Thread: Inquire Within: general questions Board: Oblivion / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If Google isn't your friend, someone here may be able to help.

Ariel
Heaven Host

[ 21. September 2014, 08:10: Message edited by: Firenze ]
 
Posted by The Machine Elf (# 1622) on :
 
So far I have been naming my computers from the Camino - my gaming pc is Santiago, the mini PC I bought when in digs while working away from home is Refugio and my netbook is Peregrino.

As its fan is a bit noisy and I want a PC in my workshop, I'm moving the mini PC upstairs and replacing it in its current role of music streaming will be a raspberry pi. Which needs a hostname, but I can't think of a Camino related name which also has musical connotations.

Can anyone here suggest a musical Camino/pilgrimage single word name?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Are there any walking songs that pilgrims sing on the way?

Huia
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
The Lourdes hymn has words in many languages, but always the same tune, Huia. The English begins Immaculate Mary, your praises we sing, The French begins Avec les saints anges en choeurs glorieux and is popular with multi-national groups of pilgrims.
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
It also has a Walsingham version, which begins:

Sing praises to Mary, the Mother of God,
Whose Walsingham way countless pilgrims have trod ...

 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
I have two technology questions which I thought I'd ask here rather than the geek-translation thread, as they're things I ponder about rather than a current problem.

1) Why does it take a computer so long to get from me pressing the on switch, to being usable for running a program? What's it doing that it needs to do each time? I think I kind of get why it takes so long for it to shut down, it's like cleaning the kitchen after cooking -- all the equipment that was out in a convenient temporary place during the activity needs to be put away into its permanent home, and all the vegetable peelings need to be tossed out. Is this roughly right?

2) I live near the boundary between two timezones. Whenever I drive West, my phone updates time automatically, but driving East I have to turn it on and off. I don't know if the West switching is quite instant, but it's faster than it takes me to get to an offramp from the interstate to check. Going the other direction, I can leave it for hours and get no switch.

[ 05. January 2013, 11:26: Message edited by: Hart ]
 
Posted by Arethosemyfeet (# 17047) on :
 
As far as (1) goes, Hart, my understanding is that's for largely historical reasons. When your computer starts up the first thing it does (more or less) is the Power On Self Test (POST). This means it checks around for all the things it expects to find. It checks whether you have a processor, RAM, graphics, etc. and informs you if you don't. It also has to read settings from your BIOS (Basic Input Output System) and make sure that everything is working at the speed and with the settings you've given it. It then has to decide what it's going to load up. Depending on how your PC is set up, it may check floppy disk drives, USB ports, and/or CD drives before booting from (one of) the hard disks. During all this there are number of points at which you can interrupt, either to change settings or to boot into Safe Mode or similar, so the computer may pause briefly to allow this. Then the computer has to load the operating system. A lot of this has to be copied from the hard disk into memory before beginning (so we're looking at several seconds just to do that), and then the complex web of programs making up the operating system has to be started in the correct order and checked before the next part is loaded. If you have a lot of things, like anti-virus, fancy desktop backgrounds etc. that load with startup, then it will take longer to find the settings, and the files to which they refer, and get them loaded up. You will find a fresh installation will load a lot faster than one you've worked with for a couple of years.

There are computers that can load very fast, but they generally aren't compatible with Windows PCs. Slow load times are part of the price you pay for PCs being backwards compatible and for being able to handle a huge range of hardware and software. Basically imagine that you about to start cooking, you don't know what you're going to cook but you know you need to do it fast; so you get all of the equipment out and ready, even the walnut mascerator and the parsnip baster, in the hope that you will be ready for anything.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
Sorry, you lost me after the words "cleaning the kitchen"
 
Posted by TurquoiseTastic (# 8978) on :
 
Does anyone know what has happened to Susan Howatch? I am a big fan of her Starbridge books, but she does not seem to have written any novels since 2004 (after producing one every couple of years for the previous I-don't-know-how-many-years). Anyone know if anything is in the pipeline?
 
Posted by Chapelhead (# 21) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TurquoiseTastic:
Does anyone know what has happened to Susan Howatch? I am a big fan of her Starbridge books, but she does not seem to have written any novels since 2004 (after producing one every couple of years for the previous I-don't-know-how-many-years).

I believe she has effectively retired from writing - given that she is 72, this doesn't seem unreasonable. She is now enjoying spending more time with friends and family.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
2) I live near the boundary between two timezones. Whenever I drive West, my phone updates time automatically, but driving East I have to turn it on and off. I don't know if the West switching is quite instant, but it's faster than it takes me to get to an offramp from the interstate to check. Going the other direction, I can leave it for hours and get no switch.

Is this also the boundary between two networks? One may broadcast the time as part of the information is is constantly sending to your mobile, whist the other may not. Just a guess.
 
Posted by The Machine Elf (# 1622) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
Are there any walking songs that pilgrims sing on the way?

Huia

After further googling, I settled on calixtinus

Thanks,

TME
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:

2) I live near the boundary between two timezones. Whenever I drive West, my phone updates time automatically, but driving East I have to turn it on and off. I don't know if the West switching is quite instant, but it's faster than it takes me to get to an offramp from the interstate to check. Going the other direction, I can leave it for hours and get no switch.

Perhaps because nobody is sure which parts of Indiana are in which timezone at any given moment?


(Explanation for overseas readers: it used to be that each county in Indiana could choose whether to go on Daylight Savings Time or not, which caused a bit of confusion on occasion. I don't know if that is still the case, but it might fit with lilBuddha's suggestion that it has something to do with the network providing service: the networks in Indiana might not force their local time on users if they might not all be using the same local time.)
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Carex:
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:

2) I live near the boundary between two timezones. Whenever I drive West, my phone updates time automatically, but driving East I have to turn it on and off. I don't know if the West switching is quite instant, but it's faster than it takes me to get to an offramp from the interstate to check. Going the other direction, I can leave it for hours and get no switch.

Perhaps because nobody is sure which parts of Indiana are in which timezone at any given moment?


(Explanation for overseas readers: it used to be that each county in Indiana could choose whether to go on Daylight Savings Time or not, which caused a bit of confusion on occasion. I don't know if that is still the case, but it might fit with lilBuddha's suggestion that it has something to do with the network providing service: the networks in Indiana might not force their local time on users if they might not all be using the same local time.)

And to add to the confusion, the corner of Indiana near Chicago is on Central Time, like Illinois, rather than Eastern Time like the rest of the state.

(Arizona has a similar situation -- most of the state has the good sense to avoid Daylight Savings Time, but Navajoland observes it.)
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
I thought Arizona had to go to Daylight Savings Time due to some Federal benefit or another. So, at least the last I heard, they do observe Daylight Savings Time, but the state also changes timezones. So during the winter they are on Pacific Standard Time and in the summer they are officially on Mountain Daylight Time, which results in no change to the clocks.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Carex:
I thought Arizona had to go to Daylight Savings Time due to some Federal benefit or another. So, at least the last I heard, they do observe Daylight Savings Time, but the state also changes timezones. So during the winter they are on Pacific Standard Time and in the summer they are officially on Mountain Daylight Time, which results in no change to the clocks.

Nope. We're on Mountain Standard Time all year.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
Thanks for those explanations. The turn on time makes some kind of vague sense to me now. The explanation for the time zone on the phone changing is the best I've heard, so I'll stick with it.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Carex:
I thought Arizona had to go to Daylight Savings Time due to some Federal benefit or another. So, at least the last I heard, they do observe Daylight Savings Time, but the state also changes timezones. So during the winter they are on Pacific Standard Time and in the summer they are officially on Mountain Daylight Time, which results in no change to the clocks.

Nope. We're on Mountain Standard Time all year.
When I first visited Arizona we had to change clocks when we visited the Navajo settlement as the whole of the Navajo Nation, whichever state it is in, employs daylight saving, though the rest of Arizona does not.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
When I first visited Arizona we had to change clocks when we visited the Navajo settlement as the whole of the Navajo Nation, whichever state it is in, employs daylight saving, though the rest of Arizona does not.

Yup.
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
Arizona has a similar situation -- most of the state has the good sense to avoid Daylight Savings Time, but Navajoland observes it.


 
Posted by TurquoiseTastic (# 8978) on :
 
I am haunted by a song about dinosaurs.

In the mid-1980s there was a dinosaur exhibit at the Ulster Museum in Belfast. Part of it was a video loop that was about an hour long, aimed at children but with lots of good dinosaur information. It had a BBC-ish kind of feel.

Every so often the (British) presenters would sing a song, most of the words of which I have forgotten, but it would be something like...

Now here they are, once again, those dinosaur names!
Won't you say them all once and then say them again!
Something something something something something- osaurus!
Something something something something Styracosaurus!
Something something something something Hypsilophodon
And something something something something that's about enough of 'em...


I would watch this over and over again until the museum would kick me out at closing time.

After a few months it was replaced, to my disgust, by a much shorter American video (c 15 minutes) which was more cartoony and much lighter on information.

If any Shipmates can help me with the identity of this video I will be a) stunned and b) strangely grateful...
 
Posted by Percy B (# 17238) on :
 
Christian relaxation.

Years ago a friend in prison found some Christian relaxation cassette tapes helpful. They were a voice giving simple guidance on how to relax, and including simple relaxing Christian thoughts.

Nothing too heavy, aiming at peace and relaxation.

Now another friend has been asking for something like this - though of course on CD.

So I turn to here to ask for any suggestions please, from what you may have used and found helpful.
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
You could have a look on YouTube - there is a wide choice of Christian meditation and relaxation videos. Lots of them have websites where you can purchase copies on a cd or dvd.
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
The current wintry weather has prompted me to ask the following:

I have a very ancient electric fire inherited from my parents who bought it in 1970. It works beautifully and is much more efficient than my so-called central heating. I use it to supplement the CH every winter when needed. I have been advised by two people, one of whom is an electrician, that I shouldn’t use it as it could be dangerous. (They haven’t actually seen it let alone examined it – they’re just saying that because it’s so old)

What do people think?
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I think they are probably right. Older devices may have inferior earthing to present ones. There is also the potential for degradation in the insulation of internal wiring which could lead either to short circuits or to live wires touching parts of the casing which you might yourself touch - this I think is the main point of danger.

On the other hand, a quick PAT test won't probably tell you much more than the fact that there is or isn't acceptable leakage to earth; while getting someone to examine the internal workings of the fire might cost as much as buying a new one.

I would also want to ask if your main fuse bosrd is fitted with RCDs or old-fashioned fuses? RCDs are much safer as they are very sensitive and react very rapidly to short circuits.

It's up to you in the end, but equipment does deteriorate over time ...

[ 18. January 2013, 11:05: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
We use new small electric heaters to supplement our heating. The rule is that they are unplugged from the outlet when we are not in the room. Also, they are plugged in through a high quality power bar that would trip out if there were to be a power surge or overheating. The power bar has a switch on it so that we could turn off the power supply if the heater ever malfunctioned or caught on fire.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If it works without problems, personally, I'd carry on using it. Just because something is old, it doesn't mean it can't do the job. I have a kettle that still works, and I've had it since 1974.

If you're worried you might get an electrician to look over it. But I'd suggest meanwhile just don't leave it running unattended, even if only for a few minutes: if you leave the room, turn it off.
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
Thanks for your responses.

I do only use the heater when I’m in the room and I’m always careful to switch off/unplug all electrical equipment when not in use. Hmm. I’m not really sure what to do. I don't want to get rid of it - it works so well. I’ll probably go on using it for the immediate future but I think I might think about replacing it before next winter, just for peace of mind.
 
Posted by birdie (# 2173) on :
 
You know those circuit breaker plug things you use with a lawnmower (in case you mow over the lead) or electric drill (in case you drill though a wire)? Would it make any difference using one of those if the concern is aged wiring possibly short-circuiting?

(I don't really know - it just struck me as a possibility.)
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
You mean "Residual Circuit Breakers" (known as RCCBs or RCDs).

As I stated upthread, you may already have them fitted to your distribution board anyway, especially if it's been renewed in the last few years. Mine are so sensitive that they will trip out if I'm cutting my back hedge and the (waterproofed) plug and socket on the extension cable are lying on the dry lawn - I have to put them onto a bit of timber.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Any ebay/paypal users out there?

My teenager bought a phone from ebay. It was against his wise mummy's advice, but she let him proceed as a lesson in life - a lesson he's now learning the hard way.

It was described as "having a barely noticeable crack on the screen, but in full working order".

There was a lot of delay on it being posted - apparently it was returned to sender once and then posted again (though not until I'd opened a case on ebay), so when it finally arrived with a somewhat bigger crack than anticipated, my boy still accepted it (still not realising it's wise to listen to mummy!) because he was so desperate to have a phone and it didn't seem to interfere with use.

That was two days ago. This morning he's got up and, overnight, two more cracks have appeared and most of the touchscreen is now no longer responsive.

Having closed the case about the delay in posting, and having accepted the phone and used it for two days, are we now - as I suspect - too late to do anything about the fact that it's rubbish?
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
You mean "Residual Circuit Breakers" (known as RCCBs or RCDs).

Ah, so that's what RCDs are [Hot and Hormonal] I'm a bit clueless when it comes to things electrical. No, I've got old fashioned fuses.

The electricity company came and did a "free visual wiring check" a couple of years ago and advised that everything was safe but not compliant with current standards (or some such phrase).
[Smile]
 
Posted by The Machine Elf (# 1622) on :
 
If you have a fire designed in the 1960s, it's also quite likely not made to the same standards for finger penetration as a modern one would be, which may be an issue if children or animals are present.

I can remember my Dad having to put the cat out several times in the 1970s after she brushed against the fire.


TME
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Several times? Not the brightest kitten in the basket, was she?
 
Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
Smudgie posted
quote:
Any ebay/paypal users out there?
The one and only time I have ever had a problem on E-Bay I contacted the seller and he made it right. You might want to try that as a first step. I have not used the guarantee but if you can not work out an exchange or a least part of your son's money back with the seller, it is worth a try to contact. E-bay.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I'd second that suggestion. Favourable customer ratings are very valuable to e-Bay vendors.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
I emailed and got a very shirty response so have opened a case seeking a partial refund. We've taken photos of the amount of damage and made sure they show the date. Not sure how much success we'll have but it's worth a try.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I'd second that suggestion. Favourable customer ratings are very valuable to e-Bay vendors.

I'm sure Ebay don't approve of this notion but if they won't cooperate, could you buy something else (really cheap) from the vendor then leave lousy feedback?
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Dies anyone know what antimacassars are called nowadays?
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
I think they may have got bigger, and now be called 'throws'.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
Does anyone know what antimacassars are called nowadays?

Probably "headrest covers". The lacy, patterned look died out a while ago to be replaced by a much plainer, oops, "contemporary" appearance, too. Except on public transport, where they usually have logos on.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Domestically, didn't they used to be called 'chairbacks'? I seem to remember embroidering some in my youth.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
I still call them antimacassars.
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Smudgie:
Having closed the case about the delay in posting, and having accepted the phone and used it for two days, are we now - as I suspect - too late to do anything about the fact that it's rubbish?

You have quite a lot of rights when you've bought stuff online - see here - but only if the phone was bought as a 'buy it now' rather than in an auction.

Also, the fact of having used an item doesn't prevent you from claiming against the vendor if it doesn't work as advertised, although some unscrupulous retailers will try to assert otherwise.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Ricardus, thank you so much. The seller is claiming my son damaged the phone himself. Unable to see how I could prove otherwise, I was quite disheartened, but Citizens' Advice have given me some really good pointers and I have composed a more formal message. Fortunately I did do "buy it now" and from a business account, even though the item was not what they usually sell. Citizens' Advice were also of the opinion that he was breaking the Trades Descriptions Act by putting "no returns " on it as you can't refuse to refund faulty goods or goods not as described.

I'm still on sticky ground over the fact it was working when it arrived and we didn't get photos of the initial damage at that point or ask immediately for a refund, but we are still within our "7 day cool-off period" and it makes me a little more confident and willing to press on with our claim. Thank you!
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Domestically, didn't they used to be called 'chairbacks'? I seem to remember embroidering some in my youth.

Ah yes, that's brought back some childhood memories. We always had 'chairbacks' - embroidered by my mum.
 
Posted by Percy B (# 17238) on :
 
Has anyone a suggested website they use which we could upload info like rotas onto for sharing among people who were given the password to go see?

Simple to use would be a bonus !
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
I think I would use Google Groups for this. Just click on Groups on Google's home page and follow the prompts.
 
Posted by Percy B (# 17238) on :
 
Thank you Amanda, but not all concerned have a Google account. Although it maybe they don't have to.

I will investigate.

What I had in mind was if there was like a archive site which different people could access to get a template document. Free is what we want too!
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
You would create a Google account for yourself for this purpose. Then you would create a single login and password that everyone would use for accessing the information you'd post. No one could access the information without knowing the login and password.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I realized on the way home that I've left my mobile phone at the office, and won't be able to get it back until Monday. I have an old spare I can use meanwhile, but is it possible (in theory) to get any calls/texts forwarded on from the usual mobile to the spare one?

(It's not a Blackberry - I've consulted the phone provider's help pages but they only give forwarding setup instructions for that brand.)
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Which translation of the Bible would an American Roman Catholic be most likely to use? Jerusalem Bible? Or something else? Thanks!
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
NAB is the translation used during Masses in English and has hence become the American RC 'default.'

[ 04. February 2013, 13:10: Message edited by: Hart ]
 
Posted by Keren-Happuch (# 9818) on :
 
Thanks, Hart.
 
Posted by SusanDoris (# 12618) on :
 
If someone is lurking, can s/he read discussions on any of the message boards?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by SusanDoris:
If someone is lurking, can s/he read discussions on any of the message boards?

Yes. It's only if you wish to post that you need to login (or register of course, if you don't have a login).
 
Posted by SusanDoris (# 12618) on :
 
Thank you.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I just bought some sea salt and noticed that the package said, 'Best before 8/14'.

I never heard of salt deteriorating, especially when it's in an airtight container. Does anyone have any idea what that's about?

Moo
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I have a memory of someone asking a similar question a few years ago and a Shipmate saying it was to satisfy rules and regs--that some fool jurisdiction had made it necessary for ALL foods to carry an expiration date, even the ones that neither expire nor cause you to expire. Sounds the kind of thing that would happen round here...
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
I have a memory of someone asking a similar question a few years ago and a Shipmate saying it was to satisfy rules and regs--that some fool jurisdiction had made it necessary for ALL foods to carry an expiration date, even the ones that neither expire nor cause you to expire. Sounds the kind of thing that would happen round here...

No Federal law, individual states appear to vary.

Different in the UK.
 
Posted by A.Pilgrim (# 15044) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
I just bought some sea salt and noticed that the package said, 'Best before 8/14'.

I never heard of salt deteriorating, especially when it's in an airtight container. Does anyone have any idea what that's about?

Moo

Yes, it's barmy, like the honey that I buy which has a 'Best before' date two years ahead when honey will keep perfectly well for decades, if not centuries. It's just a backside-covering, anti-compensation-culture legal device which transfers the risk of any ill-effects of consumption from the producer to the consumer after the date specified, even if there is a vanishingly small likelihood of the food product deteriorating in any way. It just means: 'If you eat this after the date given and you are unwell, it's all your fault and you can't sue us for compensation'.
Angus
 
Posted by Zacchaeus (# 14454) on :
 
'Eat by' a date, is the date by which it is considered safe to eat.

'Best before' means that it is still safe to eat but the quality might deteriorate after that.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
It always mystified me that mineral water, which the producers advertise as having been "filtered through volcanic rocks over thousands of years" still has a best before date.

[Confused]
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
When re-fixing the heel to my favourite black zip-up ankle boots, I inadvertedly squeezed the shoe & heel togeter so well that, unbeknown to me, the super glue oozed out and spread onto the zip. Which now appears to be superglued in the open position.
Is there any way of dissolving superglue, that doesn't involve spending a lot of money, or do I resort to buying new shoes?
 
Posted by Ann (# 94) on :
 
You can get super glue remover or, I seem to remember, acetone? (nail varnish remover) was kept in the lab to unstick the fingers of the foolish. Whether or not it would dissolve the zip is another matter.
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
Not all nail varnish removers are acetone, and so they won't all work (in general acetone-based ones are harsh and efficient, non-acetone ones are less efficient but kinder to your nails).

You can get superglue remover (Amazon have a variety at around £2-3).
 
Posted by The Machine Elf (# 1622) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
It always mystified me that mineral water, which the producers advertise as having been "filtered through volcanic rocks over thousands of years" still has a best before date.

[Confused]

You're not storing in it the rock though - after a certain point, the plasticisers from the bottle will leech into the water sufficiently that drinking it will turn you hermaphrodite.

Or maybe it will just task a bit stale.
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
Broadband question.

We are having LOTS of trouble with our T*lk T*lk broadband. Seriously thinking of upgrading to something more reliable, but wanted to do a sanity check first. We keep losing the connection, on a daily basis now it seems. Somethimes we've noticed that the connection drops when the phone rings, other times it seems to be more random.

The Talk Talk helpdesk said maybe the router is faulty, and suggested we try another one, but I'm not sure that using an old router or someone elses would work as don't they have to be configured with your own account details etc. They also told me if they send an engineer round to check our connection, any fault caused by the internal phone wiring inside the house would mean we would have to pay £50 for call out. Want to avoid this charge, and also the embarrassment of calling them out to discover its our 'fault', so I wanted to run our set-up past you knowledgeable people, to do a sanity check of whether it could be the cause of these problems, and if so, upgrading to a different provider is unlikely to help.

The phone line enters the house just inside the front door, that's where the phone socket is. Unfortunately there is no power point in the hallway, so can't locate the broadband router there as no power for it, without trailing cables in from another room. So when we moved in last year, I bought a 10 metre (I think) phone extension cable. This runs from the socket, up the stairs, into the study upstairs. Terminates with a phone socket, into which we have plugged the ADSL filter. Coming out of the flter is the phone wire, and the wire to the router. Nothing else is plugged into the downstairs phone socket except the extension cable (but no filter at that point - I didn't think it was necessary as everything goes through the filter upstairs).

Is this set-up likely to cause problems?
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
When we had a problem with our BT phone line (the phone, not just the broadband) they told us to take the front off the main socket and plug the filter and phone into the inner socket. If there was still a problem it had to be with the external phone wiring (and therefore not our expense).

This is obviously less helpful in the case of an intermittent fault, and in your case there would still be the possibility of a fault with the extension cable or the router, but it should exclude the rest of internal wiring.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Gracious Rebel

I am with T*lkT*lk, and I have not used a company supplied router for over a decade! The settings are all available on the website for the routers, and if you have a techy friend they normally can work out which settings actually apply to the router you are using (even if it is not one of the ones listed).

Jengie
 
Posted by The Machine Elf (# 1622) on :
 
Oddly enough, I spent half of Sunday adding an extra mains socket near to the master socket to eliminate an extension. It hasn't eliminated drop-outs on our service, particularly when the phone rings (this is a symptom of there being excess resistance somewhere in the circuit, so the fewer non-permanent connections in the wire the better). Try putting your router into the master for a few days and see if it helps. If there are other reasons for disconnections which are external to the house (our service also tends to go down when it snows ), then again it's more likely to be a line fault.
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
Well, I followed my hunch and tried plugging the router directly (via a filter) into the master socket downstairs. Had to use an extension cable for the power of course, so have wires trailing from the lounge .... but it works. When it hadn't been working since about midday when plugged in upstairs (when I posted this afternoon I was using a 3G dongle to connect)

So I think I have answered my own question - that it DOES make a difference to not involve the long extension cable. So maybe we don't need to change supplier after all ... will have to see if it stays connected like this, and if so, will have to look into getting a new power socket added into the hall.

TME thanks for the info about resistance etc, exactly the sort of info I was after, and it explained why it so often went down when the phone rang etc.

Still can't work out why it worked satisfactorily with this wiring, (with only very occasional drop outs), for about a year, and only recently has it been a daily occurrence for connection to be lost.

[ 20. February 2013, 18:37: Message edited by: Gracious rebel ]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Bit of a strange one here - from time to time, I get calls or texts on my mobile phone from loan companies. They all think I am called 'Claire' - which I definitely am not! - and that I am looking for a loan of £200 (again, thank goodness, definitely not). There's always a way to stop the texts- text 'Stop' or 'End' - and it's only a minor annoyance BUT I'm a bit worried that there may be something behind it. I can't imagine anyone giving the wrong mobile number by accident to 6 different loan companies [Ultra confused]

Has this happened to anyone else?

I've had that number for about 15 years, I should think, so it never belonged to anyone else.

Mrs. S, puzzled
 
Posted by Meerkat (# 16117) on :
 
I had a similar hassle with my mobile phone about 2 years ago. I was getting up to 20 calls and texts a day from different loan companies, all telling me that my loan was ready and asking to speak to Sa*****a Rob***on.

Not only have I never even encountered someone by that name, but I have had the phone number from new since 1994!!

At first, they were just annoying, but after several weeks of this, my blood-pressure was rising. I tried various tactics to get them to stop... from being polite and asking nicely to being downright stroppy and rude. They all insisted that it was my fault!

Eventually, I used the tactic (which was in fact true) that I had a relative who was seriously ill in Hospital and that every time the phone rang or I got a text, I feared the worst. That seemed to work.

I asked one of them why I was getting calls from so many companies and they told me that they are all in a 'group' and 'share numbers'!

B*stards! [Mad]
 
Posted by Sergius-Melli (# 17462) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
Bit of a strange one here - from time to time, I get calls or texts on my mobile phone from loan companies. They all think I am called 'Claire' - which I definitely am not! - and that I am looking for a loan of £200 (again, thank goodness, definitely not). There's always a way to stop the texts- text 'Stop' or 'End' - and it's only a minor annoyance BUT I'm a bit worried that there may be something behind it. I can't imagine anyone giving the wrong mobile number by accident to 6 different loan companies [Ultra confused]

Has this happened to anyone else?

I've had that number for about 15 years, I should think, so it never belonged to anyone else.

Mrs. S, puzzled

Someone has probably made a loan/car insurance (etc.) enquiry online and used fake details to do so (I must confess I am notorious for doing it myself) inadvertantly using your number in the process and the company they were searching has then sold those details on to a numbre of comapnies who then will randomly text/call you in the hope that you are a person who fits the product they are tryign to con someone out of their money for.

Alternatively you may have done this and not ticked (or possibly not unticked) the appropriate box which means the company cannot sell your details on.

I get several of these calls occassionally (despite being extra careful about allowing companies to sell on my details) and either try and turn it into some evangelising opportunity (which normally means they never phone back) or if I'm being narky allow them to waffle on for a while before explaining, very sweetly, that out of politeness I have allowed them to waffle on but I am not the person they are looking for (it has the same reaction, though the other day I had f**k off repeated at me several times before they hung up).

But anyway - your number has somewhere along he line been sold onto one of these companies who are just hoping to hit a person to scam.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Thank you Meerkat and Sergius-Melli. Each of these companies seems to obey my instructions to STOP or END, and mercifully they don't often call - so I suppose I'll just delete them. I have checked and the SMSs aren't premium numbers or anything.

Ah well - thanks again guys [Smile]

Mrs. S, grateful
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Mrs S, if you're in the UK you can report unsolicited/unwanted calls and texts to the Information Commissioner's Office. Each time I get a text (I never get calls thankfully), usually about PPI or accident compensation, it's my first port of call [Smile]
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Too many pancakes...

If held aloft forever, would all the golden syrup eventually drop off the spoon? It's been bugging me for a while!
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Presumably, but if it was me holding the spoon the only way the experiment could take place would be if I was holding it over my open mouth.
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:
Mrs S, if you're in the UK you can report unsolicited/unwanted calls and texts to the Information Commissioner's Office. Each time I get a text (I never get calls thankfully), usually about PPI or accident compensation, it's my first port of call [Smile]

Also with most mobile phone operators you can forward spam texts to 7726 (the keys corresponding to the letters SPAM) to report them as spam.
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
OK, long wind up for a question here-

A while back, I was sick and watching midday television. I was watching one of those anthology shows like the Night Gallery, a modern reproduction of the Twilight Zone, Amazing Tales, or something like that. The episode opened with a women coming to the office a priest with a problem. She was a saint, and she felt it was getting in the way of her husband's career and her daughter's social life. When she suddenly glowed with heavenly light, accompanied by a little heavenly chorus singing "Hallelujah," it is confirmed that she is indeed a saint.

