've so far managed to avoid Olivet to Calvary; TBH I can live quite happily without the Stainer as well. I know it's a good piece, but it just doesn't float my boat.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Some of us were stuck in a rehearsal taking a load of rhythmically challenged men through the finer points of Stainer's Crucifixion [Eek!]

What if it had been Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms or Britten's Cantata Misericordium? You'd still be in rehearsal now!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Ariel - sounds like a brimstone butterfly. Brimstone and orange tip butterflies are the two early butterflies you only see briefly in March and April.

We had a sea of open crocuses under the avenue of London plane trees in town yesterday with lots of people taking pictures. And a photo-bombing bumblebee feeding on them. This avenue of trees was planted for Queen Victoria's Jubilee - not sure if it was the gold or diamond. The crocuses have been there for a bit but it was the first time I've seen them opened up, not closed tightly against the gloom (of early morning or night, mostly).
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I thought at the time it might be a brimstone, although the photos look greenish and I don't remember this one as being such. Still, a cheerful and promising sight.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
posted by Baptist Trainfan
quote:
But Maunder's Olivet to Calvary is still around
SShhhhhh! don't give it any more advertisement than absolutely necessary.

Maunder - rarely do people live up to their name so completely.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Fab day out yesterday meeting up with some friends an hour or so north of here - one friend had been on a training course there and where he was was central for the rest of us so we took the chance. Great fun was had by all - even the food was okay. I came back a bit tired and was in bed not long after 8 p.m. - no afternoon nap and I am shattered!

Sad, huh?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
posted by Baptist Trainfan
...Maunder - rarely do people live up to their name so completely.

So did Stainer come from there or just leave them?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
You need to know some of Maunder's oeuvre to understand...
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Today is evidently Kamikaze Pheasant Day. What's the matter with the little perishers? No less than three trying to get squashed on the road this afternoon and verges splattered at intervals with the unfortunate successes. Plus a huge dead fox in the middle of the road, not far from where the last one was two weeks ago.

It does make going for a Sunday afternoon's drive in the countryside a bit depressing. Still, I suppose it's better than having deer suddenly crashing through your windscreen, as happened to a friend of mine.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Might I suggest madeira sauce? [Devil]

We did lots of lovely Tudor and Renaissance music today: Hassler and Tallis in the morning and Ayleward and Farrant at Evensong. The Dean's back from his sabbatical, and there was a fair amount of Decanal Grinning™.

I've said it before, but it's just so nice to be appreciated. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Maunder was a regular in my parish when I was still an Anglican, as was Stainer - both eminently forgettable Victorian blah!

Particularly when sung by a choir that is not quite [not nearly?] as good as it thinks it is.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Bright and sunny today, I hope it stays that way. I am off to Manchester to search for the dress (mother of the groom).

My personal shopper will be with me so I'll be fine (a good friend who knows what I like)

It's a bit of an adventure for me as I don't do shopping. I go in plenty of shops for Gypsy's training - but shopping? No.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Bright and sunny today, I hope it stays that way. I am off to Manchester to search for the dress (mother of the groom).

My personal shopper will be with me so I'll be fine (a good friend who knows what I like)

It's a bit of an adventure for me as I don't do shopping. I go in plenty of shops for Gypsy's training - but shopping? No.

[Smile]

Be careful. At eldest son's wedding I had just about settled on one particular outfit. Something stopped me. Wedding day arrived and DIL's mum had bought identical, down to the colour I liked.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Be careful. At eldest son's wedding I had just about settled on one particular outfit. Something stopped me. Wedding day arrived and DIL's mum had bought identical, down to the colour I liked.

Help!

But I know for a fact that his new MIL will be wearing a trouser suit - she hasn't been seen in a dress for 20 years.

[Smile]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
It never rains but it pours [Waterworks] …

- I have to move house next weekend and am dealing with the drama of getting all my crap in boxes and holy cow how do I have so much STUFF and where was it all hiding? Are my cupboards the Tardis or something?

- I worked overtime all day Saturday and then had to get up on Sunday morning and go to church when I wasn’t planning to (someone else was sick) so I didn’t get to rest at any point this weekend.

- Fiancé en rouge has the flu. Not man-flu, actual proper raging influenza that the doctor has prescribed anti-virals for.

I want to crawl into a hole until it all goes away. [Help]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
... It's a bit of an adventure for me as I don't do shopping ...

Are you quite sure you're a woman? [Devil] At our wedding, my mum and D's both had outfits in similar colours (turquoise with navy accessories), but they were different enough for it not to matter. We were at a wedding in Orkney last year where the bride's and groom's mothers had what appeared to be co-ordinated outfits - both the same colour (a pale lilac trimmed with lace) but in slightly different styles, and with different, but equally elaborate hats.

Poor La Vie - that does sound like a duff weekend. Hope Fiancé en rouge feels better soon.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Well Choccie is currently at about 30k feet and very much liking on board wifi!

I'm off to Sweden where the weather is due to be a little cooler than home but above freezing, I was rather hoping for just a little of the white stuff but I think I'm about a week late. Still it meant having to bring less cold weather gear.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Free flapjacks at the station this evening [Big Grin]

Anyone see Poldark last night? It was all right I suppose, but a bit too lighthearted for me, with a smiley Ross Poldark coming across as caring and selfless. Robin Ellis still firmly on his pedestal as far as I'm concerned.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Robin Ellis is the definitive Poldark.
On a different note, we are having a silver Abyssinian kitten in about two months and can't think of a suitable name which all three of us like. Has anyone any suggestions? (We won't guarantee to take them up!)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Do you mind if I start a thread for this in Heaven? It should get lots of ideas.

(Some more inventive than others... [Devil] )
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Sure! Lord P came up with the idea of translating "Who did that?" into Welsh.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Done! Hope you get some good suggestions [Biased]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Right. Desperate times call for desperate measures. Still feeling bummed out and highly stressed, with the added problem that the Chef™ is dying of the flu, I decided that the only thing to be done was head to Marks & Sparks for lazy comfort food.

I ate beans on toast and then raspberry jelly. My inner eight year-old feels much consoled.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Beans on toast can be a dish fit for a king, if it's what you feel like. And apparently it has all the nutritional amino acids that you need as well as being comfort food.

Win-win. [Smile]

I hope you've been dosing Fiancé en rouge with lots of Manuka honey, lemon juice and whisky/ginger/Lem-sip*.

* delete as appropriate.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Beans on toast with grated cheese on top then flashed under a hot grill is amazing - particularly if you add herbs and a dash of Worcestershire Sauce to the beans when heating them.

I've just had breakfast and am now hungry again and it's all your fault!

[Razz]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Beans on hot buttered toast with a couple of slices of bacon is my perfect combination.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Bright and sunny today, I hope it stays that way. I am off to Manchester to search for the dress (mother of the groom).

My personal shopper will be with me so I'll be fine (a good friend who knows what I like)

It's a bit of an adventure for me as I don't do shopping. I go in plenty of shops for Gypsy's training - but shopping? No.

How this takes me back to this time three years ago, shopping for my mother of the bride outfit for Nenlet1's wedding. [Smile] I don't do shopping either and everyone who had been mothers of the bride/groom were telling me how they went to this and that large retail outlet and shopping mall to find their outfits. I even had one friend who told me I wouldn't find anything in such and such a place as she had already looked for me. [Roll Eyes] [Mad] Great was my determination therefore to find the outfit in such and such a place. Which I did; on the first shopping trip I did for myself. Picture if you will the subsequent conversation between me and NenFriend - Did you get your outfit on Saturday? I did. Where did you get it? Such and such a place. [Big Grin]

I named the colour I wanted to wear beforehand to avoid clashes. I hope you found something you will love to wear, Boogie. [Smile]

Beans on toast - yum!

I have not yet seen my first butterfly of the year but according to Moomin lore if the first you see is yellow you'll have a happy summer. If white, a peaceful one. [Smile]

Nen - hoping for a brimstone.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

I hope you've been dosing Fiancé en rouge with lots of Manuka honey, lemon juice and whisky/ginger/Lem-sip*.

* delete as appropriate.

Almost. A French hot toddy (known by the charming name of "grog") is made with *cognac*.

The over the counter cold cure is a product called Fervex, which works pretty well (I don't think it's available in the UK, which is a shame because I think it works better than British cold cures), but it's only really meant for colds/mildish viruses, not full-on influenza [Frown] .
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Went to Costa Coffee yesterday and tried one of their chocolate teacakes. It's about three times the size of a Tunnocks one, and even has jam inside at the base of the mallow. I'm normally a Café Nero fan - their coffee and cakes are definitely the best IMO - but would enjoy having one of those again.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I put some raisins to soak in port this morning, so CAKE may well ensue this afternoon; we have eggs that could do with being used, and CAKE is the best way I can think of using them.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I come to All Saints in the morning, and the first thing that happens is I feel hungry!

The shops are full of Hot Cross Buns now, but I am trying to resist them until Easter. I doubt I will manage that - Mr.N would eat them all year round given the chance! If I can find a really spicy recipe for them, I might make some, minus the cross, and eat them anytime!

Lovely sunny morning, looks really spring-like, but a strong wind and rain is forecast to arrive later, so I am trying to make the most of it by sitting in the sun indoors! [Biased]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Here, Nicodemia, have a piece of raisin CAKE. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Nicodemia

M&S do an orange and cranberry loaf. If it is the same as the one I recall then it is very similar to their rather wonderful orange and cranberry hot cross buns.

Jengie
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
I don't normally join in on the culinary discussions here (TME does the bulk of the cooking in our house, as we both know we'll eat better that way!), but I am mid-way through having a go at something new to give to the Elf Lass for finger food, and the mixture tastes brilliant though I say so myself. They're black bean and sweet potato patties, and if the finished product is anywhere near as good as the mixture I licked off the spoon then the Elf Lass may not actually see too many of them... (diet, what diet?).
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Piglet's Curry with saffron rice is on the menu here at Casa Nen, we'll be eating once Mr Nen gets back from Pilates. Then he's out so I get sole control of the TV remote. [Big Grin]

Nen - feeling peckish.

[ 11. March 2015, 18:16: Message edited by: Nenya ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Sometimes the simple pleasures are the best. [Big Grin]

A friend of mine was complaining he was charged £8.70 for a glass of wine (Pinot) (yes, ok, I don't know whether it was Noir or Grigio) at a London theatre yesterday. The online conversation that followed led me to look up a local place which I knew wasn't going to be cheap and see what they charged for a glass of Pinot Grigio. The answer is that small was £6.50, medium £9, and large £17.50. Can you imagine! The mark-up on a glass of wine is ridiculous sometimes.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
That depends on a) the wine and b) the glass. I have a half-bottle glass (375ml) while a friend has one that hold a whole bottle (750ml).

It could be poor value or a bargain.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
How big is a large glass? Is that 250ml? May as well buy the whole bottle!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The large glass is actually 500 ml. It is cheaper at £17.50 than the £25 they ask for the whole bottle. That's the Grigio (white) by the way. If you wanted the Noir (red) the prices would be £9, £12.50, or £24 per glass and £35 for the bottle.

[ 11. March 2015, 19:29: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Most pubs here have glass of wine at 175ml and the large 250ml. Many do a deal where you buy 2 glasses and get the rest of the bottle free.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Most pubs here have glass of wine at 175ml and the large 250ml. Many do a deal where you buy 2 glasses and get the rest of the bottle free.

Really? [Smile]

Over here I think the most I've paid for a glass of wine in a restaurant was $16 (£8.40). I think it was 9oz, or a little over 250ml; a bottle of the same in the off-licence would cost about $11.30 (about £6).

That's quite a mark-up - at that rate a bottle would cost about $48 - and you'll be lucky if a white wine is properly chilled, as most people here drink beer, and most eateries haven't a clue about wine.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Don't forget they have to factor in storage and possibly spoilage cost as well as service. That said, most of us in my damily usually frequent BYO.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Sadly, BYO as a concept doesn't exist here; the off-licences are all owned by the Newfoundland Liquor Corporation, which is a Federal Government department (so they all carry more-or-less the same stock [Snore] ), and bringing your own wine is Strictly Forbidden™.

We have fond memories of a little café in Belfast called Piglet's* which was a greasy-spoon and breakfasterie during the day and a rather nice place to drop into for an early supper after w*rk. It had no licence, but there was a very good off-licence next door, and we could buy a bottle of ready-chilled white at offy prices and enjoy it with a nice, very reasonably-priced supper.

* yes, really [Smile]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Sales of spirits in Canadian provinces is a provincial matter (Unless you are harking back to the glory days of the Dominion of Newfoundland).

I have been in some Ontario restaurants where you were allowed to bring your own bottle, but not to open it yourself. The restaurant charged a corking fee. This may have been an experiment. I haven't heard of any for years.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
Sales of spirits in Canadian provinces is a provincial matter ...

My mistake. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It seems to have gone very quiet beside the teapot; I hope everybody's well. There's still some raisin CAKE, so do help yourselves.

It was a beautifully sunny but very cold day here today - I don't think it got above -10°C - and according to the Weather Channel we may brace ourselves for a blizzard on Monday. This may result in a snow-day, but as Monday is a holiday anyway (nearest Monday to St. Patrick's Day) it probably won't make any difference.

It's a bit of a bummer though, as I was planning to work on Monday anyway to build up hours for taking holidays.

Ho hum. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The Curse of the Migraine!

So there I was sitting in church when the flashing lights began so I closed my eyes for much of the service then on the drive home it all came back full force - well, thankfully not but it hit - got home, went to bed, cold compress on head and sleep. Thankfully woke up 3 hours later and almost completely gone. Before retirement got them on a frequent basis until I was introduced to Feverfew tabs/caps but haven't needed them since as they are so infrequent and because generally when they start I can go to bed immediately. Now just a light throbbing above right eye - why do flashing lights appear one side and then the pain on the other?

Anyway, I've missed lunch but I reckon I can afford to do that one in a while.

* * * *

In other news, not a lot really - life carries on. I was told off yesterday by a 27 year old for referring to myself as old and I was told off last week by a 17 year old for saying that it is okay to be stupid when you are retired.

Well, I am 66 so think I can claim the title old, which he can't, and I enjoy being the age I am - I certainly don't want to be 27 or, Heaven forfend, 17 again! And the 'stupid' thing was that when I was working I always had to know stuff - people were forever asking me questions or coming to me with their sexual hang-ups* or something or other and I had to listen or answer or suggest where they might look for answers or help - being paid and being seen as some sort of expert I couldn't afford to be stupid. But now I can! It's bliss!

Being old and stupid has vast compensations!


[* - in the world of sexual health you would be amazed at the things folks tell you, the most intimate details of their private lives bared to a colleague - it was pretty scary at times!]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Poor Wodders - I hope you feel completely better v. soon. I'm lucky enough never to have had a migraine, but I used to suffer from fairly debilitating, nauseous headaches, which would come in batches - I'd get one, take some tablets (Solpadeine™ were the most effective for me) and go to bed. Wake up next morning feeling fine, and by lunch-time the bl**dy thing would be back again.

Mercifully they're a rarity these days.

In other news, there was a fair amount of Decanal Grinning™ today, but whether it was because he was enjoying the music or because he's just acquired a new grandson may be open to debate.

Possibly a bit of both ... [Smile]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Yesterday was such a dismally grey sort of day that I was reduced to baking CAKE to combat it. The result was my best lemon drizzle cake ever, made with the third recipe I've tried [Yipee] I hope it freezes well, as two-thirds of it went straight into the freezer (I know Sundays are feast days, but it is still Lent, after all).

There is some in the tin, though - help yourself!

Mrs. S, domestic demi-goddess
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I adore lemon drizzle cake - but with a diabetic husband it does not appear here very often! But I do have a gorgeous recipe for Moroccan cardomen and orange cake, which is more or less fatless and not much sugar which I have just made again.

I'll have a piece of Mrs.S's lemmon drizzle and help yourself to said orange cake!

The sun has just appeared here but I fear it will be a fleeting glimpse.

Though you never know....... (emoticon for hopeful placed here)
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
So what did everyone get up to for Mothering Sunday?
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Lemon drizzle cake is especially nice if you make a lemon cake and then add gin to the drizzle instead of lemon juice [Smile] I'm sure it would also work with whisky and orange.
A quiet Mother's Day here, my youngest had a vomiting bug so no church for us but I was bought plenty of chocolate and dessert wine to accompany it.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
I had a lovely weekend being indulegd by my husband and son. They both cooked me some lovely food, in which lemons (though not gin) featured, a mozzerella salad and a lemon meringue pie. [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
So what did everyone get up to for Mothering Sunday?

Not qualified. [Big Grin]

We had the Service for Young People from the Prayer Book (it's a sort of truncated version of Matins), and distribution of flowers (to all the ladies, not just mothers), and simnel CAKE afterwards.

The threatened sn*w-day happened with a vengeance: the Council have ploughed a sn*w-bank about 6 feet high and the same wide right in front of our house. [Mad]

However, a kindly neighbour helped D. dig it out while I made pancetta pasta for lunch, so we should be able to get out tomorrow (assuming we don't get any more f****** sn*w).

[Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Mrs Sioni was away for the weekend with the daughters while I played "bears with furniture" at home with the boys.

A colleague has passed on a vile cough/cold/throat thing. It must be bad as he's absent too and he's a contractor.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I spent the weekend partly doing an online retreat, partly reading novels, catching up on housework and watching re-runs of the first version of Poldark, which knocks the new version into the shade as far as I'm concerned.

It was a quiet weekend with a lot of food for thought. The phones were off and internet kept to a minimum; by Sunday I was quite getting into it and started to realize just how much "distraction" there is in everyday life. As a Lenten exercise it was well worth doing, though the actual retreat sessions didn't give me a feeling of the numinous or connection with the divine. With hindsight I think I could have done with longer although I was getting a bit fed up at times. That isn't necessarily a bad thing, though.

[ 17. March 2015, 11:10: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
We have fond memories of a little café in Belfast called Piglet's* which was a greasy-spoon and breakfasterie during the day and a rather nice place to drop into for an early supper after w*rk.

A bit like Adam's Cafe which we used to frequent when living in London. It didn't have a licence in those days, but does now - although you can still BYO.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
So today this particular island is bright green for a certain saints day. I'm not objecting! I've made chocolate stout cake with baileys icing if anyone wants some (it's lovely :-))
 
Posted by Jemima the 9th (# 15106) on :
 
Yes please! Baileys icing sounds lovely. I think much of my introduction to underage drinking involved Baileys....Quite a bit of my legal-age drinking involves stout, now I come to think of it.

I have less glamorous but functional banana bread, if anyone wants some.

I should be doing housework, but went to a jolly fine gig last night and was up past my bedtime so am too lazy.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
We don't do Mothering Sunday as the Smudgelet, who is adopted, finds it too difficult. So we just had a lazy day. But he did decide it was a good opportunity to try out a new cake recipe he'd discovered... and I'm rather pleased he did. A beautiful three-tiered raspberry and rosewater cake with fresh cream! Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. The best Unmother's Day cake I've ever tasted. And oh dear, the fresh cream meant we had to eat it in huge slices! [Big Grin]

I did feel sorry for all the families who had nice things planned for the day which were thwarted by what miserable weather we had. And we were a bit shocked at how many people were out in their cars, particularly at the supermarket.
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
I was ill in bed on Mothering Sunday, so we're having the celebration a week late. Planning to go to our favourite Italian restaurant for lunch after church.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Smudgie:
We don't do Mothering Sunday as the Smudgelet, who is adopted, finds it too difficult. So we just had a lazy day. But he did decide it was a good opportunity to try out a new cake recipe he'd discovered... and I'm rather pleased he did. A beautiful three-tiered raspberry and rosewater cake with fresh cream! Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. The best Unmother's Day cake I've ever tasted. And oh dear, the fresh cream meant we had to eat it in huge slices! [Big Grin]

I did feel sorry for all the families who had nice things planned for the day which were thwarted by what miserable weather we had. And we were a bit shocked at how many people were out in their cars, particularly at the supermarket.

The cake sounds scrumptious. mmmmmmmmm.
I had the perfect Mother's Day trip - the usual Sunday queue at the dump vanished for the day so I was there and back in a flash, leaving more time in the garden.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
So many tasty cakes! (The boozy paddys day cake is somewhat improved by a day in the fridge, oddly enough)
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Mothering Day is not a custom here, Mothers' Day being in May. But we do observe Laetere Sunday with the Mothers' Union playing a role in leading the intercessions. We say the Mothers' Union prayer, and members distribute simnel cake.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Mmmmmm ... Bailey's icing ...

Now it just happens that the head of the theological college where D. teaches was dishing out miniatures of Bailey's on Tuesday in honour of St. Patrick - any chance of posting the recipe upstairs?

Smudgie - the Smudgelet's cake sounds deeply wicked. In a good way, of course.

And if it's got raspberries in it, it counts as one of your five-a-day, obviously. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
What I learned last night: I hate flat-pack furniture. Why aren’t the holes opposite the holes? I may also have smacked myself on the thumb with a hammer [Hot and Hormonal] [Frown]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
quote:
And if it's got raspberries in it, it counts as one of your five-a-day, obviously. [Big Grin]
Two of your five-a-day if you eat enough.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
What I learned last night: I hate flat-pack furniture. Why aren’t the holes opposite the holes? I may also have smacked myself on the thumb with a hammer [Hot and Hormonal] [Frown]

How can there be any uncertainty?
 
Posted by sharkshooter (# 1589) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Why aren’t the holes opposite the holes? (

Because you have got something backwards. And, yes, Ikea furniture is of the devil, invented and designed to make good people swear.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
What I learned last night: I hate flat-pack furniture. Why aren’t the holes opposite the holes?

Aargh, flat-pack furniture. I've had a succession of bookcases with U-shaped shelves and no backs, dressing tables where the drawers have to be opened extremely carefully with both hands in case the front of the drawer falls off, and a pleasingly lopsided chair whose back falls off from time to time. You'd think I'd learn.

And no the holes never are quite in the right place. There is always a minimum of one at least slightly out of alignment, forcing you to either strive to bend the unbendable or widen one of the holes yourself and thereby spoil it.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by sharkshooter:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Why aren’t the holes opposite the holes?

Because you have got something backwards ...
About 30-odd years ago, D. and my dad (with me as the gofer) installed a little pipe-organ rather like this in a church in Orkney, and they couldn't understand why the big pipes on the side wouldn't fit in the holes. I looked at it for a while, and realised they were trying to put them in in the wrong order; I was quite chuffed that I could see what they couldn't. [Big Grin]

You're quite right about flat-pack furniture though - there's nearly always a mysterious screw or bolt left over after you've finished. [Paranoid]

In other news, our department at w*rk is moving to a new building over the next few weeks: I saw my new office for the first time today and was v. impressed. A whole office to myself (admittedly without windows, but I haven't had those for the last four years, so I'm used to that), with my name on a board outside it! They mis-spelled it, but it's a start. [Yipee]

However, there are apparently structural issues: they allowed for the weight of filing-cabinets, but only if they were empty ... [brick wall]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Hi ho hi ho, it's off to w*rk I go ...

I only work one day a week (someone has to earn enough to pay for doggy treats and toys) but even then I am beginning to wish I was at home!

I think 'proper' retirement looms!

We had a lovely day at the Guide Dogs training centre in Atherton on Wednesday. They did some talks and long service award presentations. Then we saw the dogs put through their paces - amazing. We also had a talk by the dog care manager which really, really put my mind at rest. They showed us what the dogs' first days and weeks involved. They care for them wonderfully. I have told Gypsy she is in for some real pampering at Big School!
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Is Gypsy off to school early? It is going to be a real wrench for you, Tatze and the rest of the family (aside - typing z on my keyboard reminds me I need to clean it, sticky, yuk!).

Today is my day off as I work four days a week, but I've just decided to go down to two from September. That should be OK money-wise as long as I can sort out HMRC who have suddenly decided I should be paying 40% tax on my megre income - I had nearly £200.00 less than I was expecting this month!
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
However, there are apparently structural issues: they allowed for the weight of filing-cabinets, but only if they were empty ... [brick wall]

I'm not sure how true this story is, but at the university where I did my PhD the story goes that the entire top floor of the library is empty, as they hadn't taken into account when they laid the foundations and built the library how much the books would weigh.

I suspect the same brains of Britain who designed the library are in charge of thwarting my every attempt to do something vaguely efficient in my new job (started this week). Today's not-frustrating-at-all-oh-no-really experience was trying to log a call online to the IT helpdesk, as a cock-up has meant that I can't log onto my own computer and I have to use somebody else's with someone else again's ID (not dodgy at all, guvnor). As I'd not done it before (being new and all that) I didn't have a login ID, but there was a helpful note on the screen saying if I didn't have an ID to call this number to get one. So I called it, to get an answerphone message telling me that I should log my query online. Thanks for that... [brick wall]

Oh well - at least it's the weekend. No more work-related numptiness till Tuesday [Smile]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Does the name on the door mean you've got a permanent contract Piglet?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:
Is Gypsy off to school early? It is going to be a real wrench for you, Tatze and the rest of the family.

It's a distinct possibility and yes, we'll be heartbroken [Tear] but I would never have met her if I hadn't puppy walked her, she'd have gone to someone else - and she's off on a wonderful adventure.

Tatze will be fine, she's a real Mummy's girl - she doesn't worry at all so long as she has me.

I have asked for another yellow girl, any time after the 22nd June (My son gets married on the 20th)
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Went to The Deep in Hull today and a good time was had by all. A very clever design means that you get to see the largest tank from several different angles, including from one of the lifts, which was useful as we watched a diver feeding some sawfish (half-shark, half-chainsaw) from a large stick.

There were also penguins, a giant ray and numerous Amazonian poisonous frogs in varying colours.

Is it very wrong that we finished the day with fish and chips?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, I suppose Fish and Chips is better than a Penguin Burger - but only just!
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
quote:
I'm not sure how true this story is, but at the university where I did my PhD the story goes that the entire top floor of the library is empty, as they hadn't taken into account when they laid the foundations and built the library how much the books would weigh.
I've heard that story about Dundee University Library extension, where many of the book shelves are only half-filled. Not sure I believe it, though.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
I only work one day a week (someone has to earn enough to pay for doggy treats and toys) but even then I am beginning to wish I was at home!

I wonder how much of that is because your work day is Friday? I work part time and I love my job, but one of my working days is Friday and I've always disliked it. I'm hoping my hours will change soon, however. [Yipee]

Keep us informed about Gypsy - will you be able to visit her after she's moved on? And did you get an outfit you're happy with for your son's wedding?

I'm intrigued at how they got the spelling of your name wrong, Piglet. Piglit? Pigglette? [Biased]

I've got a lovely day ahead. Coffee with a friend, lunch with Nenlet1 and her husband and in-laws for Son in Law's birthday, then home to watch "The Musketeers" on catch up. And I'm going to walk everywhere as it's such a gorgeous day and it will mean I can have a glass of wine with my lunch. [Big Grin]

Nen - prepared for afternoon doziness.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Nice day yesterday. Someone bought me a mocha as a surprise in return for the coffee I'd bought her earlier in the week. I hadn't the heart to tell her I can't really drink non-decaff or to pour it away, so drank half of it (it was delicious) and spent much of the day with what felt like caffeine overdose in consequence.

It didn't stop me going to a lunchtime art class which I thoroughly enjoyed, or for going out for dinner in Oxford later and sitting at a table by the window, watching the world go by and sipping my favourite cocktail as the sun went down.

The art classes look to become a regular thing. It hasn't been formally arranged yet, but hopefully we'll be learning how to draw, taught by a retired teacher who is now a freelance art teacher and artist with his own studio. He introduced us to drawing by using a grid yesterday, which is something I hadn't tried before and of course it works better than freehand. Then we moved on to tonal shading. Great fun!
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Enjoy 'The Muskateers' Nenya, we watched it last night, and it's really cranking up to a explosive finale next week. I'll miss it when it goes, it's extremely silly but good Friday night fun.
It's darker here than it was during the eclipse yesterday. Off to buy the incredients for a fennel and orange soup that'll be ready later if anyone fancies a bowl.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
I only work one day a week (someone has to earn enough to pay for doggy treats and toys) but even then I am beginning to wish I was at home!

I wonder how much of that is because your work day is Friday? I work part time and I love my job, but one of my working days is Friday and I've always disliked it. I'm hoping my hours will change soon, however. [Yipee]

Keep us informed about Gypsy - will you be able to visit her after she's moved on? And did you get an outfit you're happy with for your son's wedding?

Of course I was fine when I got there - the thought of doing it is always worse than doing it!

We won't get to visit Gypsy unless her owner gets in touch - and that's up to them, I will be sending details and a photo book of her puppyhood with her. (That's assuming she graduates from school, 1 in 3 don't make it the whole way)

I got a wedding frock for a wedding I'm going to next Saturday, but not THE frock. I want to lose a few more pounds before I get THE frock - 'tho I saw lots of lovely ones [Smile]
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
quote:
I'm not sure how true this story is, but at the university where I did my PhD the story goes that the entire top floor of the library is empty, as they hadn't taken into account when they laid the foundations and built the library how much the books would weigh.
I've heard that story about Dundee University Library extension, where many of the bookshelves are only half-filled. Not sure I believe it, though.
I think it is a generic Scottish University story because I have basically heard the same about St Andrews. Now that Andrew Melville Hall was built like a ship and was actually sinking is true.

Jengie
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:
Does the name on the door mean you've got a permanent contract Piglet?

Sadly no, though it's a nice thought. AFAIK our boss has told the PTB that she wants to keep all of us on, and the funding is available, but none of us has it in writing yet. Such is the peril of being paid from research grants.

On the subject of building structures, D. tells the story of a brand-new student union building in the 1970s with the swimming-pool on the top floor, but they hadn't allowed for the weight of the water, so it could never be filled. What they did with the hole doesn't seem to have been recorded.

How did these eejits become qualified architects/engineers? [Confused]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
It's a beautiful sunny day here in Boogie Wonderland. I shall take the pooches for a run in half an hour (they will be doing the running - not me!) Then off to Church. Shame to sit inside on such a lovely spring day after all the dull rain!

Never mind, hopefully it will stay like this all day - I may even need to feed the fishes for the first time this year! My fishes all have names you will be pleased to hear [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
It did stay lovely all day over here, Boogie! Did a fair amount of gardening, tidying up etc. until my back complained so much I had to stop! It was actually warm enough to sit in our summer house, allbeit with coats on, and read the papers! [Smile]

Cloudier today, but it has plenty of time to clear up yet!

Tried a slow-roasted shoulder of lamb yesterday - it worked a treat [Smile] [Smile] But next time I will be braver with the marinade, though as Mr.N cannot tolerate spicy things I have to be careful [Frown]

Don't do church on a Sunday - not my idea of worshipping God (if there is one) nor do I like being lectured for three quarters of an hour!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm delighted that you're all enjoying such lovely weather. It was blowing a gale and pouring freezing rain here this morning - I got soaked just going 10 feet from the house to the car to go to church.

It was worth it though - in the morning we sang Batten's Communion Service, Tallis's sublime O sacrum convivium and Cwm Rhondda. What more could a (mostly) discerning piglet ask?

Oh, and I've just made some French sticks, so help yourselves.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
After a week of the Chest from Hell I have returned to work to find that a fair few others were off too, but progress has been made on a number of fronts. I cannot however remember what I was doing, so I hope tomorrow will be better.

[ 23. March 2015, 11:33: Message edited by: Sioni Sais ]
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Jack the Lass:
quote:
I'm not sure how true this story is, but at the university where I did my PhD the story goes that the entire top floor of the library is empty, as they hadn't taken into account when they laid the foundations and built the library how much the books would weigh.

I think it's a generic university library story. I heard the same thing about the university where I did my first degree. And at the university library where I worked for 14 years (the scars still show sometimes) the extension really did have to be underpinned because it was moving away from the original part of the building, presumably due to the weight of books.

NEQ, if the extension at Dundee University library has only just been built it is not surprising the shelves are only half full. There wouldn't be any point in building an extension that was only just big enough to house the books you already have - not if you are planning on acquiring more, because books accumulate in a university library faster than you can persuade the average academic to dispose of the older ones.

Architects are not the only people who fail to take the weight of books into account; the designers of bookshelves don't, either.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
No gale here, Piglet [Razz]

Bestest Mate in all the World arrives tomorrow morning, now somewhere over Eastern Europe on an A380. We are all a bit excited as he is such a tonic when we see him - and he's bringing books and opera DVDs that I ordered online to be delivered to his place - he's also bringing crumpets!

Yum-Yum.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
D's been searching for crumpets* off-and-on for weeks - they're a post-Evensong supper chez Piglet when we can find them (not very often). I'm not a huge fan, although they are nice with M's Cumberland rum butter; perhaps I should consider trying to make some in the bread-machine.

* WW, wash out your mouth with soap ... [Snigger]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Piglet, I have a Paul Hollywood recipe for crumpets - would you like me to pm it to you?