She tells the amazed priest that she doesn't want to be a saint anymore, though he can't help her. So the episode goes on with her many attempts to not be a saint anymore. She swears, worships a statue of Buddha, and murders bugs, but nothing works. As she crosses off the list of the 10 commandments she's broken, she almost despairs of ever being free of sainthood, until a visit from her sister-in-law. "It's really quite simple- you're doing all that stuff for the good of your husband and daughter. That's what saints do. If you really don't want to be a saint, PRIDE is the way to go!"

So our hero goes upstairs, dresses in a white robe, and then comes down and insists that she's going to milk this sainthood thing for all it's worth. Everyone will come and see her and how holy she is and will love her for it. Suddenly, the heavenly glowing stops! The whole family gathers and celebrates the end of her sainthood, and they live happily ever after.

Now, my question: What was I watching? I thought it was a funny little show, and I want a copy of it to show my confirmation class just for laughs.
 
Posted by Starbug (# 15917) on :
 
I don't know, but I had a lot of fun trying to google it. I hope you find out.

My question is about Les Miserables . In the film, the actors mostly used British accents, with Cockney for the poor or trashy characters and Received Pronunciation (or near enough) for the rich ones. I was wondering, what accents do they use in the Broadway production? If they use American accents, how do they distinguish between the characters' different social classes?

Also, do they change the lyrics to make it more American, or do they stick to Herbert Kretzmer's more 'English' lyrics? ('See 'em with their trousers off, they're never quite as grand', for example - would they use the word 'pants' instead?)

Sorry, that's way more than one question! I was just intrigued/surprised by the use of (mainly) English accents in the film and wondered how it's played in the USA - or Canada, for that matter.

[ 25. February 2013, 19:09: Message edited by: Starbug ]
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
I remember from the dim and distant past a children's musical about Moses. I am dating it to about 1980 or thereabouts, and it appeared on either the BBC Watch! programme or something similar. The song that's stuck in my head is the last one, with chorus something like "God said to Moses cross over, cross over, cross over".

What am I remembering?
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
Whot, "When Israel was in Egypt-land, let my people go?"

[ 26. February 2013, 12:55: Message edited by: Zach82 ]
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zach82:
Whot, "When Israel was in Egypt-land, let my people go?"

No, that's not it (although there was certainly a song with "and Moses said 'let my people go!'" as a refrain). The thing I'm thinking of was definitely aimed specifically at children.
 
Posted by Chapelhead (# 21) on :
 
This is more a request for comment than a question with a definite answer, but it doesn't seem worthwhile starting a new thread and this seems the best place to ask.

I've just finished a book by an American author, which involves two American women, probably about 60 years old, who are on a trip to the Scottish highlands. One of them is going to go by train to Edinburgh, and tells the other that she is looking forward to the trip because she has never been on a train - her companion makes no comment so presumably she, and the author, do not think this a surprising comment to make.

This brought me up short, as the idea of mature person from a developed country who had never been on a train seemed very odd. But them I thought about how long-distance travel in America is usually depicted on screen as involving flying (or 'Greyhound' coach?) rather than train travel. On the other hand, it's not as though trains are unknown in America.

Do American shipmates think the idea of an adult American who has never travelled by train unusual or perfectly common or an indication of someone from the boondocks or what?

[ 27. February 2013, 21:55: Message edited by: Chapelhead ]
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
Different parts of the US have different train usage. Places of denser population like on the East Coast and parts of the urban Midwest are more likely to use them for commuting. I live in California and bar a a little train museum school trip, never rode a train in the US until my forties when the Metrolink commuter trains started up. Now I can take a train to Union Station in L.A. when I feel like it. I might take it next week to check out some galleries in Chinatown.

A person who was a homebody in a town in the wide expanses of the West might well have never taken a train.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
Also note that whilst it is possible to travel long distances between some cities on Amtrak, it is both slow and expensive. I have relatives who have taken an Amtrak trip, but as a means of seeing the countryside rather than as a means of transportation.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
Phoenix is the sixth largest city in the U.S. We no longer have passenger trains. The closest one is over 100 miles away. We do have a "light rail" but that hardly counts.

I'd love to have train service to other western cities, and there's been talk of it for years but I don't know if it will ever happen.

(I grew up in the eastern U.S., so I have taken trains many times -- as well as in other countries -- but many people here never have.)
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
Train travel would have been more common in an earlier age, before the automobile became the primary mode of transportation. If the book were set around 1950, it would depend on the age of the women and where they grew up. Train travel was much more common around the turn of the century, when it often was the primary connection for longer distance travel, so an older woman would be more likely to have ridden a train. But one who grew up during the Great Depression and WWII (when people didn't travel as much) may have done all of her travel by bus if she had traveled at all. (

While air travel was available around 1950, it really didn't become popular for the masses until around the 1960's. It's really the only practical way to get any significant distance around the country unless one can afford to spend several days in transit.

In later years train travel became even more uncommon. Many cities don't have any passenger service by train, and the remaining trains are used primarily for freight.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
They keep talking about a bullet train from L.A. to Las Vegas. Yeah, right. Just what we need- a way to gamble government money and personal money. [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
No, it wouldn't be that unusual for an American to never have ridden a train. Outside of Europe and Japan I have ridden a train for exactly one trip, when I was 22, and I greatly regretted not taking the bus.

It really is difficult to express how miserable the state of American passenger rail is. The system has seen absolutely no investment at all in the past 50 years, and Republicans have been actively trying to murder it for half that time.
 
Posted by no prophet (# 15560) on :
 
Why are the windows in all automobiles electric and there are no longer any manual, roll them down with a circular lever knob thing windows like they were in the olden days of 10-15 years ago?

I write this as the passenger side electric window has ceased to do anything but roll down, and it is winter here. It seems like useless and preferably optional technology to me. You can get them up if you take the door apart, and then you must refrain from touching the down side of the rocker button. My second question is how to get myself and everyone else trained to not touch the window button for that window until we can get it fixed! (-22°C yesterday, near freezing today, but you may get the urgency and annoyance about it!)
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
I've often wondered the same thing - particularly when there have been floods, since electric windows are unlikely to work when submerged, and doors are hard to open against water.

The window controls failed on my previous car, and replacing them would have cost considerably more than the car was worth. I carried a hammer in the glove box so that I could smash them in an emergency.

Manual controls make so much more sense.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Drifting Star:
I've often wondered the same thing - particularly when there have been floods, since electric windows are unlikely to work when submerged, and doors are hard to open against water.

Actually, the power windows usually work quite well with the car submerged. A window breaking device of some sort is still a good idea in case of an accident.

As to why it is difficult to find cars with manual windows, marketing and convenience.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by Zach82:
Whot, "When Israel was in Egypt-land, let my people go?"

No, that's not it (although there was certainly a song with "and Moses said 'let my people go!'" as a refrain). The thing I'm thinking of was definitely aimed specifically at children.
This is a long shot and based on right time rather than an actual recall. It is not something from Pharaoh to Freedom? If it were I would put it as either the first song (Pharaoh to Freedom) or Let's all go.

Jengie
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet:
Why are the windows in all automobiles electric and there are no longer any manual, roll them down with a circular lever knob thing windows like they were in the olden days of 10-15 years ago?

[SMUG] My 2006 Citroen C1 - 63mpg, 99g/km emissions - has manual windows, manual door and boot locking, manual more or less everything. And it costs me £20 a year to tax. [/SMUG]
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
It is not something from Pharaoh to Freedom?

No, that's not it. My memory has dredged up another song:

Moses saw a bush in the desert / That burned with steady flame / And the voice that spoke from the burning bush / was calling out his name

Google seems to find someone else who remembers the song/play, but nothing more authoritative.
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet:

... the passenger side electric window has ceased to do anything but roll down...

I've had similar problems, and have usually been able to get the window back up by pressing a hand on it from each side and pulling it back up. Of course, that doesn't help if it has retracted all the way inside the door: sticking a large suction cup on it might prevent it from doing so.

One way to protect the button is to tape a plastic case or cap of some sort over it. Most controls in a car have plug connectors, so if you can get to the backside of it you may be able to unplug a wire and disable the switch. Otherwise check your fuse block to see if there are separate fuses for the LEFT/RIGHT side windows, allowing you to disable the passenger side while keeping the driver side window operable.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet:

I write this as the passenger side electric window has ceased to do anything but roll down, and it is winter here. It seems like useless and preferably optional technology to me. You can get them up if you take the door apart, and then you must refrain from touching the down side of the rocker button. My second question is how to get myself and everyone else trained to not touch the window button for that window until we can get it fixed! (-22°C yesterday, near freezing today, but you may get the urgency and annoyance about it!)

that happened with the back window of my blazer at -40 once. drove 200 miles south before it was warm enough to work again.

I have no answer for you. it sucked.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
We had the same problem too. My husband took the inner door cover off and wedged a piece of wood into the workings. That made it physically impossible for the bloody thing to come down any further than about 1/2 an inch.
 
Posted by jbohn (# 8753) on :
 
A pair of locking pliers clamped to the rails once the window is up will keep it from sliding down until repairs can be effected. Also, as Carex mentioned, most cars have the wires attached to the switches by spade connectors - unplug the appropriate ones until you can fix the mechanism.

Of course, if you've got the inner door cover off, you might as well just swap the mechanism, too - usually, the issue is the steel cable that moves the window up and down. It's not terribly difficult on most cars to swap out the mechanism; generally, it's a matter of unbolting the works, collapsing the scissor-like mechanism and pulling it out, and bolting a new one in.
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
The rubber liners along the bottom of my car's windows are defective, so that the doors fill up with water. You can hear the water slushing around when I turn corners or brake. Whenever there is a healthy storm, I have to pull back the liner along the bottom of the door to let the water flow out.
 
Posted by no prophet (# 15560) on :
 
We are seeing and hearing the word "nigga" and "niggas" used as term by young people for their friends and buddies. This is of recent onset. But perhaps there are regional and national differences. We have very few people of African descent and those who are are recent immigrants. Is this offensive for you? I have thought it is indeed offensive.
 
Posted by no prophet (# 15560) on :
 
Re car window. I have put duct tape on the button, and added a ring of tape, adhesive side out on top of that. It seems to dissuade us enough until I find out how much cost to fix it next week. I really don't want to take the door apart again, and I probably should have left it apart, but we're in the middle of winter here, so it is drafty and cold without the door together.
 
Posted by Chapelhead (# 21) on :
 
Well, gosh. Thanks for the comments on the American railway system - it's strange that something so commonplace in Europe should be so uncommon in parts of the USA.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Chapelhead:
Well, gosh. Thanks for the comments on the American railway system - it's strange that something so commonplace in Europe should be so uncommon in parts of the USA.

There is a great difference in population density. According to this website the population density per square kilometer in the United Kingdom is 257. In the US it is 34.

Moo
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Is it also due to the sheer size of America? Scotland has a population density of 67, but is of course, tiny in comparison to America. I use trains frequently - 30 mins by train gets me to Aberdeen; 2 hours to Inverness or Dundee; 2 1/2 hours to Perth; 3 1/2 hours to Edinburgh or Glasgow. It's wonderful; some of the scenery is glorious and though train coffee leaves a lot to be desired, still, sitting with a good book, coffee and a chocolate biscuit while the countryside speeds past is my idea of time well spent.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Its not really size and density as most of the parts of the USA where most of the people actually live have population densities comparable to those of many European countries. The north-east conurbations from Boston to Washington have a combined population similar to Britain or France in a smaller area than either. Even if you expand it to take in everywhere from New Hampshire to North Carolina, its denser than France.

Or making direct comparisons, California, Illinois, Ohio and Pennsylvania have about the same population density as Spain or France, Florida and New York are denser than Italy or Poland, Massachucetts, Connecticut and New Jersey are all denser than Britain or Germany (and to be fair they do have commuter trains there, though no high-speed inter-city ones)
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
Massachusetts is really a case study of everything wrong with American infrastructure investment these days. In the early 90's the state had a fit of parsimony and cut funding for transportation, with the usual calls for privatization and expectations of truly absurd levels of efficiency. Furthermore, this was in the middle of the biggest public works project in US history, and absolutely no thought was given to how buses and highways were supposed to pay it off.

20 years later, the state highway and public transportation departments are so deeply in debt they have to borrow money just to mow the highway medians. The backlog of deferred maintenance is beyond imagination, and services are being cut everywhere. Everyone knows full well that they will go bankrupt in a few years, but damned if the legislature and muster the sense to raise taxes back to the same levels they were in the early 90's. Though, even if they did, the transport agencies would be treading water for decades paying down the debt the state forced on them.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
ISTM, size and shape do indeed constitute part of the problem.
Scotland is 30,000 square miles, whilst California is 164,000. The distance from Dumfries to Inverness is just over 200 miles with an hundred more to Thurso. Whilst the distance from San Diego to San Francisco is 500 with another 300 to Yreka to nearly finish the state. Population density can be misleading. As you have mentioned, the city populations skew the perceptions of overall density. It is not the density of population centers, but the spaces between. And California has vastly great distance between major population centers and, IIRC, north of San Francisco is much, much less dense than below.
I would hazard a guess it is also the manner in which projects are funded in the US. The state system appears to complicate funding issues quite a bit, so harder to build and maintain a decent, commuter rail system.

ETA:x-post with Zach82 with a better fiscal understanding than I.

[ 03. March 2013, 01:54: Message edited by: lilBuddha ]
 
Posted by HenryT (# 3722) on :
 
Ontario is just about a million square kilometers, and nearly two days drive east to west. But the real problem with rail here is that freight actually take precedence. Grain trains can be kilometers long, and you don't do anything quickly with that much inertia. You don't easy park it in a siding either.
Ontario has a population under 14 million.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
There are issues with connections at either end, too. What good is it going to do me to get a train from here to x, if when I get off, I've still got 250 miles to go before I' m home, and what public transport exists doesn't get me there without four changes and the need to scare up a car or taxi (at vast expense) to make the last 35 miles? With luggage, too. Screw it, I'll drive and get there faster, more diectly, and with fewer headaches. Or if necessary fly and THEN drive. Still faster and cheaper.

And I LIKE trains!

[ 03. March 2013, 19:09: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Lamb Chopped that even happens in UK. This week I hired a car and drove over 200 miles; this cost me about half the cost of the train fare and took about half the time. This was booking well in advance.

I do not own a car, I prefer train if I can and driving the route was along one of our busiest roads. However in this case the train was not practical even if everything worked perfectly.

Jengie
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
I have in my possession a Bulgarian passport from 1948. I know collecting passports is strange but so am I. Anyway I find it interesting in a number of ways. It originally had Royaume de Bulgarie on the front which was stamped over with Republique de Bulgerie. Presumably this is because when the communists took over they used the existing stock of passports before making their own.

Also interesting about it is that it clearly belongs to a Jewish person. The first name is Avram and he has a clearly Jewish surname. Does anyone know how the Jews were treated by Bulgaria in the second world war? Also it has a visa issued in Prague by the Israeli interim government which allowed him to emigrate to Israel. This visa is dated June 1948. I know that Israel was founded in May 1948 so this must be a very early visa. Would anyone know how easy it would be for a Jewish Bulgarian to get an Israeli settlement visa at that point in history and how easy it was to leave communist Bulgaria at that time? He does have an exit visa from Bulgaria but theres no evidence of an entry stamp into Israel.

I'm fascinated by the social history of the passport as well as the document itself so if anyone knows anything relevant or where to find it out I'd be really grateful.
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Bright ideas?

The Smudgelet, to earn a bit of money, decided to valet my car for me. This was a good plan. However, he was doing it in a bit of a rush and didn't exactly pay complete attention to what he was doing., bless him.

So, my "Enquire Within" question is this: does anybody know the best way to get UPVC cleaner off car windscreens?
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Smudgie,

Try vinegar and brown paper.

Caution: as with this, any any other suggestions you may receive, try a bit in a corner before talking the whole windscreen.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
Does anyone know how the Jews were treated by Bulgaria in the second world war?

I had to look this up - it's an intriguing story - and found that no Bulgarian Jews were deported during the war, despite German requests. Jews of other nationalities were. There's a Wikipedia article on this. So your Avram probably stayed safe in Bulgaria throughout the war and then decided to leave as soon he got a chance. He would have been one of the first - the others went later. Maybe he knew people out there already, maybe he was desperate to leave. It seems that most of the Jewish population went - though they mostly went a bit later - but life in post-war Eastern Europe under Communism was never going to be easy.

Does it say what Avram's occupation was? Maybe he had a particular kind of job that would have been in demand in the newly established Israel.
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
Thanks Ariel. I do find it fascinating. I hold the passport in my hand and just imagine Avram's feelings of joy and relief when he got the Israeli visa.

According to the passport he was a driver which doesn't seem that important a job for the new Israel. But then I don't know how accurate that data would be.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Well, he wouldn't have been short of work. In those days car ownership was nothing like as widespread as it is now, and probably many of the new Bulgarian Jewish immigrants were more used to public transport, or horse and cart if they were country people. And with houses being built, there would have been a need for someone to drive vans or lorries to deliver construction materials, if nothing else.

Yes, he must have been overjoyed - particularly as for so many centuries people had been focusing on one day returning to Jerusalem/Israel, the vast majority without any real hope of ever doing so. And he would probably have thought of his older relatives who hadn't lived to see this day.

Definitely an intriguing story. I hope it worked out for him in the end.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Well, here's a question that may have y'all thinking I'm seeing things.

Lately, looking at the Ship, I have noticed that some vertical letters have what appears to be a thin, red strip beside them. Double l's are especially bright. At first I thought it might be a side effect of my new glasses, but when I took them off and stuck my face right in front of the computer screen ('cause I really can't see except about 3-4 inches away from my face), the red was still there.

So, not a huge concern by any means, just a matter of curiosity.

Any ideas?
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
Your monitor's dying.
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
Would anyone know how easy it would be for a Jewish Bulgarian to get an Israeli settlement visa at that point in history and how easy it was to leave communist Bulgaria at that time?

There was a brief period when the Iron Curtain countries were hoping to woo Israel into their orbit. Kibbutzim were collective farms like kolkhozy and early Zionism was quite left-leaning. When I lived in Plzeň in the Czech Republic I saw an exhibition at the Great Synagogue that showed, among other things, how Škoda had briefly supplied the State of Israel with armaments.

This period of entente did not last long, of course.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
chive, I've no idea how accurate this story is about a Bulgarian Orthodox Metropolitan stopping a planned deportation of Jews from Bulgaria, but I've certainly heard it before.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Re blogs, I'm wondering about re-starting one that I can illustrate with pics, etc. I used to have one on LiveJournal, but does anyone still use that these days, or is WordPress now the in-thing? What site would people recommend?
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Livejournal is pretty much dying, thanks to the attacks by Russians (Livejournal being used by many anti-government Russian bloggers)! Would recommend Wordpress.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
I'd like to ask about reading blogs rather than writing them. (The latter being something that I use blogspot for). Google is discontinuing their reader service this summer. Does anyone have an replacement they like?
 
Posted by Otter (# 12020) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
Google is discontinuing their reader service this summer. Does anyone have an replacement they like?

I switched to Newsblur a day or two after the Google announcement. There were a few days of snail-speed due to the massive influx of new users, but once that was sorted everything's been good. I do have a paid account, but it was only US$24 for a one-year term.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I hate it when the clocks are adjusted for Daylight Saving as i always seem to stuff up International phone calls. Here in NZ we have just adjusted clocks back an hour to NZ Standard time. Before (during summer time) I used to ring my brother in Miami at 1pm. What time do I ring to catch him at the same time?

Does Florida also adjust clocks?

Huia - easily confused
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Does this page help?

Jengie
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Does this page help?

Jengie

No -- it's an hour slow. (Currently says 9:48, but it's actually 10:48 in Florida.)
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
I normally use The World Clock. They also have a handy Time Converter.

[ 09. April 2013, 17:54: Message edited by: LeRoc ]
 
Posted by AngloCatholicGirl (# 16435) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
I hate it when the clocks are adjusted for Daylight Saving as i always seem to stuff up International phone calls. Here in NZ we have just adjusted clocks back an hour to NZ Standard time. Before (during summer time) I used to ring my brother in Miami at 1pm. What time do I ring to catch him at the same time?

Does Florida also adjust clocks?

Huia - easily confused

I use for the site below for my calls, they have a nifty 'set meeting time' gadget which helps you work out multiple location times now and in the future. I used it a lot for work and it was always correct
This site
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Does this page help?

Jengie

No -- it's an hour slow. (Currently says 9:48, but it's actually 10:48 in Florida.)
How unusual. It showed an hour fast for me.

And yes, Florida does adjust clocks. Unfortunately. [Frown]
 
Posted by Percy B (# 17238) on :
 
A friends church is looking for some simple wooden stools suitable to put next to priests seats at the Eucharist, ideally with a shelf underneath, perhaps ones that could double up as seats too.

Someone told them to try Ikea but that doesn't seem to work. It's for a chapel so the expense of church furnishes isn't what's wanted.

Anyone any suggestion, please?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
A friend has asked me what's the difference between a christening and a baptism. Come to think of it, I'm not sure I know either, so can anyone enlighten us?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
You mean something like this? I admit it is not officially a stool.

Jengie
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Does this page help?

Jengie

No -- it's an hour slow. (Currently says 9:48, but it's actually 10:48 in Florida.)
Florida includes two time zones: Miami is in Eastern Time (UTC - 5:00) while the western part including Pensacola is in Central Time (UTC - 6:00). So you can't summarize for the whole state.
 
Posted by Percy B (# 17238) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
You mean something like this? I admit it is not officially a stool.

Jengie

Yes something, LIKE, that but it seems a bit too tall to serve as a stool too...
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
So saw the legs down...

One of my most long-lasting bits of furniture started as a slightly spindly plant stand.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Percy B:
A friends church is looking for some simple wooden stools suitable to put next to priests seats at the Eucharist, ideally with a shelf underneath, perhaps ones that could double up as seats too.

Someone told them to try Ikea but that doesn't seem to work. It's for a chapel so the expense of church furnishes isn't what's wanted.

Anyone any suggestion, please?

1. Buy stool of desired height and seat size.
2. Buy shelf.
3. Attach shelf to legs of stool.

(nb: above scheme works best with square seats and square section legs)
 
Posted by Zacchaeus (# 14454) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
A friend has asked me what's the difference between a christening and a baptism. Come to think of it, I'm not sure I know either, so can anyone enlighten us?

There isn't - two different terms for the same thing. Church people will tend say Baptism, non church Christening.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Percy B:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
You mean something like this? I admit it is not officially a stool.

Jengie

Yes something, LIKE, that but it seems a bit too tall to serve as a stool too...
Just look for a bedside table or side table and look for the look you want.

Jengie
 
Posted by Arch Anglo Catholic (# 15181) on :
 
@Ariel

Baptism is derived from the Latin word for the sacrament.
Christening is the Anglo Saxon derived word for the same thing.

There are very many such pairs of words; neither has a more important or accurate meaning in my view; they just come from different ancient sources.

English is a mongrel language as you have no doubt already noted!
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
... which is why Welsh is the language of heaven.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... which is why Welsh is the language of heaven.

Peidiwch a dweud hynny; fyddai rhaid i bawb siarad yn araf ar fy nghyfer fi! / Don't say that; everyone'd have to speak slowly for me!
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Percy B:
A friends church is looking for some simple wooden stools suitable to put next to priests seats at the Eucharist, ideally with a shelf underneath, perhaps ones that could double up as seats too.

Someone told them to try Ikea but that doesn't seem to work. It's for a chapel so the expense of church furnishes isn't what's wanted.

Anyone any suggestion, please?

Might these work? They're incredibly useful and very cheap, but the shelf/step isn't underneath.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... which is why Welsh is the language of heaven.

Because it takes all eternity to learn it?
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... which is why Welsh is the language of heaven.

Because it takes all eternity to learn it?
If that were the reason it'd be Icelandic, which is orders of magnitude harder, IMNAAHO.

[ 11. April 2013, 15:35: Message edited by: Karl: Liberal Backslider ]
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
No, no, no. On that basis the language of Heaven is Basque. If you get turned on by fiendishly complicated verb paradigms, Basque is ice-cold showers territory.
 
Posted by TonyK (# 35) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Percy B:
A friends church is looking for some simple wooden stools suitable to put next to priests seats at the Eucharist, ideally with a shelf underneath, perhaps ones that could double up as seats too.

Someone told them to try Ikea but that doesn't seem to work. It's for a chapel so the expense of church furnishes isn't what's wanted.

Anyone any suggestion, please?

Ikea in the UK offer these. We have 4 at home, and after assembling, sanding and varnishing they look good. I am not a great DIYer but I think even I could fit shelf to it.

Hope this helps
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Last Sunday I was in St Mary Magdalen's in Coventry. Their lady chapel is very beautiful thanks to some very lovely stained glass, all portraying female saints. However the saints are not named and I couldn't quite figure out two of them.

I recognised St Mary Magdalene, the BVM, St Clare and St Joan of Arc. One I thought was St Margaret of Scotland since she was a queen, but looking St Margaret up that looks unlikely. She was holding keys and a pouch/purse, and portrayed with a boat with a cross for a mast. Perhaps St Helena?

The other saint I didn't recognise had a face surrounded by fire and was shown healing someone. I thought she was perhaps St Brigid due to the fire but it doesn't look like it.

Who are these saints?

(I do recommend the church by the way - lovely sung Eucharist with incense and a very friendly and welcoming congregation, even though I was just visiting.)
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
You do know that Margaret of Scotland was shipwrecked and that is how she ended up in Scotland.

Jengie
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
The female saint with the face surrounded by flame is St Brigid
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
St Margaret of Scotland's other "boat" connection is that she set up a ferry (the Queen's ferry) across the firth of Forth to facilitate pilgrimages to St Andrews. The villages at either end of this ferry are still called North Queensferry and South Queensferry.
 
Posted by scuffleball (# 16480) on :
 
What's the correct technical term for a sparkling water bottle like you sometimes see in posh restaurants and hotels, with a metal clasp at the top like a jarfait jar, like the one in this photo?

http://www.portstyle.com/images/GLA37110.jpg

(Before you ask, the photo is labelled "Glass Water Bottle" which doesn't really help a great deal.)
 
Posted by Og, King of Bashan (# 9562) on :
 
In the States at least, you can find them by searching for "flip top bottles." I collect brown versions as I find them for bottling home brewed beer. Sometimes you will see them being sold used as "Grolsch Style bottles." But "flip top" I think is the generic term.
 
Posted by scuffleball (# 16480) on :
 
Cool, thanks for the prompt reply!
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
aka 'swing top bottles' [Smile]
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
Does anyone have a reputable source for the Jewish (Cabbalistic?) tradition that the Shekinah glory of God hovers over the marriage bed?

Google finds the tradition for me, but not a source.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
You can get flip/swing top bottles from anywhere that has home brewing paraphenalia.

Lakeland also used to stock them -very handly for mixing vinaigrette/storing it in the 'fridge. [Smile]
 
Posted by Scots lass (# 2699) on :
 
The drain on my bath is blocked. I've chucked chemicals down it but that's not cleared it. On poking at it with one of those drain clearing rod thingies, I'm hitting something hard just beneath the trap. Do I have to call a plumber now, or does anyone have any suggestions for what I should try next?
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Do you have a plunger? It would be worth a try.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
If you haven't a plunger you might create enough partial vacuum by placing your palm over the drain, pressing down, then lifting up sharply. Repeat until a) it works or b) you get fed up.

It's worth a try.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
This is a long shot but does anyone on here belong to or know anyone who belongs to YLGC (Young Lesbian & Gay Christians)? I've registered for the forums but have not received an activation email. Have clicked the link on the boards to resend the activation email, but have not received one (and yes I have checked my junk mail!). Out of the contact email addresses on the website, one is not working and the other hasn't responded to my email. Only members can see other members' profiles so I can't find a member to email and ask them to contact a moderator. [brick wall]
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
A further, kind-of-related request. I would love to hear any memories of life in Coventry between 1955 and 1965 approx for some research I am undertaking (you will be credited if published). I am particularly interested in memories of the following communities

*the Irish community
*the Catholic community and main churches/church schools
*the Caribbean community, particularly Catholic members
*the Coventry motown/northern soul scene
*the early LGBT (gay/lesbian) scene - I realise at this stage it would have been very much underground and mostly illegal, but that doesn't matter, anything will help

Please PM me with your info, so I have it on file!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Okay, it's bugging me...