Mrs. S, slavering
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I use Paul Hollywood recipe for crumpets too, very successful.
Hmm, I'm tempted to make crumpets now, despite having 8-10 hours of marking to do today.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
Piglet, I have a Paul Hollywood recipe for crumpets - would you like me to pm it to you?

Why don't you post it on the recipe thread.

Moo
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Wouldn't Mr. Hollywood send raging thunderbolts if I were to use a bread-machine for his crumpets? [Eek!]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
It doesn't need to go in a bread machine, just stick it in a mixer. Here's the recipe Crumpets
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Using both yeast and bi-carb soda sounds, well, very different, and the quantity of yeast seems high. Has anyone found why the different flours are needed? All flour here is strong.

Madame used make some crumpets form Elizabeth David's English Bread and Yeast Cookery (think I got that right) . I'll see if I can dig that out sometime.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm hitting some buffers here: although I've got a food-processor, I haven't got either a stand-mixer or crumpet-rings ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Oh well, back to the supermarket we go.

There's a snow-plough bleeping away merrily below the window as I type: if they don't clear the snow-heap in front of our house this time, I'll be strongly tempted to drop something on them.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
Using both yeast and bi-carb soda sounds, well, very different, and the quantity of yeast seems high. Has anyone found why the different flours are needed? All flour here is strong.

Madame used make some crumpets form Elizabeth David's English Bread and Yeast Cookery (think I got that right) . I'll see if I can dig that out sometime.

I have made crumpets from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's River Cottage Bread Book. It has both yeast and baking powder in it. I think the book explains why, but I don't have it handy at the moment.

Piglet, the only rings I could find down here were egg rings, much smaller than I wanted. I eventually found a tiny, non-stick frying pan which was a good size. I don't think I will make them again. They were very messy and time consuming. I have made bagels from the same book. One of the best books on bread currently around.

I think there is a pond difference here too. The UK recipes I found, suggested toasting crumpets if not made that day. Crumpets here are always toasted.

To my family's thinking, there is only one brand here worth buying. When that was taken over, the recipe was kept. The other brands are rubbish. My family also believe that anything other than butter and vegemite is sacrilege as a spread.
 
Posted by John Holding (# 158) on :
 
Piglet --

I'm told that a standard tuna or salmon tin can be turned into an acceptable crumpet ring (a little small, but okay) by removing the flat ends and, presumably, smoothing out the edges.

John
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Thanks HA - saves me typing it out! That was why I hesitated before posting to the recipe thread - if Piglet didn't actually *want* it, it would be a waste of time!

Madhur Jaffrey's naan bread recipe - which I do make in a breadmaker - also uses yeast and bicarb. It works a treat [Overused]

And Gee D, strong plain flour is for bread and pizzas etc, ordinary plain flour for things like cakes and puddings - it's finer, I believe, with a lower gluten level (???).

Anyway, for the Greedy Mrs S it's back to yoghurt and muesli for breakfast, ready for a school assembly, featuring puppets, on 'Symbols of Easter'. [Smile] Wish me luck!

Mrs. S, fingers crossed
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
And Gee D, strong plain flour is for bread and pizzas etc, ordinary plain flour for things like cakes and puddings - it's finer, I believe, with a lower gluten level (???).
Australian flour, as Gee D points out is already strong. Varieties which suit our climate produce strong flour. Some is sold as bread flour but all our flour is strong to start with. Plain flour down here just means not self raising.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
If you want crumpets but don't fancy faffing about with rings how about these?
I went to a Quaker Bible study group last night. The Meeting House is only five minutes walk from my house and though no longer a Quaker I thought I'd enjoy doing Bible study with them, and so I did. Three of us were deaf and the evening was full of the sort of unintended comedy you get when people don't quite hear each other properly. Starting with trying to make tea and being told off by the Buddhists in the next door room who were meditating for being noisy.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I believe the baking soda is to produce the bubbles at the top and this recipe does work well for that. I requested crumpet rings and an iron griddle for Christmas especially to make crumpets :)You can crumpet rings on Amazon. I don't toast mine if freshly cooked as there is no need, they are hot and crispy and perfect to eat straight away, but would toast them if re-heating later.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thanks, everybody. The pikelets look rather good; I have vague memories of buying them in M&S when we lived in Belfast, but they don't really look any harder to make than pancakes.

My apologies - I seem to be turning this into another recipe thread. I'll post any other queries I've got upstairs ... [Hot and Hormonal]

In other news, it's a beautiful day here. Not a very warm one (-3°C) but lovely and sunny.

I'm wary of mentioning the word "spring" - that probably won't arrive until about the third Tuesday in May, and will last for about 10 minutes.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm sitting at the computer having sorted and prepared 16 double essays to mark and the outlook here is definitely looking gloomier by the second.
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
THere are some hints of blue sky here, and the rain has stopped.
Considering we are getting new windows and doors put in today, this improvement in the weather - however slight- is very welcome.

hope you can hear me above the sawing/hammering/drilling noises
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Glad it isn't raining for your window fitting [Smile]
I've just had a wet walk to Waitrose to get a break from the marking marathon and fill up our Mother Hubbard's, I haven't left the house since Monday. I excelled myself yesterday and got 18 essays marked, so just twelve left today and an evening tutorial and I am free to have a life again. Or at least return to my studies.
How is everyone else faring today?
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
I am in the middle of making Paul Hollywood's savoury brioche couronne with parma ham and cheese. Hope it turns out as well as the one Other Half made a couple of weeks ago or I'll never hear the last of it...
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
I make his apricot couronne at Christmas (too rich for the rest of the year, I think [Waterworks] ) and it is YUMMY - the ham and cheese one does sound good though ...

Mrs. S, slavering again
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
The ham and cheese couronne sounds delicious!
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
Just got it out of the oven - busy slavering over it.

Now, the problem is going to be resisting the temptation to eat it until teatime. Perhaps a small slice - for quality control purposes, you understand...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Absolutely - you wouldn't want to give it to Mr. R. without knowing it was OK, now would you? [Biased]

We're going out for dinner with a group of friends from the choir this evening - there are four couples, and we always try to go out to celebrate birthdays, but Life tends to intervene, and what usually happens is that the winter birthdays (five of us from mid-December to mid-March) get celebrated at some point in the winter or spring, and the summer ones (three from the end of July to the middle of August) sometime in the summer.

We're going to Get Stuffed (I think I've mentioned it before [Big Grin] ) as their menu can cater for one of the group who has a very restricted diet, and I'm rather hoping that they're on better form than they were last time we were there (music was too loud and they wouldn't turn it down, even when asked politely).

Will report back later ...
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I have a day free from work [Big Grin]
I've made the batter for crumpets and am pondering making a Swedish sticky chocolate cake my 10 year old saw in this month's Waitrose magazine (his idea of reading is looking at pictures of cakes). I might do some textile stuff later, I'm experimenting with making wrist cuffs of painted velvet.
I might also have a kip this afternoon.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Now all my days are Saturdays it's easy to forget what day of the week it actually is. Today's Saturday has so far seen the parsnip bed dug over at the allotment (ran out of oomph to plant the seedlings so that is for tomorrow) and now I'm about to continue a charity shop trawl for a black blouse with sleeves & collar which I need for my very first concert tomorrow - it's the orchestra uniform if we don't have the actual uniform.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Happy hunting, Daisydaisy, and good luck for the concert!

We had a very nice evening yesterday - the food was definitely back on form, and a good time was had by all.

In other news, I got a letter today extending my w*rk contract until the end of 2016, which is a huge relief, as our recent extensions have mostly been for either three or six months.

[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
That is good news [Smile]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Great news about the job Piglet - have they sorted out your door sign yet?

It's the first day of my holidays today. So far I've been to my creative writing class, done a bit of shopping and am in the midst of making pandolce. Should be eady this evening if anyone fanices a slice.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I doubt that they'll have sorted out the sign yet; I was over in the new building this morning delivering tea to my boss, but I didn't go up to my new place. I'm supposed to be having a measuring-up session on Monday (for the aforementioned filing-cabinets) with the secretary who's doing the organising, so I'll see how things are going then.

Spiced Winter Soup has been made and is merrily doing its thing in the slow-cooker for feeding people post-palm-cross-making tomorrow.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Palm crosses have been made, soup has been consumed, and slow-cooker is now the repository for a couple of lamb-shanks which are merrily marinating. I'll sear them in a frying-pan and set them going just before I go to bed, and on a low setting they should be ready for lunch tomorrow.

The sn*w, which was beginning to be somewhat absent, appears to be giving us an encore.

[Frown]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Piglet, your slow cooker must be huge! How many does it feed with soup!

Very excited, me and daughter are taking ourselves off to Spain for Easter - she needs a break and I need sun!! Just pray for no delays at Airports!
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
I was doing the laptop for morning Service today and everything went wrong - the text changed to black, which it does sometimes; the backgrounds to the songs all disappeared (I pressed the wrong button [Hot and Hormonal] ); someone had turned on the light over the screen, bleaching all the colour out (till I noticed and went to turn it off); and there was a minor melee over whether I was playing the correct part of the DVD (I was, but had to stop it and restart).

All nerve-racking enough, and then in the prayers the leader referred to the part of the lesson where Jesus 'went into the Temple, and looked at everything'. Oh My God, I thought, the ultimate Mystery Worshipper [Help] , and he'd be thinking 'Two thousand years they've had, and they STILL can't get it right!' [Killing me]

Mrs. S, still breaking out in a cold sweat [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It's been an eventful week. From the bus window earlier this week, I saw two men beating up a cyclist and stamping on his bicycle. Had to wait until the next day to find out from the local paper what happened - I thought they knew each other but it was apparently an unprovoked attack where they just dragged him off his bike and attacked him.

The next day (again seen out of the bus window) there was a man with a very bloody nose lying on the pavement with an ambulance and stretcher nearby and the police hurtling up towards the incident. The local paper said afterwards a child had been knocked down, but it looked like there was more than that.

I also had to unexpectedly deal with some mental health situations. As a result I've signed up on a waiting list for a course on mental health awareness, though that won't happen until the summer.

It has been difficult to stand back from this sort of thing but getting out into the countryside, both on Friday evening to see the new lambs in the fields, and today for what I can only describe as an "elemental" walk, has been good. The wind is roaring in the branches, the leaves are scudding, there are showers of blossom like confetti, and sudden drenches of heavy rain mixed with fitful sunlight. Surprisingly enjoyable.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
From the bus window earlier this week, I saw two men beating up a cyclist and stamping on his bicycle. . . . The next day (again seen out of the bus window) there was a man with a very bloody nose lying on the pavement. . . .

Remind Miss Amanda to take a different route. [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
I was doing the laptop for morning Service today and everything went wrong - the text changed to black, which it does sometimes; the backgrounds to the songs all disappeared (I pressed the wrong button [Hot and Hormonal] ); someone had turned on the light over the screen, bleaching all the colour out (till I noticed and went to turn it off); and there was a minor melee over whether I was playing the correct part of the DVD (I was, but had to stop it and restart).

Sounds like a bit of a nightmare. [Eek!] Mr Nen was on the projection for one of our services this morning but fortunately it all went rather more smoothly for him.

Rather too much going on at present - I quickly reach saturation point and am easily overwhelmed [Hot and Hormonal] - but Nenlet2 is coming home next week for Easter [Yipee] so really looking forward to that. We are decorating and the house is a tad chaotic but we're working to get his room back to a state where he can sleep in the bed and work at the desk. It will also be nice to have a break from work. I love my job but there are changes happening there, including a possible change to the hours I work, and I want it all to be sorted out now please.

Nen - change averse.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I missed church due to running in a half marathon which was also a bit elemental like Ariel's walk. It was raining and very windy and running uphill into a strong wind it seemed as though I would come to a standstill. Still, it's a good way of pretending that I am 30 rather than 53.

Church will be tomorrow night as I am trying out stations of the cross for the first time.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Piglet, your slow cooker must be huge ...

It's quite big - 7 quarts - like this one and came with a little one for doing hot dips. I wasn't the only one catering yesterday - there were four pots of various sorts of soup on the stove-top as well. I reckon I got maybe 8-10 generous bowls out of it, and it wasn't more than about two-thirds full.

I did lamb-shanks in it for today's lunch; once you've put in veggies and a couple of decent-sized shanks, it's surprising how even a big slow-cooker fills up.

Our Palm Sunday services went really well - Weelkes' Hosanna to the Son of David (what else?) in the morning, and Choral Evensong with Meditation (lessons interspersed with anthems and hymns instead of a sermon) in the evening.

To those having issues with their power-points, overhead-projectors and similar instruments of Beelzebub - hymn-books don't go on the blink.

[Devil]

[ 30. March 2015, 03:49: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

To those having issues with their power-points, overhead-projectors and similar instruments of Beelzebub - hymn-books don't go on the blink.

[Devil]

[Overused]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
To those having issues with their power-points, overhead-projectors and similar instruments of Beelzebub - hymn-books don't go on the blink.

Yes, they do: in my first church there were certain hymns I couldn't use because the binding of our hymnbooks meant that the same few pages had dropped out of most of them.

Or else I had to check all the books that would be given out, before the service. [Devil]

[ 30. March 2015, 06:45: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
We had a lovely all-age service yesterday as there was no Sunday School, with children co-opted (all spur of the moment) to act out the reading, an interactive quiz for adults and children and lots of lively worship, with signing. Our services do tend to be rather relaxed and interactive anyway, lots of banter between ministers and congregation, so our all-age service is less disruptive to us as it might feel in a more formal setting. It was announced that we had a record 99 children under the age of 11 the week before (I'm guessing about a quarter of our usual approx. 500 people congregation is under 18).
Our computers/screens worked perfectly [Smile]

Kids are home for the holiday. I've put the bread on and made crème caramel for tea and now I'm about to do a little work before settling down to my studies.
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
as one of the projection team in our church, I feel your pain, Mrs S
It always seems that the spelling errors magically appear 2 seconds after the words are up for everyone to see - and not when you dilligently check them all beforehand ( [Hot and Hormonal] )

we spent a while yesterday setting up the audio with the computer to be able to show a video clip (which only happens occasionally) with the only cable available being one we knew to be "dodgy" - only for the preacher decide his sermon had been too long already so he didn't want to use it. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
To those having issues with their power-points, overhead-projectors and similar instruments of Beelzebub - hymn-books don't go on the blink.

Yes, they do: in my first church there were certain hymns I couldn't use because the binding of our hymnbooks meant that the same few pages had dropped out of most of them.

Or else I had to check all the books that would be given out, before the service. [Devil]

Yes and its a lot hard to change them when the hymnbooks have the wrong words to the hymn!

Jengie
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
To those having issues with their power-points, overhead-projectors and similar instruments of Beelzebub - hymn-books don't go on the blink.

Yes, they do: in my first church there were certain hymns I couldn't use because the binding of our hymnbooks meant that the same few pages had dropped out of most of them.

Or else I had to check all the books that would be given out, before the service. [Devil]

The sound of pages falling to the floor, from songbooks or the Bible, is often a sign that a song or a passage is overused. One of our preachers uses 1 Peter and Romans 8 so much that the congo are ready to catch the pages when these are announced.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
Yes, they do: in my first church there were certain hymns I couldn't use because the binding of our hymnbooks meant that the same few pages had dropped out of most of them.

Or else I had to check all the books that would be given out, before the service. [Devil]

Yes and its a lot hard to change them when the hymnbooks have the wrong words to the hymn!

Jengie

And what about the all-too-common syndrome, whereby a church projects words onto a screen and also provides paper copies for those who can't read/don't like it ... but the video person and the paper person don't confer beforehand and pepare entirely different versions of what they thought was the same hymn!
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
not as bad as when the singer/ worship leader / lead worshipper sends you new(er) words for a song, during the week - which you update from the current stored version - only for him/her to lapse back into the older version during the service [brick wall]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I suspect that my views of "newer words" are for another time, and another place ... [Big Grin]

Besides, it's such a beautiful day I really can't bring myself to feel grumpy.

Even on a Monday. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
Yes, they do: in my first church there were certain hymns I couldn't use because the binding of our hymnbooks meant that the same few pages had dropped out of most of them.

Or else I had to check all the books that would be given out, before the service. [Devil]

Yes and its a lot hard to change them when the hymnbooks have the wrong words to the hymn!

Jengie

And what about the all-too-common syndrome, whereby a church projects words onto a screen and also provides paper copies for those who can't read/don't like it ... but the video person and the paper person don't confer beforehand and pepare entirely different versions of what they thought was the same hymn!
Even better when both have the wrong words! No, not an over active imagination I have been there and got the t-shirt. The result was the congregation was singing something that was neither on the projector nor in the hymnbooks! Congregations can be as fussy over words as they can over tunes (I have heard shouts of "wrong tune" in worship, admittedly a different congregation).

Jengie
 
Posted by Stejjie (# 13941) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
Yes, they do: in my first church there were certain hymns I couldn't use because the binding of our hymnbooks meant that the same few pages had dropped out of most of them.

Or else I had to check all the books that would be given out, before the service. [Devil]

Yes and its a lot hard to change them when the hymnbooks have the wrong words to the hymn!

Jengie

And what about the all-too-common syndrome, whereby a church projects words onto a screen and also provides paper copies for those who can't read/don't like it ... but the video person and the paper person don't confer beforehand and pepare entirely different versions of what they thought was the same hymn!
Or even better (which has happened at our place once or twice) when the Powerpoint display and the service sheet are done by the same person - and don't match up...
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Besides, it's such a beautiful day I really can't bring myself to feel grumpy. Even on a Monday. [Smile]

No. Wednesdays are for being grumpy.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I can't feel grumpy today either, I have no marking or teaching deadlines, I've done my studies for today and am now toying with making a garlicky ricotta and spinach lasagne for tea (a personal favourite). And my children haven't uttered a word all day, they've reached the age where as long as you feed them they ignore you. Yippee!
I'm feeling quite chilled.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Ah, the glory of being a Quaker - no hymn books, no Powerpoint, no projector and the only sound system is a loop for the hearing impaired...

...and sometimes the whole hour will go by in blissful, gathered, silence.

Sorry Piglet, no Dean so no Grinning.

A good few days away in the mountains last week - the only problem was that out of the five us in four rooms all had hot water in their bathroom except me! Showering in cold water at over 5000 feet is a bit of a challenge - on the last morning I didn't even try but waited until we got down the hill to home where I happily had a cold shower at sea level. Otherwise a fab trip and a great walk through tea gardens on one afternoon - so peaceful!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Logged into free wifi at the station this evening and got a message, the gist of which was: "If you want to continue accessing our hotpots you must accept our terms and conditions."

What, I wonder, might the terms and conditions for hotpots be? Bring your own spoon? Don't ask for more than 2 slices of bread?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Lancashire broadband?
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
[Overused] [Overused]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I HAVE JUST SPENT MORE THAN HALF AN HOUR ON THE PHONE TO TALKTALK TO TRY AND FIND MY PASSWORD - and I still haven't got it! You'd think it would be simple, but no, I've had to set up a new email address for my account, with a specific password, then my computer wouldn't load properly. Ever felt like you are hitting your head against a brick wall? Any virtual tea and cake - or stronger - going? I need it!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I feel your pain. I have a Tiscali webmail account which I can't remember the password to (Tiscali were taken over by Talktalk a while ago). I tried to access it this afternoon and couldn't remember the password. No problem, they will email the password to me. It will be emailed to the Tiscali account whose password I can't remember. No problem, just log into your account and set up a recovery email address. Oh, by the way, you'll need your Tiscali password to log in and do that.

And as you say, the website often crashes.
 
Posted by Ye Olde Motherboarde (# 54) on :
 
Sorry to jump in with this rant, but the Secret Santa thread closed and I couldn't think of anywhere to put this but the UK thread.

I HATE THE ROYAL MAIL! IT IS EVIL AND I HATE IT!

The reason?
Today, in my mail I go the Secret Santa gift from my little Santa and guess when it was POSTED?????
NOVEMBER 22!!!!

Your Royal Mail is a travesty, a sham, a joke and full of idiots!!! -----am I the only one who thinks this?????

end of rant.....I feel better now.

Now that that is over, many thanks to my Santa Giftee, it was s lovely thoughtful present and I appreciate it.

Motherboard.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
How do you know it got delayed by the Royal Mail rather than once it was in the care of the USPS?
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
How do you know it got delayed by the Royal Mail rather than once it was in the care of the USPS?

One of my sons has recently bought several pipes an a vintage leather wallet, mainly from USA on eBay. Without exception those from USA have taken weeks and weeks to arrive down here. One had postmarks from Canada, France, and Mexico, along with several others interspersed from USPS. He could follow the parcel's journey by the dates on the post marks.

I no longer buy if it is posted from USA. However, at Christmas, I bought several articles for various grandchildren from Thinkgeek. I paid quite a bit for courier service. They had two classes of courier and I chose the cheaper. I bought them Tuesday afternoon online and had them early Friday morning in Sydney.

[ 31. March 2015, 00:02: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
.. I have heard shouts of "wrong tune" in worship ...

There are stories told of an old boy in our congregation (long deceased, but a Pillar Of The Church™ in his day) who would sing the tune he perceived to be the correct one, even if it wasn't the one being played by the organist and sung by the choir and the rest of the congregation.

AIUI, he couldn't carry a tune in a bucket, so it may not have mattered ... [Devil]
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Reported conversation between two members

Him: We notice you did not make the last church social on Wednesday and were slightly surprised as we thought it was on a topic you'd be interested in
Her: Oh I am sorry I missed that, I was not aware it was on.
Him: It was clearly in the Church Magazine
Her: Oh I do not read that

The only snag was that she was the editor of said magazine!

Jengie
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
How do you know it got delayed by the Royal Mail rather than once it was in the care of the USPS?

One of my sons has recently bought several pipes an a vintage leather wallet, mainly from USA on eBay. Without exception those from USA have taken weeks and weeks to arrive down here. One had postmarks from Canada, France, and Mexico, along with several others interspersed from USPS. He could follow the parcel's journey by the dates on the post marks.

I no longer buy if it is posted from USA. However, at Christmas, I bought several articles for various grandchildren from Thinkgeek. I paid quite a bit for courier service. They had two classes of courier and I chose the cheaper. I bought them Tuesday afternoon online and had them early Friday morning in Sydney.

I haven't had a lost or delayed parcel in my UK internet business for about 5 years, the last one got lost in France. My parcels from China can take only a week, small items such as dress making patterns from the US also take a week but anything bigger can take 2 months.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
He was surprised that several parcels, from different sellers, all correctly addressed when the finally arrived, had taken not only many weeks to get here but had gone by such a roundabout route as documented by postmarks.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
My friend Lulu returned to the UK from life in California (post divorce) in 2006. As she was leaving (and all packed goods had been collected) she noticed 2 paperback books she was fond of so quickly put them into a jiffy bag, addressed it correctly to the UK home in Bristol, took it to the US Post Office, put on correct postage and waited.

The books arrived in 2013 - via places called "Bristol" in fourteen different states, despite the fact that the package was addressed to "England" as well as "United Kingdom".

It took 6 years 9 months for the package to actually leave the USA - when the USPS sent it to New Zealand with a note saying "New Zealand, Australia ?".

Once the Kiwis got hold of it they sent it straight to the UK and from leaving Auckland it took only 3 days to get to Bristol.

[ 31. March 2015, 09:49: Message edited by: L'organist ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
Him: It was clearly in the Church Magazine
Her: Oh I do not read that

The only snag was that she was the editor of said magazine!

That's not actually as daft as it sounds.

I've been typing the Cathedral bulletin for the last 10+ years, but I can't honestly say that I always read it. I get e-mails saying "please put the following in the Messenger", and I cut-and-paste; I re-format them and check for typos, but I'm not necessarily "reading for comprehension" ... [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
working from home again today.
Answered the door to someone offering quotes for exterior home improvements. Managed to get rid of hiom because the phone was ringing - answered the phone to an automated advert for something or other - I didn't let the call last long enough to find out.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
WK - tell them you 'only rent this dump'!

Mrs. S, who took a long time to come up with that one [Killing me]
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Answered my father in law's phone yesterday to an Asian gentleman asking for Mr Bee senior.
I said that he had passed away and please to remove him from their list.
He didn't reply and hung up on me.
Must remember that one.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Ye Olde Motherboarde, I have messaged your Santa to let her know it arrived - by the way, your message box is full!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wet Kipper:
- answered the phone to an automated advert for something or other - I didn't let the call last long enough to find out.

It's worth listening to the end of an automated message because they often have the option "to unsubscribe from these calls press One." This does not work if it's a message on your answer phone. [Biased]

I've had a good day at work and seeing friends and going to my zumba class. After tomorrow morning at work I am finished until after Easter and Nenlet2 comes home tomorrow evening. [Yipee]

The downside about tomorrow is I've got loads to do both at work and at home and should probably get up around 4am in order to achieve it all.

Nen - not that much of a lark.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
WK - tell them you 'only rent this dump'!

My dad used to use a similar gambit; he had signed the house over to me and my siblings, and when the caller said, "Good morning, Mr. Piglet, do you own your own house?" he could say "no" with a completely clear conscience.

A friend of ours in England has a good way of getting rid of cold callers:

CC: Good morning. I'm calling from Grabbitt & Ripoff Credit Services. May I speak to the householder?

Friend (in best Jeeves voice): This is Catchpole, the butler. I'm afraid His Lordship is unavailable at the moment ...

[Killing me]
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... put them into a jiffy bag, addressed it correctly to the UK home in Bristol, took it to the US Post Office, put on correct postage and waited.

The books arrived in 2013 - via places called "Bristol" in fourteen different states, despite the fact that the package was addressed to "England" as well as "United Kingdom".

It took 6 years 9 months for the package to actually leave the USA

[Eek!] In spite of previous experiences with cross-pond delivery I have recently ordered my DiL's birthday present from the USA. I did spend some time trying to find the same item from a UK supplier without success, so took a chance. Will be spending the next month with my fingers crossed. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
An elderly lady who came to Newfoundland to work as a nurse in the 1940s or early 50s told us that she would send a letter to her mum in England on a Sunday afternoon, and get a reply on Wednesday. She'd reply to that on the Wednesday and get a reply back on the following Saturday.

Fings ain't wot they used to be ... [Big Grin]

eta: re US post: I ordered a pair of shoes from an American web-site last summer and IIRC they arrived in about 2-3 weeks, which was fine, as I think I allowed about 5 weeks before I was leaving for the wedding I bought them for.

[ 01. April 2015, 13:56: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I've never had the courage to try a variation of what my friend's husband says to cold callers. "I'm about to make love to my wife. Could you call back in two and a half minutes?"

Apparently they never do. [Biased]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
[Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I am in Heidelberg visiting my son for the week. We have just been for a Long walk and seen peregrine falcons nesting! We have bought plenty of weissbier and four weissbier glasses (my brother brings some every week when he stays with us, so it will be good to have the 'proper' glasses) It was very windy on the North Sea crossing but the ferry is huge and we didn't feel the rocking at all. Hoping for the same on the return.

We lost an hour on Saturday night and another on Sunday!

My son's GF is from Georgia and made us some traditional food today - fabulous! She has applied for a visa so we are hoping they can both be in the UK for my younger son's wedding. She spoke no English last time we met her, but now we can have conversations (this is her fourth language!)

Back home Good Friday lunch time to pick up the pooches from their doggy Hotels.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
WK - tell them you 'only rent this dump'!

Mrs. S, who took a long time to come up with that one [Killing me]

I like the cold calls from ambulance chasers.

AC: Hello is that Mr balaam?
B: Yes,
AC: Have you ever suffered from an accident that was not your fault?
B: Yes.
AC: Did you know you could get some compensation?
B: I don't think I can.

Here starts a sales patter, which lasts a long time because I interrupt to keep telling them that I think thy are wrong. This goes on for 20 minutes until they get to the bit where they want me to agree to take them on as legal claimers.

B: I'm sorry, I can't do that.
AC: Why not?
B: I have already been fully compensated.

Why do they never ask if you have received compensation? It is fundamental to what they are doing.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Did you know you could get some compensation?

But surely the correct answer is, "Yes, I did know that, and I've already been fully compensated." Which would save you both a lot of time.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I have time to waste.

It keeps them from irritating someone else.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
As soon as I know it's a cold call - which takes seconds - I say "no thank you" and put the phone down. I never do find out what they were selling, nor do I care.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
We get lots of calls about solar panels. Some companies are OK, but I had one the other day who would not take telling that we have north facing roofs. They forced an "appointment" on me, but thankfully, when they rang to confirm the arrangements, it wsa a supervisor that I spoke to and complained about the previous caller. She agreed that our roofs wouldn't be suitable and apologised.
On a different note, did anyone watch Poldark on Sunday? I wsa rather surprised at Cornish peasants singing the Boar's Head Carol, which I thought was Oxford or Cambridge University!
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Its the tradition of processing a real, ready-to-eat boar's head that still exists at (I think) Queen's College, Oxford.

The carol has been widespread since for at least 500 years or more - we probably got it from the Vikings and the Normans, being really norsemen, likely spread it.

So, entirely in keeping for the chap on Poldark to be singing it.
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
One nice lazy morning at the start of a 5-day weekend. I didn't have the lie-in I'd really like, as I'm heading into town to meet Mother Knotweed (and Sandemaniac is working today, so I got partially woken by him getting up anyway). Pity the sunshine we had round here yesterday appears to have also taken the day off!
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Rub it in, ya git!

AG
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
I have time to waste.

It keeps them from irritating someone else.

Thank you [Overused]

One benefit of my phone line being unusable for the last month is that my day is gloriously uninterrupted. I had got to the point where I wouldn't answer until my answering machine kicked in and I could hear it was someone I wanted to hear from. Now the answering machine message asks real people to call my mobile and cold-callers not to. It seems to work.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
My son's GF is from Georgia and made us some traditional food today - fabulous! She has applied for a visa so we are hoping they can both be in the UK for my younger son's wedding. She spoke no English last time we met her, but now we can have conversations (this is her fourth language!)

My sister-in-law is *fluent* in four languages. She is a Romanian living in the US, and also speaks fluent French and Italian. ‘Tis very impressive.
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
Re Queen's and the boar's head - yes, that's us, L'Organist. The boar's head gaudy is the Saturday before Christmas.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Maundy Thursday liturgy done and dusted - the Tallis Lamentations really didn't go badly at all (especially considering that one of the tenors was ill, and some of the rest of the choir had missed a lot of rehearsals). D. was pleased with it, and it'll be even better next time. It really is a sublime piece - knocks spots off the Allegri ... [Devil]

As the Good Friday devotion really isn't my sort of thing, and the choir's presence is optional, I'm going into w*rk tomorrow, to pick up some hours for taking holidays (why can't they have civilised holidays on this side of the Pond?).

I've made a chicken curry for Friday's lunch, which'll happen at some point after 3 p.m., and all I need to do when I get in is add the yoghurt and cook the saffron rice.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
My other half is feeling tired after a frantic few weeks setting up his new business (he finally signed the investment funding on Wednesday, hooray!) so we are skipping church today to spend some time relaxing together as a family. I had planned on a nice long walk, hopefully the weather will improve.
Yesterday the children went their grandparents so my husband and I had a champagne lunch in Loch Fyne to celebrate the business deal.
I'm about to make homemade chocolate tea cakes, like the Tunnock's ones. I've never made any before but the method seems straightforward, I've got a mini fondue to melt the chocolate which is the bit that usually goes wrong for me. I've never made marshmallow before though so am slightly apprehensive about that.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Thinking of cold calling, I once thoroughly enjoyed being wooed with the delights of a new conservatory and then was very shocked when the enthusiastic salesman found himself unable to answer my final question: how do you plan to attach it to my first floor flat?

I'm sitting contemplating the long list of housework I have planned to do today. In fact, I'm feeling so lazy that I've had to invite a friend round for coffee tomorrow in order to motivate myself to set to and do it! My arm is doing well after I broke my shoulder in December but it still makes housework and the like twice the chore it usually is.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Back home from Heidelberg, both dogs picked up and snoozing. Tatze has been to boot camp - three hour walks every day! Gypsy has been to puppy walker friends and has been an angel in fur, as always.

[Angel]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I suppose Tatze will be expecting a three-hour walk every day now ...

[puts on best Barbara Woodhouse voice]: Walkies! [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I suppose Tatze will be expecting a three-hour walk every day now ...

[puts on best Barbara Woodhouse voice]: Walkies! [Smile]

Siii - teh!

She's fit as a butcher's dog, for sure!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Why would a butcher's dog be more fit than anyone else's? [Confused]

We're thoroughly enjoying having Nenlet2 home and tomorrow have a big family meal with Nenlet1 and her husband as well. I'm cooking roast lamb. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm guessing that traditionally a butcher's dog was taken out rabbiting for the shop.
My other half has just suggested it means a well fed dog [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Is it because he'd get the pick of the best bones?

After working a few hours while D. was playing for Good Friday stuff, I had a lovely lazy afternoon/early evening snoozing in front of BBC Canada's Top Gear marathon (I'll head downstairs shortly to watch the Argentinian one, which I haven't seen in its entirety yet).

Our surplices are in the wash; they can be dried while I'm doing that.

A spot of pampering (haircut) and retail therapy tomorrow (I have a 20% voucher for a shoe-shop which expires on Monday and it would be criminal not to use it), then a very early night so that I can get up for the 6 a.m. service on Sunday ...

[Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I didn't get up for my normal walk this morning and feel a bit guilty - but only a bit. Normal service can/may resume next weekend when we will be guest-free.

Today is my bessy mate's last day in India as he flies tomorrow morning and has to be at the airport by 07.30 which requires leaving here at 06.45. I hope he has had a good time, I think he has. Today will include a beach trip so he can have his last swim in the sea - the water here may be a tad warmer than in Liverpool Bay.

And once he's gone it will be Pete's last few days before he flies off Penguin-bothering before heading back to Canadia. When he has gone I will be knackered but will have loads to do - priority number one being getting the website sorted...

...and sleep!
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Heavenly Anarchist, how did the tea-cakes turn out?

My attempt at Turkish Delight went badly wrong (tasted lovely, but didn't look right, so I had to eat it all myself) and that's put me off trying marshmallow.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
'WW do you know St Anthony's Church, Chenappady? I suspect that I have visited a twinned church if you do.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Today will include a beach trip so he can have his last swim in the sea - the water here may be a tad warmer than in Liverpool Bay.

Just a tad!

We went to Muiden Castle in Holland on the way home from Heidelberg. By ek, it was cold! The biting wind sent us into the café quick sharp [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
'WW do you know St Anthony's Church, Chenappady? I suspect that I have visited a twinned church if you do.

No, we've never been there, quite a distance south and west of us. Lots of churches dedicated to St Antony around here, we used to be near St Antony's Kaloor and now Himself and Herself go to the one at Chettikad - the masses on Tuesdays always attract thousands.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
I've over-ordered pears in my on-line grocery shop so I'm going to make a pear up-side down cake as an Easter treat. We also have some amazing looking marzipan fruits from our recent trip to Catania which I'm not sure I can bear to eat they are so pretty. The weather there was ideal for me 20%, sunny but not over-bearingly hot. Now I'm back I'm researching ideas for summer holidays - it's too miserable here in SW London at the moment.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Heavenly Anarchist, how did the tea-cakes turn out?

My attempt at Turkish Delight went badly wrong (tasted lovely, but didn't look right, so I had to eat it all myself) and that's put me off trying marshmallow.

I made marshmallow once many years ago from a usually very reliable Womens Weekly recipe book. It was to be used on biscuits. When I whipped it, it expanded enormously. Covered all the biscuits I had made and could have done another four or five lots.

Women Weekly books are always reliable It was a big selling point for them. Unfortunately not in this case. I had never made it before, so followed recipe closely. Have never made it since.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
The tea cakes were great, thank you. I thought they wouldn't hold together but was very surprised that they easily popped out of the moulds and all were intact. The marshmallow was obviously more runny than the real thing but I think my children were suitably impressed. I used the recipe from Lakeland that came with the mould, I think it is on their site. I cheated and used Dove's farm biscuits though, making my own digestives would have been a step too far [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
Well done Heavenly Anarchist! Maybe I should go hunting the recipe (or go shopping in Lakeland again), given how much Sandemaniac likes Tunnock's teacakes.

Will have to wait until we've finished my current effort though - chocolate brownie with raspberries in. [Big Grin] Also available for virtual tasting, as it makes 16 squares, so I'm going to have to take some over for the parental Knotweeds (and at least 1 sibling) on Monday before it goes stale or we eat ourselves sick on it!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Have you tried the Belgian chocolate teacakes they do in Costa Coffee? Three times the size of a Tunnocks and with jam on the biscuit base under the mallow. I may treat myself to one tomorrow.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
...(tasted lovely, but didn't look right, so I had to eat it all myself) ...

Damn it, don't you hate it when that happens [Big Grin]

Mother Arachnid has been making simnel muffins from the Good Housekeeping book, a reliable source of cake recipes. Maybe we can have a virtual cake swap.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Simnel muffins sound good - I love anything marzipanny. My pear upside down cake sort of exploded when I took it out of the tin, so I'm afraid my son and I eat quite a bit of it to tidy it up before my husband came home. Tastes Ok despite its messiness, so help yourself to a slice. The teacakes sound good too, I love all those moulds and tins in Lakeland, but have such a small kitchen I can't fit anymore kitchenware in - as it is the blender lives in my son's bedroom.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Mine were also bigger than Tunnock's and featured raspberry jam in the base.

Brownie with raspberries does sound delightful. I've just made brownies with creme egg halves on top as I have to take an Easter themed dessert to lunch at our friends' house tomorrow.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm afraid I can't get on with fresh fruit and chocolate - I love them separately but really not together.

Hair coloured (by me) and cut (by someone else), chocolate confection bought for D. The shopping centre was absolutely heaving - you'd have thought it was coming up to Christmas rather than Easter, with loads of wee brats queuing up to meet the Easter Bunny ( [Roll Eyes] ).

I tried to find something to spend my shoe voucher on, but there really wasn't much that took my fancy, and nothing that didn't cost about $100 (and I wasn't about to spend $80 on a pair of shoes I really don't need).

Never mind - I've got a "spend $100, get $50 off" from a clothes shop that comes into effect in a couple of weeks ... [Big Grin]

Happy Easter to one and all! [Smile]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Along with the not-cross buns, I made the Jamie Oliver chocolate brownies*, from his 30-minute book - they have crystallised ginger, pecans and sour cherries in! [Ultra confused] The Dowager complains she has no sense of taste any more, so I hope she can taste something of these, I took her two tiny pieces when I went to visit yesterday.

She is much better, by the way, though she hasn't had a definitive answer from the consultant as to her actual condition or its treatment.

*I know they are scrummy because we once took them as part of a picnic to the motor-racing circuit at Thruxton. My petrolhead s-i-l looked longingly as the cold box and asked very sweetly if we could perhaps take the brownies in with us? [Killing me]

Mrs. S, looking forward to not-cross buns for breakfast again (mmmmmmm.......)
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
The local sorbet (and ice cream) parlour had a batch of dairy-free dark chocolate, ginger and apricot sorbet which simply had to be tried out. It is rather nice - and I now have a litre of it in the freezer - anyone for an early morning scoop ?

This morning I celebrated the Easter vigil at a cathedral nearby (I am within striking distance of 2) and suddenly noticed that the mitred person in front of me was wearing lovely dangly earrings. It struck me that this will (at last) become normal (although this particular mitred person is actually from across the pond and not a home-grown one).
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Signing in after a very long day, which seemed to comprise singing punctuated by sleeping (I went home for a sneaky nap between breakfast and the 11:00 service, and snoozed off and on most of the afternoon).

All three choral services went really well, and both sermons* (the Bishop in the morning, the Curate at Evensong) were really rather good. Although less than half the choir was there for Evensong, we still made a very decent fist of Sumsion in G and Come ye faithful, raise the strain by an unfortunate bloke called Thatcher**.

Am now moderately zonked, so I think another early night is in order - it's business as usual tomorrow at w*rk, then we're going to friends for dinner in the evening.

* The silly-o'clock service doesn't have one.

** Churches with a sense of humour used to relish putting it on their music lists on the day after General Elections:
quote:
Come, ye faithful Thatcher
[Devil]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Yet another swan has been killed by a dog in our Park. We originally had two swans, who hatched about 5 cygnets, two went early on (probably crows or the big pike in the lake) and one was killed by a dog when it was quite big. The adult male swan was killed by a dog, and the female left. The two juveniles also went, but came back, and now one has been killed by a dog. Don't know if it is all the same dog, but there are so many out of control dogs around.

It makes me mad that dog owners let their dogs kill wild life. Lots of people, especially children, love coming to feed the ducks and swans, and it worries me that these out of control dogs are around when toddlers and small children are also around the lake.

and of course, the owners are never caught, any more than the dogs are identified. Our own dog was attacked by a couple of German Shepherds that the owner was actually teaching to attack the low lying branches of trees, and hang on.

Ok, rant over. Its cold and foggy here, waiting for the sun to break through which it will later, I hope.

Trying to lose more weight, so cookies, biscuits and all things comforting off the menu!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My diet starts Wednesday after Pete has gone. It has been a while since I have been on the scales as they groan every time I get near them but strict measures will, or may possibly, be taken come the day. It will be great to get back to my early morning power walks instead of the gentle stroll I have managed since Pete arrived.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Back to the subject of cold-calling - I was visiting the Dowager on Saturday and answered her doorbell to find two Jehovah's Witnesses. I gestured at the sign by the bell which clearly says 'No Unsolicited Sales Calls', and one of them responded 'but we aren't selling anything'.

'I consider you to be selling a religion, and I would be obliged if you didn't call again'.

I wonder if they will take any notice? The Dowager has been attending the CofE church in the parish for 52 years so I think they'd be wasting their time anyway...

Mrs. S, scourge of doorsteppers everywhere! [Mad]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I once scared off a couple of JWs by answering the door in my dressing-gown* (it was early on a Saturday morning, and I was half-expecting a recorded-delivery letter about the then-recent purchase of the house) and saying "I don't come round to your house on a Saturday brandishing a copy of the Book of Common Prayer, do I?"

* not a pretty sight ... [Eek!]

eta: now that I think about it, JWs aren't allowed to celebrate anything, are they?

Maybe Mrs. S. should have said "Happy Easter!" [Devil]

[ 06. April 2015, 13:45: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Our own dog was attacked by a couple of German Shepherds that the owner was actually teaching to attack the low lying branches of trees, and hang on.

This is one of the many things that puts me off having a dog - along with the tie they are even if you're going out for a day, having to go out for walks on cold wet mornings and evenings, and scooping the poop. Your own dog can be well trained and perfectly fine but I've got a number of friends with horror stories to tell about their dogs being attacked by others while the owners watch bemused.

I'm heading into the garden shortly to get out into the warm sunshine and to take my mind off the fact that Mr Nen and Nenlet2 have left for the airport for Nenlet2 to head back to uni. [Waterworks]

Nen - post-Easter diet starts tomorrow.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
... having to go out for walks on cold wet mornings and evenings ...

I beg to differ.

I love long early morning walks. In fact, I love dog walks at any time of day. My friend has Tatze when we go away and I have her dog when she does. Guide Dogs sort boarders out for Gypsy. And, of course, Gypsy can go anywhere I do. Mr Boogs is happy to see to Tatze when Gypsy and I are out and about - no problems.


[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
... having to go out for walks on cold wet mornings and evenings ...

I beg to differ.

I love long early morning walks. In fact, I love dog walks at any time of day. My friend has Tatze when we go away and I have her dog when she does. Guide Dogs sort boarders out for Gypsy. And, of course, Gypsy can go anywhere I do. Mr Boogs is happy to see to Tatze when Gypsy and I are out and about - no problems.

On a morning like this morning, Boogie, I agree it would have been glorious. [Smile] I'm sure I've told the story before of how some years ago we came this () close to getting a black lab puppy. The following winter was one of those long icy ones that started in November and I spent the cold mornings when I woke up and the cold evenings when I got in from work being thankful we hadn't got a puppy to walk.

You haven't had any trouble with other dogs attacking yours, then? And you've obviously got Mr Boogs trained. [Biased] Mr Nen says he'd like a dog but he took zero responsibility for the one we were looking after for the day a while back. [Roll Eyes]

In other news, with Nenlet2 on the way back to uni there's a very "holiday's over" feel to things around here and I'm looking forward to getting back to work tomorrow.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
We've enjoyed a gorgeous spring day at the Dean Forest Railway. It wsa lovely to be able to eat our lunch sitting outside in the sunshine.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
The following winter was one of those long icy ones that started in November and I spent the cold mornings when I woke up and the cold evenings when I got in from work being thankful we hadn't got a puppy to walk.

I have all the right clothes for any weather!

I love the cold walks just as much as the sunny ones. Honestly.

I have never been without a dog. My first dog as an adult was Boogie (who I name myself after) he was a gorgeous Heinz 57 from Battersea Dogs Home and lived to a happy healthy 19 years. After that we had Cavaliers as my parents and MIL looked after them during the day and wouldn't have managed big dogs.

quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:

You haven't had any trouble with other dogs attacking yours, then?

No, mine learn to speak 'dog' from a young age, so when we meet a potentially aggressive dog, they give it a wide berth.

Thankfully the law has changed regarding assistance dogs as both dog and owner are very vulnerable when the dog is working. Two recent high profile cases will, hopefully help to make dog owners stop and think.

(As you can see from my obsession 'DOG' replaced 'GOD' in my affections long ago - is there a special place in hell for those who love animals more than they love god?)
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
I managed to miss most of the weekend with an Orrible Cold, but I'm much improved so last night I went to evensong with my friend (the cathedral is about 5mins walk from my house, but I hardly ever go).
And today my sister and brother in law came to see us, so we went to the pub and wandered around in the sunshine and generally had a good time catching up. Sadly no baking chez. Marzipan but my sister gave me a dozen eggs from her hens so I'll probably make something during the week (Om nom nom)
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by marzipan:
... I went to evensong with my friend (the cathedral is about 5mins walk from my house, but I hardly ever go) ...

I hope you enjoyed it and it'll make you want to go again - Choral Evensong is a lovely service, whether you're singing it or attending and listening to someone else singing it.

Just back from v. nice post-Easter roast lamb with friends from the choir, and contemplating another early-ish night (that 6 o'clock start on Sunday wiped me out)!

[Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
It's Raining!

[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]

I know that might not sound like such great news to most of you to us it's a time for celebration. I celebrated by going up on the roof, stripping naked [try not to envisage it, not a pretty sight] and sat in a plastic easy chair and got thoroughly soaked!

[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Sounds marvellous WW - I shall try it next time it rains [Biased]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Are you sure that's wise, Boogie? After all, Boogieland is near one of the rainiest places on earth ... you might be up there for quite some time ... [Big Grin]

I'm a bit confused (nothing new there) - I thought they were having flooding in Wodders' part of the world (although as it's a very large country the flooding could have been miles and miles away.

No rain here today - the sun was splitting the rocks, even if the temperature was only -7°.

I'm going to be in for a busy few days - I just had an e-mail from On High to say that I'm moving to my new office next week, so the files in nine cabinets will have to be boxed up, carted across and put back.

Hello back-ache ... [Help]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Yes, Piglet - Srinagar is about 2650 kms north of here with lots of jungle and desert and other stuff in between - never been there though I have been invited but it is also a fairly volatile region politically so...

The rain has stopped but, as usual after early rains, the power keeps going off for short periods as they sort out the various transformers - dust gathers on and in them over the dry months then the rain wets the dust and trouble ensues but the linemen are amazing and do a fab job.

Pete heads off into the wide blue yonder of Leafy Surrey tomorrow so today his main bag got packed so we're ready for the off late afternoon.


eta: I moved office a couple of months before The Breakdown and it wasn't nearly as painful as I thought it would be - and unpacking my new office was fun as I hadn't inherited it but could do it from scratch and it was so easy to work in because of that.

[ 07. April 2015, 14:18: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Mine's brand-new as well - new building (although attached to and accessible from the one I'm in), so yes - really quite exciting. [Smile]

So far I've emptied two drawers from one of the big cabinets, and discovered that I'm going to need a heck of a lot more bankers' boxes than I actually have.

Possibly more than the entire university has.

Please tell me that the office move didn't actually lead to the breakdown ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
...Please tell me that the office move didn't actually lead to the breakdown ... [Eek!]

Have no fear the trigger for the breakdown was management who couldn't! An all too common situation in my then line of work.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
I've had a lovely day out today visiting a garden trying out a new camera which works via a smart phone [Cool]
I tried a few picture with the camera lens and the iphone to compare and the camera is much better.
I'm a hopeless photographer so need some thing very automatic.

WW, let Pete know that Surrey is not only leafy at the moment but also very sunny and green with lots of gorgeous blossom [Smile]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I'm having a lovely day too - a productive morning at work, lunch with a friend, a walk in the sun, an impromptu cup of tea with a neighbour and some much-needed time to myself with my journal. And on the Ship, of course. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Having been suffering from depression for a couple of days, I think I'm beginning to pick up. Luckily I have this week off to rest and recuperate. Today I am tracing out an Elizabethan pattern on some linen to make an embroidered coif (Tudor head covering) as practice sewing for the Tudor re-creation in the summer. The pattern is a mix of winding stems and flowers and will be done in black work embroidery.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Pete's gone! He should be taking off on the first leg of his journey about now - over to you Smudgiekins!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Safe travels, Uncle Pete! [Smile]

I've discovered that my smaller filing-cabinets can be moved with the files in them, so the move shouldn't be quite as traumatic as I'd imagined. Also, I'd left the files in the lower drawers of the two that I emptied, and they can apparently be moved like that, so I got it right.

I've still got the tallest one to worry about though - it's a good bit taller than I am (not that that's saying very much [Big Grin] ).

I may have to enlist the help of someone less vertically-challenged ...

[ 09. April 2015, 03:15: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I've broken a bone for the first time in my life! I had a fall in the early hours of Monday morning and hurt my big toe. We went to the hospital in Merthyr last night and were told it would be 6 hours before we could see a doctor, and the triage nurse told us that if it was broken, it would probably just be strapped up and advised going to our local emergency centre today. Lord P took me, and within 90 minutes we had been seen by a nuirsing sister, X rayed, diagnosed and strapped up. The only problem is that I have to go to the fracture clinic next week - at least they organised it for me to go to Merthyr (Good parking, 10 miles) as opposed to Newport (Horrendous parking, 20+ miles)!
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Sorry to hear that St Gwladys - broken feet are no fun! My only break was also my foot - two metatarsals, so I called it my Beckham injury as it was the same bones that he broke. Unfortunately I didn't do it in a blaze of glory whilst playing for my country and earning shedloads of money, but by going **** over *** on Lewisham High Street.

I'm meant to be meeting a friend in Edinburgh tomorrow, she is my childhood penpal and is up for a holiday, we've not seen each other for several years. Unfortunately I had to collect the Elf Lass early from nursery today as she had a temperature (this is the girl that is almost never ill - when I got home I had to wrack my brains to remember where I'd put the Calpol, as we almost never have to use it), and after perking up a bit when she got home she's flagging again sadly. I'm still hopeful I can make it to Edinburgh, but will have to see how she is overnight and in the morning. Poor wee thing [Frown]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Poor Elf Lass and poor St. G. - hope you both get better soon.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Echoing what Piglet said.

[Votive]

Pete left yesterday and then this morning I got an e-mail from some people I know vaguely but are friends of the friends that came last November asking if they can come and visit next January! As we have no bookings for 2016 yet [and haven't even thought of it] the answer will be a definite yes. Good folks, worked in West Africa for a while years ago so won't be fazed by developing world stuff - and I haven't even started getting the website up yet, that's next week's job.

I allowed myself a lie in until 07.30 this morning but back to the routine tomorrow - yesterday I stepped on the scales and was not amused!
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Having been busy with some rather strenous gardening over the past two days, my back is complaining loudly today! Getting out of bed was entertaning, never mind putting socks on. Still, on the plus side I'm off to meed a friend's new puppy later on. [Smile]

St. Gwladys, I hope your foot is feeling better soon.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
[Votive] for all the unwell peeps.

I'm feeling much better today. I plan to spend a couple of hours learning a new embroidery stitch (plaited braid) and then catch up on my neglected studies. I might do a spot of baking too.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I was a bit concerned at lunchtime about the sudden deterioration in my eyesight - we were at a feast in memory of an old man from the other side of the village who died a few weeks ago and I found it tough to identify some of the others there. It was all a bit concerning.

Then I thought to clean my specs [Hot and Hormonal]

This afternoon's storm is moving in as I type this - I love this time of year! Well, as long as it doesn't affect my weekend away 18-20th April which would rather upset me. Some folks have gone out of their way to make time for me and I'd hate to disappoint. When the rain starts I'll be back on the roof again.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Enjoy the rain WW.
I've just sorted out my summer clothes and put the winter ones away, so hope the weather doesn't take a severe turn for the worse over the next few weeks. Come September I'm only working two days a week so quite a few workwear items have been put in a pile for the charity shop. As I've also just been and had my hearing aids cleaned I now feel ready to face the spring!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think Pete should think himself grateful he left when he did - rain, RAIN and more RAIN - fine for me as I absolutely love it but it would make getting about in a wheelchair both difficult and really rather muddy.

This evening I bought the birdies a new birdbath thingamajig for the roof - something I have been considering for about a year. It is actually a plastic tray thing used for sorting rice or gram and cost the princely sum of about 65 pence!

Ah well, it's only money and the birdies are worth it.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Hope the Elf Lass recovered sufficiently for Jack the Lass to do the trip to Edinburgh and hope the various poorly people are soon well on the mend.

I did the grocery shopping and then went for a lovely walk in the sunshine. Saw some friends this afternoon. I'm on a retreat day tomorrow, very much looking forward to that.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Lots of train cancellations this morning (fatality on the line) leading to us rushing to catch the first southbound train out, pushing past a lot of disgruntled passengers getting off because they'd been told it was terminating. We got gleefully settled in their seats then were told it was going nowhere and we should get off too. Back on the platform we were told to get back on as it was indeed going all the way south to Bournemouth. Back inside we were told it was now going north to Manchester. Then a guard poked his head round the door to reassure us it was still going to Bournemouth.

By that time we were mostly alternating between fits of laughter and resignation and not really caring where we went so long as we went somewhere. I feel I ought to sign this post off with "Greetings from Wales".
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
Today Mr RoS & I took ourselves out to investigate a possible retirement location.
A ittle market town within reach of Younger Son's new home. Very pretty open spaces, historic buildings, riverside walks, ancient ruins - we had a lovely day, but: a really busy by-pass between the historic town centre and most of the residential areas, and those areas cut through by further busy roads. And an abysmal lack of decent shops. There's a lovely pedestrianised area, but it looks like most of the shops have closed and been taken over by snack bars and cafes. It may be that I'm a food snob, but I don't want to live in a place where the only bakers is Greggs.
Very disappointed.
Heading south next month to research coastal locations.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
With a description like that, I'm trying to think where it might be!

Come to where I am. Several local shipmates, nice town, almost at the coast.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Thanks everyone for your kind wishes. Unfortunately we didn't make it to Edinburgh in the end, the Elf Lass wasn't herself at all so although we did manage a couple of trips out locally (to town to buy nappies, and to the local park for a quick go on the swings, which she loves) she could only manage short bursts before returning to melodramatic languishing. She does a good line in melodramatic languishing, I can't think who she gets it from (*looks innocent*). I think she'll be off nursery tomorrow too, although as TME isn't feeling that great either at least they can melodramatically languish together while I go to work.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Hope you have a chaise longue Jack the Lass. I find it impossible to languish without one [Biased]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Absolutely right, A-in-E - languishing has to be done on a chaise-longue, preferably with someone fanning you and feeding you grapes ... [Cool]

Busy day here - I've started actually moving boxes over to the new office, and discovered that it's not really quite as big as I imagined (or maybe it's just that the furnishings are bigger). However, all will sort itself out. Eventually.

Then an afternoon at the Cathedral office typing the bulletin, and being interrupted by noble but time-consuming things like visitors wanting to be shown round (we haven't the manpower to keep the place open to visitors except during the summer, but I don't like to turn anyone away who wants to see the place), followed by the Cathedral AGM in the evening. It was about as exciting as you'd expect, but because the Dean's very good at that sort of thing, it didn't take too long.

More box-shifting tomorrow ... [Help]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I really think that fan-person and grape-peeler and feeder needs to be two separate people!

Strange night's sleep with some very odd dreams but also quite restful, if that makes any kind of sense. If it doesn't then don't worry, I don't understand it either.

I've just been told by Himself that we will be leaving for town in 2 minutes but Herself is not yet dressed and has just gone in her room to get ready so I reckon I have at least a quarter of a hour - sarees take a while to arrange!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I went to town to dome some light shopping and got an SMS from Pete in England now - it was in French [Canadian variety] and I gather he had a nightmare of a journey over to London - I sent back that it was a judgment upon him for all his manifold sins and wickedness but I somehow doubt that he'll see it that way.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I hope Pete gets a good rest now he's landed.
A retreat sounds lovely, Nenya, I could do with one of those, I never seem to leave the house.
Just study planned for today. The boys are going to the inlaws this afternoon and I've planned a nice homemade Thai meal for myself and other half so will have some shopping and cooking to do later.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
I expect Uncle Pete's trip wasn't helped by the French ATC going en frappe* for 24 hours. It messed up all sorts of things necessitating short-haul cancellations and diversions, usually via Schiphol or Frankfurt, neither of which are my favourite airport.

*Franglais for "On strike".
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My son was sent to Nice earlier in the week to fly some sectors from there as they are short of First Officers. He got caught up in the strike.

Poor soul has had an all-expenses-paid three days in a hotel in Nice and took himself to Monaco on the train for the day. It's a hard life [Roll Eyes] [Smile]
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
May I show off a little? I cook a lot but rarely get round to trying out new recipes from the many cookbooks I own. So yesterday, having a friend round for dinner and not being at work in the day for once I went for it...

Starter: Ottolenghi's beetroot, leek & rocket salad in a (very garlicky) walnut dressing
Main: Pollo al ajillo (garlic chicken) from the Moro cookbook with chard from the Ottolenghi cookbook (amazing tahini-yoghurt dressing) and plain boiled potatoes.
Pudding: roasted rhubarb from the garden with blood orange, creme fraiche and home made shortbread.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
My son was sent to Nice earlier in the week to fly some sectors from there as they are short of First Officers. He got caught up in the strike.

Poor soul has had an all-expenses-paid three days in a hotel in Nice and took himself to Monaco on the train for the day. It's a hard life [Roll Eyes] [Smile]

The Riviera run is very pleasant especially from Villefrance to Ventimiglia on the Italian border.

If he's stranded in Nice again, suggest he takes a ride on the metre gauge line that runs to Digne. It's quite a trek so a journey on part of it might be enough.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Yangtze:
May I show off a little? I cook a lot but rarely get round to trying out new recipes from the many cookbooks I own. So yesterday, having a friend round for dinner and not being at work in the day for once I went for it...

Starter: Ottolenghi's beetroot, leek & rocket salad in a (very garlicky) walnut dressing
Main: Pollo al ajillo (garlic chicken) from the Moro cookbook with chard from the Ottolenghi cookbook (amazing tahini-yoghurt dressing) and plain boiled potatoes.
Pudding: roasted rhubarb from the garden with blood orange, creme fraiche and home made shortbread.

I've been eyeing up the Ottolenghi cookbooks for a while, is there one you'd recommend?
Garlic chicken sounds lovely, though I'd skip the beetroot starter, not a fan of beetroot.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That sounds rather yummy, Yangtze - although I might forgo the chard - green leafy things aren't really my bag.

I was wondering what an "ottolenghi chicken" was, but Google is my friend ... [Hot and Hormonal]

I've had a mildly frustrating day - first of all I managed to forget to put my contact lenses in (I'm blaming D. for interrupting my morning routine), but as I'm really not much use without, I phoned him to get him to bring them to w*rk.

Then discovered that my security card for the new building wouldn't work for the door to the corridor where my office is but does for the next corridor. As they're linked at the other end it doesn't matter, but it's a bit puzzling.

[Confused]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Frustrating must be in the air today.... I spent the morning trying to get some new kit to work that will mean that I have a landline after around 2 months. Trying but not yet succeeding. aaargh.

The sunshine coaxed me outside for the afternoon so I abandoned the phone attempts for a lovely wander around the local botanical collection, which is looking fabulous at the moment - it's the best I've ever seen the magnolias (forget the paint shade - the deep pink ones are my favourites) and their scent is wonderful too.

Was thinking of fish fingers for dinner, but Yangtze you've got me thinking of something slightly more adventurous. Maybe baked haddock with a herby crust?
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Yangtze, that does sound delicious!

Another day of school work today (I'm a primary school teacher), and I think I'm just about ready for the new term. In fact, I'm slightly concerned about how ready I do feel - I'm worried there's something huge I've forgotten to do! Hopefully Monday morning won't be a *headdesk* moment.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Ah, my phone line has been erratic, but mainly dead, since January. I feel your pain. (I'm also a big fan of fishfingers ;-) )

I have both Jerusalem and Plenty - but tend to read them rather than cook from them! Last night's were all from Jerusalem. However I've also cooked various Otteolenghi recipes that I've found online - either on their own blog or the various papers he's written/writes for.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I'm impressed by the casual way WW drops in the fact that he can tell Canadian French from European French; that must be the sign of a true cosmpolitan.

Piglet's office is pretty impressive too. Where I work you'd have to be one of the directors to have your own office, all the ordinary managers work at a desk in a big open area along with the rest of us.

I have a rhubarb in the garden but I am always puzzled when people talk about cooking rhubarb at this time of year. Mine is only just visible above the ground now, and I can normally eat it in late July.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
My longest rhubarb stalks were about 5" so it was probably a bit to early to pick, but they tasted good. (I think most rhubarb on sale at the moment is forced.)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I've lost my rhubarb since I asked for my plot to be split in two. The half with the rhubarb has been lying unattended for months. The rhubarb is, however, the only good thing about it, as that plot's prone to flooding and unstoppable bindweed.

I've planted beetroot seeds in my own half this evening. Nobody's came up last year, we're all hoping they'll do better this year.

After the allotment I went out to see the sheep, who were on the hillside enjoying the evening sunlight. The spring lambs are out of the wobbly stage and having fun exploring their new surroundings and playing with each other. It'll be a while before most of them are ready to start grazing. Some are all white, some have black faces and black legs, some are very cute indeed.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I had an awesome retreat day on the theme of the Eastern Orthodox resurrection icon. [Overused]

I wasn't greatly successful with my vegetable patch last year so plan to try a wildflower patch there instead.

Seeing a friend for coffee and chat in the morning, looking forward to that.

Nen - semi-resident of local coffee shop. [Smile]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Our rhubarb disappeared completely last year. We planted some more but that hasn't come up either. Still, I am still eating my way through last year's plums (stewed and in the freezer - I have them on top of my porage).

Re Ottolenghi - Macarius has a cousin whose family play 'Otto Lotto' - someone says a number and they cook what is on that page of the book. I imagine you could game that one quite easliy!

M.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
... all the ordinary managers work at a desk in a big open area along with the rest of us ...

Managers??? Perish the thought. [Killing me]

I'm a research assistant, and not at all sure that I'm worthy of the title. As my boss put it when I started to work for her: "I'm a researcher and you're assisting me - that makes you a research assistant", which is logical, if rather flattering!

I imagine that the office-to-myself has more to do with the nature of the work I do and the sort of information I deal with than my distance up the pecking-order, but I'm not complaining. [Cool]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Feeling a bit weary this morning - we very rarely go out on a Friday night after Mr. S's stint at the food bank. First, he's tired, and second, he needs to brain-dump all the day's events. However last night we were out late at a local club to see Snake Davis, one of our favourite sax players [Yipee] (used to play with M People, Lisa Stansfield and the like).

He's so versatile, and his band were excellent, [Overused] but the audience, though enthusiastic, was only small - I'll bet very few of you Saints will ever have heard of him, which set me thinking about how many people make a living of sorts from music without ever becoming household names.

He's also a lovely person, which makes it well worth making the effort to see him when he gets down to the soft south, i.e. not often.

Mrs. S, tired but enthusiastic [Yipee]
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
The sun has emerged after a somewhat drizzly morning [Cool]

Today is all about timetables and table plans, and winding up the last few bits of planning ready for Monday morning, when I am once again faced with 32 7 and 8 year olds - it's always a bit of a shock to the system after 2 weeks away.

In food news, I made a rather delicious sweet and sour pork with bulgar wheat last night. And there's leftovers for today, too. Hurrah!
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Feeling a trifle delicate - my own fault for taking advantage of one of the 6 Fridays 'off' I get in the year to have a very good meal with more than one glass of wine after a pre-dinner G&T.

Oh to have the capacity for alcohol of my youth [Frown]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
A trick with rhubarb is, as soon as you see leaves peaking out, to cover some of it with something light proof like a bucket and leave it. Check a after a few weeks and you should have some stems desperately seeking light.

Giving myself the day off the allotment today, although I did cut some hazel back so I have a few bean poles & pea sticks.

Now preparing my costume for Singalonga Sounf of Music this evening - Doh a Deer a Female Deer. Last time I went as a mountain.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Have fun, daisydaisy [Smile]
Productive day here, we pulled down and cleared our virginia and honeysuckle hedge, which is at least 15 years maturity. We need a proper solid fence now as the new village build is soon going to reach the field behind our house (until now we had open fields behind our long garden so we felt really in the countryside despite being in close proximity to Cambridge). I also cleared and weeded a small veg patch with the 'help' of my youngest, it's officially his patch but usually it ends up with me looking after it.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... Oh to have the capacity for alcohol of my youth ...