Within the last four months I have heard various people suddenly starting saying "I DO!" with an up-pitch on the DO. In answer to, well, basically everything.

Do you have a pencil? "I DO!" (almost girlish squeal)

Do you need to use the toilet? "I DO!" etc. etc. etc.

People used to say "Yes," "Sure," or "Here, borrow mine." Now I'm getting nothing but "I DO!" from all sides.

What ***forsaken celebrity are they imitating? There has to be one.

[ 28. April 2013, 21:00: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Yes, Lamb Chopped:

An American acquaintance tells me it is the US version of the upLIFT at the end of every sentence that became common in the UK with the rise of Neighbours .

A cure? Well, since the rising inflexion in UK English is used as an interrogatory, try this approach:
Person A to up-lift ender B

A Do you have a pencil ?
B I DO
A Yes, that is a pencil. Look, we're all getting a bit concerned at your inability to recognise everyday objects: have you seen your doctor about it? [Smile]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
[Big Grin] tempting.

The squeal is not on the right pitch for the US interrogative, though; it's more the pitch we'd use to friends to announce that we'd just won the lottery. "I WON!" which seems way too delighted for something as mundane as a pencil--or a toilet either, unless you were in truly desoerate straits. Is it still the same phenomenon?

[ 29. April 2013, 11:26: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
LC, some of just get very excited about pencils [Biased]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
You DO!

(admit it, you knew I was going to do that)
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
If you're talking about the family all of whom have the last name 'Connolly,' would you call them "the Connollys" or "the Connollies"?
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
My cousin's cousins on the other side are Connollys! They keep the 'y'. Others may vary!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Hart, as a guide proper nouns remain as they are, plus an "s", others take "ies", hence maple trees have leaves but the hockey team is the Maple Leafs.

I'm sure there are exceptions, probably as a consequence of trademarks and the like.
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
The rule I know is that if the noun X is short for a longer group of nouns in which X is not itself the element being pluralised, then you add an -s to X regardless of its normal plural.

So for example, 'Maple Leafs' is short for something like 'Toronto Maple Leaf Hockey Club players'. When you say 'the Maple Leafs', you don't mean that there is more than one maple leaf (the club logo has only one), but that there is more than one player who bears the maple leaf logo. It is 'players' that is plural, not 'leaf'.

Likewise, when you say 'the Connollys', you are not suggesting that there is more than one Connolly family. You are saying there is more than one Connolly family member. Ergo, the plural -s is used, not -ies.
 
Posted by Longshanks (# 16259) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Scots lass:
The drain on my bath is blocked. I've chucked chemicals down it but that's not cleared it. On poking at it with one of those drain clearing rod thingies, I'm hitting something hard just beneath the trap. Do I have to call a plumber now, or does anyone have any suggestions for what I should try next?

Sometimes there is a cap you can unscrew at the base of the U bend.
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
If you're talking about the family all of whom have the last name 'Connolly,' would you call them "the Connollys" or "the Connollies"?

Our friends Mr & Mrs Foot were officially the Foots, but we always called them the Feet - it just sounded better.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
If you're talking about the family all of whom have the last name 'Connolly,' would you call them "the Connollys" or "the Connollies"?

Our friends Mr & Mrs Foot were officially the Foots, but we always called them the Feet - it just sounded better.
Not really an answer, but a bit of whimsy. Our friends are the Penn family. So, natch, they are known as the Penns.

However, because we live in France, they jokingly became known as Les Stylos.

Whenever I address their Christmas card etc to Les Stylos, I now think of a fat greasy Anglo-Greek café owner called Les (short for Leslie) Stylos.

Edited because I never use preview post and only see the spelling mistakes (or typos) as I press Publish. Sigh.

[ 03. May 2013, 09:08: Message edited by: Dormouse ]
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
Thanks, all! "Connollys" it is.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
This is curiosity and puzzling me.

I know there people like Tony Philips who are interested in the mathematics of drawing Labyrinths*, I also know plenty of people who are interested in creating copies of either the Cretan or the Chartres Labyrinth and a few who occasionally do different ones. However does anyone apart from me enjoy drawing different labyrinths and actually exploring the way you create the shapes and paths that form them?

It just seems weird to me when there are literally thousands of different options that we have basically stuck with two.

Jengie

*I am fully aware that there is lots out there on the mathematics of solving mazes.

[ 09. May 2013, 21:07: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Just to add my only page which is pretty good on drawing at the present is this one. There used to be a better one on standard forms but I can not trace it.

Jengie
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
At last found usual reference point. Dig down and you will find more.

Jengie
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Has anybody else with a blog on Wibsite found that it's disappeared? When I try to access either my blog OR other peoples' I get this message:
"The requested URL /wp-login.php was not found on this server.

Additionally, a 404 Not Found error was encountered while trying to use an ErrorDocument to handle the request."

Can anyone enlighten me as to what's happened?
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
Dave W posted on Twitter that the site was down for a while, so there is a known problem that is being dealt with.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Thanks Drifting Star...As I'm hardly computer literate enough to import phots, I don't follow any social media, so I missed this.

Thank you for the "heads up"
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
That's probably an indicator of sanity rather than a lack of computer literacy!

Glad to help. [Smile]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
A question about what was contemporary Christian music in the 1970s.

I'm trying to locate a song with lyrics something like, "welcome to the worst show on earth, it's incredible, second to none."

Can anyone remember it?
 
Posted by scuffleball (# 16480) on :
 
Hi; in infant school I learnt a Somalia nursery rhyme called "The Little Fish."

It went something like this -

The little fish
Hatched from the egg
Slipped into the water
Father caught it
Mother cooked it
We all ate it
It was delicious

Except it was in Somali. Does anyone know the title in Soomali?
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
I'm sorry I don't, but I think it is a great song! [Smile]
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
I just read of an interesting puzzle on xkcd of all places. Can someone answer this: if the lift of an airplane depends on the rate of the air flowing over the wing being faster than that under a wing, how do planes sometimes fly upside down?
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
I understand that when a plane flies upside down, the pilot stears it (thereby changing the profile of the wings) as if it would go down in normal flight (but this down is now up).
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
Once you are at altitude and have sufficient airspeed, you can set the flaps for minimum lift and flip the plane over. At that point there is a slight downward lift from the wings in addition to gravity, so you can't fly that way for too long. But by setting the tail flaps to aim the nose slightly upwards you can take advantage of your airspeed to maintain altitude.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
Ah- good answers- Thank you!
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
PS Don't try it at home [Biased]
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
Not so long ago there was a thread started by someone who wanted advice on buying a smartphone. I've had a quick search and googled but no luck. Does anyone remember the thread and/or can point to a link? I'd be ever so grateful. Ta muchly.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
you mean this one which is a year out of date or this one about how we use it, which is more recent.

Jengie
 
Posted by Thyme (# 12360) on :
 
It was the first one I was thinking of Jengie Jon, but the second one looks useful as well. I have bookmarked them both now. Thank you!

[Yipee] [Overused]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Hearing the birdsong this evening, I was reminded of something I read yesra ago about Summer beginning of an evening. (And either Autumn or Winter beginning of a morning)
Does anyone know where this qoute comes from?
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
Does anyone happen to know why we say 'adoption' but 'adaptation' rather than 'adoptation' and 'adaptation' or 'adoption' and 'adaption' (IYSWIM)?
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
AIUI, abstract nouns in -ation are ultimately based on -io[n] added to the Latin past participle ending -at[um], which has the sense of 'having been __ed'. Thus adaptation is from adaptatum, which means 'having been adapted'.

Adoption, however, doesn't mean the state of having been adapted, but rather the act of adopting, and so the -ion is added directly to the stem, which is adopt.

In reality, the difference between 'having been __ed' and 'the act of __ing' is often less clear-cut than you'd imagine, so the answer 'just because' is probably equally valid ...
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
had we not would have been galloped...

There was a lot of (often daft) assimilating of English grammar to Latin (Wilkins his spade) - but the whole thing has gone to Hell in a handcart since people started being 'hospitalised' - which ought to mean being turned into a hospital, but apparently is meant to indicate that they have been taken to one. Look no longer for any coherence; that pass is long sold.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
Thank you, Ricardus- very clearly explained and just the sort of answer I knew I could rely on the Ship for.
 
Posted by Robert Armin (# 182) on :
 
Rereading Pride & Prejudice I was confronted by an old question: how does one pronounce the last name of Lady Catherine de Burgh? I grew up saying Burr, the wonderful BBC adaptation used Burg, while a recent unabridged audiobook went for Borg. Is there any way of knowing, or does it all come down to personal preference?
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
Howzaboot "deBurf?" [Biased]
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
I'd say Burg, since that's how the BBC and most British people I know would say it. She is English after all.

Cattyish, Scottish.
 
Posted by Robert Armin (# 182) on :
 
But, in both Scotland and England, "burgh" at the end of a place name is pronounced "burr". It's only in America, I believe, that it's pronounced "burg".
 
Posted by The5thMary (# 12953) on :
 
I have a question for my cousins across the pond. What are "plus fours"?
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Armin:
But, in both Scotland and England, "burgh" at the end of a place name is pronounced "burr".

Really? I've always pronounced it like 'borough' or 'burra'. 'Edinburgh' has four syllables for me, even though one is written without a vowel.
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
Thank you, Ricardus- very clearly explained and just the sort of answer I knew I could rely on the Ship for.

Thank you!

I've been thinking about it a bit more (having a very exciting life as you see) and I think one has to add two caveats:

1. I'm struggling to think of any case where the difference between 'state of being __ed' and 'act of __ing' constitutes anything more than a matter of perspective - e.g. in the case of adoption, whether you look at it from the parent's or the child's point of view. Which kind of reinforces Firenze's point that it's basically arbitrary;

2. There are many words that that don't end in -ation because they're built on Latin past participles that don't end in -at[um], e.g. action, junction, fusion are derived from actum, iunctum, fusum.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The5thMary:
I have a question for my cousins across the pond. What are "plus fours"?

Knee britches, essentially. Except they have an extra 4 inches in length which, when hoicked up and tucked into your argyle sporting socks, gives the the typical baggy-kneed silhouette. De rigueur golfing wear between the wars, not so much seen nowadays.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
There are, or were, also plus twos, plus sixes, and plus eights, with suitably varying degrees of bagginess.
I used to wear plus fours occasionally in my fogey youth. Jolly comfortable.

[ 28. May 2013, 09:21: Message edited by: Albertus ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
There are, or were, also plus twos, plus sixes, and plus eights, with suitably varying degrees of bagginess.
I used to wear plus fours occasionally in my fogey youth. Jolly comfortable.

Were these variations longer and shorter or baggier? I found every possibility on Google images, and it was Tintin's trousers that looked most convincing to me.
(And of course Google images always throws up some pics that have nothing to do with the subject, including frilly baby knickers in four colours, a birthday cake, and a young woman wearing nothing but a tub full of golf (?) balls.)

GG
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
AIUI, plus two less baggy (because less surplus cloth), plus sixes and plus eights baggier.
I think this genre of garment may be better known to trans-pond shipmates as 'knickerbockers'.
Yes, like Tintin's trousers, although mine were definitely not worn in homage to that revoltingly eager-beaver little Belgian.

[ 28. May 2013, 10:49: Message edited by: Albertus ]
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Is any UK shipmate a member of the CSMA? I'm wondering whether I've missed their regular offer of free tickets to County Championship cricket matches - possibly through skimming the magazine and then binning it. It may be defunct as I can't find a mention on the web page under "offers", but I'd like to be sure... If you are, and you still have it, could you check May's magazine please?

Many thanks,

AG
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ricardus:
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Armin:
But, in both Scotland and England, "burgh" at the end of a place name is pronounced "burr".

Really? I've always pronounced it like 'borough' or 'burra'. 'Edinburgh' has four syllables for me, even though one is written without a vowel.
I pronounce burgh at the end of a placename as burrah. Edinburgh has four syllables for me, too. But I pronounce Catherine de Burgh as "Burg". No idea why.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Armin:
But, in both Scotland and England, "burgh" at the end of a place name is pronounced "burr". It's only in America, I believe, that it's pronounced "burg".

I don't think "burgh" is ever really pronounced "burr", is it? Edinburgh, for example, is either pronounced with three syllables (Ed - in - bruh) or four (Ed - in - bur - uh).

I hear a lot of Americans successfully avoiding rhyming it with iceberg, only to end up with something close to Ed - in - burrow.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
De Burgh is originally a Dutch name, so it should be pronounced with a long, rolling chch at the back of the throat [Smile]
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
De Burgh is originally a Dutch name, so it should be pronounced with a long, rolling chch at the back of the throat [Smile]

Or "de Beau" in America? [Devil]

The lady's name is actually de Bourgh, not Burgh, but vowels in English names tend to have a certain optional character.

Debretts offers "de Burg" as the correct pronunciation of "de Burgh", although some hypothetical de Burgh calling himself Deborah wouldn't be out of line.

As for the lady herself, with an 'o', you could make a reasonable case for either Burg or Borg. There's almost no chance of a soft 'g' on the end.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
Any coin collectors out there?

Sifting through my tip jar and came across a 1922 silver US dollar. Looks like it might have some value. Any idea how to go about getting the best price for it, and how much that might be?
 
Posted by Robert Armin (# 182) on :
 
LC:
quote:
There's almost no chance of a soft 'g' on the end.
I bow to your superior knowledge, but why not? Place names have a soft "g", although I concede I got the number of syllables in "Edinburgh" wrong. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by comet:
Any coin collectors out there?

Sifting through my tip jar and came across a 1922 silver US dollar. Looks like it might have some value. Any idea how to go about getting the best price for it, and how much that might be?

I wouldn't get your hopes up - AIUI old coins aren't really worth very much unless they're either very old or special editions, simply because, by their very nature, coins are mass produced. But I'm not an expert by any means.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by comet:
Any coin collectors out there?

Sifting through my tip jar and came across a 1922 silver US dollar. Looks like it might have some value. Any idea how to go about getting the best price for it, and how much that might be?

According to this site - one of many that come up when googling for 'value 1922 US silver dollar' -,
quote:
A Normal relief coin (the most common variety) will be priced between $17.00 and $175.00 according to wear.
They also give spectacular values for mint-condition ones.

I imagine that it might well we worth a few bucks, but not very much. Perhaps it's worth to enquire more? Mostly, don't get overexcited, nor tricked by any potential buyers, if you decide to part with it.

Hope this helps.
 
Posted by Percy B (# 17238) on :
 
I was wondering if anyone has experience of the 'daily Prayer Rosary' book?

Any comments - is it good?

Thanx
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Percy, I think that might be a question for the Ecclesiantics people.
 
Posted by Percy B (# 17238) on :
 
Thanks Ariel. I did wonder, but thought its not liturgy but personal devotion, and so thought a general enquiry...

However will take your kind advice and try there.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
Not sure if anyone has the appropriate local knowledge, but it's always worth a try. I'm going to be in Austin, TX later this week for a wedding and in my free time, I'd love to do some swimming in Lake Travis. I've found online that there are a bunch of parks you can do this from, but I can't verify that any of them have lockers. I'll be on my own and I don't really like the idea of leaving my car keys on the beach while I swim. Does anyone know of anywhere that has these, or if they'll look after keys at the place where you pay admission?
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Prior to the First World War, Aberdeen (and, I assume, many other places) had nuns in a teaching order who came from a variety of countries. There were several French nuns, and at least one German. This set me wondering - when enemy aliens were being interred during the First World War, what happened to German nuns? Were they interred?
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
Not sure if anyone has the appropriate local knowledge, but it's always worth a try. I'm going to be in Austin, TX later this week for a wedding and in my free time, I'd love to do some swimming in Lake Travis. I've found online that there are a bunch of parks you can do this from, but I can't verify that any of them have lockers. I'll be on my own and I don't really like the idea of leaving my car keys on the beach while I swim. Does anyone know of anywhere that has these, or if they'll look after keys at the place where you pay admission?

Let me call my sister and I'll get back to you. She lives there. Don't miss lunch at The Oasis if you can manage it: has a beautiful view and is one of the largest restaurants in the country!

(I put in a call and am waiting to hear back)
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
My sister said to call the local parks and recreation department or find their website. I think the lake is in the city of Austin, but it may be under the aegis of the county. Good luck!
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Prior to the First World War, Aberdeen (and, I assume, many other places) had nuns in a teaching order who came from a variety of countries. There were several French nuns, and at least one German. This set me wondering - when enemy aliens were being interred during the First World War, what happened to German nuns? Were they interred?

I hope that, for all the rabid anti-Germanism of 1914, the worst that happened to them was that they were interned [Smile]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
[Hot and Hormonal]

Indeed! I wondered what would happen to a German nun, living in a British convent, when Germans were being interNed during WW1.
 
Posted by Not (# 2166) on :
 
Fairly sure only men were interned, and then only within a certain age range (based on Judith Kerr's memoirs)

Mainly men, from what I can make out from this

Suspect nuns would be classed as low risk...
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Is there anyone there who knows London Heathrow airport well and can tell me, is there anywhere there still open to the public (landside) where you can go and watch the planes taking off and landing? I know years ago it used to be the Queen's Building but I assume that is long gone. I have a plane-mad little boy coming to stay with me soon and thought it would be nice to take him out there to watch the planes.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Planespotting at Heathrow used to be the highlight of my half-term holiday when I was a girl, but with recent events the spectators' area has now been closed. Unless you're actually travelling, when you'll get to see them from the terminal windows, you now have to go further down Bath Road to what used to be the visitors' centre, I believe. Heathrow's guide for spectators.

It isn't quite as glam but maybe City Airport might do? I haven't been able to find out whether they're having the London City Airport Fun Day this year at the start of July, but if they are your little lad might enjoy that.
 
Posted by Macrina (# 8807) on :
 
Does anyone know how to remove the little grease stains that blutack leaves from painted walls?
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
WD40 removes most oily and waxy stains from painted walls, even wax crayon.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
I'll be on my own and I don't really like the idea of leaving my car keys on the beach while I swim.

It's probably too late for this trip, but I picked up several different sized Aquapacs for a recent trip to Hawaii for the same reason (and to keep sand out of my cameras and phones). Their Keymaster model was perfect for a car key, ID, credit card, and some cash. It all stayed nice and dry. My boardies all have some form of a pocket (velcro or zipper) to keep it in.

For the ladies, or guys who prefer banana hammocks, the Aquapacs come with lanyards to tie around a wrist/ankle/waistband. I found mine online, but some higher-end outdoor outfitters carry them too, like REI.

http://usstore.aquapac.net/keymaster-fits-asthma-inhalers-uss608.html

[ 17. June 2013, 20:34: Message edited by: monkeylizard ]
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
I might get an aquapac next time I go surfing without my wife. As I get older, I work less and am spending more time surfing in the off-season. Our 2013 Ford Focus Titanium does not have a "key" as such, just an electronic fob which the car senses is in your pocket and opens the doors. You push a button to start the car. I would be in a world of hurt if that was the car I took to the beach.

Last time I went surfing was in February before I bought the new car and the rented Chevrolet Cruze had an electronic key, so I buried it in the sand!

Next time I go surfing, I'll have to take my old surfer wagon and it no longer has an electronic fob, just a metal key I can put on a string in the pocket of my board shorts before I don my wetsuit.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
I got the Keymaster for my carkey and cards/cash, the Mini Whanganui for my iPhone (had to remove the iPhone case to make it fit), and the Mini Camera Case with Hard Lens for the camera. All three kept out the sand and water over 2 weeks of beach, surfing, and snorkelling and all look as good as new. If your pocket camera has an extending lens, get the one with the hard lens. If not, the Small Camera Case would do the trick.

The "secret" (it's on the packaging) is to inspect the seal area each time you close it up for any stray sand, hair, or other bits of stuff that can keep the seal from forming properly. Rinse it well in fresh water after use to get rid of any salt/sand.

Speaking of surfing...I tried it for my first time on Waikiki about 2 weeks ago. It was awesome! Sadly, I'm too far from a beach to get into it. [Frown]
 
Posted by Chapelhead (# 21) on :
 
I've recently read a book, written in the 1960s, in which one character refers to another as having "his ears too high on his head". This expression seems to suggest that the person is not to be trusted, in the same way as "having his eyes too close together". I'm not sure if this is just a 'private' expression used by these characters, or if this term was in more general use.

Google does not seem to be my friend on this. Has anyone else come across this expression?
 
Posted by A.Pilgrim (# 15044) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Macrina:
Does anyone know how to remove the little grease stains that blutack leaves from painted walls?

With the caveat that I've not actually done this myself, I would try using a small dab of Swarfega* on a piece of paper kitchen roll. Swarfega is my all-time choice for removing oily marks on anything, especially fabrics. (Followed by hand soap and then water on a fabric, but I guess that an impermeable surface such as a painted wall won't need them). Of course, it might happen that the Swarfega takes the paint off the wall, in which case, don't blame me! [Two face]
Angus

*UK terminology. I regret that if this product is unknown across the pond I can't help with alternative names or suggestions.
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by monkeylizard:

Speaking of surfing...I tried it for my first time on Waikiki about 2 weeks ago. It was awesome! Sadly, I'm too far from a beach to get into it. [Frown]

I took my Gordon and Smith surfboard to Honolulu on United Airlines when I was 20: I was a moderately experienced surfer at the time living in the La Jolla Shores neighbourhood of San Diego. It was August and there were no waves at Waikiki or Makaha where I drove in a rented car. Fortunately I had a two-island tour and went out with some success in Kona and Hilo though I tore up my feet a bit on the volcanic sea floor. I mostly stick to northern San Diego County these days and go to Malibu County Line (LA / Ventura) if I am meeting my brother. I believe my late father surfed on a redwood board in Hawaii during the last war. He was also born in LA but never surfed locally though he did teach me and my brother to bodysurf.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
Thanks for the advice, people. For this trip, locking things in my car and just taking the non-electronic key with my worked fine. I could have tied that round my wrist or safety pinned it inside shorts, but the lake end up being quiet enough that I could keep an eye on my stuff while swimming.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Macrina:
Does anyone know how to remove the little grease stains that blutack leaves from painted walls?

I'm pretty sure I read somewhere that rubbing bread on them would do it. Worth a try anyway.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Blotting paper and then press with a warm iron - if you can't find blotting paper then brown wrapping paper will do, matt side onto the stain. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Bread does get rid of grease stains and some black marks, and is a gentle way of doing it. However, I haven't tried it on Blu-Tack, which isn't the same kind of grease as butter or oil, and doubt that it would work.

There are lots of suggestions on the internet but they only seem to have limited success or none at all. I'd suggest looking for some kind of stain remover in your local hardware shop - Stain Devils have a comprehensive range and there might be something there, if you can get them where you are.
 
Posted by Percy B (# 17238) on :
 
I read a review a while ago - say a year or two - of a book about the rosary, recently published, written by a RC priest who has a particular love of / ministry with the Rosary - I think he was Irish...

Can anyone help with a title?
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
Bread is also useful for gently cleaning the covers of old books.
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Percy B:
I read a review a while ago - say a year or two - of a book about the rosary, recently published, written by a RC priest who has a particular love of / ministry with the Rosary - I think he was Irish...

Can anyone help with a title?

Hmmm. Is there any chance that you are thinking of The Rosary: Chain of Hope, by Father Benedict Groeschel? I think that was published in 2012. I don't think he is Irish, but I could be wrong. [Smile]
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
Patrick Peyton?
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Best budget Chinese in London's Chinatown? Doesn't have to be authentic but would prefer it if it was. Noodles (in soup and ho fun especially) preferred to rice dishes.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Wander round and take your pick. They're all crammed into quite a small area, and they're all much of a muchness, pricewise.

My personal favourite is the Vietnamese just around the corner that looks like someone's front room. No frills, not hugely expensive, just authentic food with no concessions to the Western palate.

(I still remember the duck portion that came, roughly chopped into over-large "bite-size" pieces, with bones still attached, to be eaten with chopsticks. Somehow, I managed, and yes it was pretty good.)
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Any suggestions on how to remove chewing gum from the side of some quite lovely black leather shoes? [Mad]

So far, I've used bits of soft tissue, dunked into warmish water, and the chewing gum is gradually coming off. But it's painstaking work, and I couldn't be bothered to do all of it yet. [Frown]

Any better ideas? Thanks.
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
I would say put it in the freezer, but you really need to have some idea about the effects of freezing on leather before you do. Maybe holding an ice cube on it, possibly in a plastic bag, would be a good compromise.

Freezing is far and away the easiest way to get rid of chewing gum from most things.


[Edited because grammar is good.]

[ 02. July 2013, 10:05: Message edited by: Drifting Star ]
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
Any better ideas? Thanks.

Belt sander. Guaranteed to remove the chewing gum. [Smile]

I agree with Drifting Star. Get the gum cold and it will be easier to remove as it hardens.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Spray with compressed lighter fuel - it will come off. If any of the dye comes off the leather then use a leather dye to blend into the surrounding areas.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
You can get a Stain Devil for that. I got one and found it worked, though this was on fabric rather than leather. You might have to polish the leather up afterwards with some black shoe polish, but that won't hurt.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Thanks, all! I'll give this a thought, and shall report back in due time. [Smile]
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
My study just got some new burgundy blinds. I like burgundy.

The walls in the study need some patching and painting and rather than do it in boring old white (original colour 25 years ago), I was wondering about a light pastel. What colours complement burgundy, in your experience?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Cream, light grey, beige or gold; or you could try a pastel pink (if you're careful about which hue you pick) or sage green. Blue-green if you want a stronger colour, but it needs to be strong and won't look good as a gentle pastel next to burgundy.

There is always the fallback option of a much paler shade of the original colour, but you might prefer to have a contrast rather than a complement.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Thank you very much. Although I am tempted by gold, I think I will settle for a light grey.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Certain shades of light blue or greyish blue would go nicely also. You have to pick the shades carefully.

Moo
 
Posted by Kittyville (# 16106) on :
 
Colours from opposite sides of the colour wheel go well together. I have some oil paintings with a dark red/burgundy background. On the advice of a rellie in the rag trade, I painted the wall they were to hang on pale green. It works really well.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I had 2 MP3 players that died recently. I am missing having some music to listen to as I commute around town and I am trying to find out the pros and cons of i-pods, MP3 (or 4) players and any other format that may suit.

I am what PeteC refers to as a technopeasant, so something that is simple would be best.

At present all my music is on cds and I would be downloading them onto whatever format I choose (or getting a friend to do this for me if I don't have the technological expertise).

So, what would you suggest?
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Get any new (or old) mp3 player, if you feel like it!

I've just bought another old SanDisk Sansa of the e200 series, which all come with a MicroSD card slot: the newer ones of these (other brands are available!) accept MicroSD cards of up to 32GB, which is a lot, and relatively cheap. Cards of smaller storage sizes are also there, like 4, 8 or 16GB (check for compatibility with the player's software).

However, what I've found myself doing is using the same extra storage card trick with my (SonyEricsson) smart phone: I've slapped the same type MicroSD card with 32GB storage in there, and so I can use the phone for listening to music, if I'm en route.

Main thing seems to be, store your music on an external harddrive, connected to your computer, and then transfer all you desire to the mp3 player/smart phone, possibly the extra card. That way you won't lose much if they crash again.

Hope this gives you a few points to consider. For further and more techy advice, check out this thread, should you wish. [Smile]
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
Just as a music player, in iPod isn't really any better or worse than the competition like Wes mentioned from SanDisk.

I never thought I'd be an Apple fan, but when it comes to iPod/iPhone I'm 100% sold.

iPod shines for 2 reasons: Apps and iTunes. The importance of apps will depend on what kind of iPod you're considering. If you want a tiny little iPod Shuffle, then you won't be running any apps. An iPod Touch is basically an iPhone* without the phone part and can run apps and communicate over the Internet via WiFi. I'm not sure if the new Nano can run apps or not. I know it has some built-in ones, but I don't know if you can add more or not.

iTunes is the software you install on your Mac/PC for managing your media library (songs, movies, podcasts, etc.) It seems to be a love it or hate it package. Control freaks hate it because of the way it stores the files behind the scenes. People who switch brands a lot hate it because it encodes music in an Apple format that other players don't read. It can do .MP3 but it's not the default.

One huge advantage of iTunes is how easy it is to use. My FiL, who needs help to login to gMail, loves iTunes. It's very easy to access the music and app stores to purchase new stuff and displays your library in an easy to read way. It also has a few less steps than many other players' software for purchasing and importing from CD and then placing them on your player.