You and me both! [Big Grin]

I wish I could drink like I used to
I can take one or two at the most;
Three puts me under the table,
And four puts me under the host.


After having had several brilliantly bright, sunny but cold days, it's now blowing a gale and raining off and on, so I don't think I'm going anywhere very fast. D's playing for the first wedding of the season (wedding fees [Yipee] ), and I'm going to go into Soup Dragon mode once the washing-up machine's finished its cycle - we really do need to get a spare potato peeler ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Talking of kitchen utensils, have any of you tried ceramic-bladed knives? Our favourite kitchen-knife committed hari-kari on a heating element the other week, and D. bought a ceramic knife (on special offer at the kitchen shop), which he says is absolutely brilliant, so I'll let you know once I've done the soup*.

* assuming I still have the same number of trotters as I started out with. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I'm going to go into Soup Dragon mode once the washing-up machine's finished its cycle - we really do need to get a spare potato peeler ... [Hot and Hormonal]

You use your washing machine to peel the potatoes? [Eek!]

No, never tried a ceramic knife...

I enjoyed seeing my friend for coffee and had a lovely walk there and back in the sunshine (a chilly wind today, though) and it's Saturday so stir fry night and a bottle of red wine chez Nen. I'm trying, with limited success, not to worry about next week which is going to be very busy with a lot of different things happening. [Help]

Nen - attempting to live in the now.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Just had a delish dinner of Duck Confit tart with salad, with a walnut oil & lemon juice dressing, followed by a lump of carrot cake. I made the cake to take in to my lessons on Monday - it's the last lessons with all of the classes in the company - and I wanted to try it before taking it in. It's very yummy. We may well eat chocklit later.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Mr Nen has just stated his preferred TV viewing for the evening - "I Give It A Year": a romantic comedy documenting the disintegration of a marriage. [Eek!]

Not the kind of thing we'd ever watch normally. Is he trying to tell me something? [Waterworks]

Nen - thinking she'll probably put her foot down over that one. [Mad]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Spent a good chunk of the week at a conference in Leicester - and of that chunk rather too much driving on motorways. Venue/hotel very pleasant, but with a few issues: conference dinner commenced at 8, main course was coming out at a quarter to 10...

So it's nice to be back in own kitchen, eat what you want when you want. In this case a tagine-ish lamb - conventional casserole with onion and carrot, but also honey, lemon juice and a little chilli.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Lambs seem to have featured a lot in my weekend but not in that way.

It's twice now I've set out for a quick trip to the supermarket which has turned into a longer visit to see the spring lambs in the fields. This morning was glorious, if colder than previous days, and the countryside is looking lovely: cottage gardens full of spring flowers, birds shouting their little hearts out, sheep grazing peacefully while the lambs explore their new world, all on a sunny morning with fleecy clouds scudding across an April sky.

The wind was something else, though, and it seemed to be getting colder throughout the day. A shame last week's weather didn't last.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
... You use your washing machine to peel the potatoes? ...

No, but I use my washing-up machine to wash the dishes, and the potato peeler was in it. [Big Grin]

I've obviously read too many Jilly Cooper books - she always calls dishwashers washing-up machines ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Soup now made, and only a tiny nick in one finger from the ceramic knife.

eta: Dormouse, your duck salad and Firenze's tagine both sound utterly scrumptious. [Smile]

[ 11. April 2015, 22:19: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I haven't owned a ceramic knife but one DIL has had several. Very sharp. Also good for cutting things which may discolour if cut with a steel blade. e.g. shredded lettuce or similar.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
You use your washing machine to peel the potatoes? ...

No, but I use my washing-up machine to wash the dishes, and the potato peeler was in it. [Big Grin]
[Hot and Hormonal] I completely missed the word "up." I can't believe I did that, I'm usually a very accurate reader and I'd read your post several times thinking, "Is she saying what I think she's saying?"

Nen - adding fears of dementia to all her other worries. [Frown]
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
Mind you, peeling potatoes in the washing machine sounds like a pretty good labour saving tip. I must try it sometime.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I would suggest foregoing the Fabric Softener.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Would make really smooth lump free mashed potatoes though.

Yesterday's Singalonga was fun, even if only about a quarter of the small audience dressed up (including a family of nuns). I won a prize for my costume, although I think I looked more pantomime dame than sound of music!

Just off to plant pea plants and seeds, plus a bit more tidying up on the allotment. This afternoon Worship will be with my orchestra -we've just been given a lot of pieces new to me so it'll be challenging.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
The gift ordered from the USA at the end of March for DiL's birthday, and not expected until it had done a round tour, according to the experiences of several people, arrived on Thursday - From Japan!

No, it had not gone a-wandering, but had been sent direct - presumably the American firm was just the agent. It arrived with no paperwork whatsoever enclosed with it, but a Japanese postmark and the name and address of the sender on the envelope.

DiL's birthday is in on Wednesday, so I am very pleased with the arrangement. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spike: Mind you, peeling potatoes in the washing machine sounds like a pretty good labour saving tip. I must try it sometime.
Back in 1960-something, my father bought a potato-peeling electric device. It was, roughly, the shape of one of those large biscuit tins, lined with some kind of rough, gritty substance. The idea was that you put the potatoes inside, closed the lid and turned the device on. The potatoes would then spin around inside, their coating being rubbed off by contact with the gritty walls.

We used it a couple of times but it wasn't perfect. Not all areas of the skins got rubbed off, and some of the grit from the inside walls of the device tended to stick to the potatoes. In principle, though, it wasn't a bad idea. It would probably have worked better with small new potatoes, assuming you wanted them peeled.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I can't remember the last time I peeled a spud - it rarely happens here, a quick was and off you go. Why do people peel spuds anyway?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Because roast potatoes aren't the same with the skin left on. Neither are mashed potatoes or potato cakes. Chips are horrible with the skin still on. Etc.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I never peel spuds, mash and roasts all come with skin on. My other half peels them in an old gadget which attaches to the Kenwood though, it looks like a bowl lined with sandpaper. It sounds similar to the device mentioned.

[ 12. April 2015, 14:04: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I am in the middle of pulling up ivy. My neighbours don't maintain their garden at all so it is entirely composed of ivy and brambles which constantly try to take over my garden as well. I dislike ivy with a passion so I am happy to pull it up, but I am glad I don't have to dig up a honeysuckle hedge. That would be like a bereavement.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Some years ago I was a dinner lady at my children's primary school and we had a drum-type device with whizzy-roundy blades inside. You put the potatoes in, ran water through it as it was going, and the potatoes came out washed and peeled. I had visions of Piglet putting her potatoes into the washing machine with the potato peeler and them emerging conveniently clean and skinless.

Nen - who still can't believe she missed the "up." [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Because roast potatoes aren't the same with the skin left on. Neither are mashed potatoes or potato cakes. Chips are horrible with the skin still on. Etc.

I once had a flatmate who had no idea whatsoever about cooking. Despite that, he once decided to cook sausage & mash for his girlfriend. He boiled the spuds in their skins and mashed them, still skin on. What he was left with was a plate of unappetising looking brown sludge.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I had a friend proudly point out she'd boiled the potatoes in their skins to preserve the nutrients.

I pointed out that she'd also cut them in half.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spike:
He boiled the spuds in their skins and mashed them, still skin on. What he was left with was a plate of unappetising looking brown sludge.

I quite often mash potatoes with their skins on. Never had them turn into brown mush - he really couldn't cook could he!
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Nen, please don't worry, that's how I read it too!

I wonder if it did and a little pink host edited it [Biased]

( it's ok Piglet, I know you didn't [Smile] )
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Recipe for duck confit tart can be found here should you wish.

I remember dad buying mum a potato peeling machine as described above - only I think it was hand cranked. Mum never really used it. Tpically my father doing things to help but never quite getting it right!!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chocoholic:
Nen, please don't worry, that's how I read it too!

I wonder if it did and a little pink host edited it [Biased]

( it's ok Piglet, I know you didn't [Smile] )

Thank you, Chocoholic. What gets me is that I quoted the post and still misread it. [Roll Eyes]

I did my first sweet potato jacket for tea last week, it was delicious. [Big Grin]

Nen - now watching Masterchef with the sound turned off.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Chocolate cake cooking, and I appear to have made one spare (three rather than two) so help yourselves [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I confess to you my brothers and sisters that my fridge appears to be filling up with cheese.

I have extra-mature Cheddar, smoked Bavarian, and this morning, impulse buyer that I am, I splurged out at a cheese stall in Stratford on Avon on a smoked organic brie and a piece of Bleu d'Auvergne.

My only regret is that the piece of Bleu D'Auvergne isn't bigger. It's even smaller now that I've just eaten half of it.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
There was Stinking Bishop in Hereford yesterday. I was tempted, but I shared a train carriage with some nice Stilton once and decided it wasn't a good idea - not for the length of journey home.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
I've a trip to Holland planned in a few weeks and if we get time we may go to a cheese fair in Alkmaar where they have the cheese carriers guild [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Well that does sound interesting - enjoy your time there!

Btw, cumin-flavoured Dutch cheese is apparently Nick Clegg's favourite cheese.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Once when I lived in France, I was staying over at a friend's house after a rather heavy night. I crawled to his fridge early in the morning hoping to find some chocolate with which to nurse my hangover, only to be greeted with the stink of Munster cheese. Normally something I loved to eat, but on that occasion... [Projectile]

In other news, back to school tomorrow, and 32 little faces beaming up at me [Ultra confused] Hopefully I remember how to do my job...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
... putting her potatoes into the washing machine with the potato peeler ...

You know that you can cook a whole salmon on the "wash" cycle in a dishwasher, don't you?

PS Don't add any dishwasher tablets ... [Killing me]
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
You know that you can cook a whole salmon on the "wash" cycle in a dishwasher, don't you?

PS Don't add any dishwasher tablets ... [Killing me]

I know someone who tried that once, but didn't wrap the fish in foil first. It was a bit of a disaster.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
There was Stinking Bishop in Hereford yesterday. I was tempted, but I shared a train carriage with some nice Stilton once and decided it wasn't a good idea - not for the length of journey home.

It's worth a trip to Hereford for that cheesshop. We once bought some Stinking Bishop for Darllenwr's parents - the cheese was nice, but the smell was impressive!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
My current test for the worthiness of a cheese emporium is whether or not they stock Barkham Blue - and if so, do they arrange financing for purchase of the same! That little deli in the town east of Lydney used to stock it but, sadly, they closed some years ago [Hunter & Todd?]. When I was last there I just waved my credit card at them and dealt with paying when I got back to India. It is a very nice cheese but the price...

Mind you, no cheese is cheap these days but at least we now know that it is a health food!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... no cheese is cheap these days ...

That's the case here as well, and particularly so of the white crumbly cheeses like Wensleydale, Cheshire and Lancashire that D. likes. One of the supermarkets here stocks something calling itself Cheshire, but he says it's not the right texture - it's almost more like mousetrap without colour. Or (and he thinks this is even worse) they add cranberries* or apricots ... [Roll Eyes]

Why do supermarkets have to have acres of mousetrap (usually erroneously described as "Cheddar") and about three square feet of everything else combined?

When I got home from w*rk today D. had just taken the dough for ciabatta out of the bread-machine, and I did the rolling, poking and baking, and the result was v. nice spread with butter and Tiptree raspberry jam. There's some left, so help yourselves. [Smile]

I'm also thinking it might be nice with goat's cheese, a grind of pepper and a tomato or two.

* I actually quite like Wensleydale with cranberries, but I don't like to admit it. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

* I actually quite like Wensleydale with cranberries, but I don't like to admit it. [Hot and Hormonal]

I can see why you would be embarrassed, why taint a good cheese [Razz]
A lovely sunny spring day here. I really should start some work and then perhaps some study but I rather fancy a nice long walk first. And I might go and weed the strawberry patch too.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Why do supermarkets have to have acres of mousetrap (usually erroneously described as "Cheddar") and about three square feet of everything else combined?

It sells. It's the default cheese for people who want a piece of relatively inexpensive cheese, or for families with children who won't appreciate the finer points of Roquefort, Sage Derby, smoked organic Brie, etc. It's also fairly versatile and can be used in a lot of everyday recipes without detriment.

The more I see of cheese the more amazingly diverse it seems to be, from the pale waxy cheeses of Northern Europe to the rich, blue veined ones of the South of France, the tiny round Babybels and the huge wheels of Stilton, and the stringy ones of the Mediterranean. There’s the soft white of goat’s cheese, the yellow of Cheddar, the orange of Red Leicester, the green of some Sage Derbys, and of course the blue of Danish Blue. It can be rock hard as Parmesan, soft and sweet cream cheese or salty Feta, almost odourless or something you can’t ignore from several feet away. People have been making cheese for about 8000 years, and who can blame them.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
I really miss cheese, since I discovered I am dairy intolerant. I discovered a not-too-bad-when-grated hard cheese alternative (Sheeze), although it doesn't melt - I miss cheese on toast the most) but after feeling vile for a few weeks double checked the ingredients to discover that it contains another no-go food for me (oats). Thankfully the soft cheese alternative is still safe.... for the moment, until they change the recipe.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
I miss crumbly cheese, I can't seem to find it in ireland. They have 15 different kinds of cheddar, gubbeen cheese (which is yummy actually), brie etc but no cheshire or lancashire (occasionally wensleydale with cranberries appears, but never with cranberries)
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I did the rolling, poking and baking, and the result was v. nice spread with butter and Tiptree raspberry jam.

Bliss. I hope the butter was unsalted. Mind you, my son calls the sort of raspberry jam which still has seeds in it as "Devil's jam", because said seeds get stuck in his teeth.

I used to think that "Little Scarlet" was the best jam in the world, but now I think I prefer the "East Anglian" conserve (sometimes called "Essex" or "Suffolk" depending on the specific provenance of the berries).

There is an interesting little museum at the Wilkins' factory. The Wilkin family founded the Congregational chapel in the village, still functioning today within the URC; the museum has some Congregational memorabilia.

[ 14. April 2015, 12:57: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by marzipan:
I miss crumbly cheese, I can't seem to find it in ireland. They have 15 different kinds of cheddar, gubbeen cheese (which is yummy actually), brie etc but no cheshire or lancashire (occasionally wensleydale with cranberries appears, but never with cranberries)

PM me and I'll send you some [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
... There is an interesting little museum at the Wilkins' factory ...

... and a lovely café. [Smile]

A trip to Tiptree for a cream tea (or occasionally a light lunch) and to stock up the larder* for the following year is de rigueur when we're in Essex.

Last year when we were coming back, we got stopped at random by the customs lady at St. John's, and when we explained that the lumpy bits in our suitcase were jars of jam, she said "that's all right - I love jam!"

* We can get a small selection of Tiptree jam here, but it costs an arm and a leg
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Vishu Asamsakal!

Today is Vishu, the big Spring Festival here in Kerala - last night we let off lots of firecrackers and again after breakfast and will again after supper - everybody is doing the same throughout the day. Shortly it will be the Vishu Feast, which is not for the faint of heart - after eating I shall retire to my sadly virtuous couch to sleep it off - mind you I think I'll be so full my couch would be virtuous anyway even were all the temptations under the sun lined up in my room. I really will be that full. Every year I plead for a small portion but, like Dear Oscar, I can resist everything except temptation - and they know it!

Let me explain there will be about 17 dishes arrayed upon the table - and think how rude it would be to Herself, who has been cooking since the wee small hours, if I didn't at least taste each one of them. And she is a very good cook.

Have I mentioned that I quite like food?
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
WW, that sounds like great (indulgent) fun - enjoy [Smile]

My week is stressful, not helped by the fact that our weekly staff meeting was moved from its usual Tuesday slot to Wednesday, so now I'm all out of sync on my days. It's amazing how minor changes to routine can throw you off. Here's hoping tomorrow is more restful.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by marzipan:
I miss crumbly cheese, I can't seem to find it in ireland. They have 15 different kinds of cheddar, gubbeen cheese (which is yummy actually), brie etc but no cheshire or lancashire (occasionally wensleydale with cranberries appears, but never with cranberries)

PM me and I'll send you some [Smile]
Mrs Kirkham's?
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I hope you have the energy to post some pictures, WW - your festivals are always so colourful!

Office move has been postponed until next week. Having moved half the contents of my office to what I assumed was my new one (well, it does have my name* on it), there's now a fair chance that I'll be moving to a different one, as the PTB have decided that having me, my boss and our files on three different floors is a bit daft.

Now, why couldn't they have told me that before I trawled all those boxes over on a flat-bed trolley with no sense of direction and the turning-circle of an ocean liner?

[Confused] [Roll Eyes]

* They've even corrected the spelling! [Yipee]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
I am completely beside myself with excitement as tonight I make my stage debut at the Theatre Royal in Winchester! I'm part of the Community Chorus for the amazing LipService production of The Picture of Doreen Gray.
[Overused] [Overused] [Overused]

Having been a devoted fan of Maggie Fox and Sue Ryding since we first saw Withering Looks, I can't tell you how many years ago, I am just praying I don't make a complete and utter idiot of myself. Not going to list all the ways I could do that ... [Help]

But first I have to go and work in the Church office for two hours *sigh*

The Over-Excited Mrs S [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
How wonderful, Mrs.S!! Don't worry, you will be fine once you get on that stage. Its the waiting that makes your tummy churn.

I am sure everything will go really well. [Smile]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
That does sound exciting! [Smile]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Enjoy it Mrs S.
I'm off for a long weekend this evening with a pile* of Quaker friends. We hire a farmhouse in Sussex for a weekend of eating, drinking walking and general catching up.


*What is the collective noun for Quakers - a silence?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
In my experience the correct term for a collection of Quakers has to be either a Gathering or, and possibly more accurately, a Confusion!

And I see Confusion as quite a positive and endearing sort of name. I see no real problem in admitting our confusion over lots of things AND we see the importance of getting on and acting on our concerns anyway.

Perhaps A Concern of Quakers would be another option.

Sorry Piglet but the camera remained on my desk yesterday and was only used a bit earlier to take snaps of a baby squirrel that Himself rescued from the attentions of a kitten. The little fellow [or lass] has since been re-homed with my ex-maths student who loves taking in stray animals and restoring them to health and vigour. He has grown up into a Very Nice Lad.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Having consulted friend who was brought up a Quaker, she advised that the correct term in her opinion would be a backstabbing of Quakers.

Or to put it another way - she said it was a society but there was nothing friendly about the meetings she was involved with.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... a backstabbing of Quakers ...

Oh dear. I'm all disillusioned now - I always imagined Quakers to be rather nice, gentle, possibly slightly eccentric souls (sort of the way I imagine Wodders really [Biased] ). The idea of them backstabbing somehow seems wrong.

I'm still in a fair-to-middling state of confusion at w*rk - the bloke from computer services came to my office today and said "you're moving today, aren't you? I've come to disconnect you." I explained that I'd been told my move had been postponed, and I'm not at all sure that he believed me, even when I told him who had told me.

Meanwhile, computer services appear to have already disconnected the main computer program that I use.

Left hand, meet right hand ... [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Sipech (# 16870) on :
 
Interesting. I was at a hustings at the main Quaker meeting house in London a couple of weeks ago. Towards the end, one chap decided to start heckling (a bit ranty, not a well-worded heckle) - most of it directed to one particular candidate who handled it fairly well.

But afterwards, that candidate mentioned to me that he was surprised that of all the places you could go, the Quakers wouldn't be the ones you'd expect to be shouting others down.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The real trouble with The Religious Society of Friends [Quakers] is that it is made up of human beings. Sad that.

Ah well.

In other news I opted out of my early morning walk today for a reason that seemed valid at 05.45 but, on consideration, no longer seems valid at 07.10. Still I am away for the weekend and have a busy time coming up so it doesn't seem too bad a decision all things considered and I have a good route already mapped out from my hotel and back to my hotel where I am going.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
How wonderful, Mrs.S!! Don't worry, you will be fine once you get on that stage. Its the waiting that makes your tummy churn.

I am sure everything will go really well. [Smile]

Nicodemia and other well-wishers - it was a riot! All the friends I'd invited along had a wonderful time, and when I put on FB 'Let's do it all again tomorrow night!' one said she thought she would! and she'd take her husband along too!

The Stage-struck Mrs. S
[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
The real trouble with The Religious Society of Friends [Quakers] is that it is made up of human beings. Sad that.

Ah well

I read a story about a Quaker woman who was overhear swearing about being locked out of her car on a rainy day.

When some one said something judgemental about her being a Quaker she smiled and said
But think how much worse I could be if I wasn't one.

Huia swearing Anglican
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Glad it went well Mrs S.
I've a lot of time for Quakers, and much as I disagree with them theologically, have never met a backstabbing one
I like the idea of a confusion of Quakers. We are about to go on a walk. It'll take 30 minutes for us to all meet in the same place, and half way through we'll get lost as we always do. Still we always make it home in the end.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Well done Mrs S!

Finally I am connected! I had been without landline for 7 weeks ("it's their fault guv, not ours") the engineer came out and found that the installation engineer had wired the stuff back to front. And the mobile phone that I waited in for all day on Weds for it not to be delivered, well that's cancelled and my old steam powered one is back up and running. I feel liberated from engineers.

Am off on retreat in a few minutes - so glad to have sorted both before I go so I can focus properly.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Glad your production went well, Mrs.S.

Phew, it's Friday. The first week back after the holidays always hits me like a truck. Still, the kids seem to have had fun, and seem to have learnt things. We had great fun this afternoon cutting up magazines to make bizarre Picasso-style face collages.

Now, what to do this evening? Ah yes: sleep. [Snore]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
The real trouble with The Religious Society of Friends [Quakers] is that it is made up of human beings. Sad that.

The same could be said of the Church of England.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Well that was slightly more excitement than I expected when I went into Oxford after work this evening. Half the city centre cordoned off, clouds of smoke, sirens going off, and a major fire at the Randolph Hotel. Watched it develop from St Giles, nothing but clouds of smoke for a while then suddenly flames leapt through the attic windows and engulfed part of the roof. That was the point when it looked out of control and as if we were about to have the Great Fire of Oxford.

You could hear the slates falling off the roof and crashing. The police kept moving us back to let more fire engines through. They're still dealing with it. The outside seems to be all right but as the fire apparently started on the ground floor the inside won't be.

I never did get the dinner I'd intended to get, but I did get some good photos instead.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Gosh - I hope everyone's safe and unhurt. [Eek!]

Balaam - I was thinking more-or-less exactly what you said - it could apply to any branch of the church.

Oh well - life would be jolly boring if we were all perfect, wouldn't it?
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Just dropping in for a quick cup of cocoa while I'm waiting for a batch of French sticks to bake.

A while back, D. bought a packet of something called "harvest grains", which turns out to be a mixture of orzo, Israeli couscous, baby black beans and red quinoa, and it's been reproaching me from the larder shelf ever since. So today I decided to turn some of it into a sort of rice-less (and hassle-less) risotto with chicken and veggies, and it was really rather good - sufficiently so that I'm off to post the recipe upstairs.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Huh! Can't seem to get Harvest grains in England. Even Amazon won't ship them here, others will, at exorbitant cost. But I like the idea of mixed cous cous and orzo with beans. Might try that.

Beautiful day yesterday, thought summer had come, but today is grim grey in our part of the world. Still, trees are beginning to show leaf, daffs are a-blowing and everything else sprouting like mad. Garden beginning to look like a garden again and not a wasteland! [Smile]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Oh my, Ariel! [Eek!]

Mrs S - sorry I missed wishing you well for your stage debut, glad it was so thoroughly enjoyed by all.

Mr Nen is away so I'm in my customary early bird routine. With only me to get through the bathroom this morning I had time to walk to the early service and the primroses and bluebells were blooming and the birds were singing and the squirrels were rootling about and it was all very lovely - if a bit chilly in the cold wind. [Big Grin]

I now need to decide whether I'm going to have my cooked meal at lunchtime (left over stir fry from last night) or this evening before I go to the prayer meeting.

Nen - home alone and loving it. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
It's been grey here today too but the sun is just breaking out so I might pop into the garden to do some weeding. Yesterday we finished removing the back hedge so now we have a clear space for a new fence to separate us from the open fields/soon to be housing estate. We need to remove some brambles from the side of the garden still. Our garden is 100 foot long and this end is quite neglected so we are planning a complete clearance of it and then perhaps some landscaping to create an outdoor seating area for entertaining.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Just back from my lovely weekend with my Quaker friends, several pounds heavier due to the amount of cake. Much walking, catching up and laughter.
I asked them about a colelctive noun for the Society of Friends and they liekd the idea of a Consideration.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
There was less stir fry sauce left from last night than I realised. I remedied this by adding copious amounts of red wine.

Nen - ever resourceful.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
It's been chilly but sunny here in Boogie Wonderland.

Gypsy came to Church and slept through the whole service. The band consisted of piano, sax, cornet, clarinet and two flutes. The music was loud and lively - so I reckon she did really well.

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Nen, that sounds like a fabulous idea!

I'm just finishing off the last of the prep for school this week, before a quick tea and an early night. I seem to be becoming a fan of early nights - at least it means waking up at stupid o'clock with nightmares is less of an issue!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We finally got round to spending a gift voucher we got at Christmas for a local Greek eaterie at lunch-time today, and very nice it was too. D. had a pita stuffed with lamb, tomatoes and tzatziki with lemon roast potatoes and I had a chicken souvlaki platter with pita and Greek salad and we shared them between us.

With the utterly yummy soft garlic bread-sticks they give you to start and including a big glass of wine for me, the bill only came to $46 (about £25), so even without the gift-card it would have been very good value.

well and cheaply-fed piglet [Smile]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
That sounds lovely, piglet. I haven't had greek food for ages, we used to eat it regularly when we lived in London. There's a good Turkish restaurant here called Efes, perhaps we should revisit there. (that reminds me, there's some North African restaurants in the Mill Road area of town that we haven't visited for ages, similar style of food)
Monday is my peaceful day, I have a 90 minute Iyengar yoga class followed by coffee with the ladies and a leisurely afternoon of sewing.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
And thinking of Greek places in your neck of the woods, I was very sad to hear, belatedly,that the dear old Eraina had closed and been replaced by some bloody trendy barbecue joint.
A tragedy- many happy memories of that place.

[ 20. April 2015, 14:32: Message edited by: Albertus ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
And thinking of Greek places in your neck of the woods, I was very sad to hear, belatedly,that the dear old Eraina had closed and been replaced by some bloody trendy barbecue joint.
A tragedy- many happy memories of that place.

Just looked it up, seemed like a lovely place. It appears the owner's mother was unwell so she returned to Greece to care for her. But yes, good old places are generally replaced with 'modern' faddy eateries.
I don't know enough about Cambridge restaurants, my other half went to Oxford and we moved here just before having the children so I never got the chance to explore (dh knows far more through work lunching). Now our boys are growing up I like to make the most of having the freedom of relaxed good eating. Any recommendations?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'm a bit worried about a lad in our village, over the weekend he has taken to wearing what is possibly a demonic symbol about his neck and there he was with a secondary neck chain from which hangs either a stainless steel or a chromium plated silhouette of, wait for it!, a penguin!

The question on which I seek guidance is how soon I should call in a priest [or a Methodist Minister?] to perform an exorcism?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Be careful with penguins - they have teeth all the way down - not to be exorcised lightly!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'll send the priest in first.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I think he shows great taste - penguins are cute. [Smile]

I'm at w*rk trying to avoid tackling the contents of a filing cabinet that's bigger than I am ( [Eek!] ) - I've been told I'm moving offices either today or tomorrow, but as they haven't told me exactly where I'm going I'm not sure what they expect me to do about it.

[Confused]

[ 21. April 2015, 14:23: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Relocating to Ulan Bator can be such a drag, can't it? When's the flight?

[Two face]

Village wedding function today - the actual marriage bit takes a few minutes then the photos take hours! The one blessing of weddings here is no speeches!! It really is loads better without them. There were bits of harmless silliness from the groom's friends but he just grinned his way through the whole thing. For once we had a non-anxious groom but then he and the bride have known one another almost all their lives and have been unofficially engaged for years.

The groom's mother is very involved politically and was a local councillor [or equivalent] until just a few years ago so loads of political guests and the groom works for a large company so lots of colleague guests so I managed to get a seat for the fifth sitting for lunch [about 200 people per sitting] and there were loads still waiting when I left!

Next I must concentrate on my next visa extension so off to the studio in the village tomorrow for a new photo then apply online.

It's all go!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Five sittings at 200 people a pop? [Eek!] Who's doing the catering - the United Nations?
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The catering is done in very large pans and everybody gets the same basic vegetarian meal. It's a great arrangement as everyone that turns up gets fed. The serving is done my friends and neighbours taking it in turns - a great way of people on one side getting to meet people on the other side - today that didn't matter as the couple families live within a kilometre or so. Even the kids get to serve the water or the salt or something.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
An Indian veggie feast, how scrumptious! [Smile]
Salmon and cheese risotto here today, we seem to have run out of vegetables and I've been too busy to shop so store cupboard food.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
I've been trying to think of something to say that's not a rant about work, and I'm failing miserably, so I'll leave it at this:

I am very grateful for the beautiful sunshine these past few days. It puts a spring in my step.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
They've found an office for me that's just along the corridor from where the files will be, and only one floor away from my boss, so it looks pretty good to me.

Should be moving tomorrow ... [Help]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Off to the allotment, for once not bothering to change into gardening shoes before entering the area, in haste to get there, do the watering and depart. Lo and behold, the path was almost completely blocked by a huge mound of cowpats, about 4' high. While I was standing marvelling at this, a man with a barrow emerged from behind it to say he'd had 15 tons of cow manure delivered that morning and he'd spent all day sorting it out between a few allotment holders who were splitting the cost.

He then got back to shovelling it into his barrow and trundling off, leaving me to sidle round gingerly in my work shoes. What the original 15 tons of cowpats must have looked like I can't imagine. He was still at it when I left.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
At least a more useful load of shit than one usually encounters.

I'm trying to give the garden a couple of hours a day - sufficient to make progress but not so much as to increase the quotidian aches and pains past tolerable. Mostly it's been weeding and tidying - the heavy labour of getting in the spuds currently chitting in the hall remains.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
At least a more useful load of shit than one usually encounters.

Indeed. Yesterday I took the Elf Lass to the baby change room in our local Waitrose only to find a giant (adult - at least I hope it was adult, I'd be worried if a baby had done it) turd on the floor. I know it's a room where you expect to deal with a bit of shit, but I could have done without seeing that.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Oh Gods, I remember when I was doing hospital portering between jobs, and a dear little white haired rosy cheeked old lady waved a washing-up bowl at me containing the biggest turd I swear I've ever seen outside not just academia but also the rhino house at the zoo... crimping that one off must surely have defied the laws of physics,

AG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That is all so much more information than I could possibly need or want ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Several hours of solid rain last night has shown me that I really need to get up and clean the guttering at the front of the house - it's a job I don't really enjoy but I'm the only one tall enough to do it - and then I'm standing on an eight foot stepladder! Not sure if I'll have time today as I am a bit busy but I'll have to find the time somewhere this week - I hope it doesn't come down to missing a nap!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
Oh Gods, I remember when I was doing hospital portering between jobs, and a dear little white haired rosy cheeked old lady waved a washing-up bowl at me containing the biggest turd I swear I've ever seen outside not just academia but also the rhino house at the zoo... crimping that one off must surely have defied the laws of physics,

AG

I've heard one such old lady thank a care assistant for delivering her baby...

Off to the dentist in a few minutes then I'll take a leisurely walk back from Cambridge in the sunshine. I haven't got any work to do today so I'll do a spot of weeding then some study. I'm trying to put together an essay about assessing the impact of telephone support in empowering new students from non-academic backgrounds in distance learning. I'm enjoying this part of the module as I'm free to choose my topic and this at least is something I feel passionately about.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Last time I was in a hospital waiting to speak to a consultant, a nurse rushed up to another visitor with a bowl of vomit, thrust it under his nose and explained in detail and at length what his wife (one of the patients) had just thrown up and why. He didn't seem terribly keen on examining it with her.

(Sorry Piglet.)

Debating whether or not to go to the theatre tonight. I haven't been for about 20 years, there's a production of something interesting locally, good seats available, reasonable price. The only thing is I've been out two evenings this week already, will be out at least one more, and feeling tired already. Not sure if I want to be getting home after 10 pm when I need to be up at the crack of dawn for the morning commute. Decisions, decisions.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
New art class today - concentrating on drawing. So far I have learnt that you should hold the pencil like this (against the side of the first finger with the thumb) and not like that (against the middle finger with the thumb and first), and that you draw with the side of the lead, not the tip.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Several hours of solid rain last night has shown me that I really need to get up and clean the guttering at the front of the house - it's a job I don't really enjoy but I'm the only one tall enough to do it - and then I'm standing on an eight foot stepladder!

Last year I had new gutters installed that are almost clog-proof. If they do get clogged, I am supposed to call the company and they will come clean them for free. So far, there have been no signs of clogging, even in the gutters which are under a large maple tree.

Moo
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... solid rain ...

Around these parts that's usually called snow. [Big Grin]

Mind how you go on that ladder ... [Eek!]

I'm now apparently moving in the morning to the office originally allocated (my boss changed her mind again* [Roll Eyes] ), so I'd better try and have a semblance of an early night so that I'm almost fit for the task. I've been nursing a bit of a headache off an on all day today and am very much hoping that it'll bugger off before tomorrow.

* She's lovely to work for, but decisiveness isn't one of her strong points.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
quote:
Last year I had new gutters installed that are almost clog-proof. If they do get clogged, I am supposed to call the company and they will come clean them for free. So far, there have been no signs of clogging, even in the gutters which are under a large maple tree
Where do the leaves go then, Moo?? And how?? [Confused]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
She's lovely to work for, but decisiveness isn't one of her strong points.

Are you quite sure about that? Is that your final conclusion? [Devil]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
Where do the leaves go then, Moo?? And how?? [Confused]

They stay on top of the gutter, and are eventually blown away like the leaves on the roof. There is a cover which allows the water to enter the gutter, but doesn't let anything else in. Here is the website of the company that makes it.

Moo
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Made it to Thursday [Smile] Which means tomorrow is Friday, which means I treat myself to a coffee and pastry from Pret on my way to work. It's the little things...

I also have the dog this weekend - since me and my ex split up, we have something that can best be described as 'joint custody' of 'our' dog. So I have the dog every third weekend, Thursday to Tuesday. It's weird, but it kind of works. And it's nice to have a canine companion round the house for a few days.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The main components of my office (except me [Big Grin] ) were moved this morning (hence my absence from the teapot), and with any luck I should finish loading up the last of the files on Friday and transporting them to where they're going to be.

I feel as if I'm only just going into the woods, let alone being out of them ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
A visit to the Eye Hospital this morning - more trouble with the optical shop staff than the doctors, etc. - if I say I think those frames are too fancy and I wouldn't wear them I mean those frames are too fancy and I wouldn't wear them! Don't keep trying to sell them to me, I don't like them!

Anyway have ordered nice new frames, that I do like and will wear, to go with the new lenses - less dioptre power but more prisms. We'll see how it goes.

Then on to the visa extension folks to check on their requirements for this weekend's submission.

Now I am going to lie down and finish my book then I may indulge in a little nap!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I spent the morning doing housework and baking - 4 baguettes (2 white and 2 rustic) and some chocolate brownies. We're off to a Sherlock convention tomorrow and I like to pack food so we don't pay extortionate amounts there.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Went to a lunchtime art class yesterday and learnt about perspective, proportions and the vanishing point, while sketching some little building blocks and their shadows. Next month we get to try sketching crushed paper. That'll be a challenge.

After work as it was a warm, beautiful afternoon, I went off to Christ Church Meadows where an inquisitive squirrel tried to climb up my leg! We settled for going for a walk together along the river bank, the squirrel bounding along beside me, stopping to pose for photos in classic squirrel poses in a quite shameless sort of way.

Went to a plant sale at lunchtime today but almost all the good stuff had gone by the time I got there. Probably just as well as it stopped me spending - I may be an impulse buyer but it would be a sad thing to impulsively splurge out on cauliflower plants.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
There was a rather dodgy smell in church last Sunday, which a few people complained to me about. Having spoken to the vicar this evening, it turns out that the culprit was a dead squirrel on top of the screen. He finally located it on Wednesday, and removed it (maggots and all). Rather him than me...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Poor squirrel. [Frown]

I'm almost in my new office; I spent most of today putting files away in order to create a bit of floor-space. I've still to get the computer hooked up (I'm not sure if I need to get someone from the geekery to do it for me), but a few more trips with a trolley and I'll be almost there.

It is very draining though - I was like a wet rag when D. picked me up this afternoon ... [Snore]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I love Ariel's squirrel story! [Smile] Not quite so keen on moonfruit's... [Frown]

I was on a guided retreat day with a friend yesterday and for something supposed to be restorative we both came away exhausted. It was neither one thing nor the other really - a bit too much guidance to give enough time to oneself but not enough guidance to frame or shape the times alone. Although there were only four of us on the course the other two were real chatterboxes - we ended up edging our way about trying to avoid them. [Hot and Hormonal] It was at a retreat place that I love going to, but it's quite a long journey there and back just for one day so I've learnt my lesson and wouldn't try to do that again.

We've had some much-needed rain overnight so I'm glad I mowed the lawns on Thursday - I can almost hear the grass sucking it up. [Big Grin]

I've got a long list of things to achieve today including preparing for leading home group on Monday evening. We're a new group and still getting to know each other so I'm a bit [Eek!] . I'm planning to do something meditative which I think will be out of the norm for some of them and I don't want to push things too far. Having my Gregorian chants as introductory music will be pushing things too far... [Roll Eyes]

I also need to go shopping and do some housework.

Nen - may need a nap at some point. [Snore]
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Well done for getting the lawns mowed, Nen - I was going to do mine today, having been putting it off all week, only to find that it's rained overnight. Bah.

Time to get moving, and walk the dog, who is currently devouring a bowl of food as if she hasn't been fed for a month.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
The fine spell broke late yesterday as forecast: but in an heroic effort I got enough ground dug - my dears! the couch grass! - to plant some earlies. Plus we got the lawn feed down and hoping that will tip the predominant grass colour from yellow to green.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Fun morning in Stratford on Avon at Shakespeare's Birthday Celebrations. I was in two minds about going, but glad I did. It always seems to be a cheerful, friendly occasion with lots of music in the air. The parade was fun as always, people humming along to the catchy tunes from the brass bands, everybody in the procession carrying flowers to deck Shakespeare's grave, lots of people in Tudor costume.

Afterwards I went up the RSC Tower, which was offering free entry. Last time I got vertigo and had to come back down again, but today the lift doors opened on to a very pretty view of the river, bridge and greenery out to the gentle rolling hills of the countryside. You get a 360° view which is worth seeing.

Back on the ground there were free cupcakes, and the riverside entertainment was getting under way. Sadly the sky looked so ominous that I left at that point, but it had been just an all-round nice morning.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Fun morning in Stratford on Avon at Shakespeare's Birthday Celebrations...

I am soooo jealous! But I'm glad you had such a wonderful time. Someone named "Ariel" deserves to have a good day on Shakespeare's Birthday.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That does sound like fun - I hope the music was appropriate. [Big Grin]

Not quite convinced about the cup-cakes though - wouldn't bannock bread and frumenty (whatever that is) have been more apt?

It looks as if spring may be beginning to happen here - it's been very foggy, which is usually a harbinger of spring. Mind you, according to the weather forecast, it's just being a harbinger of rain, of which we're being promised about three inches next week ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I have eaten frumenty several times when being a Tudor, it is a wheat based sweet pudding, like rice pudding, served alongside your pottage. And if you've been eating pottage for lunch for several days it is a very welcome diversion indeed.
We also eat cheesy farts and sweet farts with our pottage [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I really need an explanation for that ... [Big Grin]

Talking of pottage, I took a fit of goddessishness this evening and there's a pot of bacon, lentil and tomato soup doing its thing on the stove. Should be available for tasting soon.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Ooh, Piglet, save me a bowl! That sounds delicious.

Grey and gloomy here this morning, still managed to coax the dog out for a walk though. Church next, then finishing off school work this afternoon.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I really need an explanation for that ... [Big Grin]


Farts are just fritter type things, presumably where we get the word tarts from. Amusing when you tell visiting children what you are eating though, as we eat in public when re-enacting.
Most of us don't eat meat when we are Tudors as we are too poor but my husband's group in the woods decided to club together and buy some pigeons from the supermarket to spice up their diet. We do consume ale though to compensate (I worked in the dairy last year and we had an exchange programme going on between us, the bake house and the brew house.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Thank you Pigwidgeon!

quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Not quite convinced about the cup-cakes though - wouldn't bannock bread and frumenty (whatever that is) have been more apt?

Probably, but faced with a choice of a large chocolate cupcake with swirls of yellow-gold icing or a hunk of unbuttered bannock, most people would probably opt for the cupcake.

I had pottage recently at Anne Hathaway's Cottage and it was quite tasty, possibly due to the inclusion of ham hock in it. As I've heard elsewhere from re-enactors, you can put pretty well anything in pottage. As well as the ham this version had green veg and pearl barley, but I can easily see that if it was just veg with no stock you'd have to work on the herbal flavours and probably use onions and garlic to make it interesting. (There would be no tomatoes or potatoes or anything that came from the New World, or expensive spices.) Ingredients would vary according to the seasons.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Yes, our pottage does vary slightly from day to day and you are limited to seasonal available veg, beans and whatever grain is available - we eat a lot of greens and carrots in June. Meat might also be available according to your station in life, season and access. But, on the whole, food from day to day might vary little. When I re-create my lunch will be publically eaten veggie pottage for 8 days in a row but it is surprisingly good, it feels healthy and hearty, especially as you are tired and it is the only food you will be getting between breakfast and supper.

[ 26. April 2015, 09:20: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
.. There would be no tomatoes or potatoes or anything that came from the New World ...

They might have had coffee and tobacco by then though ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
[Smile]
Tea and coffee wouldn't really be familiar until the 17th century but I believe the very rich would smoke tobacco at this point. Sometimes I discreetly drink 'leaf posset' when Tudoring, 'bean posset' is also available. But we usually have weak ale available and it is socially acceptable to drink that at any time of day.

Off to my yoga class in a few minutes then an afternoon reassuring my students about their next essay.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
You could get away with mint tea, I'm sure, or other herb infusions.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Long day today - full day teaching, then a training session for 2 1/2 hours after school. All very interesting, but still an awful lot of concentrating. Hence the chinese takeaway currently being consumed. [Snore]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm still kind of in the throes of sorting out the new office (although I think I've got the last of the stuff shifted from the old one); the next stage is to order new files that can be read from side-on and get the existing files re-organised.

And on top of that there's the bl**dy Cathedral Sale on Saturday. Tablet has been made; carrot loaves will follow in the next day or two.

[Help]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I've so far this morning spent 2 hours on work admin and chasing up students who have an important final deadline for coursework today. I will be going back to this throughout the day (not least because I have a similar student deadline tomorrow).
Now I'm going to have a cup of tea and a browse before planning my own essay for the module I'm studying.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Confession time: I slept really well last night - I normally sleep well* but last night was really well so this morning, after I had done all that had to be done this morning, I went and repeated the exercise!

[Big Grin]

Now I have to avoid doing it this afternoon as well - but I have a well recommended movie to watch so will hurry off there in a moment.

* This is the benefit of a clear conscience [Two face]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
If you go to sleep all afternoon as well, you probably won't sleep all that well tonight, no matter how clear your conscience is ... [Devil]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I ended up watching PK with Aamir Khan - great movie and highly recommended for a Ship audience.

I am now heading downstairs to watch a little cricket before bed. Last night was exciting as MY team ended up top of the table!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Phew!

A long day of shopping is over - and my whole outfit for my son's wedding is bought.

Dress, shrug, Jacket, shoes, evening shoes, handbag, jewellery, tights - the lot!

With grateful thanks to my best friend and personal shopper. I bought her lunch and will send her flowers, I could not have done it without her. [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Shopping for that sort of thing is definitely more fun if you've got a Chum with you. You'll have to post photographs, so that we can see the end results.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I remember that feeling, Boogie, and it's a great one! [Yipee] My daughter came with me and it was a lovely shopping expedition (I'm not a good shopper...)

I've been to work this afternoon... it's my day off [Roll Eyes] but needs must - I did offer, rather than was asked, and my manager was really grateful.

Nen - in work again tomorrow but at least it's Friday. [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm doing a bit of extra time at the office this week too, Nen - we've got the Official Opening of the new building on Friday afternoon, and I'm going to stay on, even though it's after I'd normally be finished. Apparently afterwards they'd like some of us to be at our desks/lab-benches/whatever, looking professional and industrious*, while they let the bigwigs wander round and look at the place, so I'll stay on for a wee while.

I suppose I'd better look out some moderately smart clothes ... [Help]

I need to work up extra hours anyway as we're heading back to Blighty for a week in mid-May. D's been asked to give the opening recital on the re-built organ in the Colchester Moot Hall, about which he's v. chuffed, as (a) they're paying him enough to cover both our air-fares; and (b) he thought they'd have asked Someone Famous™.

I'm currently messing about here while I wait for blueberry loaves for the bl**dy sale to cook (I was going to do carrot ones, but the blueberry cake-mix was cheaper and D. said, why not have a change?).

* [Killing me]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Blueberry loaves sound lovely. I could do with making some cake today, it will be a fine distraction from my studies.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
Blueberry loaves sound lovely ...

TBH, I neither know nor really care whether they're lovely - I won't be eating them. [Big Grin]

We've had a few VIP-types already being shown round the offices, and two of them were friends from the Cathedral, who stopped to say hello when they saw my name on the door.

Because I don't know when I'm finishing w*rk today, D. made me a sort of Greek salad with goat's cheese, tomatoes, olives and spring onions to take with me for lunch, and it came straight from Heaven.

[Axe murder]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Blueberry muffins worry me. They always look mouldy, even when fresh. I'm sure a loaf wouldn't have this problem, though.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I know exactly what you mean - I'm a total fungophobe, and in any case I don't particularly like blueberries ... [Big Grin]

I should be downstairs making potato salad, but I'm up here telling you about the new Pigletmobile, which D. collected today.

Cute, eh? [Smile] I feel as if I want to paint black spots on it to make it look like a ladybird ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

Cute, eh? [Smile] I feel as if I want to paint black spots on it to make it look like a ladybird ... [Big Grin]

Very cute!

I always wanted to paint black spots on an old-style Volkswagen beetle.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
I gave my lawn it's first (somewhat overdue) cut of the year yesterday - it's amazing the difference it makes. Of course it now needs another going over to get the spots I missed.

I have the great excitement of grocery shopping this morning, enlivened soomewhat by going with a friend, so we can at least stop for a coffee and put the world to rights.

Also, it looks like we actually have applicants for the headteacher post at my school - hurrah! Now to hope and pray that at least one of them is right for us, or September will be...interesting.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

I should be downstairs making potato salad, but I'm up here telling you about the new Pigletmobile, which D. collected today.

Cute, eh?

Oh yes! Cute indeed
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Excellent choice Piglet. I had driving lessons in several different makes of car but the Nissan Micra was the one I clicked with: it felt so light and responsive and easy to drive. Five years on my little secondhand one is still a joy, reliable and problem-free. They're less cute than the older ones but still a good thing - hope you enjoy yours!

[ 02. May 2015, 07:33: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I had an earlier model but wasn't so keen on the newer ones. I'm very seriously considering getting a VW Up! like this. I like the Polo but it's just a tad too expensive [Frown] .

[ 02. May 2015, 07:56: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I had an early Micra, and I just loved it! Really enjoyed driving in those happy days! But alas we had to downsize to one car, so I gave it to my daughter. She loved it, and her son learnt to drive on it. Eventually she had to get another car and gave the Micra to her son, my gorgeous grandson. He drove it for ages, but sent me a text a couple of years ago saying sadly "The Micra has died". I was really sad. But I reckon it had done very well.

Good little cars.

Anyone know where Spring/Summer has gone?? [Confused]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Probably away for the Bank Holiday to the Mediterranean. I don't blame it, it's dismal here.

Woke up this morning thinking it would be fun to see a matinee today, as I haven't been to a live performance of anything for years. Choices are:

The RSC in Stratford on Avon with 9 tickets remaining, the cheapest of which is £57; the Oxford Playhouse for "Measure for Measure", affordable seats, but the whole thing's in Russian; a youth dance group's performance of "Strictly Come Dancing"; and the local cinema seems to have closed.

I settled for a trip to the supermarket instead where unfortunately they had a cheese sampling table and I've added to the collection in my fridge. If you haven't had Welsh Rarebit cheese it is lovely.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Grocery shop all done, coffee consumed and world partially sorted.

I'm now busy trying to plan 3 weeks of work on The Tempest for my class of 7/8 year olds. It's challenging and exciting - I'm looking forward to bringing one of my favourite plays to life with them, and just hoping that they enjoy it. If it works, it'll be amazing...here's to hoping!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm currently in the Cathedral office, playing hooky from the Sale; we've got a military service tomorrow (Matins commemorating the Battle of the Atlantic) which needs a separate order of service, and D. and I came down to get them photocopied.

That's far more important that serving coffee*, isn't it? [Big Grin]

Heading back there for soup 'n' sandwiches lunch in a few minutes, and will probably get a bollocking from the bossyboots in the choir who thinks I should have stayed up there ... [Eek!]

* There are always several more servers than we actually need anyway, and most of us end up standing around getting bored.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
I had an earlier model but wasn't so keen on the newer ones. I'm very seriously considering getting a VW Up! like this. I like the Polo but it's just a tad too expensive [Frown] .

I have one of these and they are great. (Mine is exactly like the one in your pic...)
It is my second one.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We had three successive Micras when we lived in Northern Ireland and loved them, but they've only started selling them here in the last few months. When D. told the sales-lady at Nissan that he'd had three already, she was v. impressed, in a rather puzzled sort of way. [Big Grin]

Spring Sale now done and dusted, and my patriotic potato salad* (particularly appropriate as Britain celebrates the birth of a new princess!) must have gone down well, as it all disappeared.

* When I can get them, I use a mixture of red, white and blue potatoes, so it looks a bit like this.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Spent yesterday in the garden centre and garden, I bought some plants and herbs for my patio pots and hanging basket, planted out some toms and did some weeding. More weeding, cutting and planting required this afternoon but it's currently very grey and damp.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
Spent yesterday in the garden centre and garden, I bought some plants and herbs for my patio pots and hanging basket, planted out some toms and did some weeding. More weeding, cutting and planting required this afternoon but it's currently very grey and damp.

It must be much warmer in Trumpington than Boogie Wonderland! We are still getting frost in the mornings.

I have primulas everywhere 'till the end of May.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Our last car was a Micra. My husband bought it to cheer himself up after he'd had his wisom teeth out, so he went for the sports model. It was not easy to drive, which was annoying as I'd suggested we got a Micra on the stregth of one I'd driven before (which was obviously the pipe and slippers version).
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Didn't your slippers tend to slide off your feet when driving? Very dangerous, I'd have thought. [Devil]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
Spent yesterday in the garden centre and garden, I bought some plants and herbs for my patio pots and hanging basket, planted out some toms and did some weeding. More weeding, cutting and planting required this afternoon but it's currently very grey and damp.

It must be much warmer in Trumpington than Boogie Wonderland! We are still getting frost in the mornings.

I have primulas everywhere 'till the end of May.

[Smile]

We rarely have frost this time of year, the few times it has occurred we have lost our cherries as they are in bud early here.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Went out this morning to a newly opened Dutch restaurant and had a 12" bacon, cheese and mushroom pancake with syrup for breakfast. Delicious but so filling that I still haven't wanted any lunch.

It's also Oxfordshire Artweeks this month - this is when Oxfordshire's artists throw open the doors of their studios to the public and you get to see paintings, pottery, sculpture, etc etc. Sometimes the exhibitions are in village halls, or quirky places. You can talk to the artists and some of their works are for sale, but no pressure either way.

I've been to three exhibitions this weekend. One was in a medieval barn full of Victorian agricultural carts, with the paintings propped up in and around the carts, another was in a room at the National Herb Centre, with a tasteful decoration of brightly coloured handmade bloomers and knickers overhead as you approached. Amazing how prolific some of the artists are - two had enough paintings on show to fill a small gallery by themselves.

No sign of the expected deluge of rain to spoil anything, either; it's been a lovely warm sunny afternoon.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Ariel, the pancacke sounds delicious, and the artwork fascinating!

I've been busy at church most of the day - we had the first of our summer open afternoons this afternoon. Not very many visitors, but then that's often the case for this first one. Hopefully things will pick up in future months.

Other than that, I'm half-planning a bike ride for tomorrow, depending on a) the weather and b) how much energy I wake up with. It could end up being a duvet day, but on balance I think I'll lean more towards getting out and getting some fresh air.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Huge congregation for the Battle of the Atlantic service today - much bigger than D. and I expected. We've had military-type services where there's only a few rows of rather puzzled-looking cadets who haven't a clue what they're supposed to do, but this time the church was full of them. It all went v. well though - Stanford in B♭ and My soul, there is a country and a huge amount of Decanal Grinning™.

We also heard this morning that we're going to lose our curate, who's been appointed to the local High Church parish; we're hoping that the Bishop will see good sense and appoint our former organ scholar, who's currently the rector of a parish in the country, but we'd really like to get him back.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Bishops seeing good sense - whatever will the laity think up next?

* * * *

Fabulous, brilliant, wonderful weekend away in Mysore, or Mysuru as it now known officially. It turns out that friend, H, there has been keeping a little secret from me, as we learnt when we surprised him by appearing at his work unannounced, that his wife is due to have their second child tomorrow [Tuesday]! Yet on Saturday she [and her MiL, though MiL said it was mostly DiL] still managed to cook a most magnificent and sumptuous Muslim feast for lunch. We hardly ate anything later in the day, I was still a bit full Sunday morning but managed to force down a smidgin of breakfast when we found a Kerala-style restaurant that cooked one of our favourite dishes.

We also re-met a little lad we knew from H's wedding in 2010 - I was walking through Mysore Market [amazing place!] and saw this guy then he smiled and I immediately knew the smile from back then - he is now a big strapping 16 year old commerce student but still as much a sweetie as he was when he was younger.

We also had to go on a hunt for an hotel as the one we usually use was full [it usually is if not booked well in advance] and we eventually tried a very unprepossessing looking little place but once inside it was great, a real find - and with pleasant staff as well. My room was more like a suite and all for about 11 quid! In Reception they have an amazing fin-de-siecle style lamp hanging on the wall - hideously beautiful as these things often are.

Altogether a brilliant weekend. We got home this morning to find no power and the inverter supporting the fridge/freezer had blown so lots of food to throw away. No use crying over it, inverter man coming tomorrow then a restock and all will be fine. We showered and went to bed and I'm heading back there any minute - getting too old for overnight coach journeys!

[ 04. May 2015, 06:08: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Lovely walk to the Isabella plantation in Richmond park yesterday where the azaleas are in full bloom. Why do clashing pinks look great when they are in a park and awful if I try to re-create the effect in my garden?
My husband is working today, and my son and I are lazing around trying to actually persuade ourselves to do something. Not a lot of success so far, though I have hung out the washing, and he's trimming the hedge.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I'm suffering from my usual Ariel Envy - you always seem to have such a lovely time at weekends. [Smile]

Today holds domestics for me - loads of washing as Nenlet1's machine is out of action, also clearing the patch in the garden where the vegetables were last year and where I'm putting wild flower seeds this year. The vegetables weren't a huge success. [Disappointed]

But we are out for a meal with Nenlet1, husband and in-laws this evening so that will be good.

Nen - always glad of a break from cooking. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Sarasa, UnclePete used to have as a siggy line a quote from the late and much missed Peter Cook:

quote:
Every morning there’s the toothpaste to be squeezed, the laces to be tied: it’s a full life.
Perhaps what you achieved is enough for today.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
You're so right, Wodders - after all we are not saved by works!

We have our Church Festival this weekend, so exhibition of art and craft in the church and a fête - hopefully not worse than death - this afternoon. I've made a cake, potted some plants and am helping with the puppet show but Mr. S is only coming along to spectate - we're both a bit wiped out by last week's exertions looking after the Dowager (who is much better and managing on her own, thanks to and for your prayers [Overused] )

Mrs. S, very grateful for the above [Angel]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
I'm suffering from my usual Ariel Envy - you always seem to have such a lovely time at weekends. [Smile]

Well, weekdays I spend 3h a day commuting and most of the rest of the time in an office job. By the time I get home I don't feel much like doing anything in the evenings, so tend to cram "real life" into weekends.

I was recently reminded that about a year ago I'd decided to try to do one different thing each day, even if it was only a small thing like a sandwich filling I'd never normally try or a different route to the bus stop. The idea being that by the end of the week, you've had seven new/different experiences. Hopefully some will lead to other discoveries. Some won't, of course, but there should be a few memories to look back on when old, decrepit and unable to get out any more.

Having said that, I'm not quite sure how visiting an animal sanctuary and being accompanied part of the way by a sneezing goat is going to enrich my life, but God moves in mysterious ways.

You can see the Artweek knickers here, if you want.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
...I was recently reminded that about a year ago I'd decided to try to do one different thing each day, even if it was only a small thing like a sandwich filling I'd never normally try or a different route to the bus stop. The idea being that by the end of the week, you've had seven new/different experiences. Hopefully some will lead to other discoveries. Some won't, of course, but there should be a few memories to look back on when old, decrepit and unable to get out any more...

Here we generally refer to that by the far more succinct "next week"!

I think this is a great idea and I should give it a go.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... try to do one different thing each day, even if it was only a small thing like a sandwich filling I'd never normally try ...

A challenge that involves trying out new food? Now that's my sort of thing ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
WW - we've taken your adviceand filled the rest of the day with reading, knitting and computer games (plus a rather nice lunch).
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I love being a bad influence - I have years of experience!

[Two face]

Seriously, a little bit of spoiling ourselves is a Very Good Thing!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I like the knickers [Smile] when I used to make and sell cloth nappies (I made modern fitted poppered ones from pretty vintage fabrics) I knew a fellow cloth nappy maker who collected other makers' nappies, they were hung from the ceiling of her workshop.
Went with friends to Ickworth House today and had a good long walk in the grounds and a picnic lunch. The children played in the river and we did a little geocaching.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
A rather different day to the one I'd planned, having woken up with sciatica all down one leg. In view of that, going for a 10 mile bike ride didn't seem like such a smart idea, so instead I visited a friend who's housebound following some time in hospital. I got yummy cake for my trouble, and a lovely two hours of catching up and chatter.

Now time to think about work tomorrow... [Paranoid]
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Like Sarasa I also went to see the Isabella plantation this weekend. The azaleas are very good but they go a bit overboard on the pink ones. The other place I sometimes go is the Valley Gardens in Windsor Great Park, and there they also have some lovely yellow and orange ones, which are my favourites.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I signed up for a taster session in Nordic Walking, and had my session this morning...it is surprisingly good fun. And gives you a whole-body workout....zzzzz all afternoon.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
I signed up for a taster session in Nordic Walking, and had my session this morning...it is surprisingly good fun. And gives you a whole-body workout....zzzzz all afternoon.

St. E, I don't suppose you ever saw 'Inspector Norse' by the amazing LipService Theatre - the world's first flat-pack, self-assembly, hand-knitted Swedish noir detective story? THAT featured Nordic walking ... [Killing me]

Mrs. S, devoted Lip Service fan [Overused]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Went to Whitby today with some friends and a lovely time was had by all. Lots of the small villages we passed through had been on the path of the 1st day of the 'Tour de Yorkshire' cycling event over the weekend, so there were painted bikes and bunting and white rose flags along all the roads. One bakery even had cycle-wheel iced biscuits.

Sunday's leg started from Wakefield city centre, so we had lots of mass-hopping between us and our sister church in town. People found it easy to go to a Saturday vigil than brave the closed roads. Seems to have been a success though (apart from sporadically shonky weather) and spectators have enjoyed it. Hopefully it'll become a permanent thing.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We were in Yorkshire last September and thoroughly enjoyed looking out for all the coloured bicycles - what a lovely idea (especially the ones that were decorated with flowers)!

May Day isn't a holiday here, so it was business as usual, and making a start on the re-organisation of the filing system. It's going to take ages*, but now that I've started (well - started producing labels on the computer) I don't know that it's going to be so bad.

* As long as they have funds to pay me, it can take as long as it likes. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
We had the Church Festival and Fête here in lovely sunshine yesterday. Today it is blowing a hoolie (sp?) and raining stairrods, so for once the sun *did* shine on the righteous, or at least the church-going [Cool]

The puppets were a great, if chaotic, success, and there were plenty of people at the Fête buying Stuff* so I think it could be counted an official Success [Yipee]

*not me, I hasten to add!

Mrs. S, Greatly Relieved [Biased]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Mrs S: re the sun not shining. there is a rhyme:

The rain it raineth every day / upon the just and unjust fella; / But more upon the just because / the unjust hath the just's umbrella.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
There's also Piglet's Umbrella Principle™: if you take an umbrella, you won't need it. [Big Grin]

A gentleman with a Hoover just came to my office and (very politely) asked if he may hoover the carpet. I (equally politely) got out of his way (he took less than a minute - there's not that much exposed carpet), but I was somewhat surprised.

I've worked in offices on and off (mostly on) for the last thirty-mumble years, and in all that time I've never seen a cleaner come in to an office during office hours. There are cleaners with those big ride-on floor-polishing machines doing the corridors all the time, but never anyone in individual offices.

puzzled piglet [Confused]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Perhaps he unintentionally strayed into the wrong time zone. Or muddled a.m. and p.m.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
He's probably new. Normal service will be resumed next week.

So windy here that I was blown off my feet at the bus stop this evening. Lots of branches down, leaves and blossom petals everywhere. I gave up trying to do anything about my hair and went home looking like Medusa.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
On an old U.S. television series, the private detective would often grab a vacuum cleaner (aka Hoover) and go into an office posing as a cleaner in order to rifle through files or desk drawers.

(For a more serious investigation, he'd pose as a painter so that he could close off the office for a full day.)

Don't say you haven't been warned!
[Snigger]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
I had my purse nicked once when two men claiming to be typewriter repair men came to our offices. The receptionist just waved them through, and they went room to room - if there was somebody in the room, they'd ask if this was the room the broken typewriter was in, and if the room was empty, they rifled through. Then they moved onto a different set of offices.

Months later my purse, minus the money, turned up in the cistern of a male toilet; they'd been ditching the evidence as they went along.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We had the same at university.

1976 - I remember it well. We were watching Wimbledon, two 'TV repair men' came to the student lounge and took the TV away while 30 of us watched them do it!

[Roll Eyes] [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Au contraire - when I worked at the Large American Computer Company, the cleaners only *ever* came during office hours*$, and they would only clean your desk if you weren't sitting at it. Thus, if you - unlike most people - came into the office every day and sat at your desk, it never, ever, got cleaned!

* for security reasons.
$ and only every month or two, at that!

In the end, if we ever spotted that endangered species a Cleaning Lady, we'd all clear and lock our desks and RUN!

Mrs. S, looking back with more fondness than felt at the time [Killing me]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Office cleaners generally clean around things. They won't move anything on your desk (they may polish the space in the middle that doesn't need it and ignore the corners that do) and they probably won't move your chair to get at the crumbs under it, but will poke it with the nozzle of the vacuum cleaner, and go away again.

Once a year or so your phone gets cleaned. You know when this has happened because the earpiece is sticky with polish.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It may be something to do with the new building; I never saw any cleaners in the offices of the old one, although my waste-paper basket was emptied every now and then, so they must have come in after I'd left. Where I worked in Belfast the cleaners worked from 7 to 10:30 in the morning, and presumably did the offices before we arrived; they only came in during office hours to sign for holidays/sick leave or pick up their salary slips.
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
... 1976 - I remember it well. We were watching Wimbledon, two 'TV repair men' came to the student lounge and took the TV away ...

When D. was a student, living in halls of residence, some of his neighbours decided that what their communal lounge needed was a carpet. Someone (we'll call him Joe - I can't remember his real name) pointed out that there was a rather nice one in the bar of (I think) one of the other halls, and the next weekend a few of them got hold of a Transit van, went into the bar and politely asked the customers to step off the carpet. Assuming they were taking it away for cleaning, the customers obliged, and the carpet was installed in the lounge.

When they left the halls of residence, the carpet went with them to a house where Joe and D. both stayed. Joe graduated, and left, leaving the carpet behind. D. moved into his room in the house for the next year, and when he graduated, the carpet went with him. D's dad, realising it was rather a good carpet, kept it and had it cleaned and it turned up when we got married. It's currently on the floor of our spare bedroom, and if we ever get round to getting a nice floor put into the sitting-room, I think it may migrate there.

Piglet, in possession of stolen goods ... [Paranoid]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
When my first son was a baby we moved into an old dilapidated house. We painted and patched in the baby's room and I ordered a rug for the floor. Wrong one was delivered so I sent it back. This happened twice more and I eventually kept the next delivery. When I unrolled it, I decided I much preferred it to my original choice. However, the department stor just could not get it right, even though I supplied order number and details.