It also makes gift giving easier for your friends..."oh I'll give him/her an iTunes card" [Smile]

If all you want is a simple music player, look at the iPod Shuffle. You still get the ease of use of iTunes in a very simple package.


*If you happen to also be ready for a new phone, the iPhone is also a player. No need for both an iPhone and iPod for most people. One device for everything. I know most Android-based phones are also .MP3 players and they all run apps so that's not an iPhone exclusive thing. Not to start an Apple vs. Android war as both have good and bad, but in my experience iOS (used by iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPod Nano) is much easier to use. My wife and MiL can't figure out how to do much of anything on their Androids without my help but can both easily use my and my FiL's iPhones. Both will be switching to iPhone soon, for their convenience and my sanity.
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by monkeylizard:
iTunes is the software you install on your Mac/PC for managing your media library (songs, movies, podcasts, etc.) It seems to be a love it or hate it package. Control freaks hate it because of the way it stores the files behind the scenes. People who switch brands a lot hate it because it encodes music in an Apple format that other players don't read. It can do .MP3 but it's not the default.

Indeed. One of my most frustrating technological experiences was trying to transfer my music collection from a PC to a Mac. Also, unlike an mp3 player which is basically a memory stick with an audio player built in, it's impossible, without third-party software, to transfer music from an iPod to iTunes on a computer.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
iTunes is a gerat music player for a mac or a PC. I use it on bioth and have for years. Simple and easy.

Its sort of OK way to acess the Apple Shop and do downloads but its unneccessarily complicates, has a crap search facility, isn't very cusomiosable and is terribly slwo (though I suppose that's the onlie shop not the local app)

Its a completely utterly stupid and idiotic way to manage apps on an iphone or ipad, unintuitive, clumsy, dangerous, easy to break, hard to make it do anything it doesn;t want to do, and all to liabnle to accidentally delete all your apps or music from the phone just because you chose the wrong sync option. Especially if you have more than one mobile device and moer than one computer with itumes (as I do). Plug the wrong one into the wrong one and click the wrong little box and it takes hours to get your stuff back.

The only reason milliosn of peopel put up with it is because you ahve to use it with the iphone and the advantages of the iphone between syncs are so great they are willign to put up with the dead hand of itunes

Buit as a music player - its great.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
No-one will ever believe me when I say that the dozens of egregious typos in that post were invisible until after the edit period was past. But they were.

I know what words I wrote. When I look at what I have written I can see the words. The letters fade into them. It takes effort to see them separately.

Honest.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Perhaps it might help to get a spelling checker plugin for your browser - anyone got any good recommendations?

Or another option might be maybe to copy your posts into Word before you post them, and get Word to spell-check them for you.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks Wesley, Monkey Lizard, Richardus and Ken. I understand most of your advice (I think).

It's school holidays here, which means chaos in the shops, so I'll put it off for a bit while I consider what you've said.

And Ariel- would the plug-in you're suggesting to Ken work like spell check in Word?

Huia
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
I love my SanDisk! Tiny and cheap, and you can get so much storage for so little money.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
I still have my (relatively) old Creative Zen mp3 player, and it's just fine. I must admit I only download podcasts and not music (the only music I have on it is the playlist for our wedding reception) but it seems to work basically OK synching with iTunes (when there are problems I think they are Windows-related rather than Creative-related, and they usually resolve eventually).
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Perhaps it might help to get a spelling checker plugin for your browser - anyone got any good recommendations?

I have a spell-checker form my browser [Smile]

quote:

Or another option might be maybe to copy your posts into Word before you post them, and get Word to spell-check them for you.

Word? This is one of your Earth "jokes" I think?

(I usually write all but the shortest things in a text editor, which does have a spellchecker) But I type fast while I'm doing other thiogns...)
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
I used to love iTunes, but since version 11 it started to suck more and more. The jukebox feature has been removed, the working of intelligent playlists has changed...

I'm considering moving my music collection to another program.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
I found in a book the other day an extract from a letter by Marie Stopes in which she said that olive oil was a good contraceptive- I assume when applied internally by a woman.
Is this true? If it is, why isn't it more widely know?
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Olive oil impedes sperm motility, so as a contraceptive it's better than nothing, but not much.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Another popular one was a sponge soaked in vinegar. So sort of sex'n'salad dressing.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Going from the ridiculous to the sublime - or vice-versa, depending - how does one get a rust stain out of low-pile (aka indoor-outdoor) carpeting without ripping it all up and starting anew? I know how the stain got there, but couldn't tell you exactly when it started.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by PeteC:
...how does one get a rust stain out of low-pile (aka indoor-outdoor) carpeting without ripping it all up and starting anew?

That's a toughie. You can get rust stains out of fabric by putting lemon juice on them and exposing them to sunlight. This may fade the fabric.

Moo
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If a coloured garment that's in the wash has run all over white clothes, i.e. the dye is unstable, why is it so difficult to get the colour out of the white clothes? Logically, it ought to be as easy to get it out of those as it is to lose it from the original, no?

(I know, when did logic ever apply to clothes?)
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
You can buy special dye removers.

Moo
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
After my earlier question on chewing-gummically-challenged shoes, here's one from a different branch (sic!) of life:

I've just got this kitchen trolley, second hand, for not much dough. I'm planning to use it as a mobile workbench, similar to that in the article; it doesn't have to look great, to start with. It's birch wood.

I've now found that the worktop/butcher's top is splitting along some of the seams; you can see these if you zoom in on the first link. As I've never experienced anything like it in IKEA furniture - except on a few 20-odd-year old Ivar shelf boards (pine wood) - I'm curious as to, in your expert opinion, a) why it may have started to split, and b) what you think can be done about it.

To a) I thought, perhaps very dry room for extended period. To b): perhaps use woodfiller or glue (the cracks are max 0.5 to 1 mm wide only, and don't go all the way)? Or - I may be totally off the mark here! - would a 1 or 2hr waterbath help the wood to sort of regain some its flexiblity, and help close the cracks? (Only asking, I really don't know!)

Thank you again, Shippies! [Smile]
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
If a coloured garment that's in the wash has run all over white clothes, i.e. the dye is unstable, why is it so difficult to get the colour out of the white clothes? Logically, it ought to be as easy to get it out of those as it is to lose it from the original, no?

(I know, when did logic ever apply to clothes?)

Sometimes it's the fabric as much as the dye. Some fabrics 'take' colour much better than others. Also some articles may contain a surplus of dye some of which easily runs out of them, but which would be as hard to remove totally from a garment as the smaller amount is from the pale garment into which it has run.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Huge request, we are trying to trace my father's cousin who he is in vague contact with*, as Dad is in hospital. The problem is we really have very little to go on.

His first name is Ray
He is related to Law, so he maybe Ray Law but Law equally might be his mother's maiden name
We think he lives in Norfolk but has connections with Birmingham or more accurately Walsall or Smethwick.
He will be over seventy.

Any clue where to start looking. Telephone directories give me about twenty names for R Law in Norfolk.

Jengie

* Dad has plenty of cousins but this is the only one he has any regular contact with.

[ 20. July 2013, 16:21: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
I would probably just phone them each in turn and say something similar to what you said here. Chances are that one of them will know who he is or at least who in their family knows all the relations. Hope it works out.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Maybe if they were in Smethwick or Walsall that would work but the chances are that there is only Ray (and his wife?) in that area of the country. Ray's route to Norfolk was via Newcastle.

Hey they are relatively sedentary by our family standards, with my mum's family we are fortunate if the next generation are on the same continent as the previous. Yes this means either my niece or nephew are likely to start continent hopping.

Jengie
 
Posted by jackanapes (# 12374) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
If a coloured garment that's in the wash has run all over white clothes, i.e. the dye is unstable, why is it so difficult to get the colour out of the white clothes? Logically, it ought to be as easy to get it out of those as it is to lose it from the original, no?

(I know, when did logic ever apply to clothes?)

Generally, a certain amount of fabric of a certain type will hold fast a certain amount of dye of a certain type. It can hold extra dye in a non-fast state. It is this extra dye that comes out in the wash and colours your whites. Your whites will then hold fast some of that dye.

Once dye is fast, it is difficult to remove although, as stated upthread, there are products available that will do this job more or less well, dependent on dye and fabric involved.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by jackanapes:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
If a coloured garment that's in the wash has run all over white clothes, i.e. the dye is unstable, why is it so difficult to get the colour out of the white clothes? Logically, it ought to be as easy to get it out of those as it is to lose it from the original, no?

(I know, when did logic ever apply to clothes?)

Generally, a certain amount of fabric of a certain type will hold fast a certain amount of dye of a certain type. It can hold extra dye in a non-fast state. It is this extra dye that comes out in the wash and colours your whites. Your whites will then hold fast some of that dye.

Once dye is fast, it is difficult to remove although, as stated upthread, there are products available that will do this job more or less well, dependent on dye and fabric involved.

One thing that may help is to strongly bleach some white rags, rinsing well, and then wash the off color garment with the rags and no soap or bleach. That was a standard trick for cleaning washers after using dyes in them.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Huge request, we are trying to trace my father's cousin who he is in vague contact with*, as Dad is in hospital. The problem is we really have very little to go on.

Letters to local papers in that area? I regularly see letters like that locally asking for any information or on the local society websites. You can e-mail the letter, or maybe tweet and ask for a RT to the papers in that area.
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Is it a long distance call for your dad? Maybe check old phone bills for a number in that area.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Unless the surname is very common try directory enquiries on the web or just google the name.

And you could always try facebook.
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Huge request, we are trying to trace my father's cousin who he is in vague contact with*, as Dad is in hospital. The problem is we really have very little to go on.

Letters to local papers in that area? I regularly see letters like that locally asking for any information or on the local society websites. You can e-mail the letter, or maybe tweet and ask for a RT to the papers in that area.
The Eastern Daily Press is widely read in Norfolk.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
... and if he's around 70 he's more likely to list himself as Raymond, rather than Ray.

Any idea if he's married, wife's name, etc? That could all be helpful too...

Good luck [Votive]
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
My lavatory cistern has suddenly started making a loud moaning sound whenever it is flushed. Any suggestions?

(This is a serious question .....)

[Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Mine did that. At first I thought I had Moaning Myrtle stuck down it. It seemed to happen more if it wasn't flushed for a few hours, then for whatever reason, it cured itself after some weeks. I'm assuming in this instance it was low water pressure, though the internet suggests there can be more than one reason for this problem.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
I'm planning on shaving my head to raise money for the Behcets Syndrome Society in memory of a friend's sister who died from the disease this year. I will put a JustGiving link in my signature once I've set it up, but does anyone have any hints for taking care of a bald head? I will need sunscreen (I am pale and use spf 30+ as standard) but other than that, is there anything else to be aware of?
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
Any suggestions on how to remove chewing gum from the side of some quite lovely black leather shoes? [...]

Thank you all for your advice and encouraging words! I've just now tried with my Kärcher steam cleaner, and lo and behold: all the chewing gum's come off! So, apparently, both extremes work: ice and steamy heat. Yay! - I shall reward myself with a pot of peanut butter. [Yipee]
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
Any suggestions on how to remove chewing gum from the side of some quite lovely black leather shoes? [...]

Thank you all for your advice and encouraging words! I've just now tried with my Kärcher steam cleaner, and lo and behold: all the chewing gum's come off! So, apparently, both extremes work: ice and steamy heat. Yay! - I shall reward myself with a pot of peanut butter. [Yipee]
Rubbing peanut butter on the gum might work (oil + mild abrasives) but you'll be followed around by squirrels when you wear the shoes. ;-)

[ 22. July 2013, 06:00: Message edited by: Palimpsest ]
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
@ Jengie Jon
Local radio stations? They will sometimes read out inquiries like this and quite a lot of people listen, or know people who do.
Electoral Registration Officers (though these are at District Council level, so might need to approach a lot of them)?
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
I had a minor disaster when I was doing some (very infrequent) baking yesterday and my microwave/convection oven decided to not elect the pope, if you get what I mean. The disaster went in the rubbish along with the baking dish, the oven is cleaned and works fine. But there appears to be a lingering smell of smoke in the air (noticeable when I leave the apartment and come back in) I use air freshener spray. I have windows open and such but does anyone know of a way I can speed up the process?
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
I have a question! There is a cat who lives up the street from my parents' (he definitely has a home) who is what looks like an un-neutered male - you can tell his sex from across the room - but has the loveliest, most gentle nature. Loves belly rubs, doesn't mind being picked up, loves pettings and isn't noisy. He has also never sprayed, that I've seen, and since my mum gives him treats we see him a lot. He is a big cat but tall rather than stocky, with long legs and radar ears, and small paws for a male cat. Is it possible that he is neutered and his balls just stayed big? He just doesn't act like an un-neutered male at all.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
I've just got this kitchen trolley, second hand, for not much dough. I'm planning to use it as a mobile workbench, similar to that in the article; it doesn't have to look great, to start with. It's birch wood.

You'll want to clean out any 'crud' that has built up down in the cracks as best you can. Then get some good wood glue. In the US we have a brand called Tightbond that works well. After working the glue down in the cracks, you'll want to put clamps on the whole thing to squeeze the joints together like this. On that size, 2 clamps should do it. Clamp it for 24 hours then sand it smooth to remove any glue that squeezes up from the cracks.

The easier option is to work some wood filler into the joints and then sand it smooth after it dries. No clamps to deal with and it'll probably hold up just as well unless you're really beating on that surface.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Thanks for the advice. I think for now we can get away with not contacting cousin Ray. If my father deteriorates or such then we will have to reconsider especially if Dad has not left a contact number in an obvious place.

Jengie
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by monkeylizard:
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
I've just got this kitchen trolley, second hand, for not much dough. I'm planning to use it as a mobile workbench, similar to that in the article; it doesn't have to look great, to start with. It's birch wood.

You'll want to clean out any 'crud' that has built up down in the cracks as best you can. Then get some good wood glue. In the US we have a brand called Tightbond that works well. After working the glue down in the cracks, you'll want to put clamps on the whole thing to squeeze the joints together like this. On that size, 2 clamps should do it. Clamp it for 24 hours then sand it smooth to remove any glue that squeezes up from the cracks.

The easier option is to work some wood filler into the joints and then sand it smooth after it dries. No clamps to deal with and it'll probably hold up just as well unless you're really beating on that surface.

Thank you, ML! - In the meantime, I've found out that the previous owners stored the thing in what seems a somewhat damp cellar. So that's where the cracks are from, then.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
Lumosity -- actually a useful service for mental training worth $5 a month and a few minutes each day of your time, or a rip-off based on pseudo-science? Thoughts, please!
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Hart, I use it daily without paying the monthly fee. Doing this doesn't allow me to chart my progress in detail or see weak spots. I do, however, get to do three of the five games daily (including practice of these three in a one-off session) and then my score is charted according to how many personal bests or top five scores I get. It's quite nice to see the scores gradually rising. The games rotate daily, and the two you don't get to play are from the same range as the ones you do, so you get a go at all of them eventually.

Obviously a great amount of it is down to learning rather than getting "cleverer", but the variety and quality of games is good and I do feel it is at least keeping my brain active. It seems to energise me for the day a bit, too, if I do it in the morning after my breakfast.

Definitely give the free version a go and see how you get on with it. I like it enough spasmodically to think "I may pay for the full version".

My brother pays for Happy Neuron which he also finds really good - it has been invaluable to him as he trains his brain to regain his language and memory after a stroke. It's a bit more expensive and a bit more Americanised but better for him as it focuses more directly on language as one of its key areas. Happy Neuron does not allow free access to the games, though, unless you do a trial subscription.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
Wes, if it were me, I'd go the wood filler route. Then if after a few years it starts falling apart, I'd take the top off and replace it with two layers of 1/2" plywood glued together and sanded smooth. It wouldn't look as nice as the butcher block style, but it wouldn't ever crack and would be just as stable.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
Lumosity -- actually a useful service for mental training worth $5 a month and a few minutes each day of your time, or a rip-off based on pseudo-science? Thoughts, please!

The evidence so far is no.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
I have an old Black & Decker hammer drill that I've had for years and years but don't need to use it much. When I last used it a few weeks ago it was fine, but when I got it out again yesterday it isn't working. I've tried changing the fuse but that doesn't help. I don't have the instruction leaflet any more.

There is a button on the side of the drill which I seem to remember is some kind of "reset" button, but pressing that doesn't make any difference.

Any advice appreciated on what I can do to get it working again - or should I just give up and get a new one?
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
What model is it? It ought to say somewhere on the machine. You/we could then google/duckduckgo/startpage for a manual, and perhaps for advice on similar problems people had. - That's at least what I normally do for a start; it sometimes even works! [Biased]
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
What model is it? It ought to say somewhere on the machine. You/we could then google/duckduckgo/startpage for a manual, and perhaps for advice on similar problems people had. - That's at least what I normally do for a start; it sometimes even works! [Biased]

I don't know if the manual would be available, the drill is at least 30 years old!
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
You might be surprised and find it available, Sparrow.
Question: does the chuck rotate when twisted? Might need to be forceful with it.
Two reasons to try. One, it might be frozen. Two, in motors with brushes, the brushes can develop a "flat spot". Rotating it might allow it to move. Also check the cord for breaks.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
You might be surprised. Search Google using the model number from the serial plate and you may find the manual.

If it's 30 years old or more, it leads me to wonder if it may be one of the old metal housed ones. If it is, then it breaking is the best thing that could happen to you. Any metal housed power tools should be replaced with plastic* ones. The "vintage" ones look cool and have a certain nostalgia to them, but that metal conducts electricty. If the motor inside arcs, it will zap you. They're also very heavy compared to plastic ones.

*Plastic/polymer/glass-filled-nylon/whatever that stuff is.

[ 30. July 2013, 19:17: Message edited by: monkeylizard ]
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Yes, it is a metal housed one and very heavy! I think you are probably right, time for a new one.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
[Eek!] Get rid of that death machine! You'll be surprised at how much easier the lighter weight is to handle. Here's a comparison from Popular Mechanics of some popular models. It looks like the one from Rigid would be a good choice.

I have an old metal housed Craftsman drill (complete with nylon braided electric cord). I don't use it but I keep it because it's one of the only things I have of my grandfather's.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
I've Rigid cordless tools and they are terrific. Durable and reliable.

BTW, Monkeyliizard, your link does not work for me.

[ 31. July 2013, 14:12: Message edited by: lilBuddha ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
It's possible that this is the link monkeylizard intended.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
If it's an old drill, check if it has replaceable brushes. Many of these have two caps which hold the brushes in and over a long time the brushes wear out and usually can be replaced.

Metal housings are dangerous if the drill isn't grounded. In the US this is a three prong plug. The weight may be a problem but it also damps the vibration for those of us with bad wrists.

Black and Decker invented the hand drill (or gets credit in the US) and originally made fine tools. Over time they cost engineered the quality out to make it a cheap consumer tool. They then bought DeWalt, which was a professional tool maker and started engineering the quality out.

Rigid used to make very high quality plumbing tools ( and calendars of extremely pneumatic models). I believe the Home Depot DIY hardware store bought a license to their name and is making consumer grade tools. They still make the expensive and high quality pipe threaders, but I'd look at the drills carefully.

Milwaukee is still an expensive and high quality drill and tool supplier. Their 3/8 hammer drill is the tool to buy if you have to drill holes in concrete. It's also worth buying a few of their expensive drill bits even if you have a cheap drill rather than use cheap bits.

[ 31. July 2013, 17:46: Message edited by: Palimpsest ]
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
I don;t know if we have Rigid in the UK, I've never heard of them. Black and Decker are the leading manufacturers here.
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
I have two Black and Deckers. The 1/2" has a metal housing and I don't use it anymore. I also have an early bottom-of-the-line 1/4" which came with no reverse. It does have a plastic housing. I plan to use it next month to install a wall-shelf in the dining room. I've never had any problem with either of them!
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
I don;t know if we have Rigid in the UK, I've never heard of them. Black and Decker are the leading manufacturers here.

Rigid is now the Home Depot house brand.

As Palimpsest mentioned, they used to be pretty much indestructible, but are now somewhat cheaper. As an example, old Rigid sump pumps had a lifetime warranty. The new, basically identical, ones have a warranty for only a few years.

Rigid kit is still pretty reasonable, though, and in my experience, Home Depot doesn't nitpick on the warranty.

[ 31. July 2013, 19:25: Message edited by: Leorning Cniht ]
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
IME, Black and Decker are acceptable for occasional use. Ridgid take serious use. Bought mine online with the Ridgid name, but in the UK they are AEG. Same tools.
De-Walt are also very good.
Neither of these may be the absolute best, but price/performance for them are difficult to beat.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
Lumosity -- actually a useful service for mental training worth $5 a month and a few minutes each day of your time, or a rip-off based on pseudo-science? Thoughts, please!

I used it for a while, during a free offer. They had some good games (esp. the one with the birds, IIRC). But I didn't want to spend the money to continue. (Though if you're on their mailing list, they'll periodically offer you some free time.)

I use the following games/puzzles, instead, and have found them to stretch my brain and help with some neuro glitches:

--BrainBashers.com. Free.

--GamesForTheBrain.com Free.

--Games that came free with my computer: Solitaire, Freecell, Purble Place, Mahjong Titans, Chess Titans. Most of them didn't come naturally to me, so learning them was a lot of work. But I've found unexpected benefits, like remembering names more easily. And they were great at getting me through some depression.

--I periodically pick up more cheap games on CD at office supply stores. They run $5-10. I usually go for educational ones, or ones that develop non-violent strategy and skills. (E.g. Chuzzle and Jewel Quest.)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Golden Key, if you liked those, you might like Mensa puzzles. I found Sudoku very good for sharpening up thought as well, during a period of brain fog.

[ 04. August 2013, 07:06: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Have you ever come across an alternative to sticky tape for fixing to the top of venetian blinds - my bedroom faces west, high up, and really heats up in the afternoon - I tried hanging an old sheet sprayed with water over the top but need a temporary fix that can be redone each day. I really need to replace the blinds with curtains. (My mind has just got to work on this. The windows are the full width of the room, so there's nowhere to pull them right back to allow the full effect of the view - I have just realised I can get a curved end to the rail. But meanwhile, I need to fix the sheet to the blinds.)


 
Posted by Kitten (# 1179) on :
 
Hi Penny. How about adhesive Velcro tape. One side could be stitched to the sheet and the other stuck to the top of the blind
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
What's the total width to be spanned? And height? How easy would it be to affix hooks to either walls, ceiling or window frame?
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Width - nearly 3 metres. The windows are about a metre high.
The frame is a rather poor example of UPVC. The wall is plasterboard hiding the steel frame construction of the structure (as far as I know - when I had a wooden rail fitted in the living room, it was quite easy for the fitter. In the study downstairs, the fitter had a horrid job with something more like plywood. I wasn't watching there.
The blinds have a top piece of metal which will hold a magnet (can't find any nice strong ones in any shop round here, fridge ones wouldn't do).
Stick on velcro might do, but I don't want the thing to be permanent either on the wall or the sheet, and I know the stick on velcro doesn't stay stuck well on fabric if stressed.
I really want a quick temporary solution, so I can put it up and take it down each day. It won't be hot enough to need it in a few weeks! I even wondered about Blutak!
If I get round to hooks, it will be for the curtain rail, I think.
Thanks for the suggestions so far.

[ 04. August 2013, 16:28: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Rare earth magnets are very strong.
 
Posted by Porridge (# 15405) on :
 
My place of work (a not-for-profit with a teensy budget) has been offered some new office furnishings by a corporation which is updating.

The furnishings include standing desks -- computer work stations at counter height at which one can stand rather than normal desk height where one sits. (Sitting can be available if you add a bar stool, I understand).

Do any shipmates have long-term experience with standing computer stations? My computer work requires speed and concentration on word-processing material. Any advice? I'm tempted to put my dibs in, but want to know about potential downsides, as once it's mine, it'll be a loooong commitment.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
Rare earth magnets are very strong.

Thanks - and reasonable. Though I am abjuring Amazon at the moment.

I've been looking up bay window curtain rails, as I want to have the curtain come back round a corner on the side near my bed, possibly with a cord. Turns out that I can't have it corded at one end at that size, unless I pay about £400. I'm sure there used to be a DIY way of cording curtains simply.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Porridge:

Do any shipmates have long-term experience with standing computer stations? My computer work requires speed and concentration on word-processing material. Any advice?

No experience with that as such, but how are you at standing for long periods of time, e.g. commutes (ever tried using a laptop while standing on a train?), concerts, long queues? Prone to backache at all?

Are the workstations adjustable? You might not be the right height for a particular one: I'm thinking RSI/strain on the wrists here. It's usually easier to adjust a chair than a desk. Can you experiment by approximating the conditions at home?

What are the company replacing them with? I'm guessing they're offloading for something a bit more conventional. (No sign of most offices clamouring for them.)
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Porridge:

Do any shipmates have long-term experience with standing computer stations? My computer work requires speed and concentration on word-processing material. Any advice? I'm tempted to put my dibs in, but want to know about potential downsides, as once it's mine, it'll be a loooong commitment.

I do not, personally, but I knew a programmer who did use one. He would alternate between the stool and standing. Seemed to work for him. Though he was physically sound, average weight, no joint or back problems. And tall.
 
Posted by Porridge (# 15405) on :
 
Well, I wondered about the off-loading, too. What I've seen of the stuff is all very blonde & brushed-aluminum & sleek-scandinavian-curvy, and they're a law office. I think it was somebody's Major Taste Mistake.

I can stand for fairly lengthy periods (and that, frankly, is the reason for my interest -- getting up off my a**). Also, as noted, I can always get a tall chair for when I need a sit-down.

My real concern: will I be able to think and concentrate on writing @$#! monthly reports (i.e. 3-4 page works of jargon-larded creative non-fiction detailing the goals we've met and made progress on with individual clients on my case load) when they're due? When I'm standing at home, I tend to be in motion, and these monthly reports -- 44 of them every damn month -- generally have to be compiled and written in the course of 4 working days, and if not submitted correctly & on time Medicaid can withhold our money (and I would get fired).
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Does anyone have suggestions about the best kind of glue to use to put a cover back on a paperback? All the pages of the book are still together, but they won't be for long if I don't get the cover back on.

Moo
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Here is one to try, Moo.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
If you do end up with the "perfect bound" paperback coming apart, there's a fairly good description of repair here. The glue that lilBuddha mentioned plays a key role here, too.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
It's possible that this is the link monkeylizard intended.

Yep. Thanks. I don't know what went wrong between the COPY and the PASTE.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Ariel--

Thanks for the games link! [Smile]
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
Thanks to people who gave feedback on lumosity. I think the conclusion I've reached is that if I have time and keep on finding it fun, it's probably more productive than wasting time on buzzfeed or something, but less so than going for a run, reading the news, reviewing Hebrew verb paradigms, cleaning my sink, etc. I was just trying to calibrate it!
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
Rare earth magnets are very strong.

Thanks - and reasonable. Though I am abjuring Amazon at the moment.

I've been looking up bay window curtain rails, as I want to have the curtain come back round a corner on the side near my bed, possibly with a cord. Turns out that I can't have it corded at one end at that size, unless I pay about £400. I'm sure there used to be a DIY way of cording curtains simply.

Where are you located Penny? I recently had a London based firm come and put up a curved curtain rail round my front room bay window. They were very helpful.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
Rare earth magnets are very strong.

Thanks - and reasonable. Though I am abjuring Amazon at the moment.

I've been looking up bay window curtain rails, as I want to have the curtain come back round a corner on the side near my bed, possibly with a cord. Turns out that I can't have it corded at one end at that size, unless I pay about £400. I'm sure there used to be a DIY way of cording curtains simply.

Where are you located Penny? I recently had a London based firm come and put up a curved curtain rail round my front room bay window. They were very helpful.
North West Kent. I had John Lewis do a curved rail downstairs, but it was much shorter. The straight stretch of this one is nearly 3 metres, and no-one seems to want to do that length with a cord at only one end (where I would be able to pull it from my bed!) How long was yours?
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
About 4 metres with two bends in it to fit round the bay. I didn't have a cord but they would have done it if I wanted it. I can PM you their details if you like.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
About 4 metres with two bends in it to fit round the bay. I didn't have a cord but they would have done it if I wanted it. I can PM you their details if you like.

Yes please. It does seem to be the cord that is a problem.