Some years later we bought a slow combustion wood heater for lounge room. It had to come from South Australia by truck. That was the year of the truckies' blockade and our burner never arrived. We questioned and grumbled etc for several weeks. We were we eventually told to come into the store and take anyone we liked. We collected a great Norwegian model which burned really well.

My guess is that ours fell off the back of a truck and disappeared or was used for cooking and warmth on the side of a road during blockade. I imagine store didn't lose but made an insurance claim.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
A church I used to dep in during the 1970s ordered 500 plastic cups to 'emergencies' when washing up wasn't going to be an option.

First delivery date came and went, as did the second; then a truck arrived, man with clipboard said "sign here" and deposited very large box which proved to contain 5000 small disposable wine/sherry glasses.

Mrs Vicar called company 3 times, treasurer twice, both requesting that wrong box be collected and correct items delivered. Waited in and another truck came, left another box BUT refused to take first box - "we don't do collections".

New box contained same as the first - wine/sherry glasses - so more calls made, promises made to deliver correct stuff and collect wrong, etc, etc, etc.

After 3 months, numerous letters, finally the day dawned when (a) correct stuff delivered; (b) truck to collect wrong 10,000 glasses failed to arrive; (c) letter delivered saying keep the wrong delivery, too awkward and expensive to arrange collection.

I think they're still using some of the 'wrong' deliveries for sherry on feast days [Eek!]
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
And no doubt they are the envy of all their nonconformist 'wee cuppie'neighbours.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I am back in Paris and it is raining. I want to be on holiday again…

Last week we were in Vienna. Much patisserie was consumed [Big Grin] . My favourite thing was a joint effort entertainment between the Spanish Riding School and the Vienna Boys’ Choir. I want a white Libertana horse <sighs wistfully>.

OTOH, I am mightily sick of the Blue Danube Waltz [Help]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
...OTOH, I am mightily sick of the Blue Danube Waltz [Help]

Hearing once in a decade is probably enough - Strauss is a bit syrupy for my taste.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
A small London hospital I worked in had a 26 foot Victorian oak boardroom table nicked while there were some workman in doing renovations [Paranoid]
Another hospital had the outpatient computers nicked one evening, we presumed by some 'cleaning staff' who managed to sneak them out in black bags.
 
Posted by Fredegund (# 17952) on :
 
I remember being baffled that someone would go to the trouble of walking out of Warwick Arts Centre with a 6ft artificial plant.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... very large box which proved to contain 5000 small disposable wine/sherry glasses ...

That's God's way of telling you to have wine or sherry instead of coffee. [Cool]
quote:
Originally posted by La Vie en rouge:
I am mightily sick of the Blue Danube Waltz

<sings>
The Danube is blue, not pink, not green
Not yellow or red, or tangerine ...
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
The Danube is blue, not pink, not green
Not yellow or red, or tangerine ...
[Big Grin]

No, no -- it goes:
quote:
♫ The Blue Danube Waltz, by Strauss, the louse. ♫
Just heard it on the radio yesterday and sang along with the first line before changing stations.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
...OTOH, I am mightily sick of the Blue Danube Waltz [Help]

Hearing once in a decade is probably enough - Strauss is a bit syrupy for my taste.
What I realised after hearing it for the fourth or fifth time… is that there is absolutely no development in the music whatsoever. Especially with all those repeats bloody everywhere. You’re not meant to sit down and listen to it in any case. It’s supposed to be wallpaper for dancing to.

Actually, another Viennese favourite, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, is also wallpaper. If you’ve ever played it, you realise that Mozart makes five minutes of music last for quarter of an hour. But at least it’s *good* wallpaper.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
To follow the general theme of weird things being stolen, my friend used to have a life size cardboard cut-out of Pierce Brosnan liberated from the local cinema. It used to live at the top of her landing and scare the crap out of unsuspecting late night visitors.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
<sings>
The Danube is blue, not pink, not green
Not yellow or red, or tangerine ...
[Big Grin]

I saw that this morning and have my petite porcine pal to thank for today's earworm. [Roll Eyes]

A domestics day of shopping and washing and clearing out some cabinets in the dining room for their collection by the Free To Collector later. Fortunately Mr Nen is here to mastermind their removal as I can't for the life of me see how they're going to get through the door. [Eek!]

Meanwhile, what was in them is piled up round the house awaiting sorting. I am completely on board with the idea of sorting, tidying and decorating, but when we have more rooms piled up with stuff than we have functioning properly I begin to worry. [Help]

Nen - looking forward to normal service being resumed but it may take at least the rest of this year.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Not a theft - quite the reverse.

Between the end of a baptism service (around 4.45pm) and people arriving to get ready for Evensong (c5.45pm) a church I knew gained a massive bog oak wardrobe/linen press which appeared in the choir vestry. [How massive? 12 feet wide by 8 feet high by 3 feet deep]

What amazed everyone was the said vestry was locked to the outside world and impenetrable from inside the church; the only keyholders hadn't issued their key to anyone so it was a complete mystery how the damn thing came to be there.

Advertisements in the local press came to naught so it was delivered to the local saleroom where it was sold for a much higher price than we'd been led to believe.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
And I suppose that because you never officially had it in the first place you didn't need a faculty to sell it- result!
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Exactly!

Even the Archdeaon had to agree that it couldn't have been hidden and it had never appeared in the Terrier so... the money was very useful for replenishing the choir library!
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
clearly a miracle!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
We have a great - though nurse led - A & E at our local hospital, who examined me and X rayed me after I had a nasty fall and hit my head last night. I then had to go to Newport to see a doctor as there was something they weren't happy with. We then waited another 2 1/2 hours, eventually saw the doctor who told me I needeed X rays. When told I already had, he gave me a quick examination and took the collar off. I don't think he ever saqw the Xrays! Grrrr!
(I'm OK but a bit stiff and achey today so no harm done)
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
[...] When told I already had, he gave me a quick examination and took the collar off. [...]

I didn't know doctors wear collars these days! How strange he should get so informal with you, and so quickly! [Big Grin]

Hope you are feeling better soon, and all will be all right in the end! [Votive]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Poor you, St. G. - that sounds very nasty. Facetious Piglet says put more tonic in it; kindly Piglet says hope you feel better very soon. [Votive]
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
... my petite porcine pal ...

[Killing me] You've never met me in Real Life, have you? [Killing me] Sorry about the earworm.

We saw our first iceberg of the season yesterday - quite a size, and right in the bay beside the rocks.

I love living here. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I suppose it's a matter of just going with the floe!
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I suppose it's a matter of just going with the floe!

Groan!
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Thank you, thank you, thank you.

It is nice to be appreciated...


...or something.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Having thought about this on the bus today I have to warn you that I can get far worse than this. If you doubt me on that just ask Uncle Pete.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm suffering a slight case of post-election-night fatigue; I stayed up until 3 a.m. (our time - 6:30 UK time), having not really meant to, but it was rather compulsive ... [Hot and Hormonal]

In other news, it's sn*wing. [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Well, you had summer yesterday, didn't you?

* * * *

I think my friend V is related in some way to Gollum! No, his eyes don't bulge quite like that...

He was telling me this morning how, in his community, after a death the close relatives only eat vegetarian food for 12 days. Well, his uncle died and then 12 days later his grandmother died so that will be 24 days by the time next Wednesday comes and they have fish again - he is eagerly anticipating the event.

Fish!

[ 08. May 2015, 13:46: Message edited by: Welease Woderwick ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That's interesting, as for some reason I imagined that vegetarian food was more the norm in your part of the world.

Piglet, wrong as usual ... [Big Grin]

And yes - we did have summer yesterday. [Frown]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Kerala has a l-o-n-g coastline and fishing is a major industry - we are also a major exporter of seafood, particularly prawns.

I can't eat prawns or shellfish [another bl**dy allergy] but yesterday I had some lovely baked seerfish with saute potatoes and salad. I only eat fish once every few weeks for the antidepressant bit but I've got to look forward to my little bit of non-veg.

Plus we still quite like food.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
WW I don't know how you managed it, but you must be related to my daughter; you are the only person I know with the similar allergies. Can you eat Brazil nuts and pineapple?
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
WW I don't know how you managed it, but you must be related to my daughter; you are the only person I know with the similar allergies. Can you eat Brazil nuts and pineapple?

In season, no pineapple is safe from him. Brazil nuts? Not common, if indeed known, in India.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
The twins, Mary and Jack (nearly two years old) are coming for lunch today. I've got my boys' old Duplo down and set the train track out, charged the batteries - all set!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I hope your own personal batteries are charged..twins that age could be very tiring.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Went to the Canaletto exhibition at Compton Verney earlier this week - very good.

Went out yesterday with a new colleague for a team pub lunch. (Country pub, white with black-painted timbers on the outside, less interesting on the inside.) Food was served on large grey slates, which is probably quite trendy, but I couldn't quite get my head around eating off a roof tile.

(Do you put them in a dishwasher?)
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
It is, apparently, trendy to use all kinds of items instead of plates. There's a Twitter account dedicated to crusading against this trendiness called We Want Plates.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
The twins, Mary and Jack (nearly two years old) are coming for lunch today. I've got my boys' old Duplo down and set the train track out, charged the batteries - all set!

[Big Grin]

We are expecting a grandchild in the summer and there is the World's Supply of Lego, including Duplo trains in the loft. There are other toys and stuff but the Lego is best remembered from my childhood and our childrens'
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
We too have boxfuls of Lego and Duplo in the loft for any possible future grandchildren. It seems to be the thing that everyone keeps. I imagine the next generation of children will have among their first coherent sentences, "I hope you've got more than b****y Duplo in your loft."

Nen - who wishes Duplo were all that her loft contained. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:
It is, apparently, trendy to use all kinds of items instead of plates. There's a Twitter account dedicated to crusading against this trendiness called We Want Plates.

I may have to sign up to that. A while ago I had a burger and chips served upon a chopping board, the burger with a skewer stuck through it to keep it together. Serving a meal on a chopping board just looks as if the cook couldn't be bothered to find a clean plate.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
We have the children's books, the duplo, the Lego, the happyland, the Playmobile, the dolls, the Thomas the Tank Engine stuff and, unaccountably, the Disney videos which my husband won't let me throw out in case videos make a come back [Disappointed]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Never mind the toys, what about the serious kit: cots, high-chairs, etc.

I have a wonderful Edwardian cot: much higher than even 1950s versions so you don't have to bend at all to pick up the child, sides lower perfectly, and metal so can be scrubbed when taken out of storage for the next arrival. And the high-chair is the proper version that splits in the middle to form a low seat with table, with abacus beads down the sides.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We had a great time with the twins and they really enjoyed playing with the Duplo.

But their favourite thing? Pingu on the TV! (They don't have a TV at home)

[Smile]
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Glad you had a good time with the twins, Boogie. Toddlers visiting me tend to occupy themselves with trying to access the cats who will have sensibly taken themselves off somewhere toddler proof.

This morning I went on a hunt for a plain black summer frock but of course black isn't a summer colour (although navy blue is [Confused] ) so I decided to dye a white linen one. During the dyeing I experienced rubber glove failure on one of the thumbs so now have an alarmingly blue/black thumb [Help] . After rinsing the dye out I discover that, while the dress itself is black [Yipee] the thread didn't take the dye - I'll resew where the white thread is visible and then I'll be ready for playing with my orchestra.
 
Posted by mrs whibley (# 4798) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:
It is, apparently, trendy to use all kinds of items instead of plates. There's a Twitter account dedicated to crusading against this trendiness called We Want Plates.

I may have to sign up to that. A while ago I had a burger and chips served upon a chopping board, the burger with a skewer stuck through it to keep it together. Serving a meal on a chopping board just looks as if the cook couldn't be bothered to find a clean plate.
What you are describing is, I understand, known as a 'slider'. Whether this is because you have to slide the burger etc. off the skewer, or because the whole lot is in danger of sliding off the board into your lap, I'm not certain.
 
Posted by Cathscats (# 17827) on :
 
Don't you hate it when they go and sew natural fabrics like cotton or linen with synthetic thread. That is why the dye doesn't take. I have pretty much given up dyeing because it has happened too often. [Mad]
 
Posted by Garasu (# 17152) on :
 
Leviticus has something going...
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
They use polyester thread because it is stronger. I admit that I mostly use it too when I sew, as it is also much easier to get hold of and consequently cheaper.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Even though I dye regularly (sometimes with home made ones) I invariably forget about polyester thread - grrrrr. Still, I've a week before I need to wear it which gives me time to resew the dress.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I spent my day teaching a 6 hour revision day in health theory. Meanwhile, my husband and children had a wonderful day dressed up in doublets and hose and romping around a Tudor Manor! Then after they picked me up we all did some wood whittling (as my husband was obviously in full Tudor swing by then and his Tudor role is a wood turner). I did my first ever whittling and carved an old man's face from a pencil [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
... I've a week before I need to wear it which gives me time to resew the dress.

If re-sewing it is an option, could you have got some lightweight black fabric and made the dress yourself?

Re: allergies: seafood allergies aren't all that uncommon, and they can be quite specific. D's boss can eat certain sorts (possibly mussels?), but prawns and shrimps make him really ill.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Related? Possibly, after all I am an Essex boy - if you have any Thompson [mum's maiden name] relatives from Ilford-Romford-Thurrock area then be very worried!

Pineapple and Brazils no problem - though not, of course, Chocolate covered Brazils - my dad's favourite way back when. Do they still make them?

Fresh pineapple served within an hour of being picked is fab!

Happily, CK, I'm fine with milk and cheese and so on - made myself scrambled egg with garlic and then chopped black pepper cheddar [at a ridiculous price] stirred in for supper last night - Ambrosia!.

The major issue for me really is tea/coffee/chocolate where a little can really set me off - particularly chocolate as it is so incredibly addictive and it tastes so darned good! Pepsi, Coke, Mountain Dew, etc. are not a problem as I never drink carbonated drinks beyond plain soda water.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I have no genealogical links with Essex - arrived here via a convoluted route, so it's really unlikely. I know most of that area, as I spend more time than I like going through Ilford to Romford.

Thursday I was actually on the right train moving from Romford back to student in the East End following the morning meeting when the train ground to a halt at Seven Kings, followed by an announcement of a fatality on the track at Stratford. It's really, really difficult to sympathise with suicides when trains are cancelled and the stations are closed for hours throwing everyone into struggling to continue journeys on the then overloaded buses. I managed to get on the fourth that came past; that bus driver was not counting passengers. The whole debacle was added to by frantic phone calls about the science practical another student was attempting in Acton.

My daughter's allergies are getting better on the milk and chocolate, the blocked nose is worth the taste in her reckoning. But the wheat/gluten remains an issue, as does shellfish, nuts and pineapple. Although it might be worth checking the pineapple. (Nuts in the broadest sense as she can eat almonds, peanuts, chestnuts and hazelnuts, which are very different from other tree nuts, but it's easier to say allergic to nuts.) At one point all alliums (leeks, onions, chives, garlic) were on the list, plus tomatoes and strawberries.

Some time, when she was at her worst, I gave up on vegetarianism with her, because creating a balanced vegetarian diet with those limitations that I actually wanted to eat hurt my brain. But at her worst she had weeks of eating rice, lamb and pears which she isn't allergic to, to try and stabilise her stomach and symptoms.

I am trying to summon up some energy to write some more teaching materials for tutors with a non-teaching background. But the deadline for that lot of coursework is 22 May, so I do need to do this one.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
... I've a week before I need to wear it which gives me time to resew the dress.

If re-sewing it is an option, could you have got some lightweight black fabric and made the dress yourself?
It was an option, but the only black fabric in the whole of the nearby Big City was plain polyester and looked nasty. Plus I've no confidence in the sizing on sewing patterns - I've lost count of the number of times I've got to the fitting stage only to find the garment is too big (armholes can't be reduced) or too small. And this is when I've checked and double checked the sizing of the pattern pieces. I already have about 3 dress-lengths waiting for me to pluck up courage with. My next step is to make a pattern myself, but I don't have time for this one.
So undoing & resewing is fine this time.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Curiosity killed - re the pineapple. I've given up fresh pineapple because it was giving me symptoms of mild allergy - tingling swollen lips mostly. Tinned pineapple doesn't have the effect. But I am allergic to physallis.

I'm not allergic to anything else at all - just physalis, and. mildly, fresh pineapple. Can your daughter eat physalis?
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Evening all [Smile]

It's been one of those crazy busy weekends when I don't seem to have stopped particulary, and the to-do list has waxed and waned all over the place.

Still, yesterday evening we had a little concert at church, which included performances by a recorder consort; I knew there was more to the recorder than the plastic school descants, but even so it was something of a surprise to see the variety that exists.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I agree people often don't realise there's a range of recorders. I still have the ones I used to play at school and in college concerts. As well as the descants I also have a treble (lower than a descant) and a sopranino (tiny and higher). Haven't played them since I graduated, though.

It's been a quiet and pleasant weekend. Went to Hook Norton today, which is quite a picturesque village, in other words, lots of beautiful country cottages in narrow, winding car-clogged streets. However, I hadn't been there before so that was my do-something-different thing for Sunday.

(Saturday's was watching the BBC Young Dancer of the Year on television, which isn't something I'd normally watch but the diversity of styles was quite interesting - ballet, street dance, Indian, contemporary - and some very talented dancers. I wouldn't mind going to see a live performance.)
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
I've had a weekend of eating. it's my birthday today so son cooked us a fantastic meal (mushroom ravioli and bakewell tart) I also had lunch out with a friend that has a birthday tomorrow yesterday and with my mum on Friday. I've slightly offset the food and alcohol by a bit of gardening this afternoon.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Happy Birthday, Sarasa!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
... As well as the descants I also have a treble (lower than a descant) and a sopranino (tiny and higher) ...

We've got a Garklein, which is a fifth higher (and even tinier and squeakier) than a sopranino; its bottom note is 2 octaves above middle C (the same as the high note in Allegri's Miserere). I played the tenor when I was in school, and owned one, but I've no idea what happened to it; it may well turn up when we finally have to clear Dad's house ... [Eek!]

We had absolutely my sort of day musically today: Byrd's Mass for Four Voices and Tallis's Verily, verily I say unto you in the morning, Morley canticles and Greene's Thou visitest the earth in the evening, and organ voluntaries that might have come from the score of The Six Wives of Henry VIII, and made you want to dance a galliard (or something like that).

This all made me a happy piglet, and also caused much Decanal Grinning™ [Big Grin]

PS Happy birthday, Sarasa! [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Belated Felicitations, Sarasa!
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I miss the bass recorder I had regular access to for a couple of years. I loved my treble recorder as well, and would've given up on recorder playing completely if I'd not been persuaded to move to treble.

Come to think of it, I'd've given up on singing if my then very sensible music teacher hadn't put me with the altos when I joined the secondary school choir.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Happy belated birthday Sarasa.
Lots of gardening done yesterday, I cleared a new flower bed and sowed seeds, rescued another bed from the weeds, hoed the veg patch and planted some climbers near my son's play hut.
A busy day staring at the screen today though. I've just planned out a marking grid and I'll shortly be going to my yoga class, then when I get back it's a marathon marking session until late in the night.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Busy day in the garden here as well. Cleared all the pots of bulbs, replanted the daffodils but chucked the tulips, they never do very well in the garden again, and I wasn't all that keen on the colour, not at all like it said on the packet! Then got rid of old compost, cleaned and refilled the pots ready for pre-ordered plants arriving next weekend from a local grower.

Trouble is, I've forgotten what I ordered! [Hot and Hormonal]

Also have two Gro-Bags waiting for possibly peppers and a courgette, when weather is reliably summery. Against our house wall they should do well. I hope. [Smile]

Very impressed by our musical and recorder-playing Shippies. My sister started playing the recorder but found it too difficult for her arthritic fingers. I am totally unmusical so will not be going anywhere near an instrument!! [Biased]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We are off to Holy Island for a few days with both dogs. Neither has seen the sea before - I can't wait to see their reactions!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Skipper, of blessed memory, used to get cross with the sea and would run along barking at it!

The sea didn't seem at all perturbed.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
This recorder discussion is timely as I was playing one at church yesterday. Usually I play the guitar, but some songs, usually golden oldies, are best left unstrummed. I then play the piano harmony on a treble, or occasionally the tune on a descant. Yesterday it was God is Love. I do have a brace of tenors but rarely play.

The Holy Isle at this time of the year sounds lovely. There's nothing quite like the smell of wet dog [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Skipper, of blessed memory, used to get cross with the sea ...

You should have called him Canute. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
We are off to Holy Island for a few days with both dogs. Neither has seen the sea before - I can't wait to see their reactions!

[Smile]

Lots of photo opportunities! We look forward to seeing the results! *watches blog impatiently* [Biased]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Stopped off at the supermarket on the way home this evening. In addition to the extra mature Cheddar and the Cheddar with caramelized onions I already had in, I now have Camembert with mushroom, Bavarian smoked cheese with ham, and Roquefort. Moral: never shop when you're hungry.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Problem: at the cheese counter one is always hungry!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Ariel, I'll be right over with a French stick or two. What colour of wine would you like me to bring? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
A party! I'm coming too! [Big Grin]

Nen - who in reality has to go to work. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Problem: at the cheese counter one is always hungry!

This man ^ spends thousands at a cheese counter and should never be left unescorted.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I hasten to add that is thousands of rupees and not sterling - and the rate is about Rupees 100 = one pound!

Still I like spending money on cheese and Uncle Pete certainly seems to enjoy eating it!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Just back from a long walk round the Island, the dogs loved it. Even better there was nobody around at all - causeway closed until mid day.

They are now snoozing before we go to Bamburgh castle.

It is very dog friendly round here - all pubs, cafes etc allow them [Smile]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Sounds lovely Boogie - certainly somewhere I'd like to go to.
Thanks for the birthday wishes, it was certainly one of the nicest weekends of celebration I've had in a while. it isn't quite finished as I'm being taken out to tea in a posh hotel on Friday.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Ariel, I'll be right over with a French stick or two. What colour of wine would you like me to bring? [Big Grin]

Happy for you to bring over whatever you think would suit. I have several favourites, red, white and pink.

(Assuming there's any cheese left by the time you get here...)

[ 12. May 2015, 14:51: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We're actually coming over to Blighty next week for D's organ recitals in Colchester, but I suspect we'll be a bit to the east of Platform 3.

The official opening one is by invitation, but there's a second one, open to the public, the following Sunday; if anyone in the Mystic East™ wants details, send me a PM. [Smile]

We're hoping to be able to fit in a Cambridge Sprint (evensong at King's, followed by a sprint along the road for evensong at St. John's), as we haven't done one for ages, but whether we'll get the time is another matter. We're missing out on going to a Cathedral Organists' Association conference at King's (it's happening today [Frown] ), about which we're mightily pissed off, but think we might try and fit our Proper Holiday round the winter conference, assuming it's somewhere reasonably accessible.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Boogie, enjoy Holy Island - it's one of my most favourite places.

Today has been somewhat frantic. I had an hour between getting home from work and leaving again for the Archdeacon's visitation service, during which time I had to wash, dry and straighten my hair, eat something and type up the notes to two meetings (fortunately both very brief). By some miracle I managed it, but I'm still somewhat 'jangly' a few hours later. Time for bed with a nice cup of herbal tea I think...
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I am still in my marking pit of despair but I am telling myself I am on that final stretch and then the marking evil will disappear until the new academic year. Tomorrow I will celebrate!
(Of course, then I have to write an essay of my own for which my tutor has generously given me an extension...)
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Back for lunch after another long walk round the island in the sunshine. This is dog heaven!

Once the causeway opens we will leave and find another huge, empty beach. But until then it's really quiet.

I am looking forward to processing all the photos.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Boogie, make sure you sample the local Mead whilst you're there. Purely in the interests of the local economy, don't you know.

Embleton bay/Dunstanburgh castle area would be my recommendation for The Most Gorgeous Beach In The World if you're looking for a particular place to point the car towars...
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
I wish TICTH was still up and running. I've got an UTI, [Frown] [Roll Eyes] and as with any infection, it seriously affects my walking. [Frown] The good side of it is that I had taken a sample to the doctor's, and he rang tonight to tell me that there is a prescription for a different antibiotic at the chemists we use. There are definite advantages in living in a small town [Smile]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Back for lunch after another long walk round the island in the sunshine. This is dog heaven!

Once the causeway opens we will leave and find another huge, empty beach. But until then it's really quiet.

I am looking forward to processing all the photos.

[Smile]

If you are heading towards Bamburgh, head for Budle Bay first. Watch for mud flats or dog washing could be on the cards.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
I wish TICTH was still up and running. I've got an UTI, [Frown] [Roll Eyes] and as with any infection, it seriously affects my walking. [Frown] The good side of it is that I had taken a sample to the doctor's, and he rang tonight to tell me that there is a prescription for a different antibiotic at the chemists we use. There are definite advantages in living in a small town [Smile]

I hope you are better soon [Frown]

I have finished my marking for the academic year - hooray!

[ 13. May 2015, 23:06: Message edited by: Heavenly Anarchist ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I think UTIs deserve a special Hell all of their very own! Preferably somewhere down in the hottest and most uncomfortable part of the lake of fire. It's the keep taking lots of fluid when I know peeing is going to be agony that I find difficult.

I feel for you St G and I hope you get better soon.

Congratulations on the marking HA, isn't it wonderful to get it over with? I just hope and pray you don't get a little package asking you to second mark a piece just when you've put your marking brain away.

We have had three little nieces of Herself staying until yesterday, they were very sweet but it's quite nice to wake up to a child-free house!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... it's quite nice to wake up to a child-free house!

When I still lived at home and my nephews and nieces were little, I used to feel a little bit sad to come home from w*rk when they'd left after a visit and there was no longer a row of little wellie boots in the porch, until I realised that there would also be no-one yelling and running about under our feet ... [Big Grin]

Now the eldest has a toddler of his own (and another on the way). I'm getting old.

[ 14. May 2015, 02:44: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Piglet, don't worry: growing older is inevitable, growing up is optional!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thank goodness for that! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
I am still in my marking pit of despair but I am telling myself I am on that final stretch and then the marking evil will disappear until the new academic year. Tomorrow I will celebrate!

Glad to hear it's finally over - I remember that final marking feeling so well! I had a year off when I had the Elf Lass, and then decided that with a young baby I couldn't devote the time to the students that they all seem to need, so have given up the OU work completely now. I will at some point look into returning to distance tutoring (either with the OU or UHI, probably) but for now I'm enjoying the freedom!

Thursday afternoons we (the Elf Lass and I) usually go on an organised buggy walk locally, but today she is a little bit snotty, and about an hour and a half ago she fell asleep face first into her lunch and still hasn't woken up yet*, so I'm going to have to give it a miss today. When she wakes up I'll give her the rest of her lunch then we might head to the park anyway, so she (and I) get a wee bit of fresh air.

* just want to clarify I didn't leave her there with her face in her plate! I have however taken a picture of her flat out on the floor (where she is now, sleeping the sleep of angels) as we have to build up our collection of incriminating photos where we can.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Babies have an amazing capacity to suddenly sleep don't they [Smile] With my younger son we just needed to shade his eyes and he nodded off.
Every time I find myself grumpy about my marking workload I remind myself that I have a reasonably well paid job which is interesting, very flexible, low stress and where my having bipolar disorder is not considered a problem. And I can even be a perpetual student for free. I've reduced from 3 modules to 2 now but I can't imagine leaving for a more conventional job.
I'm actually hoping the faculty will fund me to do a part time PhD on the social history of healthcare when I've finished my Masters.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
Babies have an amazing capacity to suddenly sleep don't they ...

It's not just babies; D. can fall asleep anywhere (and regularly does). The Curate's wife refers to him affectionately as the Dormouse ... [Snore]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The youngest of the kids we had stay this week used to get in the car, cuddle up on Herself's lap and fall asleep almost as soon as we were moving. I can pretty much sleep at will as well.
 
Posted by ElaineC (# 12244) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
Babies have an amazing capacity to suddenly sleep don't they [Smile]

It wasn't the falling asleep when we were traveling by car that surprised me so much as when they woke up. Stop in the car park of a 'Happy Eater' or a 'Little Chef' or Gran's dive and they'd be instantly awake.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
I want to hear about your Gran's dive.
[Biased]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
So do I - I've got a mental picture of a little old lady, white hair and spectacles, and a diving-board ... [Eek!]

Nice Ascension service this evening, music by Batten and Croft. As D. says, why can't Ascensiontide be six weeks long, as so much splendid music has been written for it?

[ 15. May 2015, 00:36: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
So do I - I've got a mental picture of a little old lady, white hair and spectacles, and a diving-board ... [Eek!]

I was picturing another type of dive, but maybe that's an American meaning -- a low-life bar.

(If that is an American-only definition, I apologize for posting it on this thread.)
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Don't worry, Pigwidgeon, the word is certainly current in Liverpool - but then it would have to be!
 
Posted by ElaineC (# 12244) on :
 
'dive' should have been 'drive' - you can't even rely on a spellchecker if you type the wrong word with the right spelling and I can't even blame predictive text as I was using my laptop. I just can't type even after 40 years working with computers!!
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
My sister was always the one who was asleep by the time we got to the bottom of our road on any car journey; I was the child who needed constant entertaining. Fortunately, I was fairly happy with a book.

A brief pause of a Friday evening, before heading off early tomorrow to my sister's for my niece's dedication this weekend. It will be nice to see everyone, but it is something of a houseful, always a bit of a shock to the system after my quiet little flat.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Apparently, if I wouldn't go to sleep, my parents would put me in the car and drive round the block a few times. It always worked.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
When we lived in Ireland, on journeys from Belfast to Dublin there was a fair chance I'd be asleep before we got to the border. On one return trip, I was asleep before we'd actually left the centre of Dublin ... [Snore]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
When we lived in Ireland, on journeys from Belfast to Dublin there was a fair chance I'd be asleep before we got to the border. On one return trip, I was asleep before we'd actually left the centre of Dublin ... [Snore]

Should have taken the train, then you could have both had a sleep ...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We did, when we were on our honeymoon. We'd spent the first week in Belfast house-hunting (we moved there a couple of months after we got married) and then took the train to Dublin, hired a car and did a sort of whistle-stop tour round the Irish Republic. All I really remember about the train journey was that we got stuck in a non-smoker (which was a Bad Thing in those days), and it didn't improve my mood.

I shouldn't really be messing about on here - I'm taking a break from ironing/folding/packing stuff for our trip over the pond, but I should really go back to it. Had a v. successful retail therapy session this afternoon (I had a voucher that needed spending before tomorrow and got a couple of tops for half-price, and a pair of trousers for less than $20).
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm just dropping in for a quick cup of Earl Grey before Evensong, then we're heading over to Blighty this evening.

I'll try and call in while I'm away, but it'll be on my mother-in-law's laptop, and I hate laptops.

At this point, I'm (obviously) racking what passes for my brain to think of what I might have forgotten to pack ... [Paranoid]
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
This weekend has been the weekend of me falling over - yesterday I slipped on the floor which was wet since a man had been doing things to the radiator (and our landlord came by to see if I was ok a while later! With tasty wine!) and then today I was crossing the road when I tripped over the kerb and fell flat and grazed both my knees. Mr marzipan was much amused as I haven't had grazed knees so bad since I was about twelve or so (luckily we were shopping so we could buy me some plasters)
Anyway I dare say I'll heal pretty quickly but for now my knees are feeling pretty sorry for themselves
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I've found that as you get older you are less bothered about grazes on the knees because the pain in the joints distracts you. A few years ago I slipped whilst chasing my toddler son and was so in tears with the pain in my arthritic knees that I didn't notice the broken wrist until 2 hours later...
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I was away Saturday night seeing friends, the first two hotels I tried were both full up but I found a really nice one just opposite the local District Jail - it was super! Not the cheapest but great rooms and in the evening, when it was bucketing down with rain, the restaurant was passable as well - apart from not having the tandoori going so no garlic naan!

[Waterworks]

I made do with some very fresh chapati instead to go with my Paneer Butter Masala and my Dal Tadka.

And the ice cream afterwards was good too - limited flavours but they had both Vanilla and Butterscotch, the ones that matter the most, so I was a happy [and dry] bunny.

My room didn't overlook the jail but I could see it from the lounge area near the lifts and it looked a bit grim; I preferred the room I was in.

Travelling back on the train yesterday I was realising again how gorgeous this place is and how lucky I am to live here. Long may it continue.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
I've found that as you get older you are less bothered about grazes on the knees because the pain in the joints distracts you. A few years ago I slipped whilst chasing my toddler son and was so in tears with the pain in my arthritic knees that I didn't notice the broken wrist until 2 hours later...

ow ow ow ow ow.... I really feel for you, HA. Some years ago I ran in to the conservatory on my way to answer the phone, tripped, went down on my kneecaps on the ceramic tiled floor ow ow ow ow ow [Waterworks] Miss S had to persuade me to get to my feet, or I might be lying there howling yet [Waterworks]

(and that was not one of the three occasions when I broke a wrist!)

So, I feel your pain, marzipan and HA (())

Mrs. S, sympathetic for once
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Somwhat stressful day here - we've had interviews at my school for a new headteacher. I was only involved in a minor way, but still had a banging headache by 2pm. Here's to hoping they choose the right person.

Other than that, a lovely weekend at my sister's, for my niece's dedication, only slightly marred by public transport nightmares on Sunday evening - a part of the journey that should take 30 minutes took over two hours. Happy days...
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Piglet, I had no idea you could hijack an iceberg!


[Eek!]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Public transport, gah. I was just about to leave the office this evening, checked the timetables and found that my train had been dropped from the new summer timetable, and I would have a 40 minute wait and miss my connection. Total time taken to get home would be c. 2h+, minimum.

At this point the zip on my handbag then fell apart which didn't really make my evening either. I liked that bag and it hadn't even had that much use.

Still, look on the bright side. I received a lovely surprise gift of chocolate in the post this morning. Admittedly when I opened it, it had clearly been near a source of intense heat and melted and bubbled out of shape and recognition, but the bits I salvaged were pretty good. And I guess I get to go shopping for a new handbag.

[ 18. May 2015, 18:22: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Our new parish priest turned up yesterday. Seems like a very nice on-the-ball man with a line in uplifting sermons.

Apparently on moving into the presbytery he put up his own sets of shelves and then asked if the deacon wanted a cup of coffee. Unheard of [Eek!]
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
Put the late Mr Bee's father's bungalow on sale last Wednesday and have had 3 offers already.
We realise so much can go wrong and Mr Bee refuses to celebrate yet, but I am feeling most cheered!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Not just vodka, Nicodemia - they make GIN as well, and very nice it is too. That may even be the iceberg we saw last week (or the one we couldn't see for the fog).

We've made it across the Pond, and wonder what possessed the builders of Terminal 2 at Heathrow to put the baggage reclaim in a different time-zone from where the plane actually lands. Things were not improved by the taxi driver getting stuck in traffic on the M25 and arriving four hours late. We whiled away some of the time by having breakfast in a Weatherspoon's in the departure concourse upstairs, and it was quite good, but not in the same league as the cafe in Morrison's supermarket in Berwick-upon-Tweed, and twice the price.

However, now safely ensconced and looking forward to a spot of Retail Therapy this afternoon.

eta: I'm off to join the airport rant in Hell now ... [Devil]

[ 19. May 2015, 12:46: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Welcome, Piglet, enjoy your stay. Hope the further travelling goes more smoothly.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Our new headteacher was announced (to staff) today. I couldn't be happier with the panel's choice [Yipee] and it's such a relief to finally have certainty for next academic year.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
This weather is barking mad. I went shopping in bright sunshine at lunchtime, spent 5 minutes in a shop and emerged to a tropical downpour. Got soaked, went into another shop and came out to a windy but sunny day. Went back to the office and watched a hailstorm bounce off the cars and set the hazard lights of one of them off before the weather sprites got bored and changed the settings to warm and sunny for the next quarter of an hour.

I now have a replacement camera, anyway. A replacement handbag will be my next project at the weekend, which may be slightly longer than expected if the proposed rail strike goes ahead on Tuesday.
 
Posted by Roseofsharon (# 9657) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
watched a hailstorm bounce off the cars

That hailstorm had me dashing outside with a tea-tray to provide emergency protection over the pot of baby lettuces on the patio. I thought they were going to be flattened!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Roseofsharon:
That hailstorm had me dashing outside with a tea-tray to provide emergency protection over the pot of baby lettuces on the patio. I thought they were going to be flattened!

What a great picture that conjures up! (and admiration for such care for baby lettuces - good thing you were in!)

[Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Happy Birthday Gypsy - one year old today!

Happy birthday to Gem, Gena, Gin, Goldy, Gromit, Guy, and Gyp too!

She very much enjoyed her sardine birthday cake.

[Smile]

We have just had 'the call', Gypsy goes to Big School on the 9th June. She is joining the Leeds team. We will be making the most of the next 3 weeks xx
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Oh Boogie...

But - glass half full person - when will the next pup arrive?
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
Boogie, Gypsy (and Tatze) -- What a bittersweet time for all of you. You've had a wonderful year, and now Gypsy has a new future.
[Tear]

Looking forward to hearing about and seeing your new little girl.
[Smile]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Boogie - thinking of you and Gypsy and Tatze and all the family. What a wonderful year you've had together. What a gift you're giving to someone. What a gap there'll be in your household. Hope you have a precious time together for the next three weeks.

I am running on full throttle at work with a colleague away on leave, but took some time out this afternoon to have coffee with a friend.

Nen - not entirely sure which way is up.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
... when will the next pup arrive?

Very soon after June 22nd. It's my son's wedding on the 20th so I will be busy that weekend.

I have asked for another yellow girl, but Mr Boogs has asked for a black girl - so we will see!

[Smile]

I have enormously mixed feelings, the main ones being pride and sadness. With quite a tinge of excitement about the new pup + guilt about that as Gypsy hasn't even left us yet!

I will be heartbroken when she goes, but she was never mine and is off to do what she was born for. Also, it won't be like that final trip to the vet as she will be more than fine. I have seen the big dogs at school - they absolutely love it!

All my sadness will be self centred and, hopefully soon dealt with. I have booked a five day holiday in Lisbon, Portugal with my girl friend - leaving the day after she leaves, so no time to mope.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I hope the transfer goes well Boogie [Smile]

I'm on the last stretch of an essay about research paradigms, just a couple of hours work to go now. Then I need to write a tutorial on revision technique for tomorrow (my co-tutor who I had hoped would assist in this as she is supposed to be teaching with me appears to have gone awol and is not answering her email [Confused] )
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Going on holiday right afterwards sounds like a very good plan, Boogie - by the time you get back and have your suitcases put away, the new puppy will almost be with you.

Hugs and best of luck to Gypsy as she starts her training. [Smile]

We've had that rain/sun/rain scenario here in Essex today too; we went down to Frinton for a spot of lunch and it didn't really know whether it was going to chuck it down from the heavens or not.

I'd better go, as supper seems to be being prepared around me, and if I don't get out of the way I may get trodden on ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Off to face the bureaucrats this morning and possibly facing a fine [which I have known about for ages and am happy to pay] for a late submission of this time's papers. They are nice folks but, rather like going to the dentist, I am always anxious beforehand. Then back to do the exam results for the kids - and glad the printer is mended so I am give them decent, legible copies.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Hope all goes well, WW. I know the feeling you describe.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Good luck WW.
I had lovely plans for today, as I have finished my essay and am not teaching until this evening I thought I might have a stroll into town, look around the botanical gardens and have lunch there with a book. I woke up to a lovely sunny morning just right for a walk. Only now I have a 10 year old at home feeling sick [Frown]
I might have to content myself with some gardening.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Told very clearly that I have do my online submission today and go back tomorrow, the last day of my current residence extension to discuss everything. I also act as online result getter for the area so it looks like being a busy afternoon.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Good luck, Wodders.

D. probably needs a spot of good luck today too; his concert includes a Commissioned Work which, not to put too fine a point on it, is the biggest load of elephant-poo we've ever heard: the sort of farts-and-squeaks stuff that was fashionable about 30 or 40 years ago. I grew up attending the St. Magnus Festival in Orkney, which showcased a lot of that sort of b*ll*cks, so I'm fairly immune to it, but it's really not a very pretty piece. It also features electronic sounds which appear to have been produced via a laptop, and at one point it sounds as if someone's switched on a Hoover ...

D. is of course, playing it beautifully, but the audience aren't going to know that. [Eek!]

At least they won't be able to tell if there are any wrong notes. [Killing me]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I'm going to be a Good Boy and not post a link to the composer description of said work. Reading it does, one has to say, may it sound just a little bit pretentious. On the other hand, it may be a work of pure genius. It does sound - and this is being more serious - that it is location-specific and won't travel well; "occasional" in the old-fashioned sense of the word.

An organist of my acquaintance may well be at one of the two performances, more probably tonight's; if he is, I shall ask for his Considered Opinion. Mind you, knowing that he likes composers such as Bach, John Stanley, S.S. Wesley and J.B. Dykes, I think it won't be too hard to guess what that Opinion might be ...
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I grew up attending the St. Magnus Festival in Orkney, which showcased a lot of that sort of b*ll*cks.

You're not a fan of Peter Maxwell Davies' "Eight Songs for a Mad King", then? [Devil] To be honest, I saw it performed in a semi-staged performance about 12 years ago and - despite the extreme atonality - I thought it was rather good and was glad to have gone. PMD's later compositions are easier on the ear though!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:


At least they won't be able to tell if there are any wrong notes. [Killing me]

But they may suspect the use of the wrong instruments.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
My friend, although not particularly liking the piece, found it "interesting for its sheer ingenuity". So I think that's a modified thumbs-up!

By the way, I don't think the "sounds" Piglet mentioned came from a Hoover, I would think that they're more likely to have emanated from a Paxman diesel engine, possibly the kind fitted in High Speed Trains.

[ 22. May 2015, 08:29: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Today I did my last telephone tutorial of the academic year - hooray! Just 2 more weeks of work to go now.
This evening we are off to the local theatre to see The Importance of Being Earnest. David Suchet is playing Lady Bracknell and the boys are big fans of his Poirot :lol:
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
We are now in what is called Summer here, in other words the hottest few days/weeks of the year when it is definitely not Piglet friendly and even I feel a tad uncomfortable. Ceiling fans are on a higher settings than normal - and, as soon as the weather breaks, will be switched off again for a month or six, depending on the adequacy, or otherwise, of the monsoons [we get two of them here, which is rather fun].

In other news we have been and seen the bureaucrats - they were helpful and pleasant thus calming down the close-to-panic I was in when we got there. In a few weeks the police will come and interview me again then a few weeks later I should get a call-back for my endorsements and then come September I should be able to start the process for the indefinite right to remain stuff - which will be a manifold blessing!

It's been a long journey!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Fatality on the railway line this evening so no trains. I took the bus to town instead, which then got stuck in a traffic jam necessitating a diversion by a circuitous route, which was also filling up nicely with its own traffic jam. Time taken to get home, 2.5h.

Apparently even though the rail strike isn't now going ahead, the train company has still cancelled services on the Tuesday anyway.

Consolation: office cake sale for charity, where someone had made quite the most delicious chocolate and Guinness cake I've ever sampled. If you get the proportions right, it doesn't taste of beer, but has a lovely richness and almost chocolate fudge consistency without being too sweet.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
You're not a fan of Peter Maxwell Davies' "Eight Songs for a Mad King", then?

Actually, yes I am - it's a very clever piece, if somewhat disturbing. The point is, Max is a genius, but I'm not so sure about Unnamed Composer. Having said that, she seemed very pleased with the whole thing, and the audience cheered to the rafters, even if they were a bit puzzled.

If you can make it, come along to the repeat concert on Sunday afternoon and you can judge for yourself. [Big Grin]

Had a nice lazy, recovering sort of day today - we had lunch in a pub in Rowhedge and I spent most of the afternoon dozing off.

Planning to go to Cambridge tomorrow for a King's fix. [Yipee]

[ 22. May 2015, 21:01: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Hope you enjoy Cambridge, Piglet [Smile]

I'm relieved that it's the half term break this week, especially after a stressful week - I know it's been bad when I have a low-grade migraine rumbling on for three and a half days! Fortunately I seem to be over that now. Which is just as well because even though we have a week off school, there is so much to do, mostly notably report writing. It never ceases to amaze me how long it ends up taking. Add to that planning to be done for next half term, and I don't see it being terribly restful!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We always enjoy a trip to Cambridge - there's something very uplifting about hearing the best choir on the planet singing wonderful music in such a beautiful place.

And the retail therapy and restaurants aren't half bad ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Where will you eat in Cambridge?
The play was great fun last, beautifully acted and David Suchet a lovely Lady Bracknell.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Hello all - I don't post often but enjoy reading what everyone is up to. I want to give a Big Shout Out to Mr D who did this year's tax forms for us. He is a big star like that.
We are off to this hotel/restaurant tonight: Hotel Radio to stay and to pig out in the restaurant. It's to celebrate our 30th Wedding Anniversary.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Ooh... I totally want to eat there.

I particularly fancy a dessert that involves "Le Café Arabica, le Calvados et le Chocolat Bahibé" ...

Fun morning spent trying on summer sandals and embarking on the quest for the perfect summer handbag. I'm sure it must be easy to find a reasonably priced bag in a style and colour I like, no?

I remain optimistic.
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
Today not really the day I was expecting it to be, we're buying a house and we were supposed to get keys last week so that we could move our stuff today... However we didn't manage to close the sale last week since our bank is apparently staffed by idiots (anyway our solicitor hasn't got the money yet) so instead we had a fairly lazy day wandering around town and meeting up with some friends... On the plus side, the marriage referendum got a yes vote :-) and the friend we met up with had come home from dublin so that he could vote.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Oo, I hope the house sorts out soon, marzipan.

I took advantage of the good weather yesterday to spend some time in the garden. I'm growing wild flower seeds where the unsuccessful vegetable plot was last year, and they are all sprouting really well. [Yipee]

In church this morning we were all invited to voice a prayer of thanksgiving if we felt we wanted to. I refrained from thanking God for the yes vote to gay marriage in Ireland; I didn't think that would go down too well in my con-evo church. [Biased]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I doubt it would, Nenya! I have left my fundie evo church now, but I can imagine a long and ranting sermon today on how wrong it all is. They never failed to make their views known from the front on such subjects!

One reason I am not there any more!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Had a really nice day yesterday - ploughman's lunch in a pub in Suffolk on the way to Cambridge, nice wander round in the sunshine, pretty darned good Evensong. The place was packed - we were queued right round the Quad to the porter's lodge. Wish Evensong at home had that effect ... [Big Grin]

As it happened, when we left King's we weren't quite hungry enough to do justice to dinner, so we went to Bury St. Edmunds, and by the time we got there we were. We tried to get into Côte, but they were fully booked, so we went to Café Rouge instead, and it was quite simply heavenly.

We started by sharing a bread platter with tapenade, olives and seriously good butter, then D. had perfectly roasted chicken, and I had excellent confit de canard with green beans and gratin daupinoise.

With a shared cheeseboard and a bottle of dry white wine, it was thoroughly splendid, and so much better than anything we can get at home.

D's second run at the concert today was well-attended, and the audience v. appreciative, so all has gone really well. Up to London tomorrow and home on Tuesday.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by daisydaisy:
... I've a week before I need to wear it which gives me time to resew the dress.

If re-sewing it is an option, could you have got some lightweight black fabric and made the dress yourself?
It was an option, but the only black fabric in the whole of the nearby Big City was plain polyester and looked nasty. Plus I've no confidence in the sizing on sewing patterns - I've lost count of the number of times I've got to the fitting stage only to find the garment is too big (armholes can't be reduced) or too small. And this is when I've checked and double checked the sizing of the pattern pieces. I already have about 3 dress-lengths waiting for me to pluck up courage with. My next step is to make a pattern myself, but I don't have time for this one.
So undoing & resewing is fine this time.

Well, I can confirm I have definitely lost confidence in my ability to use dress patterns. I spent the afternoon adjusting a pattern and making up what can only be described as a potato sack. I might be able to salvage the skirt part, but the bodice is a lost cause.

Tomorrow I shall shut the door on it all and enjoy a day away from it.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Don't despair, daisydaisy. I had not sewn much for years apart from some very successful lounge pants from a pattern enclosed in a craft book. when I moved to my own place I was looking forward to sewing again.

I bought some material and the proper size pattern for a round, slightly scooped sleeveless dress.

As you said, a sack of potatoes. There was next to no shaping, no darts. What surprised me more was that instructions said for both neck and armholes to just fold a hem and stitch. Can't remember the brand of pattern but it was what I would consider reputable in the past. I was expecting a pattern for a facing for neck and arms and instructions to use at least interfacing on it. It turned me off sewing again as pattern will need several adjustments. or improvements, to my mind.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
... we went to Café Rouge instead, and it was quite simply heavenly...

Do you fly out of Terminal 4? When I have in the past I have usually had a meal at the Café Rouge there and have always found it rather pleasant - and infinitely preferable to eating on the plane! They do very good omelettes.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Back from Girl Guide Camp - joint County one with lots of divisions and sub-camps. Our Guide unit shared our sub-camp with another Guiding Unit from a nearby town, sleeping overnight in tents on Friday and Saturday nights.

It's tiring. We start with erecting the mess tent and our leaders' tents on Thursday night. The last one pretty much in the dark. Sunday afternoon means taking everything down other than the girls' tents, which we theoretically leave them to do, and packing up around the rain showers. The final hurrah is returning kit to the district store last night. (Kit gets bought and shared between the 3 Brownie, 2 Rainbow, 2 Guide and 1 Senior Section units in town.) Those 4 or 6 man tents aren't dainty and the mess tent takes two adults to carry the bag. Theoretically, because I had to help the girls from one tent get theirs down and when I looked around to see how the more experienced tent were getting on, the young leaders and leaders from the other unit were taking it down, with the help of one of the girls, the others having drifted off to who knows where.

The Guide Leaders from both units, who could take days off midterm, spent Friday afternoon setting up the stoves in the mess tent, erecting the young leaders' tent and receiving the food delivery. I walked in, still in work gear, just before the girls arrived.

We, Guide Leader and me, were on kitchen duties all weekend, plus general camp duties of manning the Bouncy Castle and our own sub-camp activities. There was also the joy of unofficial toilet duty. Every time we visited the (primitive) block we had to flush all the toilets as the girls weren't managing it.

Today I feel the need to sprawl and do little, but I've got standing tickets to As You Like It at the Globe tonight. Although the second load of washing has finished and I need to hang that out.

I only made this camp because I had half term to recover afterwards. Last year I got as far as planning the camp and putting up the mess tent on Thursday night, muttering I didn't feel very well. It later transpired I had pneumonia.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Piglet, I'm glad Cambridge was just as lovely as you'd hoped [Smile]

Curiosity, I hope half term is sufficient to recover from Guide camp. I always feel slightly guilty that I don't have a camp license for my Guide unit, but given the amount of work involved, I really don't think I'm up to taking them away.

I had a pleasant Pentecost yesterday - a joint Parish service in the morning, then a Deanery picnic in the afternoon. The picnic was slightly spoiled by a few showers, which probably also put some people off, but overall it was good fun.

I'm certainly pleased that it's half term, as it means a break from teaching - but it's in no respects a week off. The task this week is reports, reports, reports. Just for once I'd like to have them done before we go back to school! Fingers crossed...
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
County is offering some camps for girls without leaders. We've got one girl signed up for the next one, but if she's anything like she's been this weekend she's going to have a very rough time.

Half term for me isn't off either. I have a meeting for a student tomorrow, loads of resources to write and I've offered a revision day for another student on Wednesday, Thursday or Friday. He starts his GCSEs next week. But work doesn't start again until tomorrow, I'm not being guilted into working today.

Reports for us go out termly and I know the Easter ones haven't gone out - because I've only seen half of them to check. We have to write fortnightly reports and I'm asking for fortnightly planning too. And I know most of the last lot wasn't done because they no longer come to me and the lack of feedback means the tutors aren't playing any more.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Don't despair, daisydaisy. I had not sewn much for years apart from some very successful lounge pants from a pattern enclosed in a craft book. when I moved to my own place I was looking forward to sewing again.

I bought some material and the proper size pattern for a round, slightly scooped sleeveless dress.

As you said, a sack of potatoes. There was next to no shaping, no darts. What surprised me more was that instructions said for both neck and armholes to just fold a hem and stitch. Can't remember the brand of pattern but it was what I would consider reputable in the past. I was expecting a pattern for a facing for neck and arms and instructions to use at least interfacing on it. It turned me off sewing again as pattern will need several adjustments. or improvements, to my mind.

Sixty-five years ago when I started sewing, I didn't follow all the instructions because they struck me as unnecessary. I got away with most of my shortcuts. Nowadays I wouldn't dream of simply following the instructions and not adding things. The resulting garment would look awful.

Moo
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
I doubt it would, Nenya! I have left my fundie evo church now, but I can imagine a long and ranting sermon today on how wrong it all is. They never failed to make their views known from the front on such subjects!

One reason I am not there any more!

I feel I do need to say a warm and positive word about my church as there has never, in my hearing at least, been anything long and ranty about it and while the Defend Marriage petition was around briefly before the vote was taken a while back, it was not advocated from the front and it was known that the minister wouldn't sign it.

*skips briskly away from Deceased Equine*

Domestics today and Nenlet2 and son in law are coming for a meal this evening. He's a teacher so has the coming week to work at home [Biased] but the rest of us have a very busy week to look forward to.

Nen - trying not to spend too much time on the Ship. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Curiosity, I feel for you. I've read your hell post, and sympathise. I've helped on a St. John Cadet camp, and have experienced the sort of little darling you talk about - the sort who gets quite upset that she can't use her hair straighteners on a camp in the middle of a field. It reallty does make you wonder!
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I find it hard to imagine David Suchet as Lady Bracknell, but I did a Lent course this year, and it was a CD with 3 contributors Justin Welby, Wendy Beckett, and David Suchet. I found David Suchet far the most interesting of the three.
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
Curiosity, when I used to go to Guide camp, we never had flush toilets of any sort, let alone a bouncy castle! though we are talking 55 or so years ago.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Nice little improvised treat yesterday. On account of recent wedding we are Broke™ and can’t afford days out that we have to pay for. But I wanted to go out and do something fun on the public holiday so went trawling google in search of free entertainment.

I found that there was going to be a concert recording at Radio France. Their big symphonic concerts you have to pay for but they have other smaller events that are free. So we went to the recording of the “Pleasures of the String Quartet” programme. We hadn’t reserved but we decided to take our chances and when we arrived there was still space left. It was a young quartet playing some monstrously hard Beethoven and Schubert. They were awesome.

We’re definitely going to do this again. Just round the corner from us (we walked home), and completely free.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Brilliant! That sounds blissful, lver!
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
Having had a (mostly) nice quiet weekend, I'm now back in w*rk. At least it's a 4-day week.

I was deserted by Sandemaniac in favour of a cricket trip to the Netherlands, and he should have been landing at Harwich this morning. For a good reason, his carload missed the ferry last night. [Waterworks] So, hopefully they've got onto the daytime sailing, will land about 10pm today, and I'll see him tomorrow evening when we both get home from w*rk. Even a 4-day week isn't making me feel much better today thanks to that!
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Back from Girl Guide Camp - joint County one with lots of divisions and sub-camps. Our Guide unit shared our sub-camp with another Guiding Unit from a nearby town, sleeping overnight in tents on Friday and Saturday nights.

It's tiring. We start with erecting the mess tent and our leaders' tents on Thursday night. The last one pretty much in the dark. Sunday afternoon means taking everything down other than the girls' tents, which we theoretically leave them to do, and packing up around the rain showers. The final hurrah is returning kit to the district store last night. (Kit gets bought and shared between the 3 Brownie, 2 Rainbow, 2 Guide and 1 Senior Section units in town.) Those 4 or 6 man tents aren't dainty and the mess tent takes two adults to carry the bag. Theoretically, because I had to help the girls from one tent get theirs down and when I looked around to see how the more experienced tent were getting on, the young leaders and leaders from the other unit were taking it down, with the help of one of the girls, the others having drifted off to who knows where.

The Guide Leaders from both units, who could take days off midterm, spent Friday afternoon setting up the stoves in the mess tent, erecting the young leaders' tent and receiving the food delivery. I walked in, still in work gear, just before the girls arrived.

We, Guide Leader and me, were on kitchen duties all weekend, plus general camp duties of manning the Bouncy Castle and our own sub-camp activities. There was also the joy of unofficial toilet duty. Every time we visited the (primitive) block we had to flush all the toilets as the girls weren't managing it.

Today I feel the need to sprawl and do little, but I've got standing tickets to As You Like It at the Globe tonight. Although the second load of washing has finished and I need to hang that out.

I only made this camp because I had half term to recover afterwards. Last year I got as far as planning the camp and putting up the mess tent on Thursday night, muttering I didn't feel very well. It later transpired I had pneumonia.

If it is so tiring, why do Guiding? I was a Scouter (still am) active with the kids for 20 years in Cubs and Scouts with the odd pinch hit in Beavers. Your experience sounds normal for a multi-section, multi-unit camp.

Flush toilets? Bliss. Bouncy castle? [Eek!] Back in my day...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Gypsy is such a gentle dog. I saw her lying down, watching and gently nosing something on the ground. I thought it may be a bee, so I investigated. It was a baby bird with all its feathers but clearly too young to be out of the nest box. I popped it back in - I hope it stays there now!

[Smile]
 
Posted by Sipech (# 16870) on :
 
Had a lovely surprise while I was out walking on the South Downs on Saturday. I stopped for a drink on the Monarch's Way, just outside Brighton, and heard a little rustling sound behind me. I expected it to be a blackbird, going through the undergrowth, but as I turned around I saw the beautiful little face of a weasel staring back at me.

It had known I was there long before I was aware of its presence. It then darted back into the shrubs before returning about a minute later, just to check I was still there.

Wonderful things to find in the English countryside.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
The countryside is full of surprises, and small, sudden enchantments. I haven't forgotten the first time I came across a slow-worm, a magnificent piece of gleaming, living bronze. I'd no idea what it was at first, either.

Anyway, enjoyable morning in Stow on the Wold today. Fewer antique shops but more art galleries. Still full of artisan or Cotswold this, that or the other, and still full of cars. But am enjoying my artisan cake and Cotswold chocolate.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Gypsy is such a gentle dog. I saw her lying down, watching and gently nosing something on the ground. I thought it may be a bee, so I investigated. It was a baby bird with all its feathers but clearly too young to be out of the nest box. I popped it back in - I hope it stays there now!

[Smile]

[Axe murder]

She's a lovely dog, and will do well as someone's special helper and companion. (And you've obviously done a great job as her foster mom.)
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Gypsy is lovely! [Axe murder]

We did some gardening yesterday (something of an event) and a robin kept fluttering about, amazingly close. Sadly, the hay fever kicked in that afternoon, so that's me on antihistamines until about September. [Roll Eyes]

In fact, I've felt quite strange all day and plan to go to bed after Springwatch this evening.

Nen - hoping she isn't Coming Down With Something.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
The birds have all fledged!

I thought the one Gypsy found was too small to fly, but clearly not. Its parents must have thought I was loopy putting it back in the nest box. I was worried for them as the magpies were hanging round but I am glad to say they have all headed off for safety in the woods.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
If it is so tiring, why do Guiding? I was a Scouter (still am) active with the kids for 20 years in Cubs and Scouts with the odd pinch hit in Beavers. Your experience sounds normal for a multi-section, multi-unit camp.

Flush toilets? Bliss. Bouncy castle? [Eek!] Back in my day...

Because I'm desperately trying to keep some outside things going around a job that's burning me out, fast. I started the weekend exhausted after a tough half term trying to get qualification coursework completed and submitted for 10 students across nearly as many sites across London, and additional complications. The first day started early enough to deliver camping kit before teaching and leading a training session. Sorry I needed a safety valve.

And before I get someone else telling me I shouldn't complain about the day job - it's a promotion I've been manipulated into, not something I applied for or chose to do. I am only trying to hang in there to get these kids through their qualifications.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
... Do you fly out of Terminal 4?

Sadly not. The Air Canada flights used to go from Terminal 3, which has a lovely restaurant called something like Chez Gerard where we used to have breakfast before leaving, but last year they moved us to Terminal 2, which is a gigantic pain in the @®$€.

As I mentioned last week, you arrive in a different time-zone from your luggage, and when you're leaving, they don't put up the gate number until about 10 minutes before your check-in time, with a cheery reminder that the gate is fifteen minutes' walk away.

We managed to get a v. decent (if a bit overpriced) breakfast this morning, which was just as well, as the lunch provided en route was a strong contender for the worst aeroplane meal we'd ever had - pasta the texture of shoe-leather in a truly ghastly tomato and spinach sauce. Ugh.

I suppose it was a bit of a let-down after dinner on Sunday, when we managed to get into Côte Brasserie in St. Alban's (detour on the way to the hotel at Heathrow). If anything it was even more divine than Café Rouge had been. D. had chicken (again), with watercress and faultless frites followed by a v. good crème brûlée, and I had lamb shank with mustard mashed potatoes and buttered carrots followed by a cheeseboard (again).

I know it sounds a bit predictable, but it really is the sort of food we can't get over here unless we go to Saint Pierre.

Better tootle off now - back to w*rk tomorrow ... [Snore]
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Ready to start another day here - I seem to have fallen into quite a pleasant half term pattern of work work work in the mornings, then spending the afternoons visiting friends. There should probably be a bit more work happening, but at the same time things have been tricky recently, so a bit of relaxation is probably doing me some good.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonfruit:
... so a bit of relaxation is probably doing me some good.

I do so agree!

This morning I chose a new route for my morning walk and it worked out rather further than usual at about 75 minutes - and also there was a good 15-20 minutes on the main road which, even that early in the morning, is quite busy. I don't like breathing diesel fumes so that route is now off my list!

When I got home breakfast was about ready and then I had a very couple of hours back in bed.

I like sleep!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Hope all teachers here are finding half term refreshing. A lot of staff at my work are also on leave so I'm the one keeping office stuff going at present. [Biased]

Nen - feeling delicate this morning but grateful to be better than yesterday.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I'm feeling quite chilled but tired. My health regime allows me only one big social activity (ie dinner party or family get together) a week and so far I've done 4 over the weekend! Theatre trip on Friday, Eurovision dinner party on Saturday, family do on Monday and a friend's birthday tea yesterday. All of which were very lovely and enjoyable but too much socialising makes me tired which triggers my mania. But I seem to be coping well and I'm going to have a couple of lazy days before doing some study.
A bit of gardening today and I might walk to the botanical gardens for tea this afternoon if it stays sunny. If not a local walk.
My students have exams next week and my only workload this week is replying to their concerned emails and forum posts. Soon term will be over and I'll just have my own studies to occupy me.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Another morning in the churchyard, helping to clean up the memorial garden (it's been largely untended for at least a year, ever since a lump of stonework fell off the church and nearly brained a parishioner). It's just reinforced my determination that my ashes shall be scattered at sea! [Ultra confused]

(case in point - I threw away a basket full of baubles and dead holly leaves, bearing the label 'Merry Christmas!' [Projectile] and while that was probably the worst, it was by no means the only object left from Christmastime - it's nearly June, folks!)

Mrs. S, who seems to have acquired a second garden, or maybe allotment [Eek!]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Pete, where are you when we need you?

It was fish and chips for lunch today - or rather baked fish and saute potatoes and Herself had prepared enough for an army, let alone just the two of us!

I think it may well be Malabar Fish Curry for lunch tomorrow, I only managed between a third and a half of the fish but I did force myself to eat all the potatoes - and have regretted it since - they were delicious but potato really makes me sleepy and I slept most of the morning away. So this afternoon I walked down to the post, did some shopping, did some reading and now back online and also writing a letter at least 6 months overdue!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I can't tell you how happy, relieved, settled and all round pleased I feel this afternoon.

I went to visit Gypsy's 'Big School' this afternoon (with the excuse of delivering old towels and blankets I'd collected on speaking engagements) They could not have been more friendly. I met Gypsy's trainer and was shown where she will be during the day - in the office with her trainer. Only eight dogs are there so it's a very small school. The Manchester one has 80 dogs at any one time.

They gave me coffee and chatted of over half an hour while Gypsy got to know the other dogs.

My mind is at rest. Bring on the next puppy! I have asked for a yellow girl, Mr Boogs has asked for a black girl - so we will see!

[Angel]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
... Eurovision dinner party ...

Considering where the UK entry finished, I bet that was a laugh a minute. [Devil]

It must be over 30 years since I last watched Eurovision; I just Googled "British Entries" and the last one that looks at all familiar was One Step Further by Bardo in 1982. [Hot and Hormonal]

prehistoric piglet
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Glad that you feel happy about Gypsey's 'big school' Boogie. I bet they are used to concerned puppy walkers. It must be all to similar to letting go of your precious child their first day at school.
I'm on half-term and have had a lazy day so far, thoug I've just made a savoury cauliflower cake from an Ottolenghi recipe. It remains to be seen what it tastes like. I deliberatly made it when husband and son weren't around as I'm sure neither of them would have fancied the sound of it in the abstract!
Tomorrow I'll go swimming, hold me to it!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Boogie, perhaps they'll compromise on a brown pup.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Boogie, perhaps they'll compromise on a brown pup.

There are chocolate Guide Dogs - I know one called Ava - but very few, not sure why.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Chocolate labs are less common generally though, aren't they?

There's a local Guide Dog school round here, I see the dogs being walked by the pros and know a couple of the walkers (did a lot of work on their marriage when I was working in the church office). One of the dogs on training last week was a real mutt - Hairy Maclary style, but a reasonable size, not quite as big as a Labrador, more Cocker spaniel sized.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Chocolate labs are less common generally though, aren't they?