I like to sleep with the curtains open and the window open. If I read in bed first, the moths come it. A cord would mean I would not have to get out to open up the view of the sky in the dark!

In my youth, I needed blackout curtains. Then I had new windows fitted, and took all the fittings down for the men, who decided not to do that room when they said they would. So I went to bed without bothering to put everything up again and found I could sleep through with no problem.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I have bought some curly curtain rail. I have consulted my Readers Digest "How to do just about anything" which has said something along the lines of "some track comes with cord ready fitted, or you can do it yourself" and then TOTALLY FAILS TO TELL ME HOW!

I can work out a way of cording it to open the curtains, but not how to do the close without leaving cord dangling across the window when it is open. And I know my parents had done it on old fashioned curtain rails about 50 years ago without any professionals.
 
Posted by Martha (# 185) on :
 
Has anyone had any success in mending Le Creuset stoneware? I unthinkingly put frozen fish fillets in my baking dish and popped it in a hot oven, whereupon it cleanly cracked in two, right across the middle. It's such a clean break that it seems like gluing might work, but I wasn't sure if there was anything that would hold up to being cooked and washed.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I have bought some curly curtain rail. I have consulted my Readers Digest "How to do just about anything" which has said something along the lines of "some track comes with cord ready fitted, or you can do it yourself" and then TOTALLY FAILS TO TELL ME HOW!

I can work out a way of cording it to open the curtains, but not how to do the close without leaving cord dangling across the window when it is open. And I know my parents had done it on old fashioned curtain rails about 50 years ago without any professionals.

Does this help, it would take more detail but you need to remember you are pulling on a loop not a single string and actually it is moving a master glider.

Jengie
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Martha:
Has anyone had any success in mending Le Creuset stoneware? I unthinkingly put frozen fish fillets in my baking dish and popped it in a hot oven, whereupon it cleanly cracked in two, right across the middle. It's such a clean break that it seems like gluing might work, but I wasn't sure if there was anything that would hold up to being cooked and washed.

I'm sorry to have to say it is extremely unlikely that this can be fixed so as to survive cooking and washing [Frown]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Martha:
Has anyone had any success in mending Le Creuset stoneware? I unthinkingly put frozen fish fillets in my baking dish and popped it in a hot oven, whereupon it cleanly cracked in two, right across the middle. It's such a clean break that it seems like gluing might work, but I wasn't sure if there was anything that would hold up to being cooked and washed.

Before you consign your beloved baking dish to the scrapheap I'd get in touch with Le Creuset, asking what can be done to repair it.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I have bought some curly curtain rail. I have consulted my Readers Digest "How to do just about anything" which has said something along the lines of "some track comes with cord ready fitted, or you can do it yourself" and then TOTALLY FAILS TO TELL ME HOW!

I can work out a way of cording it to open the curtains, but not how to do the close without leaving cord dangling across the window when it is open. And I know my parents had done it on old fashioned curtain rails about 50 years ago without any professionals.

Does this help, it would take more detail but you need to remember you are pulling on a loop not a single string and actually it is moving a master glider.

Jengie

Thank you - I had a nose around on that company's site but hadn't found that page. I'm only going to be hanging one curtain, pulling in one direction, but with a curve at one end to take the fabric away from the glass which nearly fills up the whole wall. The problem with the loop is going to be keeping the cord from falling down when it isn't a track with a slot for it (because those tracks will not allow me to do what I want - they are most emphatic about it). Maybe a weight on the operating loop will keep it taut.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
The loop runs both along the top and bottom of the rails. One of the sides of the loop goes through the glider the other is blank.

Jengie

[ 10. August 2013, 12:22: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by Pearl B4 Swine (# 11451) on :
 
when I checked this thread, just the last post, to see what was being chatted about, Jengie's post was at the top of a fresh page. For the life of me I can't imagine what the blazes the subject is! I scoured me brayne for something that has loops and rails and a glider. And I resisted the temptation to look at the previous page.

But now I AM going to go look. [brick wall]
 
Posted by RuthW (# 13) on :
 
Since this seems to have gone unanswered ...

quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
I have a question! There is a cat who lives up the street from my parents' (he definitely has a home) who is what looks like an un-neutered male - you can tell his sex from across the room - but has the loveliest, most gentle nature. Loves belly rubs, doesn't mind being picked up, loves pettings and isn't noisy. He has also never sprayed, that I've seen, and since my mum gives him treats we see him a lot. He is a big cat but tall rather than stocky, with long legs and radar ears, and small paws for a male cat. Is it possible that he is neutered and his balls just stayed big? He just doesn't act like an un-neutered male at all.

Both my young male cats were unneutered when I picked them out at the local shelter. When I was let into their enclosure, they were huddled up together in one corner, and when I sat on the floor, one immediately came up to be petted and soon rolled over to have his belly rubbed. While the other took a couple of minutes to decide to come close and be petted and after a little while had had enough, the first cat wanted all the petting he could get.

So I'd say you probably just know a very mellow cat.
 
Posted by argona (# 14037) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pearl B4 Swine:
when I checked this thread, just the last post, to see what was being chatted about, Jengie's post was at the top of a fresh page. For the life of me I can't imagine what the blazes the subject is! I scoured me brayne for something that has loops and rails and a glider. And I resisted the temptation to look at the previous page.

But now I AM going to go look. [brick wall]

Noooo! Don't look! It'll be curtains for you!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I've just finished reading the diary of a 12 year old who was killed when the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. I made me realise how little I know about why Japan went to war. All the war history I did at school focussed on the war in Europe or various battles New Zealanders fought.

Can anyone suggest a starting point from for finding out more about the Japanese?

(Hosts, I'm not sure if this might be better as a thread in Purg, but I'm posting it here first as I want fairly specific information).

Huia
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Huia

You should first look at the Russian-Japanese hostilities of 1904-5 and then go onto read about the Japanese invasion of China (Manchuria)in 1931 - this will give you a beginning for the Japanese in WWII. The ceding of the Korean peninsula was also a factor, plus the Japanese exploitation of native unrest in some colonial possessions - notably those belonging to the Dutch - gave the Japanese opportunity to encourage localised unrest.

The Japanese were invading SE Asian countries before the war began in Europe and long before the Americans came in after Pearl Harbour.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
As L'organist said, it goes back further than the official start of WW2. If you're specifically interested in what led to the Empire of Japan attacking the U.S, then here is a short version of what led up to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Keep in mind the Japanese expansions that had been going on since the turn of the century that L'organist mentioned.

There's some nuance left out in that summary. There were people in the Emperor's advisors that tried really really hard not to go to war with the U.S. Even Admiral Yamamoto knew that it was only a matter of time before Japan lost if they went after the U.S. He said in a letter to the prime minister that In the first six to twelve months of a war with the United States and Great Britain I will run wild and win victory upon victory. But then, if the war continues after that, I have no expectation of success. 6 months to the day after Pearl Harbor, the U.S won the battle of Midway which was the turning point in the Pacific theater.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks L'Organist and Monkeylizard, with the little I have read your suggestions make perfect sense. That's one of the difficulties with history, the roots of an event often lie much further back, so finding a place to start can be challenging.

Huia
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Not sure it requires a thread of its own (tell me if you think it does though) but has anyone here been InterRailing? I turn 25 in February so next summer is my last chance to do it on a youth pass. I have only been as far as France and Belgium and have always wanted to see Eastern Europe. I am happy to travel alone and use youth hostels. I would probably want the 22-day continuous or month-long pass, so I can see as many countries as possible.

Edited to add - Ruth, thanks. He is un-neutered.

[ 15. August 2013, 13:28: Message edited by: Jade Constable ]
 
Posted by Qoheleth. (# 9265) on :
 
A question for Polish speakers, please. Maximilian Kolbe whose feast was observed last Wednesday - how should we pronounce his name, please? Google Translate offers "Kol-beh" (short 'e' as in 'get'). Can I trust Google [Eek!] ?

thanks
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
I have very dark hair and no grey hairs. My father is in his late sixties with the same colour of hair and no grey hairs. My grandmother died in her early nineties with the same colour of hair and no grey hairs. All this is good. But suddenly I've developed grey hairs in my eyebrows. I don't want to look like a reverse Alistair Darling so I pluck them madly.

How come my eyebrows are going grey but my head hair isn't?

[edited to stop stupidity on a fairly stupid post anyway]

[ 17. August 2013, 11:02: Message edited by: chive ]
 
Posted by argona (# 14037) on :
 
Eyebrows are their own creatures.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Qoheleth.:
A question for Polish speakers, please. Maximilian Kolbe whose feast was observed last Wednesday - how should we pronounce his name, please? Google Translate offers "Kol-beh" (short 'e' as in 'get'). Can I trust Google [Eek!] ?

thanks

Wikipedia has that too. In addition, if you just enter 'Kolbe' there, you'll find quite a number of famous German-origin people with that name. His father was an ethnic German (according to Wiki), so it certainly makes sense, IMO.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
If in may copious free time ( [Killing me] ) I wanted to get better at chess, how should I go about it? I know the rules, but I've never really studied the game much at all beyond that. Against the free chess game that comes with Windows, I can beat the computer on its easiest setting just over half the time, which I think probably makes me pretty bad.
 
Posted by Gwai (# 11076) on :
 
My dad's answer would definitely be learn a few standard chess openings, and learn to stop giving away your pieces, if you haven't already.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
Also, find a human who is better than you to play with - either in real life, or I gather that there's an internet chess server that my chess-playing godson frequents, which contains players of a wide range of standards.

Computer chess programs tend to be a bit idiosyncratic.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
I have very dark hair and no grey hairs. My father is in his late sixties with the same colour of hair and no grey hairs. My grandmother died in her early nineties with the same colour of hair and no grey hairs. All this is good. But suddenly I've developed grey hairs in my eyebrows. I don't want to look like a reverse Alistair Darling so I pluck them madly.

How come my eyebrows are going grey but my head hair isn't?

[edited to stop stupidity on a fairly stupid post anyway]

Eyebrows are typically the last part to change. Know one knows why hair colour varies on the same head.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
At 5:30 this morning I was woken by a beeping sound in my kitchen -- sounded like someone pushing the buttons on my microwave. I went to see what was going on, and my microwave clock read "99:99." Went back to bed, the beeping started again. I unplugged the microwave.

There didn't seem to be any electrical storm last night, and all other clocks are o.k.

Any idea why this would happen? Do I need to dispose of my 11-year-old microwave and get a new one? Or do I call an Exorcist???

[Confused]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Possibly caused by a power surge.

Switch the microwave back on and then proceed to set the clock.

In other words: if all else fails switch off, wait and then start again.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Get out of the house now!

Run! Run!

11years?! Likely a fault within the microwave itself, though possibly a wiring fault. Plug the microwave into a separate circuit, if it happens again, there is your answer.
 
Posted by Pearl B4 Swine (# 11451) on :
 
My microwave oven trips the circuit breaker every now & then. Its annoying to go to the basement to re-set it. Only happens every couple of months. But sometimes it happens several times in 1 day GRRR

Question: How can I keep bread from getting moldy as long as possible? I know some smarty will say "Buy it fresh every day". Does keeping it in the refrigerator help any? What about freezing it?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pearl B4 Swine:

Question: How can I keep bread from getting moldy as long as possible? I know some smarty will say "Buy it fresh every day". Does keeping it in the refrigerator help any? What about freezing it?

How long does it take you to use a loaf? I bake my own, so it has no preservatives. Once cool, I put it in a plastic bag (flimsy supermarket one usually) and thereafter I reckon it will keep 3/4 days - by which time, if not before, it's used up. I keep extra or emergency bread in the freezer (not the fridge - that doesn't really work for bread). Once unfrozen, I expect the bread to stay usable 2/3 days.

So if you can't obtain bread in small enough units to match your consumption, I would subdivide it into amounts which you would expect to consume within, say, two days, bag each portion and freeze. Use as required.

[ 28. August 2013, 15:57: Message edited by: Firenze ]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I put the slices (in pairs) in resealable and reusable plastic bags, and disperse them around the freezer in odd corners. Takes a bit of time, but it's much easier than defrosting a whole loaf, and saves me from overloading the compost bin. Bread goes mouldy in the fridge as well.

If I've been very good and made my own, I have to slice the lot at once.

If I've been slightly good and bought at the local proper bakers, they slice it for me.

If I've not been good, and picked up some marked down wholemeal bread at the supermarket, it's already sliced.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
If you are using shop-bought bread then keep it in a cloth bag in the breadbin - and buy smaller loaves.

The alternative: make your own dough - large batch - but only bake as much as you need, keeping the rest in the freezer. When you need more, bring the next batch of dough to room temperature, knead and prove and then bake.

A good cookware shop should have loaf tins of varying size or just make rolls.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
If you bake your own bread, use buttermilk. It keeps the bread fresh longer.

Moo
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
I've decided it's time for a new microwave. (Unfortunately, since this town is the home of the USA's largest university and they just moved into the dorms last week, the pickings are pretty slim.)

When I've had power blips in the past, I heard one longish beep (like when it tells me it's finished) and the clock goes to 00:00, not 99:99. Also, my answering machine (yes, I still have one!) is plugged into the same outlet, and that wasn't affected.

So thanks for the advice. I guess I can cancel the exorcist.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Pigwidgeon--

Do you have any pets that roam about? Might they have played with the microwave?
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
Pigwidgeon--

Do you have any pets that roam about? Might they have played with the microwave?

One dog, who was asleep next to me in bed -- until the beeping woke her as well. She couldn't have gotten up on the kitchen counter anyway.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pearl B4 Swine:
My microwave oven trips the circuit breaker every now & then. Its annoying to go to the basement to re-set it. Only happens every couple of months. But sometimes it happens several times in 1 day GRRR

Sometimes a circuit breaker goes "soft" and trips when it shouldn't. Before you call the electrician to swap the breaker or replace the microwave, if it's a plug in unit, try plugging it in to another circuit if you can and see if the problem goes away.
 
Posted by Pearl B4 Swine (# 11451) on :
 
Thanks for all the bread tips. Tho I'm an excellent cook ( it's the truth ! ) my only failing category is yeast dough. I usually buy 'better' breads at the store.

And thanks for the microwave advice. I'll try it.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pearl B4 Swine:
Thanks for all the bread tips. Tho I'm an excellent cook ( it's the truth ! ) my only failing category is yeast dough.

Breadmaker. I've found Panasonic to be sturdy and reliable and not expensive. For all the effort it is - less than 5 minutes - it's worth it. I have just the basic model, but cycle through white, white-with-sesame-and-poppy-seeds, white with Parmesan, challah, brioche, brown, seeded brown, oatmeal, wholemeal, honey-and-sunflower seed wholemeal and a few others.
 
Posted by Pearl B4 Swine (# 11451) on :
 
Thanks Firenze. I got to work googling bread makers, reviews, prices, etc. Down the right side on one page was "Most popular Q & A's about bread machines"

After a couple of predictable Q's about the loaf sinking in the middle, gluten-free bread,etc, there was this:

ROTFLMBO.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
Going back to keeping bread for longer, I used to have trouble with bread going mouldy in the bread bin until I started putting a little container of salt in there with the bread. The salt absorbs the moisture in the air, and needs to be changed when it looks wet, but it does work. I've had very few problems with mould since I started doing this.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Most ordinary British bread stays reasonably edible for 4 or 5 days or so, and its good for toast for another 3 or 4 after that. Goes stale rather than mouldy unless you keep it somewhere both warm and damp. Loads of preservatives I suspect. Though the same is true of the organic sourdough bread I buy sometimes.

French-style bread goes a bit stale or chewy on the second day. Pitta bread seems to go off quite fast too - I suspect that's because the stuff I get from local Turkish supermarket has no preservatives or additives, not even salt - or so the bag boasts.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I am still mildly boggled by the idea of bread being around long enough to go mouldy.

Mind you, besides the regular breakfast attrition, I have a good many culinary uses - crumb toppings, extender for meat loaf, stiffener for lentil bake, Brown Tom etc.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
New question - has anyone used stevia leaves (fresh) for sweetening?

After my blackberries, sweet every other year, turned out to need far too much sugar this year, I thought of using the leaves and bought a couple of plants from the garden centre.

I don't have any idea how much to use, or if I have enough plants to maintain a sensible supply.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Many stevia varieties have a bitter aftertaste. This is why the processed products will often have either a chemical counter or undergo a mechanical process to reduce this.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I have chewed a leaf - it wasn't awfully bitter, but one leaf wouldn't have been sweet enough, either, so I don't know what enough would have been like.
One of the brands said that they extracted it like a tea, so I might try that. Timing might be critical.
The woman in the garden centre said her mother uses it in her porage, snd did not mention bitterness.

[ 30. August 2013, 19:35: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
If blackberries are bitter try this: wash and then put into pie (or whatever) with a large spoonful of honey and the juice of an orange...
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Years ago I had a link to a website which was laid out like a spider diagram and linked all genres of music along a "if you like that, you may well like this" sort of style. You'd just click on the bubbles on the spider diagram and hear the music, and all the bubbles linked to it would be of a similar or overlapping genre. Anyone know a)what it was, b)whether it's still around and c) where I can find it again? I can't remember for the life of me what the website was called, and googling hasn't helped so far.

Needless to say, the website was free, but you couldn't download the music, you could only listen to it on that site.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
If blackberries are bitter try this: wash and then put into pie (or whatever) with a large spoonful of honey and the juice of an orange...

Thank you - but they aren't bitter, just not sweet. And I'm trying to avoid any extra sugars. The health advisor I spoke to at a fete on Saturday was even doing down fruit as having too much sugar in it. Aargh!
 
Posted by Gwai (# 11076) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Smudgie:
Years ago I had a link to a website which was laid out like a spider diagram and linked all genres of music along a "if you like that, you may well like this" sort of style. You'd just click on the bubbles on the spider diagram and hear the music, and all the bubbles linked to it would be of a similar or overlapping genre. Anyone know a)what it was, b)whether it's still around and c) where I can find it again? I can't remember for the life of me what the website was called, and googling hasn't helped so far.

Needless to say, the website was free, but you couldn't download the music, you could only listen to it on that site.

Pandora?

Though now I'm not sure. I have a visual memory of something older than Pandora that was like that. I think Pandora uses similar technology, but it doesn't have that sort of diagram. Still thinking about this one, because I know exactly what you mean!

[ 04. September 2013, 16:49: Message edited by: Gwai ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
There's an app called Discovr Music that is arranged like that.
 
Posted by The Kat in the Hat (# 2557) on :
 
There is this one Every Noise at Once

or maybe this one
Music Map
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Not certain whether to kiss you or trample your Hat, Kat. Brilliant sites, but I can see much time spent...
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Was it Misicovery ? - which is a site I think I discovered courtesy of The Ship some time back.

ETA And if I could spell, I'd have written MUSICOVERY [Hot and Hormonal]

[ 05. September 2013, 06:35: Message edited by: Dormouse ]
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pearl B4 Swine:
My microwave oven trips the circuit breaker every now & then. Its annoying to go to the basement to re-set it. Only happens every couple of months. But sometimes it happens several times in 1 day GRRR

Question: How can I keep bread from getting moldy as long as possible? I know some smarty will say "Buy it fresh every day". Does keeping it in the refrigerator help any? What about freezing it?

We eat 1-4 slices a day, of a bought wholegrain loaf. We put the sliced loaf in the freezer, and take out not more than 6-8 slices in a bag in the fridge. Works for us. We never know when we'll be out for lunch, or decide to get something totally different.

GG
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
quote:
Originally posted by Pearl B4 Swine:
Question: How can I keep bread from getting moldy as long as possible? I know some smarty will say "Buy it fresh every day". Does keeping it in the refrigerator help any? What about freezing it?

We eat 1-4 slices a day, of a bought wholegrain loaf. We put the sliced loaf in the freezer, and take out not more than 6-8 slices in a bag in the fridge. Works for us. We never know when we'll be out for lunch, or decide to get something totally different.

GG

If you take sandwiches to work, using frozen bread keeps the filling fresh, and the bread will have thawed by lunchtime.
 
Posted by Gwai (# 11076) on :
 
I've been lately trying to read more about the actual making of politics. I hesitate to even ask for recommendations here, because I know there are thousands of books where people, often minor players write a book to tell their side of the story. And all books tell one side of teh story or another, but sometimes they also in the course of it reveal a ton about the process and how it was done. For instance, Kissinger's memoirs, for instance are fascinating and I recommend them to anyone whether they worship him or violently hate him. I learned a lot about politicking as well as about Vietnam and the Nixon presidency. Master of the Senate was even better for that and a brilliant book to boot. What else? I've read some of Churchill, and he's interesting but spends too long on exactly how many of what kind of ship for my patience instead of talking about why he said what he said to persuade people to agree to making the ships. Should I go back to Churchill, or who do you recommend?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
If you want an insight in the backstairs of politics and government in the UK in the latter half of he 20th C, I'd recommend Alan Clark's Diaries. Minor politician, major lecher and gossip though.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
You could also look for 'The Time of My Life' by Denis Healey, sometime Labour chancellor of the Exchequer, and quite possibly the best Prime Minister we never had. He's still with us (age 96) and has or at any rate had friends on both sides of the House.
 
Posted by Gwai (# 11076) on :
 
Thanks, both. I will definitely look at both of those.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
I really like the song "Some Nights" by Fun. But, what on earth do the lyrics mean? Do they tell a story? Are the verses in any way connected? I'm lost.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
I have found that published diaries have more of the day-to-day goings on of politics than memoirs. No doubt they're just as biased towards the writer's point of view, but they capture more of the actual goings on rather than vague ideas. I'm enjoying reading Ronald Reagan's diaries now.

It's neat to see just how much variety exists in the job of POTUS. Meeting other heads of state, emergency security meetings, appointing ambassadors, preparing speaches, taking a call from a donor or old friend, and meeting little miss Betty McAnybody, winner of the national 'Don't Run With Scissors' safety campaign poster-making contest....all in one day.

It shows some view of how the politicking works. He'll mention that he sent so-and-so off to meet with such-and-such to convince them they should support bill X.
 
Posted by Qoheleth. (# 9265) on :
 
Hi - I'm hunting for an over-the-top arrangement of Happy Birthday (pref SATB) for a joint 80th/90th party coming up soon. Google tells me that Arnold Bax did one in 1951 which might be rather splendid, but I can't locate it either online or on paper. And the 'Murcans can get a set of eight arrgts by Russell Robinson, but not available in UK.

Anyone got any fun ideas, please?

thanks
Q.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
I've seen a decorative feature on a building and wonder if there is a proper architectural term for it.

It's a decorative piece on the front of a public building, just below the apex of the roof.

It's a circular stone carving featuring a woman and child who, I think, represent one of the virtues.

I could describe it as a stone plaque, or as a motif, or maybe as a roundel, but I wonder if there's a correct architectural word for it?
 
Posted by Pearl B4 Swine (# 11451) on :
 
I don't know what started me searching...but...I'm curious to know the derivation of the phrase "By-and-large" . I know how to use it, but I want to know where it comes from. Dictionary dot com says it's a nautical thing, akin to tacking across the wind to make progress. So?

It also offers the following cute limerick:
Do any of you wordy people know?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Nautical in origin.

From sailing close to the wind (called BY the wind by old salts) and sailing downwind (called LARGE because if you sail downwind you can use large sails and you'll go fast).
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Qoheleth.: Hi - I'm hunting for an over-the-top arrangement of Happy Birthday (pref SATB) for a joint 80th/90th party coming up soon. Google tells me that Arnold Bax did one in 1951 which might be rather splendid, but I can't locate it either online or on paper. And the 'Murcans can get a set of eight arrgts by Russell Robinson, but not available in UK.
There are a number of SATB arrangements on the internet. I haven't found the one by Bax though.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
[Help] How do I work out what kind of these new-style lightbulbs are equivalent to a) a 40W bulb, b) a 60W bulb and c) how do I dispose of any lightbulb containing mercury - which I'm really not keen to buy but may have to - I assume they should not go into the glass recycling bins?

Any advice gratefully received. There's no clue on the packaging and I don't know what a 7W light bulb might be used for.

[ 28. September 2013, 10:30: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I think I have old enough packaging at home to give me equivalents to double check this but 7W I think is equivalent to 40W in old money, 11W to 60W and 15W to 100W

[ 28. September 2013, 10:58: Message edited by: Curiosity killed ... ]
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Curiosity killed ...: I think I have old enough packagmg at home to give me equivalents to doubles check this but 7W I think is equivalent to 40W go old money, 11W to 60W and 15W to 100W
Hmm, I see a rule there somewhere [Biased]
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
Wiki is your friend even including a helpful table
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Our local dump has a special bin for low energy bulbs.
 
Posted by mrs whibley (# 4798) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Nautical in origin.

From sailing close to the wind (called BY the wind by old salts) and sailing downwind (called LARGE because if you sail downwind you can use large sails and you'll go fast).

Also the origin of the title of the Shipping Forecast theme music - 'Sailing By', which does not mean 'Sailing Past'!
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
Low energy bulbs (CFLs) are a pain. Even now, they take time to "warm up" to their full brightness - up to a minute. The colour of their light (a.k.a "colour temperature") is less kind on the eyes than the old tungstens. And, of course, they're an environmental nightmare, containing not only complex circuitry and rare earth elements, but also small amounts of mercury, which means that if you break the glass on one, they automatically become "hazardous waste".

As regards equivalence to the old tungstens, they're never an exact replacement, but the wiki table that BroJames linked to is rather better than the claims made on most bulb packaging, which tends to overestimate the brightness of the CFL. As a rough guide, I'd say look for the one you think you need, and then go for the next strength up.

I haven't looked into LEDs much, but in the next couple of years they should be a better bet than CFLs. They're very expensive, but last even longer than the CFLs - up to 50,000 hours compared to a CFL's 15,1000 hours - so recycling may become Someone Else's Problem!
.....

I have a question: I have about 50 or 60 theology books I want to get rid of. It seems a shame to send them to a general charity shop, as I don't think they'd shift them and would probably end up pulping them. I did google one agency that claims to send them to theology students in the third world, but I didn't like the agency's (extreme, conservative, literalist) statement of faith, and I don't want to support them.

Does anyone know of a good way of getting these books to a good home?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Did you have a local SPCK bookshop? If so, was it taken over after the crash and, if so, do they sell second-hand books?

Failing that, approach the local ministerial or readers training scheme co-ordinator.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
or a nearby theological college/seminary.

Also there are some specialist theological book dealers out there, but a lot of theology passes its use by date very quickly.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Thanks for the helpful advice on lightbulbs. My next question (and this should be my last on this) is: can I put one of these new-style 15W bulbs (equivalent to c. 100W) into an older desk lamp that's designed to take a maximum of 60W, or will the desk lamp overheat? Should I be looking at the 11W(60W) instead?

I have a small and rapidly dwindling stash of 60W lightbulbs but really could do with a brighter light. If I could get away with the equivalent of 100W in a 60W appliance, it would be quite useful.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Adeodatus

Firstly charity book shops like Oxfam might well bite your hand off! It is popular novels that they have far too many of. Indeed if they have a rare text Oxfam sell it on Amazon rather than through a local book shop.

Secondly this seller regularly advertises for stock in Reform. There are others which may also be interested. I have bought from Lund in the past. There is also a small number of second hand book shops that specialise in liturgical material.

As to Theological books going out of date, the scholarly tomes have a far longer life time than the popular stuff. I have stuff well over fifty years old and still valuable on my shelf, my father has even older stuff.

My reason for promoting Oxfam is that when I needed a classical text for my thesis it looked as if it was going to be impossible to find. The copies on the web were well over £100, and it was too specialised for the University Library. However,Oxfam sold a copy through Amazon for £40. I am grateful for them and will be directing some books their way when I sort out my library post PhD.

Jengie
 
Posted by TurquoiseTastic (# 8978) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Thanks for the helpful advice on lightbulbs. My next question (and this should be my last on this) is: can I put one of these new-style 15W bulbs (equivalent to c. 100W) into an older desk lamp that's designed to take a maximum of 60W, or will the desk lamp overheat? Should I be looking at the 11W(60W) instead?

I have a small and rapidly dwindling stash of 60W lightbulbs but really could do with a brighter light. If I could get away with the equivalent of 100W in a 60W appliance, it would be quite useful.

You will definitely not overheat your desk lamp. The bulb will only draw 15W of power so it will only draw a quarter of the current that your old 60W bulb did, so there should be no electrical overheating problem. It will also kick out much less radiant heat than the old bulb did. In short, it should not be a problem at all.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Thank you very much. I wasn't clear whether it was input or output. Brighter lights will be great!
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
The wattage is the input of the bulb. Lumens are the output. A 15w input in a CFL will give you roughly the same lumens as a 60w input in an old bulb. Thus the energy savings. Less power used to produce the same amount of light.

CFLs are from hell. I hate them. LED is definitely the future.

[ 01. October 2013, 19:47: Message edited by: monkeylizard ]
 
Posted by Arethosemyfeet (# 17047) on :
 
I have to say I love my 150W daylight CFLs. A wonderful coloured bright light. Much better than the standard yellowy colour of both CFLs and incandescents. I've not seen an LED bulb that can match them.
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
I am with monkeylizard on this one. After I bought my first LED bulb*, I swore I would never buy another CFL. The warm-up time for CFLs is obnoxious. The mercury thing is obnoxious. The newer LEDs are very bright, can be in any number of colors (my multi-colored Christmas lights are now all LEDs). They are brilliant. Literally.

*It is a Philips Ambient LED. 1100 lumens (17 watts). Love it.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
If you liked "The Master of the Senate" the other volumes in that series are worth reading.

I don't read many political books, but I found The Peloponnesiian War by Donald Kagan fascinating enough that I'm slowly reading the larger work it was condensed from. Reading about decisions when Democracy was new and the descent into a destructive war is fascinating and still relevant.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
Or kill 2 birds with one light bulb...
Light and wireless speaker in one convenient package.

http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/05/led-lightbulb-speakers-for-wireless-music-in-every-room/
 
Posted by Adrienne (# 2334) on :
 
Some while back, I followed a link in someone's signature line to a store selling, among other things, cute baby vests. I failed to bookmark it at the time, and now I can't find it again. If this is you, or you know who it is, could you let me know please? (Perhaps by PM if no longer in the signature, so as not to advertise). Many thanks!
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
Recent sad news from Lampedusa has brought the name to mind again. I am sure I have read a 'classic' English poem called and/or about Lampedusa, but I can't track it down. Does anyone know it?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
I think you mean The Leopard by Giuseppi di Lampedusa, Duke of Palma. This is his best-known work although he also wrote prize-winning poetry.
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
A curious question arose yesterday and I wondered whether anybody might know the answer, or where to find it?

As most will be aware, the majority of languages distinguish between 'you' (singular) and 'you' (plural), something that English clearly fails to do. Yet English still had both deferential and familiar usage ('thou' and 'you') in James I's time, as witness the KJV Bible.

Does anybody know when the use of 'thou' fell out of the English language in the UK?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Sort of around the 1600s I think. I've a feeling it would be around the time of the Civil War. Though obviously some groups retained the usage, and others still use it today in parts of the north.

[ 14. October 2013, 20:38: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
Thanks, Ariel. I had rather guessed something of the sort, but it does beg the question why? What caused the form to fall out of use? Was it something arising out of the Commonwealth?
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I have heard a story about a duke or earl who was on trial, and objected to being addressed as 'thou'. He said he retained his rank even though he was on trial.

Unfortunately, I can't give you a date for this.

Moo
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Darllenwr:
The majority of languages distinguish between 'you' (singular) and 'you' (plural), something that English clearly fails to do. Yet English still had both deferential and familiar usage ('thou' and 'you') in James I's time, as witness the KJV Bible.

Does anybody know when the use of 'thou' fell out of the English language in the UK?

This article, among others, is instructive. "Thou" and "thee" were originally singular, and "Ye" and "you" plural. The plural forms migrated over to the singular side as polite address, and by Shakespeare's time they began to supplant the other singular forms.

A similar phenomenon occurred in Spanish (the voseo, as it is called) and other languages.
 
Posted by Ginga (# 1899) on :
 
There was a thread on pens a while ago which suggested to me that someone here might be able to help with this. I have a fountain pen that was a gift some years ago and which I use daily. It's a lovely pen, but the lid no longer stays on. I now carry it around bound up in an elastic band, which is scruffy and inconvenient.

I've searched around for a DIY cure, a replacement lid emporium, or a set of rules by which to assess the reputabilty of places that might claim pen-fixing expertise but have yet to come up with anything. If anyone knows of how or where one might fix a willful lid, I would be most grateful. It's a mid-range Schaeffer that's not on their website, so I can't offer much by way of specifics, sorry.
 
Posted by Darllenwr (# 14520) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
quote:
Originally posted by Darllenwr:
The majority of languages distinguish between 'you' (singular) and 'you' (plural), something that English clearly fails to do. Yet English still had both deferential and familiar usage ('thou' and 'you') in James I's time, as witness the KJV Bible.

Does anybody know when the use of 'thou' fell out of the English language in the UK?

This article, among others, is instructive. "Thou" and "thee" were originally singular, and "Ye" and "you" plural. The plural forms migrated over to the singular side as polite address, and by Shakespeare's time they began to supplant the other singular forms.

A similar phenomenon occurred in Spanish (the voseo, as it is called) and other languages.

Thank you - very interesting
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
The use of "thee" was still common in Lancashire when I was growing up. I remember my gran telling someone: "Don't thee 'thee' me!" meaning that the other person shouldn't get too familiar with her.
 
Posted by Chapelhead (# 21) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe:
"Thou" and "thee" were originally singular, and "Ye" and "you" plural. The plural forms migrated over to the singular side as polite address, and by Shakespeare's time they began to supplant the other singular forms.

Indeed, and it is possible to identify (sometimes changing) relationships in Shakespeare by whether individuals use 'thou' or 'you' forms. In Twelfth Night Sir Toby Belch advises Sir Andrew Aguecheek that one way to antagonise a rival is, "If thou "thou"-est him some thrice it shall not be amiss".
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
A query relating to satellite TV and receivers: I have never had satellite TV, but not long ago I moved into a flat that had a satellite dish outside the window and a cable from it coming through the wall, ending in a frayed end of wire. If I decide I want a satellite box, either Freesat or one of the paid contracts, should I be able to use this dish and cable? And what kind of connection do I need on the end of the cable, is it just like a coaxial aerial connector or is it something more complicated?
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
I think you mean The Leopard by Giuseppi di Lampedusa, Duke of Palma. This is his best-known work although he also wrote prize-winning poetry.

No, it's not that. But thank you anyway. I think I'll need to wait until I'm home and can browse my bookshelves.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
I have heard a story about a duke or earl who was on trial, and objected to being addressed as 'thou'. He said he retained his rank even though he was on trial.

Unfortunately, I can't give you a date for this.

Moo

Google confirms recollection that Sir Edw Coke at the trial of Sir Walter Raleigh in 1603 said to him, "I thou thee thou traitor" which may be what you were thinking of.
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
Sparrow

we moved into a house which had previously used Sky TV, but we use cable TV
Our TV has a Freesat decoder which we hadn't previously used.
I just hooked up the satellite cable which the previous owners had left behind into the freesat connector on the back of the TV and it worked.
I don't know if it's a feature of SKY, or if the previous owners had "multi-room" but the cable was "doubled" , with 2 connectors, so I just picked one and plugged it in.

THe connector has a very thin spike in the middle of it, and screws in to the back of the TV , a bit like
these

[ 17. October 2013, 08:35: Message edited by: Wet Kipper ]
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
On closer examination it looks like some sort of coaxial cable, there is an inner quite thick copper wire, surrounded by a layer of what looks like insulation, then surrounded again by a layer of copper wire, then the plastic cover. It looks like it would fit the sort of connector in your link, I just don't know how it would fit on!

Might cut a chunk off the end and take it into Maplin's and see what they say.
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
On closer examination it looks like some sort of coaxial cable, there is an inner quite thick copper wire, surrounded by a layer of what looks like insulation, then surrounded again by a layer of copper wire, then the plastic cover. It looks like it would fit the sort of connector in your link, I just don't know how it would fit on!

Might cut a chunk off the end and take it into Maplin's and see what they say.

If I remember right, you can get the F-plugs that Wet Kipper illustrated and they fit over the end of the cable - the central pin of the plug is actually hollow and the wire in the middle of the cable goes up inside it. I think I'm right in that - so maybe you could look for a plug first and try it. They should be obtainable from one of the larger DIY stores or, as you say, Maplin.

...

Does anyone know anything technical about hi-fi? I've recently acquired (legitimately!) some mp3 files of some vintage classical music recordings. I want to do a little bit of tidying-up editing, using the Audacity music editor, and then dump them to CD. Unfortunately there's a significant DC offset on the recordings and, what's worse, it's not quite constant.

My question is, if I leave the DC offset there, will it damage my hi-fi if I play the CDs? Or should I try the tricky job of getting rid of it? (Tricky because, as I say, it's not constant.)
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Among all the energy-saving tips being promoted for this forthcoming winter, I've seen the old recommendation that you should put sheets of tin foil behind your radiators to reflect the heat back into the room. Has anyone ever tried this, and does it help at all?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
Recent sad news from Lampedusa has brought the name to mind again. I am sure I have read a 'classic' English poem called and/or about Lampedusa, but I can't track it down. Does anyone know it?

You're not thinking of Vitae Lampada? - the Gatling's jammed and the colonel dead -
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Originally posted by BroJames:
Recent sad news from Lampedusa has brought the name to mind again. I am sure I have read a 'classic' English poem called and/or about Lampedusa, but I can't track it down. Does anyone know it? [/QUOTE]

Can you remember anything more about the poem or its content?
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
Among all the energy-saving tips being promoted for this forthcoming winter, I've seen the old recommendation that you should put sheets of tin foil behind your radiators to reflect the heat back into the room. Has anyone ever tried this, and does it help at all?

Yes it works. Better still are the insulation backed foil sheets you can get at hardware stores.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Won't work for us sadly - we have hot air heating.
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
My radiators are relentless heat demons put on earth to roast me alive.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Mine are all from Laodicea. On a good day.
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
At some point in history, it was decreed that every radiator in the city of Boston would be stuck on at full blast, and the only way to regulate the heat would be to open the windows to let in some cold air.

Efficient!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Ah. Hereabouts we're permitted to regulate our central heating.

I could turn mine up, but then I'd be kept awake by the whirring sound as the meter clocks up a bill the approximate size of GNP of Bolivia.
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
Do you have electric heating? I have steam heating, which means the landlord has to pay for the heating oil for the central boiler.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Gas. Plus I am the owner of this fine example of uninsulated 1920s jerry-build *. I am thus free to spend winters huddled under 15 cardigans while paying a small fortune for such whispers of heat find their way through the pipework**.

*nice period features though.
**put in 25 years ago by previous owner, who was a Bodger.
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
Could you have a go at insulating the pipes yourself? It's a pretty straight forward dealie.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Cohorts of energy efficiency advisers have retired defeated by our house. The solution is Live Somewhere Else.
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
Ah, sorry to hear that. Have you tried arbitrary fits of rage? Sometimes that helps.

In the United States, they have heaters fed with corn which, so I hear, can heat a large space quite cheaply. An electric device, which draws hardly any electricity at all, drops kernels of maize on a fire one by one. They make a similar jobber using wood pellets instead of food, if that makes you feel less guilty.

[ 13. November 2013, 17:53: Message edited by: Zach82 ]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Firenze

You too live in a house without cavity walls, then?

There is a solution - but I don't think the government scheme will cover it.

You need to apply solid insulation to the walls: either by battening out inside and then insulating between the battens before plasterboarding over; or by battening the outer walls, applying insulation and then there is either a pre-fabricated panel system or have something like cedar cladding or even traditional brick.

Polystyrene insulation attached to the bottom of the floor joists and then infill with rockwool will help too.

If you have crittal windows then there are replacements made that will take double-glazed units. If you're not in a conservation area just replace the windows. If stuck with the crittal then have secondary glazing.

The government scheme is all based on people having standard double-layer construction: anything out of the norm isn't covered.

My commiserations. We can't insulate much either: the outside route is barred because the house is listed and the inside method would leave us with rooms so small as to be unusable.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I don't want to commandeer this thread for my house-heating problems. It's a totally first-world problem, of choosing to live in a property both old and large.

We will probably move in the next year or so (for other reasons) and look for something modern and insulated and poky.

So, let's move away from the bottom of the escalator and let the folk with questions off.
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
can anyone recommend an english translation of Gilgamesh that would be easily accessible to a bright but easily bored 12 year old?
 
Posted by comet (# 10353) on :
 
Firenze: we have two of these, one for backup in the main house and one as my soul source of heat in the tent. they're expensive up front but it's worth it, as they pump out an exceptional amount of heat. When I ran out of fuel oil last winter, it heated my whole (small, 520 sq ft) house comfortably when it was -29C outside.

I don't know how reliable electricity is for you - we always try to have at least another source of heat if the power is out. in our case, wood.
 
Posted by Eigon (# 4917) on :
 
Robert Silverberg, the SF author, wrote a very good version of Gilgamesh called Gilgamesh the King.
 
Posted by Pearl B4 Swine (# 11451) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:

We will probably move in the next year or so (for other reasons) and look for something modern and insulated and poky.

Have a look at these-- Tiny Houses, and when they say tiny, they mean it. Pearlie
 
Posted by TonyK (# 35) on :
 
A rather technical question - but not computer-based, so not for the Geeks thread!

Some 'kind' person has fiddled with the mixer sliders on our church sound system. Nobody seems to have a clue what the original settings were, and I don't know enough to fix the situation properly, although I have managed to stop the feedback!!

Basically my question is this: The radio mic receivers show -40 to -20 db on what I assume to be the incoming audio frequency. The sliders go from +30 to -40db (I think, it might be -30).
I've currently got the sliders on about -10, but it doesn't sound right somehow.
Does anybody know how to sort this out - or have we got to spend money we don't really have and get the installers back.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Tony,

Can you either post a link to a pic of the board? Or provide a make and a model Number?

[ 02. December 2013, 22:00: Message edited by: lilBuddha ]
 
Posted by Doc Tor (# 9748) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TonyK:
A rather technical question - but not computer-based, so not for the Geeks thread!

Some 'kind' person has fiddled with the mixer sliders on our church sound system. Nobody seems to have a clue what the original settings were, and I don't know enough to fix the situation properly, although I have managed to stop the feedback!!

Basically my question is this: The radio mic receivers show -40 to -20 db on what I assume to be the incoming audio frequency. The sliders go from +30 to -40db (I think, it might be -30).
I've currently got the sliders on about -10, but it doesn't sound right somehow.
Does anybody know how to sort this out - or have we got to spend money we don't really have and get the installers back.

On the assumption that you're using a regular mixing desk...

There is a pot at the very top of the row. This is the gain, and will probably be also marked with +-db values. Turning the gain up (clockwise) will increase the signal to the desk.

Below that will (again, depending on your setup) be four or five pots controlling the treble, midrange and bass components of the signal. This will change the tone of the top, middle and bottom frequencies of the sound.

Only then does the signal get passed to the fader (the slider).

I hope that helps, and that I haven't hopelessly patronised you.
 
Posted by TonyK (# 35) on :
 
Doc Tor - not patronising at all.

We don't have a mixer in the traditional sense with multiple controls for each channel. Each receiver feeds a single slider control in a unit of twelve sliders - only 6 of which are labelled (4 radio mics; 2 wired mics) At the extreme right end are two additional sliders - one labelled CD (which presumably feeds in the CD signal) and another slider which seems to control the overall signal to the power amplifier, though I am not certain about this. One of the church wardens told me that she understood that this was it's function...

There is what appears to be a graphic equaliser (as far as I understand it!!) but it's safely behind a clear plastic shield so hasn't been tweaked.

The general feeling is that the volume from the radio mics is too high, while the wired mics are about right. As I was trying to sort things out during a service, I didn't want to change the volume too much. I'll have another session in an empty church, but this too doesn't make for an accurate scenario, as there'll be no bodies to absorb sound - and presumably radio signal.

Why can't people just leave things alone when they don't understand it? And why didn't the installers leave a note of the optimal settings? [Frown]

I hate being the one-eyed king in the land of the blind!!
 
Posted by TonyK (# 35) on :
 
LilBuddha - I'll take a photo next time I'm down there - the hardware is mainly Audio-Technica (3000b series) though I think the power amplifier is a different make.

It'll be a day or two though...
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TonyK:
LilBuddha - I'll take a photo next time I'm down there - the hardware is mainly Audio-Technica (3000b series) though I think the power amplifier is a different make.

It'll be a day or two though...

Tony, The Audio Technica 3000b is a wireless system consisting of a large receiver and wireless mics.
Here is a link to the manual. At least the web page for it, I do not wish to force the hosts to download the pdf.
There are no sliders that I notice.
Each component that has any gain(volume) control could be part of the problem. A pic of each component would help. But as a starter, I would drop all the gains to a mid-level and raise/lower from there.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
This may be due to using line level sources on microphone channels or vice versa. The manual doesn't show any per channel adjustment, but it talks about a setting on each transmitter for microphone or instrument level.

I don't see where your wired microphone inputs are going in. If you have a mixer in the setup, there may be a switch on each input channel which switches between line level and microphone. If these are set incorrectly, you can get the results you're talking about either because the system level gain has been set wrong to adjust bad input level settings. Does the c.d. input work correctly?

I hope this doesn't add to the confusion.
 
Posted by TonyK (# 35) on :
 
Thanks for the replies so far.

I think my main problem is getting my head around the negative numbers.
A volume control is easy - the zero setting is effectively off and the scale then goes up in positive numbers.
By analogy I can understand that a gain control, with a zero setting in the middle, increases the signal when it is moved to the positive and reduces the signal to the negative.

But how can a receiver show that it is receiving -40 to -20db? How can you have a negative signal??
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TonyK:
Why can't people just leave things alone when they don't understand it? And why didn't the installers leave a note of the optimal settings?

Once you've got the slider levels set correctly, make a white mark next to them with something like Tippex. (Of course that won't help you if people have fiddled with other buttons as well, but it's a start).
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
TonyK: But how can a receiver show that it is receiving -40 to -20db? How can you have a negative signal??
Maybe it helps to remember that decibels are essentially a logarithmic scale. Instead of -40db, you could be thinking about 10⁻⁴.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
This might be a stupid question.

Yesterday, Royal Bank of Scotland had a computer glitch which stopped people being able to use their debit cards. Student son was one of those affected. He doesn't have a credit card, so he had no access to any money, and he doesn't normally carry much cash.

It's sorted now, but I realised I have no idea how to get money to someone in that situation - is there a way?
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TonyK:
But how can a receiver show that it is receiving -40 to -20db? How can you have a negative signal??

Decibels are always a ratio of one thing to another, or to a standard reference. A marking on a gain control of -10dB probably means that the output is 10dB less than the input, or less than what it would have been under some other condition (for example, with no equalization.)

Single levels are often referenced to some standard signal level, such as 1mW or 100mV at some standard impedance. In that case a negative number simply means that the level being measured is below the reference level, whatever it happens to be.
 
Posted by AngloCatholicGirl (# 16435) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by comet:
can anyone recommend an english translation of Gilgamesh that would be easily accessible to a bright but easily bored 12 year old?

Comet, Andrew George has done a good modern English translation, but it is still in verse form, so you might want to check if your 12 yr old is ok with yards of poetry.

Joyce Tyldesley has done some excellent translations of Egyptian stories specifically done with younger readers in mind, if they like Gilgamesh, they may enjoy these as well.

I trust you will not be quite as excited by the epic of Gilgamesh, as its re-discoverer, George Smith, "On reading the text he...jumped up and rushed about the room in a great state of excitement, and, to the astonishment of those present, began to undress himself." [Big Grin]

Photo of the original text

[Took the extra http out of the link. It's a common mistake!
jedijudy-Heaven Host]

[ 04. December 2013, 01:49: Message edited by: jedijudy ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by AngloCatholicGirl:

Photo of the original text

Early versions of the Kindle had high text definition but were, unfortunately, rather cumbersome...
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
This might be a stupid question.

Yesterday, Royal Bank of Scotland had a computer glitch which stopped people being able to use their debit cards. Student son was one of those affected. He doesn't have a credit card, so he had no access to any money, and he doesn't normally carry much cash.

It's sorted now, but I realised I have no idea how to get money to someone in that situation - is there a way?

Western Union?
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
Moneygram is now world wide. You just put in the sum at your end (post office) and he gets it ASAP at his end (post office.)

I use it all the time now to transfer money to India, but it works well in the same country. Moneygram
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
I have just received some handkerchiefs I ordered for Mr. Plummer from the website of A Well Known Chain Store. They turned out to be disappointingly thin and he thinks he'll need to use them two at a time. Looking at other sites there are plenty of glowing descriptions of the area and patterns of their handkerchiefs, but nothing about the thickness. Does anyone know of a good UK source for thick'uns?
 
Posted by TonyK (# 35) on :
 
Thanks, guys, for all your helpful tips and hints - especially Carex with the explanation for negative db ratings.

I changed the setting for one of the radio mics this morning and used it successfully at a funeral service.

I can now adjust the others accordingly.

Situation wasn't helped by the discovery that a large number (40 sets!) of zinc carbon batteries had been purchased for the transmitters. A test shows that they lose power very quickly and actually run out towards the end of our main service. Even I know that alkaline batteries should be used for these devices. Another test showed that 2300mAh rechargeables ran for over 4 hours without problem. The manual says that alkaline batteries will run for 6 - 8 hours, depending on the transmitter power setting.

I think I'm finally getting to grips with it all!
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I have just spent about twenty minutes trying to communicate with a business by e-mail. After I had filled in all the blanks, they showed some letters and numbers, slightly distorted, and asked me to type them. I tried more than thirty times, and every time I was told it was invalid. This happens to me more often than not. Is it just me, or do other people have this problem? Also, does anyone have any suggestions about what I can do?

If we still had the TICTH thread in Hell, I would have posted there.

Moo
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Moo: Also, does anyone have any suggestions about what I can do?
I think what you're talking about is CAPTCHA. Most CAPTCHA boxes have a little loudspeaker icon next to them, where you can hear the letters instead of reading them. Maybe this can help?
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
I also find those hard. I've never tried the speaker, I may have to at some point. I'd guess it normally takes me 2-3 tries to get one right.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Also, no spaces (even if the characters are shown in two groups). The site I usually encounter them on though changes the display if I get it wrong, so sooner or later I get ones I can decipher.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Polly Plummer

Best to look at the luxury end of the market - Turnbulls, Selfridges, etc - or try House of F****r - and HofF have an on-line shop.

Had a quick squint and they have a variety of plain white available.

(Some sites don't list under handkerchiefs - try "pocket squares".
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
There is no speaker icon. [Frown]

This is the website for a company that installs expensive gutters that supposedly can't be clogged by leaves. (If they get clogged, the company will send someone to clear them for free.)

Why on earth do they want to make it so difficult for a potential customer to contact them?

Moo
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
On the captcha things, may they roast in hell--

If you have any unusual software doohickeys (like the one that allows me to add Viet accent marks) make sure the bloody things are off before you enter anhthing, or they'll throw funky coding in there and mess it all up.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I gave up and telephoned them. I didn't want to because of my hearing problem, but I couldn't think of anything else to do.

The call went okay, and they made an appointment to come and give me an estimate.

Moo
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
Thanks, l'organist, I'll try something more upmarket!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Also, no spaces (even if the characters are shown in two groups). The site I usually encounter them on though changes the display if I get it wrong, so sooner or later I get ones I can decipher.

If you are given the option to select another, do so. I find anything with I, L or 1 is trouble. S and 5 can be awkward too.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Mr D and I were having a bit of a (ahem) "discussion" about the fact that he had left the stairs and landing lights on all day again and he said that they were only two LED lights and a low energy bulb (true) and that
1. They were designed to be left on all day
2. They took up minimal amount of electricity
3. It took more energy turning them off and on than it did leaving them on all day (for 12 hours)
4. I often leave the kitchen door open and let out all the heat and that is a much worse sin and makes the Baby Jesus cry because it pisses all the heat away.

Now, I will concede that (4) is possibly true (except maybe the bit about the Baby Jesus crying) but the other three points sound like slightly-guilty-justifying-myself bollocks. But I don't know. What do People Who Know About These Things think?
 
Posted by Doc Tor (# 9748) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
Mr D and I were having a bit of a (ahem) "discussion" about the fact that he had left the stairs and landing lights on all day again and he said that they were only two LED lights and a low energy bulb (true) and that
1. They were designed to be left on all day
2. They took up minimal amount of electricity
3. It took more energy turning them off and on than it did leaving them on all day (for 12 hours)
4. I often leave the kitchen door open and let out all the heat and that is a much worse sin and makes the Baby Jesus cry because it pisses all the heat away.

Now, I will concede that (4) is possibly true (except maybe the bit about the Baby Jesus crying) but the other three points sound like slightly-guilty-justifying-myself bollocks. But I don't know. What do People Who Know About These Things think?

AFAIK - compact fluorescents do 'wear out' if you turn them on and off frequently. LEDs do not, which is why they're almost universally used for the lights on electronic gubbins. LEDs can and do fail, but that's more likely due to a failure in the surrounding circuit than the LED itself. The LED bulbs from IKEA that I've just bought suggest they might outlast me, and I'm only 47.

While low-energy bulbs are low energy, they are not zero energy. I've found that I have to use more CF bulbs in a given area than incandescents - my kitchen has 11 11W CFs, which is brighter than two 60W bulbs, but not as bright as 11 60W bulbs... would I leave two 60W bulbs burning when I didn't have to? No. I'm not sure about whether it takes more power to turn a CF on than it consumes in normal use, but that doesn't sound likely. LEDs, it certainly doesn't. CFs do take a minute or so to come to full brightness. If I'm in an out of a room, I'd leave them on. If I was out of the house for an hour or so, I'd turn them off.

If I could afford to swap all my CFs for LEDs at once, I would. It'll be a gradual changeover instead.

Also, shut the bloody door. 'Born in a barn?' is a frequent cry in our household.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Doc Tor:

Also, shut the bloody door. 'Born in a barn?' is a frequent cry in our household.

[tangent] I once saw a cartoon of Jesus leaving a door open -- and being asked that question. [/tangent]
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
I know nothing about opera except that when I do listen to a soprano singing some anguished song (I don't even know what to call the songs) I find it soothes the mental. Can anyone recommend a CD of suitable anguish to provide said soothing?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
I am looking for a quote that describes Dissenting/NonConformist sects I suspect in 18th century but maybe earlier. It is not complimentary and is something like "A disputatious and divisive people" but it picks up a description that instantly recognizable as catching something of the character of the tradition.

Anyone know what it actually is?

Jengie
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
I know nothing about opera except that when I do listen to a soprano singing some anguished song (I don't even know what to call the songs) I find it soothes the mental. Can anyone recommend a CD of suitable anguish to provide said soothing?

Solo songs in an opera are arias. If you want anguish, you'd probably like Puccini (I don't particularly, but I don't like anguish). You might want to try something like this.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Can anyone recommend a good AddBlock?

I don't want to Google it as I may download something even worse!

Every other word on the Ship is being made into a link and popping up adds - it's awful!

(My anti virus is Kaspersky and all up to date)
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
That's because what you are not running your browser directly, but through another programme which reads everything you do. And you have downloaded it when you clicked on a link on an infected site somewhere. Virus checkers won't find it because it isn't a virus running in the browser but a programme running in front of it. How to get rid of it? Have look at the list of programmes you have installed, In My Computer on a PC. If you can find something that isn't supposed to be there uninstall it.

Do not use internet shopping or banking while it is still there. Seriously. You are being tracked.
 
Posted by Clotilde (# 17600) on :
 
Does anyone remember the simple 'Rules for a Church goer' or whatever it was called that the Archbishops - of Canterbury and York wrote?

It used to be printed sometimes on Confirmation Cards or was it baptism.

Can anyone signpost to an online version of it?
We'd like to see it at our church and maybe revise it a little bit for local use.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
That's because what you are not running your browser directly, but through another programme which reads everything you do. And you have downloaded it when you clicked on a link on an infected site somewhere. Virus checkers won't find it because it isn't a virus running in the browser but a programme running in front of it. How to get rid of it? Have look at the list of programmes you have installed, In My Computer on a PC. If you can find something that isn't supposed to be there uninstall it.

Do not use internet shopping or banking while it is still there. Seriously. You are being tracked.

Thanks balaam - I will try and find it and zap it.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Does anyone know how the custom of running toy trains at Christmas got started? The trains were part of my childhood Christmas, but now I can't see the connection.

Moo
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Does anyone know how the custom of running toy trains at Christmas got started? The trains were part of my childhood Christmas, but now I can't see the connection.