There's a local Guide Dog school round here, I see the dogs being walked by the pros and know a couple of the walkers (did a lot of work on their marriage when I was working in the church office). One of the dogs on training last week was a real mutt - Hairy Maclary style, but a reasonable size, not quite as big as a Labrador, more Cocker spaniel sized.

They use labradoodles now CK LabradorXPoodle

Look at these two beauties, due out to their puppy walkers next week (standard poodles). I'd love to get one of those to raise!

[Smile]

[ 27. May 2015, 18:53: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Briefly stopping off at my folks in East Anglia on the way back from even flatter flatlands to the East, who should I spot in the East Anglian Daily Times but our (and Piglet's) very own David Drinkell, with a truly magnificent organ on display!

AG
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I've had a thing about Standard Poodles ever since I read Steinbeck's Travels with Charley about 50 years ago - they are fabulous dogs.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
... Piglet's very own David Drinkell, with a truly magnificent organ on display ...

I've been married to an organist for over 25 years - do you think I'm not used to organ jokes?

[Snigger]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Glad you're feeling positive about Gypsy's next step, Boogie. [Smile]

WW - a walk and breakfast and then going back to bed sounds so lovely. I'm envious! Not that I normally want to go to bed in the mornings but I'm having a long week at work with pretty much everyone else on leave and feeling a bit under the weather too [Frown] .

Nen - sorry to moan. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Never knew poodles could be guide Dogs! Its a breed I could never quite take to - all that clipping into silly pom poms! But maybe if they were left to be dogs I could change my mind!

Glad you are happy about Gypsy's next step, Boogie - she is going to make someone a wonderful Guide Dog, I am sure.

If summer doesn't hurry and arrive up in this part of the UK I am going to emigrate!! [Biased]
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
we have a house! [Yipee]
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
Hooray for the Marzipan house!

I'm supposed to be using this half term break to get sorted for my house move once the students have finished, but other than doing two bin liners full of shredding, and buying some items to replace ones I've used here and which are on their last legs, ( brooms and dustpans and cleaning items) I seem remarkably unmotivated and just want to forget it all.

This is the longest spell in my adult life I've gone without moving house (6 years) and I appear to be gripped by a fear I've forgotten how to do it! On the other hand, I had remarkably little to give to the work's summer fete, so I'm vaguely optimistic I've not accumulated too much other than that which was necessary in my time in this house.

*toddles off for a snooze, all this thinking is Hard Work*

[ 28. May 2015, 10:58: Message edited by: Japes ]
 
Posted by marzipan (# 9442) on :
 
...yeah, we're not completely packed yet (it's hard to live out of boxes is my excuse)
since we're going from renting to buying though, we can have a few weeks overlap wile we shift stuff over (we're moving within the same city)
Though it will probably end with packing boxes madly at 2am in usual Marzipan fashion!
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I've been married to an organist for over 25 years - do you think I'm not used to organ jokes?

[Snigger]

But how could I resist such a golden opportunity? Besides, Colchester Moot Hall really does have a magnificent specimen of the breed.

AG
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I hope you're feeling better soon, Nenya, and can get a rest over the weekend.
Congrats on the house, marzipan.
I've just pottered around today, a little housework, a little gardening, a bit of work. I really should do some gardening now but am really not in the mood [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Congratulations on the house, marzipan, and good luck with the eventual move!

Nen, hope the rest of the week picks up, and that the weekend at least is restful.

I've got a fair amount of report writing done this morning - progress is definitely being made! Now on to the planning this afternoon - the history of the church in 5 RE lessons, anyone?
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:
Hooray for the Marzipan house!

Is that a bit like a gingerbread house? [Big Grin]

Happy new house, Marzipans - hope your move goes well. And yours, Japes - get packing!
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I have put together the essential, not to be lost sight of box of supplies, to be guarded with my life! (Coffee, kettle, teaspoons, toilet rolls, etc..)

I've a few weeks yet...
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by Japes:
Hooray for the Marzipan house!

Is that a bit like a gingerbread house? [Big Grin]

Happy new house, Marzipans - hope your move goes well. And yours, Japes - get packing!

I have a sudden craving for window cake aka Battenburg!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Battenburg [Projectile]

Gingerbread [Big Grin]

But neither is permitted. [Frown] I'm making yet another effort to lose some weight. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - glad that Friday is in sight.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Battenburg is probably a bit too sweet for me these days but Gingerbread, and just about anything with ginger in it, is wonderful!

Massive clouds the colour of a bruise this morning when I went for my walk, and a few spots of rain - now the sun is cracking the flags so I will risk a trip to The Big City for some light shopping and to meet some friends. Yes, I shall take an umbrella and a towel and wear the lightest clothes possible as they dry quicker.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Battenberg cake is one of the things we miss from home; we've never seen it in the shops here, not even in the international section.

And because we weren't thinking about it, we didn't have any when we were home last week. [brick wall]

Oh well, next time ... **sigh**
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I love Battenburg. Hm, I might consider making one but we are out of eggs as our hens have decided they're too old to lay. Perhaps a walk to Waitrose today?
Actually, I must go and look at the hens as one was looking a bit peaky yesterday.
 
Posted by Sipech (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tree Bee:
I have a sudden craving for window cake aka Battenburg!

Some of us live with that condition permanently. [Razz]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
I am so pleased to see Friday evening. [Yipee]

The mixture of sun and rain today has done wonders for my garden, saved me the job of watering and brought my wildflower seedlings on a treat.

Mr Nen is away so beans on toast for tea. I may also crack a bottle. [Biased]

Nen - preparing to put her feet up and try to recover from the week.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Oh Battenburg - a coffee shop here does a wonderful version which I can't resist.
I've had a ncie day catching up with a couple of friends and now catching up with my family.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
Nenya, make sure you empty the bottle before you crack it!

Didn't go to the city yesterday and I'm not going today - I decided that the last two days of the long school holiday means it might be a bit busy - I may go Monday instead so I can then go and visit a friend in hospital a bit further away.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I made orange and lemon Battenburg and it was very scrummy.
Today we are off punting on the Cam [Smile]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Mr Boogs is busy cycling from Amsterdam to Saltzburg. He has organised the trip this time. Two Australians, two Americans and two from the UK are on the 'team'. They are staying at youth hostels on the way, which is mostly down the Rhine. I envy them the views but not the cycling!

I've just returned from a lovely, sunny pooch walk round our favourite reservoir. Making the most of my last days with angel-in-fur Gypsy [Angel]

Now I have all sorts of house and garden work lined up - but can I be bovvered?

Oh, and my son's best man has asked for photos so I must get scanning, I picked them out last night - hope he uses the cheeky ones, hehe!
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
Nenya, make sure you empty the bottle before you crack it!

Fret not, WW. I can always be relied upon to empty the bottle. [Big Grin]

I saw a friend for coffee and chat this morning and cut all the lawns this afternoon. I now feel justified in watching Pride and Prejudice on the TV and having some time on the Ship.

Nen - planning a bottle of red later. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Oh, and my son's best man has asked for photos so I must get scanning, I picked them out last night - hope he uses the cheeky ones, hehe!

Is it wrong that I took a photo of the Elf Lass today and my first thought was "wedding reception" [Devil] (it was of her sitting on the potty reading her daddy's New Scientist magazine). I'm not going to share it elsewhere (I'm trying very hard to limit the number of pictures I put online of her, for example), but it's definitely one that I will have to remember should the time come that I'm called upon to provide cheeky photos.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Nen, hope you enjoy the bottle when the time comes. [Smile]

Fairly quiet couple of days here - I think I'm creating a bit of calm before the storm of the last half term of the year begins on Monday. It's going to be a busy one!
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Went to Charlecote Park (National Trust, near Stratford on Avon), this morning and found it absolutely packed. Apparently it had been on Countryfile, hence the interest. I've been a few dozen times before but had a look around again anyway. A bit of a potential problem with bees seeming very interested in one of the window frames and two making it inside. I pointed this out to one of the guides who took the view that you expect insects in the summer, but a Yorkshire couple backed me up and we swopped bee-swarm and wasp-nest anecdotes for a bit.

I was about to tell them the tale of how a friend and her family returned from holiday and commented that their daughter had drawn one of their bedroom curtains but not the other, then realized as they got closer that actually the "curtain" was a massive wasps nest, but the conversation had reached a natural pause so that anecdote must remain untold.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
... Today we are off punting on the Cam [Smile]

Now why couldn't you have done that last Saturday - we'd have given you a wave! [Big Grin]

I think we must be only now getting back into the right time-zone: we were at an early-evening do at the Deanery yesterday celebrating the Dean's daughter's graduation, and when we came home, we both zonked out on the sofa, not waking until the wee small hours. Having then had a decent night's sleep, I think we're just about getting there ... [Snore]

It was a nice, if not completely sunny day today, so we went for a drive down to Witless Bay and had our first lunch of the season in the Irish Loop Coffee House. The food was, as ever, excellent: D. had lentil loaf, and I had quiche Lorraine, both with salad, and then we both had bread-and-butter pudding (lemon for him, cinnamon and raisin for me).

As tomorrow is our curate's last day (he's been appointed rector of the local High Church shack), there's a turkey-and-salad lunch after the morning service, so a fairly large dish of potato salad has been created.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Another time, perhaps, Piglet [Smile] We have a punting season ticket so we like to go regularly, my other half used to do speed punting when he was at Oxford and as he punts from the 'wrong' end we often get banter from the guides when going down the backs. We usually go to Grantchester though as it is more peaceful for a picnic and more convenient for trying to teach my 14 year old to punt.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
We usually go to Grantchester though as it is more peaceful for a picnic and more convenient for trying to teach my 14 year old to punt.

And do you have honey for tea? [Smile]

A wild wet morning here, very different to yesterday, but the rain is Good For The Gardens. I have got tea and cereal and brought it back to bed.

Nen - feeling decadent.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Wild and wet here too, but we have had a lot of rain, and the gardens could do with some sun and warmth now.

Never satisfied, are we!

Still, the dog is looking at me, so its time to don waterproofs and wellies and brave the elements! [Eek!]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by Heavenly Anarchist:
We usually go to Grantchester though as it is more peaceful for a picnic and more convenient for trying to teach my 14 year old to punt.

And do you have honey for tea?

We had sushi bought from Waitrose! Grantchester is actually walking distance from my house in Trumpington so it always seems strange to punt there from Cambridge and then have to go back into town.
Trumpington has it's own lines in Brooke's poetry, along with the other local villages.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I have bought a piece of Battenberg from the supermarket, a while since I've had it but was inspired by the references here. I am guessing the spelling with e is the right one, as they called themselves Mountbatten here rather than Townbatten, but not 100% sure.

When Rugasaw and Pata le Bon visited England, I took Rusasaw to Cambridge while she was rehearsing with the choir, and he wanted to go on one of those guided punt trips along behind the colleges. The guide lost the pole on the way back, and had to ask another boat to retrieve it for him, so he for one shouldn't be giving anyone else any stick whichever end they are standing.

Judging from your posting style, Heavenly Anarchist, the language of Trumpington residents has improved somewhat since Rupert Brooke's day !
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
And the punt returning the pole was full of amateurs too - so many ways of embarrassing the guy paid to punt.

I found Battenberg in the supermarket too and remembered why I stopped eating it. I'm with WW on this ginger anything is better.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
My London grandmother always had a Battenberg as part of tea when we came to visit, and I associate it with her. I used to love it, though in recent years find it too sweet. But I find most shop-bought cakes and fruit pies are too sweet. When baking I usually reduce the sugar by at least an ounce to make it more palatable. And some fruit pies can be made without added sugar.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I sweeten baked apples and apple pies with dried fruit, sultanas works well, and no sugar from choice. I also started making rice pudding with coconut milk and dried fruit instead of sugar but haven't made it for ages.

I offer people hot drinks with caution as I often don't have sugar to sweeten them, as I don't put sugar in tea or coffee. (I probably only have honey or molasses in the kitchen at the moment, from using them in cooking - Thai sauces or honey glazes.)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Honey is much nicer in tea than sugar - a rounded and more mellow kind of flavour. I learnt that from some international students in my college days (can't remember whether it was a Dutch thing or not).

[ 31. May 2015, 17:08: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Honey in tea was an English thing in ancient times that died out. Shame really.

The traditional English hot drink, isn't that coffee? After all, tea was first consumed in coffee houses, so coffee must be earlier.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Mulled ale or cider, probably. It'll likely be some form of booze dating from those days when water wasn't safe to drink. And nothing like a cup of mulled something on a winter's night.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Both tea and coffee were drunk in 17th century England but the coffee house did come first and tea was introduced via the coffee house. But coffee houses were very male institutions and I guess it was the drinking of tea at home by women that turned it into our national drink, by the mid 18th century tea was more popular than coffee, I believe.
Up until then most people drank small ale, a weak beer. At the Kentwell Tudor re-creations we drink traditional small beer from the brewhouse, they often flavour it with herbs and it is very refreshing. We kept a jug of it in the dairy.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Yes, a red hot poker inserted into...

...sorry that was The Miller's Tale.

[To Ariel, cross post]

[ 31. May 2015, 17:52: Message edited by: balaam ]
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Yes, a red hot poker inserted into...

...sorry that was The Miller's Tale.

[To Ariel, cross post]

Chaucer's mill isn't there any more, it was in Trumpington.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
OK, that interested me so I went to look.

Wassail is the original name for mulled mead and cider and Geoffrey of Monmouth apparently describes wassailing in 1135 (as does Shakespeare). The tradition is thought to have been introduced by the Vikings. Lambswool is another version of mulled mead or cider that included apples. I have a recipe in a National Trust book of recipes, which references the University of Leeds Brotherton Library, for Lambswool using beer. That one can be dated to being in existence in Robert Herrick's Twelfth Night (1648).

Coffee arrived here in around 1583, according to wiki, and the first shops were established in 1654.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
... and if you look further back still, the Romans had "calidum", which was a hot drink made of wine, water and spices. Those long cold nights in Northern Europe probably sparked it off.

Looking further into that, apparently seawater was the water of choice. I kid you not. Pliny the Elder wrote a whole chapter on salted wines in his Natural History and mentioned a few other flavours too. The wine with resin still survives today as Greek retsina, but today's Trading Standards people might have something to say about the adulterations of the other ones (ground marble, pitch, brown earth, gypsum and lime...)
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
Yes, a red hot poker inserted into...

...sorry that was The Miller's Tale ...

... or possibly Edward II. [Eek!]

Mea culpa re the spelling of the cake - I got my bergs and my burgs mixed up. [Hot and Hormonal]

I think we gave Fr. J. a decent send-off today. I felt quite sorry for him when he made his speech thanking everyone - I think he's genuinely sad to be leaving us (and we'll miss him and his family), but I suppose clergy have to go where bishops put them.
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity Killed:
I offer people hot drinks with caution ...

Far fewer calories than sugar, eh? [Big Grin]

I don't know if I've related this story before, but when D. came over here for his interview for the job, he stayed with one of the basses in the choir, whose wife (also in the choir) was away visiting relatives. When D. asked for sugar for his tea, his host (who's a lovely chap but a bit of a dipstick) didn't know where it was kept and (presumably) didn't have the wit to try and find it.

Which is why D. no longer takes sugar in his tea ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Just found out that a brace of aunts are going to be visiting from far flung places. I'm doing my usual mental list of particularly English food to introduce them to and am now, due to Ship-inspiration, thinking of offering them a slice of Battenberg.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
And, I hope, roast beef with all the trimmings. [Smile]
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
The transition from the hottest days of the year to the [relative] cool of monsoon takes me unawares every year. Last week the ceiling fan was on all night, last night no fan and by the end of the week the blanket may well be back on the bed - it really is that quick.

It is also wonderful!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
Just found out that a brace of aunts are going to be visiting from far flung places. I'm doing my usual mental list of particularly English food to introduce them to and am now, due to Ship-inspiration, thinking of offering them a slice of Battenberg.

Given your location I would hope that Rhubarb Crumble would be well up the list.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Offhand, my "introduction to British food" staples are:

Toad in the hole (or Mole in the hole, as it is always referred to in our house)*
Crumble and proper English custard
Fried breakfast / bacon sandwiches
Bakewell tart
Coronation chicken (for occasions when cold food is required)
Jacket potatoes (with or without baked beans)
Chocolate digestive biscuits
Trifle
Christmas pudding, mince pies etc. at the right time of year

Fish and chips is another one you can go for but personally I’m terrified of deep fat frying.

The advent of Marks and Sparks in Paris also means that I can put out an English cheese platter (preferably with chutney/pickle for proper English effect) which goes down surprisingly well with the cheese snobby French.

*a result of my talent as a Yorkshire pudding maker, inherited from my grandmother, who was also the originator of the "mole" appellation. My predilection for Mole means that I don’t always head down the Roast beef route directly.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
When a certain shipmate from the other side of the pond visited for a couple of weeks we had a very English menu with something different each day - including fish & chips at a Harry Ramsdens and a Cornish pastie and cream tea while we visited Cornwall.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I believe that in some communities in Yorkshire the Yorkshire Pudding is eaten first with gravy as a sort of starter - the idea seems perfectly reasonable to me.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
I believe that in some communities in Yorkshire the Yorkshire Pudding is eaten first with gravy as a sort of starter - the idea seems perfectly reasonable to me.

It's not unknown for Yorkshire Pudding to appear as starter, then as part of the main course, and finally as pudding with jam & custard or golden syrup. Few seem to object.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
I'm not surprised, it sounds pretty good to me.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Though I did see an advert on a pub/hotel the other day which was advertising its 'famous all you can eat breakfast' with a picture of bacon, eggs, black pudding, beans etc and yorkshire pud.

That was a first for me.

M.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
The transition from the hottest days of the year to the [relative] cool of monsoon takes me unawares ...

The transition from winter to summer is a bit like that here; spring is usually a Tuesday afternoon in mid/late May. This year was no exception: when we left for England on 17th May the temperatures were in single digits (and not particularly big ones at that), and when we came back on the 26th, leaves had appeared on the trees and the temperature was 23°*. [Eek!]

Admittedly that didn't last, but I'm still a sock-free zone and I think spring must have been the Tuesday we were away.

* Centigrade, Wodders. When the pilot said that was the temperature as we landed, we thought either (a) he was having a Fahrenheit moment; or (b) we'd mis-heard him. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
SO excited [Yipee] I'm being taken to a GIN Festival, Piglet! In GINchester, even!

It's even better in that I'm being paid for as a thank-you for making some cushion covers for a dear friend - and I haven't even got the material yet [Killing me]

Mrs. S, Completely Beside Herself
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
The rellies don't eat pork or beef which sadly cuts out roast beef, 90% of sausages, black pudding amongst other things.

Maybe rhubarb in a Yorkshire Pudding accompanied by a GIN and tonic [Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
The rellies don't eat pork or beef ...

Perfect excuse for roast lamb*, then. [Smile]

I've had a moderately productive sort of day: I made a couple of ciabattas (they're usually D's speciality - this was my first try) and dismantled the last of a chicken for D. to turn into sandwiches for tomorrow's lunch, and then in a fit of goddessishness even did a spot of ironing.

No wonder I dozed off on the sofa ... [Big Grin]

* not that one needs an excuse for roast lamb.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I admit that I’ve never tried it, but I am given to believe that vegetarian mole in the hole is not unpleasant. It’s the Yorkshire pudding that matters. I have seen Yorkshire pudding served with roast chicken on occasion, which is kind of heresy, but if they don’t eat beef might be worth it.

I can’t believe I forgot cream tea in my previous list of British delicacies. I have never made scones that didn’t go down like a house on fire. You can even get clotted cream here these days (once again, courtesy of Marks and Sparks).
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
When I was 17 and worked in a kitchen of an old people's home we regularly made 'chopped toad' - toad in the hole made with de-boned lamb chops. It was cooked in a round dish with the chops presented as a cartwheel.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
During the war/rationing years, when I was a girl, my mother would mince what was left of the weekend joint (not much!) and mix it with Yorkshire batter mix (dried egg, and possibly dried milk) and bake it in a big flat tin.

My sister and I fought for the scrapings round the tin. It was our favourite meal. Thinking back, my mother was a great cook and so good at making things stretch!
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... vegetarian mole in the hole ...

I'm intrigued - do you fill the Yorkshire pudding with veggies and some sort of veggie sauce instead of sausages and gravy?

A-in-E - assuming your location doesn't render it heretical (or possibly even traitorous), what about Lancashire hot-pot? [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
We went to a lovely old Norfolk pub on Saturday: the "Ostrich" In Castle Acre (it's not quite so immaculate as the website photos suggest). My wife had what she declared to be the best Toad in the Hole of her life: good and meaty local sausages on a bed of creamy mash all inside a huge circle of crispy batter. She graciously allowed me to try a bit: it was good!
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... vegetarian mole in the hole ...

I'm intrigued - do you fill the Yorkshire pudding with veggies and some sort of veggie sauce instead of sausages and gravy?

I often put roasted veggies in the bottom of a Yorkshire pudding (squash, peppers etc) ie I pour the Yorksire batter on the veggies.
 
Posted by Welease Woderwick (# 10424) on :
 
That sounds delicious, I must give it a try.
 
Posted by moonfruit (# 15818) on :
 
Mmm, Toad in the Hole is one of my favourites, although with living on my own I tend to go for the frozen ones, with baked beans of course!

WW, my dad used to make a vegetarian Toad in the Hole when my sister was going through a vegetarian phase as a teenager; it was delicious!

Report writing is an ongoing chore over here in teacher-land; I dread to think how many hours I spend on them altogether. And with another teacher in the school off sick for an indeterminate period, we're faced with having to write reports for her class as well. [Ultra confused]

On the plus side, a meeting that I was rather nervous about last night went much better than I expected, for which I'm very grateful. [Smile]

[ 03. June 2015, 18:13: Message edited by: moonfruit ]
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
If I ever have to pass a test to prove that I am English, I do hope that it does not involve eating a cream tea, which I doubt if I could manage. Scones are fine, but cream no, the fattiness of it is like being asked to eat a big slab of butter. I would struggle to swallow it.

I love trifle but I scrape the cream off the top of it ! Strangely though I like cheese which is mostly fat.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
I approve of the idea of your Gin Festival.

In the late 1970s some old Rugbeians founded a club called The Campaign for Real Gin - I think it came about when Gordon's reduced the strength of its standard product from 40° to 37°. Whatever, various events took place over the years and respectable sums were raised for charity.

Special events at the 10th and 20th anniversaries included things like a CRG stakes at Towcester races, a garden party at the HAC in City Road, and Juniper balls at the Waldorf. So successful were these that enough was raised to fund a lifeboat - The Spirit of Juniper which is based at Littlehampton.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
The rellies don't eat pork or beef which sadly cuts out roast beef, 90% of sausages, black pudding amongst other things.

Maybe rhubarb in a Yorkshire Pudding accompanied by a GIN and tonic [Smile]

Jewish Hindus? Can't be many of them around. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Well roast does not have to be beef. Roast lamb, with mint and cranberry sauce, roast potatoes gravy, beans, carrots is still and English Roast dinner.

There is Shepherd's Pie, Stew and dumplings, strawberries and cream.

Now you could serve Manchester Tart which was a staple of school dinners in your area of the world when I was a kid although we did not call it that.

Of course you have the option of taking them to try real Bakewell Pudding.

Jengie
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
moonlitdoor - I'm with you on the cream, and the thought of cream in coffee is pretty revolting too. I spent a long time adding dairy milk to tea and cereal, eating cheese and biscuits with salad for lunch for me but cooking lactose-free around my daughter. Nowadays I can't do cream sauces either - they taste of fat to me too, as does the smell of grilling beefburgers, but I quite like the creamy texture of soy cream in pasta sauces or risottos. Cheese has a tang to it that makes it taste less fatty.

When my daughter moved to university I bought a pack of butter to cook mushrooms and eggs, having missed omelettes and creamy scrambled eggs and that pack took me months to eat because it was too rich.

I am pretty sure it's the fattiness of meat that I don't like as I least dislike game and offal, which tends to be much leaner.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
The rellies don't eat pork or beef which sadly cuts out roast beef, 90% of sausages, black pudding amongst other things.

Maybe rhubarb in a Yorkshire Pudding accompanied by a GIN and tonic [Smile]

Jewish Hindus? Can't be many of them around. [Smile]
[Smile] Just garden variety Tamil Hindus. I think the non-eating of pork is pretty common.

I'm planning to take them to the local Cuban-ish restaurant, so Mancunian or Lancastrian food is not out of the question.

Baptist Trainfan: I've had an Ostrich burger in the Ostrich pub and very tasty it was too.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Whereas what I love about cream is the fattiness of it. And I could easily eat butter by itself, too, if I allowed myself.

I don't much like very fatty meat though.

M.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I can understand that, M. - I can clart butter over new potatoes or slices of French bread as if it was going out of fashion, and cream is a gift from God, but I hate the layer of fat on a piece of meat. When I lived at home, I'd cut it off and give it to my dad, who loved it, and my mum would ask if I was trying to kill him off. [Eek!]

He's still alive and tentatively kicking at 90 ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Fat from meat is very variable. If it is from barbecued lamb chops I'll fight you for it. Ditto pork crackling. Mostly it needs overcooking to make it worth eating.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
It's HOT here. I've just walked back from town and worked up a not-very-ladylike sweat. [Hot and Hormonal] Summer seems to have arrived here in the UK. [Big Grin]

I am fair skinned and a hayfever sufferer so I tend to seek shade and stay indoors. [Roll Eyes]

[ 04. June 2015, 15:46: Message edited by: Nenya ]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
More British stuff for the list!

I made kedgeree last night which went down rather well. (I know it’s really meant to be a breakfast but I think it also makes a rather nice supper).
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I love kedgeree, but sadly (and somewhat oddly) I usually can't get smoked haddock (or even smoked cod) here for love or money.

A friend gave me some smoked turbot once, which worked all right-ish, but it's really best with haddock or whiting (and a few shreds of smoked salmon if I'm feeling extravagant).

Piglet, missing British things ... [Frown]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... vegetarian mole in the hole ...

I'm intrigued - do you fill the Yorkshire pudding with veggies and some sort of veggie sauce instead of sausages and gravy?

A-in-E - assuming your location doesn't render it heretical (or possibly even traitorous), what about Lancashire hot-pot? [Big Grin]

First the Hot Pot, nothing heretical there, I enjoy foreign food.

As for Yorkshire pudding alas the old Yorkshire way of serving them (AKA the correct way) is dying out. Served on its own with gravy*, as a starter before, not with, the roast beef. Not individual puddings either. but a large one big enough for the family which is cut into pieces.

Dispensing with tradition, my favourite way of serving Yorkshires is filled with liver and bacon casserole.

---

*Gravy as in made from the meat juices thickened with corn flour, no granules or stock cubes in sight.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Finally, at long last, a warm day when I could at last dispense with a jacket. About time we had some warmth. I suppose that will be it for this year.

Went to Cafe Rouge this evening for moules tempura with aioli, fries and a glass of Muscadet. I hadn't planned to, but public transport let me down so an early dinner seemed like a good way of passing the time.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
Apparently I could probably still pass GCSE maths, although I last studied maths some 30 years ago.

The BBC website has the question about sweets which they say has generated so much comment. Quite an easy question, only took a couple of minutes, but it would take me far longer to work out how to complain about it on twitter ! GCSE modern technology I probably would not pass.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Despite looking at the BBC video twice I'm still a bit confused. I think maths is one of those things you get or you don't. I can do it if I memorise the formulas, but I still don't really understand it, much as I'd like to.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I more-or-less got it by the end of the demonstration, but I doubt very much that I'd have been able to make the connections on my own, especially in an exam situation.

Mind you, it's about 35 years since I did any algebra and I suspect I've lost whatever knack I once had. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
I looked at the question, realised what it was really about - but hadn't a clue how to prove it!

Algebra was always a total mystery to me. Luckily I took the old School Certificate, and a lowly pass in Maths was all I required for what was known as "exempt from matric."

Just as well, it was all I got!

But I've managed for the n number of years afterwards with basic arithmetic and a bit of basic geometry!!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We are still on the old National Curriculum GCSEs for maths. The one that Gove said was too easy. The nasty Goveian version comes in June 2017.

I haven't looked and am heading out, but it will be interesting to see.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Most adults do not do algebra after age 16. Then get rusty at it. Seeing that the question was aimed at A and A* grades only a few 16 year olds would be expected to get it right, and an even smaller proportion of adults.

If it isn't hard there's no point in asking the question.

I thought it was easy, but I have done Physics at university and that needs some pretty cool maths.
 
Posted by moonlitdoor (# 11707) on :
 
I did history at university so I was pleasantly surprised that I found a maths question quite easy.

The range of standard of pupils taking GCSE is quite wide, so presumably there are always going to be questions that are too difficult for some people. Otherwise the better pupils would get everything right. So I am not sure why this particular question was picked on.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nicodemia:
I looked at the question, realised what it was really about - but hadn't a clue how to prove it!

Likewise. I'm afraid I failed Maths O level 4 times despite having had remedial tuition.

As I discovered much later in life, it's only logic, and there are only four things you can do with numbers: add, subtract, multiply and divide. All else is a combination of these four principles. These days I enjoy maths (and logic puzzles), and enjoyed having a go at the question, but embarrassingly, I don't know how to work it out so didn't get very far at all.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
It depends on how well you know your numbers. There is a formal way of solving it which uses quadratic equations (This is still taught at GCSE) but for those familiar with numbers would spot an informal way which basically depends on you to know what multiplies together to give 90.

Jengie
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Just watched the video - it makes much more sense when he talks you through it. I have done stuff like that before but not for a long time - thought this was mainly going to be about probability which is something I never mastered, but it was much simpler than that.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
My 14 year old (starts GCSE next year with the new format) could work it out but he's predicted a distinction in maths and will be a scientist like his physicist father.
I worked out the first stages and had to be told what to do in the middle before being able to complete it - but it did take me two attempts to get my o'level maths.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
So I am not sure why this particular question was picked on.

Apparently the children were thrown because of the question structure; it gave them the answer and asked them to provide the format. It would appear that they were more used to answering questions than explaining them.
It reminds me of my exam on Total war and social change for my history degree. The questions were phrased very differently to previous papers and did not state the key theories they wanted us to discuss, the questions were worded so that we had to work out what they wanted for ourselves. This, of course, shouldn't be a problem at degree level but there were several students who came on the forum afterwards and said 'but there was no question on total war!' and so on. But there were questions on all the topics that they mentioned.
Generally these students were the same ones who had complained that they thought the course would be about total war and hadn't realised they would have to write essays on social change [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Changing the subject somewhat (all this algebra's making what passes for my brain hurt), we bought a Lavender Ecocube the other day, and I set it going in the sitting-room window this morning. I love the look and scent of lavender, so I'm hoping that my complete lack of green fingers isn't too much of a handicap to its survival. [Big Grin]

They apparently also do basil, which I love fresh, so if the lavender works I might give it a go as well; I've been making a vague attempt at a diet that involves quite a lot of tomatoes, so fresh basil would be a nice thing to have around.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Just as I was posting the above, D. came in and suggested going to Granite to share one of their charcuterie-and-cheese platters, so we did (and shared a piece of rather good cheesecake).

On coming home, I had a fit of goddessishness and made a pot of soup for tomorrow's lunch, which should be ready for virtual tasting quite soon.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Mmmm, lavender. I love the smell of it. I have lavender plants in my allotment, five or six small ones to form a mini-hedge at the boundary between mine and the next, two in the herb section. They're coming into flower now and I'm hoping it'll attract some bees (not too many though, the last thing I want is a swarm in my allotment).
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
We went to a lovely old Norfolk pub on Saturday: the "Ostrich" In Castle Acre (it's not quite so immaculate as the website photos suggest). My wife had what she declared to be the best Toad in the Hole of her life: good and meaty local sausages on a bed of creamy mash all inside a huge circle of crispy batter. She graciously allowed me to try a bit: it was good!

I went there once about 15 years ago with a couple of black friends from church while we were on our way to Walsingham. I went in first (my friends were outside phoning home to make sure the babysitter was OK with the kids) and the landlady was charming. As soon as my friends walked in, her attitude changed completely and became very frosty - almost rude even. When she realised they were with me her frosty attitude extended to me as well. I've never been back.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Goodness, that's awful! Of course it may have changed hands since then, possibly more than once.

As an aside, my mother retired to rural Norfolk in 1986. She had been a worker in a residential children's home in London, where many of the "kids" were black. As they grew up they came to visit her - at first curtains twitched as black people were virtually unknown in that part of the world. My mother, I think, got a bit of a reputation at first ... but attitudes did change over time.

[ 07. June 2015, 07:59: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
Shared lunch at church which means I ate too much of the wrong things. Struggling to stay awake over some proof reading I need to do.

Nen - feeling replete.