Moo

Anyone who has ever received a toy train as a Christmas gift feels they must run it there and then. Could the tradition have come from there?

I've seen (large) Christmas cakes with (a small) railway running on top. Even one with a motorised sleigh!
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Does anyone know how the custom of running toy trains at Christmas got started? The trains were part of my childhood Christmas, but now I can't see the connection.

Moo

Anyone who has ever received any toy as a Christmas gift feels they must play with it there and then. - I know I did. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
I would also suggest that, beyond the toy playing connection, there is something of a natural connection in that the train track (at least with starter sets) tends to be a big circle--and thus perfect to set up around the tree with the trunk in the center.
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
I know nothing about opera except that when I do listen to a soprano singing some anguished song (I don't even know what to call the songs) I find it soothes the mental. Can anyone recommend a CD of suitable anguish to provide said soothing?

Solo songs in an opera are arias. If you want anguish, you'd probably like Puccini (I don't particularly, but I don't like anguish). You might want to try something like this.
My mother listened to Puccini while having a hip joint replaced under local anaesthetic (an NHS perk). Personally, I felt that no anaesthetic at all would have been better than hearing Puccini, but that's my mother. I hate Puccini - sounds like slow motion mud wrestling to me. However, for arias that both soothe and enliven the soul, Mozart opera works better than anything else for me. They run every possible emotion, and The Marriage of Figaro has them all. I know we're not supposed to offer medical or psychological advice here, but I never heard of Mozart doing anybody any harm. Even Gilbert and Sullivan can soothe - The Yeomen of the Guard is worth a try.
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clotilde:
Does anyone remember the simple 'Rules for a Church goer' or whatever it was called that the Archbishops - of Canterbury and York wrote?

It used to be printed sometimes on Confirmation Cards or was it baptism.

Can anyone signpost to an online version of it?
We'd like to see it at our church and maybe revise it a little bit for local use.

The card I received when I was confirmed (in 1995) had printed on the back: "A Short Guide to the Duties of Church Membership issued by the Archbishops of Canterbury and York" - is that what you're looking for? I found this link: http://www.suffolksaints.info/download_files/er_letter.pdf

Not sure if that helps?
 
Posted by Pre-cambrian (# 2055) on :
 
I know the rule about not re-freezing something once it's been defrosted. But if, for example, you defrost some raw meat and then make something like a stew out of it can you freeze the leftovers of the cooked result? Or would that still count as re-freezing, resulting in death, destruction and excessive trips to the lavatory?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
[Big Grin] i think what the real problem is with refreezing is mostly a breakdown of texture. Double freezing can give you mush. It could also get you sick IF you managed to lose track of the total amount of time you had had it defrosted altogether, and wound up boubking the safe period ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pre-cambrian:
I know the rule about not re-freezing something once it's been defrosted. But if, for example, you defrost some raw meat and then make something like a stew out of it can you freeze the leftovers of the cooked result?

AIUI if the meat has been well-cooked, any bacteria that were in it have been killed. You can safely freeze the leftovers.

Moo
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
Standard disclaimers apply, but it's quite common for Brazilians to defrost and refreeze their food a number of times.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pre-cambrian:
I know the rule about not re-freezing something once it's been defrosted. But if, for example, you defrost some raw meat and then make something like a stew out of it can you freeze the leftovers of the cooked result? Or would that still count as re-freezing, resulting in death, destruction and excessive trips to the lavatory?

The main issue is the risk of bacterial contamination/growth. Cooking stuff through resets the clock. Even with an already cooked food like soup, say, provided you can thoroughly reheat it to kill any bacteria, you would then be able to refreeze. (Though, as others have pointed out, other qualities in the food might suffer.)
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
From my own experience, if you cook something within 24 hours of it being defrosted, and freeze the leftovers when they're cold, then defrost and reheat them for eating, personally I haven't had any ill effects from doing so. However, not everything will taste the same or have the same texture once re-heated.

Also, fish and seafood are something to be careful with. I don't refreeze and reheat those.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I'm of the freeze once raw, freeze once cooked. And if it's not finished up by then, you're probably sick of it anyway.

If I am freezing stuff, I tend to bag it up into single meal helpings (we bulk buy from Costco from time to time).
 
Posted by Pre-cambrian (# 2055) on :
 
Thanks all. This is very helpful. And in accord with what I hoped the advice would be [Smile] . It's beef which I'll be using in a sort of rendang, although the recipe doesn't use that name. I've used the recipe before, but to my taste the amount of spices needs to be upped significantly. I'll see what happens this time.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pre-cambrian:
I've used the recipe before, but to my taste the amount of spices needs to be upped significantly. I'll see what happens this time.

Freezing may affect the flavor of the spices.

Moo
 
Posted by Mr Clingford (# 7961) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
quote:
Originally posted by Pre-cambrian:
I've used the recipe before, but to my taste the amount of spices needs to be upped significantly. I'll see what happens this time.

Freezing may affect the flavor of the spices.

Moo

It seems to weaken the taste of cinnamon IME.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We regularly cook things with meat that's been frozen and then freeze and re-heat the left-overs, and we've never had any ill-effects.

So far, anyway ... [Paranoid]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
We regularly cook things with meat that's been frozen and then freeze and re-heat the left-overs, and we've never had any ill-effects.

So far, anyway ... [Paranoid]

Me too, but a friend of mine has just got food poisoning this way. The key seems to be re-heating thoroughly the second time, not just to eating temperature as tempting as that might be in a hurry (the culprit was lukewarm pea and ham soup resulting in 4 days worth of dehydration followed by a hospital visit).
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Another thing to consider is time in the table. The longer something stays out, the more likely bacterial growth. Freezers and refridgerators may well not kill what has already begun growing.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
And it won't do anythinh about toxins akready generated by said bacteria.
 
Posted by Clotilde (# 17600) on :
 
I notice some ministers at churches have a banner at the bottom of their e mails with a little advert about their church - its not just text with a link. Its more than that. Basic info and you can click on it to a web page. How is it that done?
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
It will depend on your email provider and/or the email program you use. I use Thunderbird, and there are instructions as to how to add various types of signature here. My email provider is BT (Yahoo) and within the Yahoo website there are instructions for adding plain text or rich text signatures.
 
Posted by Clotilde (# 17600) on :
 
Thank you - that was very helpful. I do use Thunderbird.
 
Posted by Pyx_e (# 57) on :
 
I want a decent quality picture (for a church poster) of someone jumping on the back of a red routemaster bus. I have tried google, flickr Iphotostock and various other sites. Any suggestions as to where I might find one?

It's drving me slightly crazy.

Fly Safe Pyx_e
 
Posted by Eutychus (# 3081) on :
 
Quick suggestions here and here (assuming that's the kind of Routemaster you mean)

/stopped being a London Transport nerd c.1977
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Go to e Strand in London, where the 9 and 13 routes still use old buses?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
How badly do you want it, Pyx_e? The London Transport Museum has a visual image library and a photographic collection which might well answer your need (I haven't explored it) but there would be a fee.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Clotilde:
Thank you - that was very helpful. I do use Thunderbird.

I'm a Buckie man myself

[ 16. January 2014, 20:01: Message edited by: Albertus ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Pyx_e - how fast do you want that picture?
 
Posted by Pyx_e (# 57) on :
 
Thanks Euty, the first one (bus wise). Ken I am nearly at that point! Ariel, what a great site, sadly no pictures I could find of someone jumping on the boarding platform of a moving RM.

CK, I am very keen to get a decent pic. We are trying to present faith as somthing that is moving and is a journey. Hence a "getting on the bus" picture. Ariel's site has a few pictures from training sessions of people falling off the platform, which maybe useful for where we are [Big Grin] How fast? Well I have been looking for over 6 months, The poster can't happen until I have the right pic. I am willing to contribute to a fund of anyones choice for decent, action, movement filled picture. Money, Chocolate.......

Fly safe, Pyx_e (ex LT worker and fan of Routematers having spent many a drunken night sitting in the set at the top of the stairs going back and forth between Wood Green and Tr Sq on the 29)
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I'll look on Flickr later and through what I've taken. we have Routemasters on a steam train link where I live and I see the 9 when I am in town.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
This is from the Routemaster entry in Wikipedia and is open source so you can use it
Routemaster
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
OK can't see anything that I suspect is what you're looking for on the EOR Flickr group I checked but it does have cool red Routemasters.

There's this guy might be worth asking or checking his blog.

Is this sort of thing any good or do you have in mind someone swinging themselves aboard a moving bus with blur for movement in the surroundings? I have that image in my mind but I can't find it, either. Does it have to be the old Routemaster or the new one.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yes, I had a mental image of something more like this, though that isn't coloured, obviously, or this, rather than one where the bus is motionless.

Though Pyx_e might like this to illustrate how religion teaches you to rise above it all.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Do you have a contact who could Photoshop what you want?

GG
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Galloping Granny - the reason I'm asking new Routemaster or old is that I'm going to be near Tottenham Court Road on Thursday evening and the 38 is a new Routemaster and goes along TCR, so I could have a go at getting the shot. Or if old, I could have a go on my High Street - but if he wants London it means going to Piccadilly ... and I could be around there on 1st and 2nd February. And if I get something half way there, I could probably photoshop the rest.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Is this any good? Or this?
 
Posted by Pyx_e (# 57) on :
 
Again, thanks some great photos that last one is the closest (Thanks BT). CK, in my mind its the old RM but I can not ask you to go wandering around London. For me part of the frustration is that "someone running to jump on a routemaster" is my iconic mental picture of these buses. There MUST be a photo lol. Ah well as long as it's not me being daft.

Fly Safe. Pyx_e
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Pyx_e - I wander round London with a camera in hand anyway.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pyx_e:
I want a decent quality picture (for a church poster) of someone jumping on the back of a red routemaster bus. I have tried google, flickr Iphotostock and various other sites. Any suggestions as to where I might find one?

It's drving me slightly crazy.

Fly Safe Pyx_e

Not exactly jumping on but here are people getting on a Routemaster.

http://nos.twnsnd.co/image/72563172177
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pyx_e:
I want a decent quality picture (for a church poster) of someone jumping on the back of a red routemaster bus. I have tried google, flickr Iphotostock and various other sites. Any suggestions as to where I might find one?

It's drving me slightly crazy.

Fly Safe Pyx_e

I don't suppose this is any help?
http://www.mrs2be.com/supplier-of-the-month-march.php
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Having enormous problems getting images on tumblr and elsewhere (but tumblr is the worst) to show up. Even user images are blank for me. Have cleared the cache/cookies/history etc, restarted the laptop (am on a laptop not a mobile device), but there's no difference. I am using the latest version of Firefox. Any ideas?? It is very annoying.
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Go to e Strand in London, where the 9 and 13 routes still use old buses?

I rarely take buses in London: I prefer the Underground. I took a long walk from a station not far from Russell Square to Marble Arch because I needed to go to M & S to replace clothing lost by British Airways after an extended US visit. I did take a bus with a Shipmate after a meet in Bristol though because I feared shifting my hired car which was in a busy neighbourhood near a public park across the street from our lodgings. Though it was a lovely Renault Megane convertible hardtop we got as an upgrade, I shall never drive there again! It's a bloody nightmare and we missed our train. Thank God, there was safe passage on the next one!
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
I used to use the underground, until I found that some of the stations were closer together than I thought. With busses you get to see more of London.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I find it odd that people rely on London Underground to get around. There are too many stupid journeys - like Leicester Square to Covent Garden or Regents Park to Great Portland Street when you can stand outside one station and see the other.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It breaks up the quantity of people travelling by public transport, though; if there was no Tube, the buses would be phenomenally overcrowded.

The system works for people who are less familiar with London, though where it falls down is on the Tube when people unfamiliar with how the Underground works are trying to leave a station where the exits are labelled something like "South side of Regent St", or in giving directions to any tourist that start "Take the southbound Northern line then change for the eastbound Circle and District..."
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Total change of subject, a churchy sort of question, about organisational language. It's been niggling me for a couple of weeks since an episode of Midsomer Murders in which a maddish woman vicar (or rector) finds a painting in the crypt and various shenanigans follow while she plans to open up the place as a pilgrimage destination or something.
And a part of me was going "No, you can't do that, not without a ******** from the deanery, or the Archdeacon", and I simply can't recall the word.
It is a technical word meaning something like permission in context, but sounding like something else in ordinary speech. And though I am never likely to need it, it bothers me that I can't remember it.
 
Posted by Meerkat (# 16117) on :
 
The word is 'Faculty'
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Faculty? Usually from the diocesan advisory committee I think.

I watched that episode but Just kept thinking she should be in Lewis!
 
Posted by Meerkat (# 16117) on :
 
Faculties can be a pain, too! [Smile]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Thank you. I only ever came across it once during my connection with the CofE, and it was in the church my parents went to, not one I was associated with. So not essential to my life to know. But there was this faculty shaped hole in my brain that wouldn't fill up. Thanks again.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Is anyone able to suggest a kind of heat pad or collar for neck muscles - the sort you can pop into the microwave that retains heat for a while? I'd originally thought a wheat one, but they all seem a bit heavy for someone elderly, so possibly gel. If anyone can recommend one, that would be great.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Is anyone able to suggest a kind of heat pad or collar for neck muscles - the sort you can pop into the microwave that retains heat for a while? I'd originally thought a wheat one, but they all seem a bit heavy for someone elderly, so possibly gel. If anyone can recommend one, that would be great.

I've one similar to this. Light, though, is a relative term. I think it is lighter than the wheat ones, but it this could be largely because it does not sag. The wheat wan to roll off wherever you put them. The lightest are the disposable, but that obviously costs more for long term use.
 
Posted by Gwai (# 11076) on :
 
Pasted from Purgatory

quote:
Originally posted by leo:
A lovely image, I found it in To Grow in Love: A Spirituality of Ageing by Brian Grogan.

He says it is from a theologian but there are no footnotes.

Does anyone know which theologian?


 
Posted by Eutychus (# 3081) on :
 
The actual quote is, I believe:

quote:
“the reality of creation as a whole has become a monstrance of God's real presence”
and the theologian is Hans Urs von Balthasar. The book is “The Glory of the Lord”, vol I p420. Here's one source.

Just shows how important it is to properly attribute and source quotations in one's writings.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Thank you.

The author didn't use footnotes - presumably because his book was originally serialised in 'The Messenger' magazine.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
A really odd one for the font nerds. For my thesis I have bits that are in a different "voice" to the main text. The problem is that, while I can find advice on choosing two font solutions for headers and main text, I cannot find any advice for working with a third font to carry the other voice. Any suggestion on how to go about choosing this third font.

Jengie
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
My suggestion would be to use one sans-serif font for headers - do you mean headings? - and use large bold for those, and one serif font for main text, normal roman. You can then call out the additional material in normal, non-bold, sans-serif which will look distinct from the serif. If you start introducing extra typefaces it can all start to look distracting and it needs to look easy to read.

Alternatively you could reverse the idea, have your headings in a large bold serif font and keep that font, but drop the point size and scrap the bold for displayed material. That might even be in italic. Your main text would be in the sans-serif.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Would italicising do?

The only other thing I can think of would be choosing a 'handwritten' font.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Ariel

This is a three font problem, not a two.

Firenze

The problem is italic is used for quotes and book titles.

If people want my provisional choices

Headers in Geneva (all right that is for fun reason that the thesis involves the Reformed tradition and that seemed a good way in keeping on theme)

Probably a Garamond (classic serif font) for the main paragraph text.

I am open to changes in them.


Jengie
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I was going to suggest Bradley Hand - but it's not free: list of free handwritten fonts. Of that list One Stroke Script might work
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
This is a three font problem, not a two.

It doesn't have to be, is what I'm saying. If you want it to look professional, I strongly recommend not using a third font. You may already have italic for book titles, etc - that's not a problem. If you use italic for the "third voice" then simply reverse the italic of book titles etc to roman in those extracts. This is what they do in academic book publishing.

However, your thesis, your rules.

[ 22. February 2014, 09:07: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Ariel:

Tell me how I am to distinguish this other voice then?

Jengie
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Thanks Curiosity

Script would be right, these are more personal episodes than the main academic text. My main concern is legibility.

Jengie
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Tell me how I am to distinguish this other voice then?

This is a suggestion which you are of course free to not pursue, but this is how I would go about it.

Main text: Garamond

Headings: Geneva - if the Garamond main text is c. 10pt headings probably need to be c14pt bold to make them stand out

Third voice: Geneva, roman, c. same point size as the Garamond. The difference betwen serif and sans-serif should be clear enough. But if it isn't, then the third voice could be in italics. Where a book title or already italicized word appears in the third voice, that instance of italic would need to be romanized. I.e. in that kind of situation you simply reverse the usual italic.

Anyway, that's my 2p worth, and I've nothing more to add.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
In publishing we've dealt with this by adjusting other matters--bold or semibold, condensed vs not, indented vs not, extra leading, block quote style, type ornaments, text boxes, and/or background shading. Any of these might help to avoid the third font.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
How about just right-justifying it?
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
I would think that italics are the natural form of the second voice. You can reverse citations and book titles into roman. Less graceful alternatives would be small caps, if the alternate voice bits are small enough or slightly different weights like semi-bold or the equivalent. If they are paragraphs, then using a larger set of indents to 3/4 the measure may be sufficient.
The problem with using different fonts is what seems obvious to one reader may be missed by an oblivious reader. If it's really obvious it may be distracting to a perceptive reader.
 
Posted by crunt (# 1321) on :
 
Yes, what Hart said; Left and right justification. The use of too many fonts is messy and distracting (IMO).
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Actually Palimpest that is a really good argument for putting in a different font. If the reader does not notice the difference the whole second voice pieces will feel very odd indeed. In my opinion it would be far more likely to annoy the reader if they think they are reading the first voice and find you are in the second than anyone is likely to be annoyed over changes of text.

They are faction (fictionalised accounts of actual events) and therefore the voice is not academic. This is why a script hand would be appropriate. However they are part of the flow of the chapters I write and need to be read in place as the academic prose is written with them in. I wish my published paper was online as it has the same sort of structure.

Boxes would be the normal way to do this but there are problems with this:
  1. Getting the word count right
  2. They are too long for boxes
  3. They actually fit into the written structure of the chapter

The aim is partly to support the academic text but partly also to destabilise it. I am inviting people to explore imaginatively the same phenomena and see if they agree that my interpretation is plausible.

Left and right justification is out due to writing conventions.

Jengie

[ 23. February 2014, 08:29: Message edited by: Jengie Jon ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Fortean occurrence in the cupboard.

We have a large, walk-in cupboard on the shelves of which are a large number of miscellaneous glasses. This morning, three glasses sitting together contained liquid - apparently water, with a yellowish tinge but little or no perceptible odour. There was no liquid on the shelf round about, nor on the shelf above. One glass (a goblet) had a small amount, one (a tall tumbler) was one third full and a stemmed beer glass was almost completely full. They are at the front of the collection, in fairly frequent use, and the liquid is unlikely to have passed unnoticed - so this has happened overnight or at most in the last day or so.

Your theories are invited.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Someone is messing with your head.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
It is out of fear of this that every house I've lived in where I've had this power has stored glasses upside down.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
What is shelf underneath made of / covered with? I.e. if there had been some sort of leak / drip 36 hours ago, would the shelf have absorbed any liquid on it and now appear dry?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Painted wood.

But there is nothing to leak from. No bottles above, not adjacent to or underneath a wall or ceiling.

If it were a condensation event - though as an interior cupboard the climate is a very stable one - why just those 3 glasses, and how come the high variability in volume?

LC - trouble is, there are only the two of us in the house. That and a rather lively (incontinent? but tidy?) mouse.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
What is the difference between "second cousin" and "first cousin once removed"? And does either of these terms explain the relationship of me to my cousin's child? (and if not, what is the term to describe this relationship?)
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
First cousins share a common grandparent.
Second cousins share a common great grandparent.
Third cousins share a common great-great grandparent.

"Removed" comes into play if the two people are of different generations.
Once removed - a single generation apart.
Twice removed - two generations apart.

So you and your cousin are first cousins.
Your child and your cousin's child are second cousins.

Your cousin's child is your first cousin, once removed.
You are your cousin's child's second cousin, once removed.
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
Your first cousin once removed is the child of your first cousin.

The grandchild of your great aunt or great uncle is your second cousin.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
Thank you both - that's very helpful and cleared it up for me [Smile]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Basically, to get the "first / second/ third / fourth you count back from you to the common ancestor. Then to get the "once /twice/three times removed" bit you count down from the common ancestor to your relative. If you're the same generation, then there's no "removed" if there's one generation difference you're "once removed"

The reason why you and your cousin's child aren't the same to each other is because your cousin's child has to count an extra generation to get back to the common ancestor. But the generational difference is identical either way, so you're both "once removed"

ETA -cross posted

[ 25. February 2014, 17:17: Message edited by: North East Quine ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
This morning, three glasses sitting together contained liquid - apparently water, with a yellowish tinge but little or no perceptible odour. There was no liquid on the shelf round about, nor on the shelf above. One glass (a goblet) had a small amount, one (a tall tumbler) was one third full and a stemmed beer glass was almost completely full. They are at the front of the collection, in fairly frequent use, and the liquid is unlikely to have passed unnoticed - so this has happened overnight or at most in the last day or so.

Your theories are invited.

That's a quare thing.

1) Have you had guests round recently who might have put glasses in the cupboard while you weren't looking?

2) Are you sure it's water in the glasses?

3) Are the glasses all of the same provenance i.e. left to you by an elderly teetotal relative in a will, who hated the Demon Drink?

4) Are the glasses in order, i.e. the fullest on the side furthest from the emptiest? If so, you may have a tidy ghost.

5) Empty, wash and put them back with a request for [your favourite brand of white wine or beer] next time. Sit back and await results.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
Fortean occurrence in the cupboard.

We have a large, walk-in cupboard on the shelves of which are a large number of miscellaneous glasses. This morning, three glasses sitting together contained liquid - apparently water, with a yellowish tinge but little or no perceptible odour. There was no liquid on the shelf round about, nor on the shelf above. One glass (a goblet) had a small amount, one (a tall tumbler) was one third full and a stemmed beer glass was almost completely full. They are at the front of the collection, in fairly frequent use, and the liquid is unlikely to have passed unnoticed - so this has happened overnight or at most in the last day or so.

Your theories are invited.

The north east family discussed this over dinner, it being far more interesting than our own lives.

We want to know:
1. Do you still have the glasses with the liquid in them?
2. If so, does the differing levels of water let you play a tune on them?
3. Where is the nearest source of liquid? Any pipes running through the cupboard?
4. Have you had anyone in the house in the last couple of days?
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
For Christmas I was given a very pretty glass jar that had been made into a home made candle, completely full of wax with a wick. The wick has now come out and I am left with a jar three quarters full of hard wax. Is there any way I can get rid of/melt the wax to get it out so I can save the jar?

I have thought of putting it in the microwave on a very low setting, or in a very low oven, or stand it in a pot of hot water ... would any of these ideas work?
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
I'd go for the hot water option as the safest, after all you only need to melt the wax around the edges to get it to slide out, unless the jar has a narrow neck, in which case you may need to do it several times.

Others may be more venturesome.

Huia
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Yeah, hot not boiling water as Huia says. After the main mass slides out, you might also need to put hot water into the container to remove the last bits. Hot water inside is a god way to remove the final bits of a spent candle as well.

ETA: Have a care and proceed cautiously. Better to start with water too cold than to break the jar. Candle jar glass is not always the highest quality.

[ 25. February 2014, 19:45: Message edited by: lilBuddha ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
That's a quare thing.

1) Have you had guests round recently who might have put glasses in the cupboard while you weren't looking?

Nope. Nobody else in the house for weeks.

quote:


2) Are you sure it's water in the glasses?

We weren't going to taste it. But it looked and smelt like slightly musty, yellowish water.

quote:


3) Are the glasses all of the same provenance i.e. left to you by an elderly teetotal relative in a will, who hated the Demon Drink?

Having neither teetotal relatives, nor ones who left me anything, definitely not. All of very ordinary, and differing, provenance.

quote:


4) Are the glasses in order, i.e. the fullest on the side furthest from the emptiest? If so, you may have a tidy ghost.

Dunno. Beloved had moved - and indeed washed and used one - before telling me about it.

quote:


5) Empty, wash and put them back with a request for [your favourite brand of white wine or beer] next time. Sit back and await results.

Trouble is, even if they were brimming with the '83 Côte de Nuits, you'd hesitate to drink it, wouldn't you?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:

We want to know:
1. Do you still have the glasses with the liquid in them?
2. If so, does the differing levels of water let you play a tune on them?
3. Where is the nearest source of liquid? Any pipes running through the cupboard?
4. Have you had anyone in the house in the last couple of days?

1. No. Realistically - no sterile, sealable container to decant to, and no chance either of us would get round to finding an analyst.
2. At most it would have been three notes. But yes, it might have summoned the mothership.
3. No pipes. A number of bottles in the general vicinity, but I think we would have spotted if the liquid had the characteristics of any of them.
4. Owing to ongoing dental misery, we've been in social purdah.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Re candle in jar:

Ditto re warm water. Candles sometimes contain odd ingredients, and who knows how they might react in a microwave?
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:



Candles sometimes contain odd ingredients, and who knows how they might react in a microwave?

That's the fun part.

It could be spectacular.
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
Query: is it right that we are now in late Feb 2014 and this thread is still titled 2013?

Should it not be closed down and a new, fresh thread begun?
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TheAlethiophile:
Query: is it right that we are now in late Feb 2014 and this thread is still titled 2013?

Should it not be closed down and a new, fresh thread begun?

Maybe we are waiting until we have 2,013 questions...
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TheAlethiophile:
Query: is it right that we are now in late Feb 2014 and this thread is still titled 2013?

Not any more.

quote:

Should it not be closed down and a new, fresh thread begun?

If it falls into sufficient desuetude to be swept away in the regular tidy, that will be a Sign. Otherwise - kicks an offside mudguard - looks sound enough to me.

Firenze
Lackadaisical Heaven Host

 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:



Candles sometimes contain odd ingredients, and who knows how they might react in a microwave?

That's the fun part.

It could be spectacular.

Thanks all, the hot water idea worked fine.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:

We want to know:
1. Do you still have the glasses with the liquid in them?
2. If so, does the differing levels of water let you play a tune on them?
3. Where is the nearest source of liquid? Any pipes running through the cupboard?
4. Have you had anyone in the house in the last couple of days?

1. No. Realistically - no sterile, sealable container to decant to, and no chance either of us would get round to finding an analyst.
2. At most it would have been three notes. But yes, it might have summoned the mothership.
3. No pipes. A number of bottles in the general vicinity, but I think we would have spotted if the liquid had the characteristics of any of them.
4. Owing to ongoing dental misery, we've been in social purdah.

Do either of you sleepwalk?
Were the glasses just where they normally were on the shelf?
Are they used for anything special?
Have you taken everything off the shelf above and confirmed there's nothing on it?
Do you have any theories or are you still mystified?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Have you had any more recurrences?

Have there been other anomalies in the house since you've been there?
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
Re Candle in the jar

Have you tried adding another wick. If you put one on the surface, it may melt its way into the body of the wax.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
I could be wrong, but it seems to me the wick would remain on the surface or relatively close. One heat the wax to melting the insert a new wick, perhaps.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Use a heated skewer to make a deep hole then thread the new wick into the hole, perhaps?
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
I couldn't be bothered - I really just wanted to keep the jar, which is what I have now managed to do.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Nothing to add to the Cupboard Mystery. Neither the glasses nor that spot on the shelves has evinced any more Manifestations.

Meanwhile, our downstairs neighbours have moved out (not on account of any Weird Goings On) and new people come in Monday. I'm hoping they have a cat, as that would address the major unwanted feature of the house at the moment - a particularly impudent mouse.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
When I learnt geography (OK, in the last century), it was

The Ukraine
The Crimea
The Gambia
The Netherlands
The United Kingdom
The United Nations
The United States
The Isle of Man
The Vatican

now and again, The Lebanon; and possibly more I can't remember.

In the past year or so there seems to have been a distinct shift in the media to dropping the definite article. While I can understand it for Lebanon and Gambia, which aren't collective nouns, and don't have an adjective in front of them, it sounds a bit odd just to say, "United States decided..."

So why would a Ukraine, or a Gambia, or a Crimea need a definite article? And why the shift to dropping it where (IMO) it ought to be retained?
 
Posted by Og, King of Bashan (# 9562) on :
 
More than you ever wanted to know.

In the case of Ukraine, the official name of the country is just "Ukraine," as opposed to even "The Republic of Ukraine," so in that case, you can't even use the excuse that you are just shortening the official name- it is just "Ukraine." There is a suggestion that the older use may have been appropriate when it was the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, but it isn't that anymore (don't tell Putin).
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
The explanation for Ukraine that I was given was that 'ukraine' means 'borderland', i.e. borderland of Russia. Calling the country 'the borderland' emphasises its status as a sort of adjunct of Russia, whereas if you just call it Borderland, that emphasises that the name is a proper noun and therefore doesn't necessarily mean what it's derived from (just as Newcastle doesn't immediately suggest 'new castle', but 'The Newcastle' probably would).

Or something. I'm not totally convinced given that Ukrainian doesn't have definite articles, so we're arguing about the English translation of the name rather than anything else.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
OK... but what about Crimea, Gambia, etc etc? It's always been "The Crimea" as far I know.

[ 02. March 2014, 08:05: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Horseman Bree (# 5290) on :
 
I've never heard of "THE Crimea".
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Horseman Bree:
I've never heard of "THE Crimea".

Its the new name we thought up for the west side Cimmerian Bosphorus when the Turks took it from the Tatars. Before then it was plain old Crim Tartary. (And nothing to do with Paphlagonia)
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
It also used to be The Argentine - have just finished I Capture The Castle (again) and Cassandra mentions being warned about hospital nurses trafficking girls to 'The Argentine'.

Unrelatedly - bit TMI but have had a bit of a horrid time lately digestive-system-wise. Currently having some truly awful trapped wind/gas that even prescription antacids aren't touching. I have to make myself retch for it to dissipate - not nice. What's the best solution? Epsom salts maybe?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
You don't want antacids, you want something with simethicone in it. Then I'm afraid it's exercise--lots and lots of it. Walking will do. It's got only two ways to come out, and walking will, er, move it along.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Thank you!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
You're welcome!
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Jade Constable--

Some other home remedies:

--If you don't have acid reflux, try peppermint tea.

The reason you can't with reflux is that it relaxes the esophagus so much that stuff can easily come back up--so you get a volcano inside. No fun.

Also try eating caraway seed and dill, or making them into a tea.


--Drink baking soda in warm water. Directions should be on the package. Or drink seltzer water.


--Massage your mid-section.


--Try some very gentle stretches, if you can manage.


--Drink miso soup.


IME, YMMV, etc.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yogurt. The sort with extra bacteria in it. Eat a portion of that and it will likely increase bloating etc for a few hours but after that you should have some peace.

Also, may I remind people that there can sometimes be a fine line between mentioning harmless home remedies and issuing medical advice, which the Ship doesn't do, so please be careful about that. Thanks.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Ariel--

Apologies if I over-stepped. I did make a point of classifying my suggestions as home remedies, out of caution for the Ship. I recently had to deal with a very bad bout of what Jade Constable has, and I know how awful it can be.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
First of all I assume you have been to the doctor to make sure it isn't anything else? Indigestion symptoms can often mask something else.

If it is just wind, I find relaxing in a hot bath helps, then lie down flat with the lower half of your body a little higher than your head, e.g. with a pillow under your hips. It's easier for the gas to escape if it doesn't have to fight the force of gravity!

[ 03. March 2014, 08:17: Message edited by: Sparrow ]
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
Seconding the suggestion of mint tea.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
quote:
Originally posted by Horseman Bree:
I've never heard of "THE Crimea".

Its the new name we thought up for the west side Cimmerian Bosphorus when the Turks took it from the Tatars. Before then it was plain old Crim Tartary. (And nothing to do with Paphlagonia)
Oops.i prayed for THE Crimea yesterday when leading the intercessions in our ever so politically correct church.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
Correction - for 'THE Ukraine'

That's probably wrong too.(?)
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I expect God knows who you mean.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Mint tea sadly doesn't do very much for me in that way - I have IBS anyway (no reflux that I know of) so familiar with a lot of the remedies, it just seems to be quite a stubborn case. Got some simeticone capsules which seem to be working.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I think I am going to have to resort to my peppermint oil capsules - having something similar today.
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
When I've saturated myself with coffee - the curse of working at home - I make a pot of ginger tea. I boil the water in a stainless steel pot, turn off the heat, add chopped ginger root and let it steep for half an hour or so. It reheats well in the microwave oven, but don't overheat - ruins the taste. Strain it into a mug, add a teaspoon each of lemon juice and honey, and you somehow feel that you have done your body a favour when you drink it.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
I am going through simeticone capsules like sweeties - in lots of pain every time I eat. Sigh. The simeticone do help, I'm just getting through them so quickly! I have a doctor's appointment on Thursday (unrelated) but wondering if I should go to the minor illnesses walk-in centre sooner.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Pain is not something to have more of than is strictly necessary.

I would go to the drop in.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Me too. Pain every time you eat is rather disturbing. Go rule out the more problematic stuff and feel better soon. (At my worst I took to fasting, and it still didn't help. If I'd done what I oughter the problem would have been fixed much sooner.)
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
As I understand it, there are things called oil pipelines, which move oil from places where it's produced to places that need it, and they move it very long distances. Why don't we have that for water? In the Midwest, we had a ton of snow this winter (the 8th most in recorded history where I live) and we will have flooding unless we get really lucky with its melting speed. Further West, there are droughts? Why aren't there pipelines evening this out, especially given that infrastructure projects are politically popular right now?

[ 04. March 2014, 14:40: Message edited by: Hart ]
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
Because water doesn't sell for $112 per barrel.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by monkeylizard:
Because water doesn't sell for $112 per barrel.

It may yet...
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
They do in fact have aqueducts, though none that go through several states as far as I know. Trying to imagine the sheer cost of concrete, steel, etc. for such a project (water gets used in vastly greater quantities than oil does).
 
Posted by Og, King of Bashan (# 9562) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by monkeylizard:
Because water doesn't sell for $112 per barrel.

It is always interesting seeing how attitudes change between parts of the country where it rains too much and parts of the country where it rains too little. Trust me, Las Vegas and Phoenix spend a lot of money to get the water to keep those golf courses green.

The hydrological system is pretty complex, and when you start messing with it, you can cause a lot of damage. Wetlands, groundwater, and flowing streams are all connected. If you start shipping water out of Indiana to Nevada, it may alleviate flooding, but at what cost? Less water in the ground for future drought years, and probably less water in important wetlands where birds nest. We have already done our best to prevent the Mississippi from flooding, which proved to be problematic for the gulf coast- less silt = no buffer from hurricanes = Katrina (oil pipelines don't help with that either). Plus, it seems like it would be extremely complicated to work out a system to fairly distribute the water. In a surplus year, fine. But once more homes, farms, and golf courses are built out here on the expectation of that extra water, what happens when the Midwest has a dry year and can't send the water over?

We have already done a lot of damage to the hydrological system in this country, and I would want assurances that we weren't causing even more before I would support a pipeline like you propose.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
I believe several water pipelines were built in Australia in the last century to move water from the Snowy Mountains to some of the cities.

In the UK the demand for water in the Midlands has long been satisfied by piping water from Wales and it has been suggested that water from the north of England and even Scotland could be moved south, possibly using canals, to alleviate the persistent water shortages in the south-east.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Update on my abdominal pain - ended up going to A&E today, since I couldn't get hold of my GP and 111 (UK non-emergency medical helpline) were useless, and it was the middle of the day on a weekday so I figured they wouldn't be too overrun. Had blood and urine tested, all are fine so the doctor reckons my gastroenteritis from over the weekend irritated my stomach lining sufficiently to cause the pain when I eat. Now at least have some strong pain relief and some stomach-soothing meds, and was told to keep an eye on it for now - to be honest it's the pain that's been the biggest problem so I'm happy with that. Having an early night and looking forward to sleeping properly without pain!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Good good good.

Looks narrowly at you--

So are you the one who sent it MY way?
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
In the United States there are a lot of projects to move water around, especially in the Southwest. It's difficult to do them across states because when water flow is down states want to keep the water for users in the state. The Colorado river water is allocated to the various states so that it barely makes it to the Gulf of Mexico before turning saline. There are massive redirections of water in California to Los Angeles and the Imperial valley.
But most water supply gets used to capacity and then it's a struggle for who gets it, the growing cities or the thirsty farms. Also, some water sources such as aquifers eventually run out if they are fossil water.
Water diversion also has other impacts; it tends to kill fish. In the Northwest, there's an ongoing tension between dams for power and irrigation and wildlife and salmon. One of the big projects of the last decade was to eradicate a damn on the peninsula and try and restore the fish. So note that any proposal to redirect water at this point will be opposed by the people who live where the water is now.

None of this is new. The Southwest United States goes through periodic severe droughts which overwhelm massive irrigation projects. There was a massive drought between 200 AD and 1200 AD which ended some large civilizations in the Southwest. There's a limit to how much water can be moved. It becomes simpler to move the water intensive agriculture or the cities to where the water supply is now.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Several times, I've come across the idea of Americans going out for breakfast after church on Sunday morning. Now for RCs and others who fast before the Eucharist, I get this, but it seems to be a thing across denominations. My question is, don't you get hungry by not having breakfast until after church? I mean if church starts at 10 and ends at 11-11.30, then you have coffee and a chat, and then drive (being Americans) to the breakfast place - that's lunchtime, not breakfast! If I hadn't eaten until then I'd be starving throughout the service. Unless after church breakfast is some kind of second breakfast? Do American church services start earlier?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Church starts at eight (maybe nine, if you have a humane schedule) and you're out by midmorning. Unless you've got commitments that force you to stay through two or more services.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Many people who go to eat after church go to brunch--a combination of breakfast and lunch. They will not eat again until suppertime.

Moo
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
Church starts at eight (maybe nine, if you have a humane schedule) and you're out by midmorning. Unless you've got commitments that force you to stay through two or more services.

Is this normal across denominations?

In the UK it's normal to start at around 10 and have breakfast before you go unless you are fasting.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Our After Church Lunch Bunch eats together every Sunday after the 10:30 service, but ours is definitely lunch. Some of our friends go to the early service (9:00) then go to breakfast together. I think that may be the main reason they go to early church!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
It varies from congregation to congregation. Those with a single service tend to have it about 9 or 10. Two services will usually produce 8 or 8:30 and a 10:30-ish one, with an education/coffee hour in between. More, and you're basically starting at ouch o'clock and scheduling a new one every hour and fifteen minutes until they're all fit in. And then of course there are evening or non-Sunday services at many churches.
 
Posted by Gwai (# 11076) on :
 
I'm interested to read about when our church services are because if I hadn't read this, I would have said that churches in America are at 11 usually, and 10 sometimes. Certainly that is vastly the norm in my experience though the church I attend now has a 9am service in addition to the 11am.
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
Having moved around in the UK a bit, I've found regional variations. In London, an 11am service seems to be the norm. The only major exceptions are the anglicans, who are fairly haphazard. If you pick a time, you can a find a church whose meeting starts then.

In Bedfordshire, 10am was the preferred time, though I haven't lived there for some time.

In Sussex, a happy medium was 10:30.

Personally, I prefer an earlier service as I feel as otherwise I'm just pottering around at home beforehand and tend to get home quite late for lunch.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Maybe it is denominational, then, though I was going off the noticeboards and ads of everything I've seen, which here and in CA have been mainly Catholic, Lutheran, Baptist, non-denom and various flavors of charismatic. I suspect but can't prove that the earlier service times occur in congregations where a large percentage of the people feel pushed for time on Sundays (eg working that day or coping with children's scheduled activities).
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
There is a lot of variation. I'm sure CofE churches with algernative 8am services still exist, if only because so many people here say they do. But its been a long time since one crossed my radar. The choice seems to be between 10, 10:30, and 11.

I know some places with the main service at 9am, but they are all - all two of them - part of teams where they share one priest who needs to be somewhere else for 10:30.

As for breakfast - I'd far rather stay in bed an extra hour than get up earlier than I have to before church! So I leave off eating till afterwards. Much easier on the old bones.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
(puts up hand) Macarius & I go to the 8 am Prayer Book service, then go home for breakfast and then I go out to ring for the 10.30 service (I don't stay for that, just go home after).

M.
 
Posted by Og, King of Bashan (# 9562) on :
 
Honest answer: I suspect most of them have a bowl of cereal or toast before church. [Eek!] (I'll admit to it- no one would want anything to do with the grumpy troll that is hungry me.)

Some of the southern Episcopalians I have known like to say that a sermon should always be short enough to allow you to beat the Baptists to the brunch buffet.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
There is a church here which has its service at 10.40 am. Originally that was to fit in with the bus timetable, but I'm sure that has changed many times since then! Anyway, most folk come by car these days ...
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Some of us are naturally not breakfast eaters. It runs in my family.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Okay, we've got a murder case which has been dragging on and on and ON and it hasn't even gotten to trial yet, lo these five years later. I'm watching the freaking thing on Casenet to see current status and it just keeps getting continued, often no reason specified. Last week two things popped up i don't understand: ON CALL MEMO FILED and CASE REVIEW SCHEDULED (and then continued to April, naturally). Does anybody know what these mean and whether we might be slouching slowly toward trial? I know the people and just want this slo-mo trainwreck to be over.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
IANAL, but I think an on-call memo is a notice X hours or days before the trial is planned to start.

[ 15. March 2014, 02:26: Message edited by: monkeylizard ]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I hope you're right. We have yet another month of this...
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
I've got some multicoloured IKEA LED lighting strips. I've noticed that when I switch them to blue, things like orange stickers on nearby stuff light up quite brightly.

What is the physics behind this, and are there other colours that react to blue (or any different colour) light in a similar way?

This is not UV light yet, is it? In the 1970ies/80ies discos of me yoof, you could see specks of dust on your jacket when they turned on the UV lamp effect.

Thanks for your insights. [Smile]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
why we see things in colour: different coloured light means only certain amounts of light to reflect from coloured objects. Under a red light, red objects look black as all the light is absorbed by the object. Under a blue light an orange object will reflect all the light back as there's no blue in orange.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I have a freezer full of homemade soup. The main constituents are a variety of vegetables plus stock I have made myself from poultry carcases. I do not add salt in either process. But after eating the stuff, which does not taste particularly salty, I have a salty aftertaste. I don't understand this.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
why we see things in colour: different coloured light means only certain amounts of light to reflect from coloured objects. Under a red light, red objects look black as all the light is absorbed by the object. Under a blue light an orange object will reflect all the light back as there's no blue in orange.

But it is the other way around. Red objects absorb all light, but the red so under a red light they are brighter while blue objects look black as they have no blue light to reflect.

Jengie
 
Posted by Dal Segno (# 14673) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
why we see things in colour: different coloured light means only certain amounts of light to reflect from coloured objects. Under a red light, red objects look black as all the light is absorbed by the object. Under a blue light an orange object will reflect all the light back as there's no blue in orange.

But it is the other way around. Red objects absorb all light, but the red so under a red light they are brighter while blue objects look black as they have no blue light to reflect.

Jengie

Jengie is right. Under blue light an orange object should appear black because it absorbs all the blue light.

However, if the orange object is fluorescent, then it will convert the blue light into orange light.

Fluorescence is also why UV light can cause some objects to glow: the UV light is absorbed and re-radiated as visible light.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I have a freezer full of homemade soup. The main constituents are a variety of vegetables plus stock I have made myself from poultry carcases. I do not add salt in either process. But after eating the stuff, which does not taste particularly salty, I have a salty aftertaste. I don't understand this.

If you use canned vegetables, they are jam packed with salt.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I have a freezer full of homemade soup. The main constituents are a variety of vegetables plus stock I have made myself from poultry carcases. I do not add salt in either process. But after eating the stuff, which does not taste particularly salty, I have a salty aftertaste. I don't understand this.

You can also get a lot of salt if you added celery. You may have also used brined chickens. This is common if you buy a pre roasted chicken at a store or if it was a koshered chicken.

You might try cooking a peeled potato in the soup; and discarding the potato and see if that removes the salt.

[ 22. March 2014, 05:04: Message edited by: Palimpsest ]
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
But none of that explains the lack of salt taste whilst eating.
 
Posted by St. Stephen the Stoned (# 9841) on :
 
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

I've got to the part where he gets involved with Llanthony Priory. My question is: how should it be pronounced? I know how to pronounce the Welsh double L (and I can*), but it always looks to me as though it should rhyme with "lantern-y". Is it LlAN-thony or Llan-thO-ny? And is the O long or short?

(The book itself carries an ex libris sticker showing that it once belonged to a person delighting in the name of Seraphim Newman-Norton.)

*(although perhaps not to the satisfaction of a native Welsh-speaker)
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
My Welsh isn't particularly good, but the stress is generally on the penult (second to last syllable). I would assume 'short o.'
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Palimpsest:
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I have a freezer full of homemade soup. The main constituents are a variety of vegetables plus stock I have made myself from poultry carcases. I do not add salt in either process. But after eating the stuff, which does not taste particularly salty, I have a salty aftertaste. I don't understand this.

You can also get a lot of salt if you added celery. You may have also used brined chickens. This is common if you buy a pre roasted chicken at a store or if it was a koshered chicken.

You might try cooking a peeled potato in the soup; and discarding the potato and see if that removes the salt.

I use fresh not tinned veggies - though if I do buy tinned stuff, it is without salt, canned in water only. The chicken/turkey is usually cooked by me. On occasion I have used pre-roasted chicken for stock, but recent occurrences have been with turkey. I've not noticed celery being salty. Some soups include it.

[ 24. March 2014, 07:28: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by St. Stephen the Stoned (# 9841) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
...a person delighting in the name of Seraphim Newman-Norton.

I'm embarrassed to admit that I thought this was somebody's affected soubriquet. [Hot and Hormonal]

I wonder if he wants the book back. After I've read it of course. It has annotations, perhaps by His Grace*.


*if that's the correct style. Apologies if it isn't.

[ 24. March 2014, 16:27: Message edited by: St. Stephen the Stoned ]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
As a valleys girl, I would pronounce it Llan to ny - "thlan toe nee. It used to annoy when my late mil pronounced it Llanto-nee - generally the stress is either on the second sylable, or the penultimate sylable if the word is long
 
Posted by Zach82 (# 3208) on :
 
From the annals of "questions you didn't think to ask," this map from The Economist weighs coffee vs. tea consumption across the world. Americans opt for coffee 75% of the time, Brits opt for tea 78% of the time, while Australians and Canadians sit on the fence.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Few surprises for most peopel there I'd think - except that the Middle East, including Turkey and Iran, is tea-drinking, not coffee. There seems to be a boundary down the middle of North Africa - Libya, whuich they miss of their map, is a tea nation, Tunisia and Algeria are coffeee.

And Kenya, where most of the high-quality coffee imported into Britain is grown (the cheap stuff comes from South America) is one of the most heavily tea-drinking countries in the world. I am an eye-witness - I suppose a mouth-and-stomach witness - to this. When I lived in Kenya there were coffee bushes growing outside our window. Well-cared-for, high-value, arabica coffee, native to East Africa, and the source of the majority of the income of the village. (You had to go a few miles further up the mountain to find tea) Yet everyone drank tea, every day. The only coffee available to drink was small, overpriced, sachets of Nescafe instant that were IMPORTED from America.

But the chai was wonderful [Yipee]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
Few surprises for most people there I'd think - except that the Middle East, including Turkey and Iran, is tea-drinking, not coffee.

It depends where you go. The Levant will offer you coffee, and cafes are part of everyday life, as they have been for a long time. (And yes, Starbucks and Costa Coffee have now made it to Beirut and Amman, and there was a thriving coffeehouse scene in Damascus until recently.) Tea is an alternative, but the coffee culture has been popular there as anywhere else.
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
I have a freezer full of homemade soup. The main constituents are a variety of vegetables plus stock I have made myself from poultry carcases. I do not add salt in either process. But after eating the stuff, which does not taste particularly salty, I have a salty aftertaste. I don't understand this.

I think this may be a weird physiological thing. I sometimes find that I a left with a salty aftertaste after drinking coffee (black, strong, no sugar). The coffee itself tastes fine. I am experiencing it now at almost 9am, having not eaten or drunk anything else other than water (and a couple of headache pills) since last night.

I would love to know why.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I am beginning to wonder if what I am tasting is actually stuff which has run down the back of my mouth from my nose. Given that the natural fluids of the body are a bit saline.
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
That makes a lot of sense.

So something in your soup and my coffee is possibly causing an increase in the charmingly named post nasal drip. I'm thinking that the culprit is a different one for each of us!
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Observation since suggests that it isn't from my nose, it's in the saliva*. So I'm wondering if there's some process by which the stomach needs a certain amount of salt to function properly, which it hasn't been given. So the salivary glands secrete it, and it gets swallowed.
*Though currently, I am getting it from the nose - but I haven't had any soup. Nothing since breakfast.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Taste is a weird thing. Many causes can alter your perception of taste. Because you perceive a salty taste does not mean you are tasting actual salt.

In looking around, I found nothing to suggest the stomach needs salt. The kidney hold or release salt depending on the body's needs.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Saliva is mildly alkaline to optimise the conditions for amylase, the enzyme in saliva that starts breaking down starch. Those electrolytes that make the saliva alkaline could be what makes it taste salty.

Nasal drips flow down the back of throats, usually imperceptibly and won't necessarily be obvious, and that really does taste salty.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
But it doesn't always taste salty. Does at the moment, post soup. I learned to control salivation, when taught about Pavlov's dogs*, and later when I found about the two sorts of saliva. The thick sort isn't tasting of salt, and that would be the one with the enzyme, as I recall. The watery type seems to the the culprit. I will test again tomorrow at various times.
If salivary glands have any similarity with mucous producers in the nose, tear producers in the eyes, or sweat glands, they could move sodium and chlorine ions about.
I've just had a drink of milk to change the environment a bit, the saltiness went, and now it's back again. It's about the same as tears in strength, and definitely at the front of my mouth, not the back.
Maybe it's a symptom of something horrible.
*I sat in the biology lab thinking of eclairs, and then simply switched to thinking of salivating.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Why do people dislike "Shine, Jesus, Shine" so much?
 
Posted by Meerkat (# 16117) on :
 
I don't! I'm a child of the 'fifties' and far prefer the more traditional C of E worship and Hymns, but I rather like SJS.

I must be a bit strange! [Razz]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Take your pick:

1. Because its the late C20th version of Jesus wants me for a sunbeam.
2. Because the idea of a "shining" deity is getting perilously close to the notion of the Sun-King so beloved of Louis XIV: As we gaze on your kingly brightness, So our faces display your likeness
3. Because its theologically illiterate and musically dire.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:

1. Because it's the late C20th version of Jesus wants me for a sunbeam.

That's actually a children's hymn, so probably angled towards the little ones. There are plenty of hymns (for adults) with dodgy wording where theology has been sacrificed to rhyme.

quote:
2. Because the idea of a "shining" deity is getting perilously close to the notion of the Sun-King so beloved of Louis XIV: As we gaze on your kingly brightness, So our faces display your likeness
Well, this is a new aspect that would never occur to me.

I thought the tune was quite upbeat and energizing, myself.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
You may find the tune 'energising' (whatever that means: but if you look at it in the cold light of day it is a not very good homage (there are other words for it) to Dave Brubeck's Take Five.

On the whole, a foundation course at art college may not be the best preparation for a career in original composition, orchestration, etc.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
You may find the tune 'energising' (whatever that means: but if you look at it in the cold light of day it is a not very good homage (there are other words for it) to Dave Brubeck's Take Five.

... the existence of which I was completely unaware until this moment ...
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Asking the LORD to shine is Biblical. Its in a couple of psalms.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
It is a serious question and one I have pondered. Firstly there have been other bete noir hymns. The one that preceded it was "Make me a Channel of your Peace" and I suspect "I the Lord of Earth and Sky" has also attracted some derogatory attention since.

However given timing and such "Shine Jesus Shine" should be one of those memories of middle aged people who occasionally sing it out of sentimentality and younger people should view it as embarrassing.

That is not the case. The polemic and vitriol directed at "Shine Jesus Shine" is still going strong. As well as those who think no service is complete if it is not sung. It is making me conclude that it is actually a great chorus. A good chorus is one lots appreciate, but a great one must be able to stir stronger emotions of love and loathing and for some reason "Shine Jesus Shine" does that.

Jengie
 
Posted by Starbug (# 15917) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
On the whole, a foundation course at art college may not be the best preparation for a career in original composition, orchestration, etc.

Tell that to John Lennon or Lionel Bart, who were both art school students before taking up music full-time. Neither of them could read sheet music, along with Irving Berlin, who could only play the piano in one key - it didn't stop him becoming one of the best-known American composers. I don't think there's any need to disparage Graham Kendrick because he didn't go to Juillard or a simliar establishment - not everyone can afford it.

[ 29. March 2014, 12:36: Message edited by: Starbug ]
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
3. Because its theologically illiterate and musically dire.

[Overused]
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:

3. Because its theologically illiterate and musically dire.

I hate the music too - BUT an organist who also has a theology degree once took me to task for loathing this - he went through it verse by verse, cross-referencing to the Transfiguration narrative.

The worse bit is when it talks of nation - sounds very right wing.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
You may find the tune 'energising' (whatever that means: but if you look at it in the cold light of day it is a not very good homage (there are other words for it) to Dave Brubeck's Take Five.

You have just proven there is no God. If there were, your mentioning those two together would have caused the Apocalypse.
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
The very first time I went to a church service on Christmas Day [this was when I was in my mid-thirties – I had no church involvement at all before that] we sang Shine Jesus Shine. On Christmas Day! At the time I loved it but I would be horrified if that happened today.

It was also sung at my confirmation service several years after that. So although I don’t really like the song very much I sort of have a soft spot for it as I associate it with important occasions in my life.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Our church has a gravestone dated 1748, which has a carving of an angel with outstretched arms. It holds a timer in one hand and a scythe in the other. From its mouth comes a banner, with words, but those words are now illegible. The first three letters are VIV... and it looks as though the phrase may have been three words long. At any rate, it's not a long phrase.

Any suggestions as to what a mid C18th gravestone angel might have been saying? Were there a few stock phrases for use on gravestones?

ETA - the stone has flaked at one point, and I don't want to try taking a rubbing as I think it might flake further.

[ 01. April 2014, 14:25: Message edited by: North East Quine ]
 
Posted by Gwai (# 11076) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Why do people dislike "Shine, Jesus, Shine" so much?

Because it's popular and has become symbolic of a sort of bouncy Christianity? I dislike it, but I also remember loving it as a child. It made me want to come to church, in fact. So I'd rather say it has a place, and perhaps the problem is that those of us who want more reflective worship tend to get annoyed when worship is covered with glittery bounce.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Our church has a gravestone dated 1748, which has a carving of an angel with outstretched arms. It holds a timer in one hand and a scythe in the other. From its mouth comes a banner, with words, but those words are now illegible. The first three letters are VIV... and it looks as though the phrase may have been three words long. At any rate, it's not a long phrase.

Any suggestions as to what a mid C18th gravestone angel might have been saying? Were there a few stock phrases for use on gravestones?

ETA - the stone has flaked at one point, and I don't want to try taking a rubbing as I think it might flake further.

No idea as to the text, but, you could try taking photos at several different times to get different shadows. And under different temperature conditions, in case frost picks details out. Or rain drying differentially. Also take said photos from different angles. Depends how much time you want to spend.

About how many letters do you think the words might have?
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Our church has a gravestone dated 1748, which has a carving of an angel with outstretched arms. It holds a timer in one hand and a scythe in the other. From its mouth comes a banner, with words, but those words are now illegible. The first three letters are VIV... and it looks as though the phrase may have been three words long. At any rate, it's not a long phrase.

Any suggestions as to what a mid C18th gravestone angel might have been saying? Were there a few stock phrases for use on gravestones?

ETA - the stone has flaked at one point, and I don't want to try taking a rubbing as I think it might flake further.

Vivat in æternis? (On the strength of this)
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Vivat in Aeternis looks possible.

The stone has completely flaked over the final section. I don't know if the flaking is confined to the part which had words carved in it, or extends beyond it. I'm sure the whole phrase didn't have more than about 30 letters, and less if the flaking went beyond the words.

I think I can pick out an "N" which corresponds to the "n" in "in."

I will have another look in different light.

Thank you, Penny S and BroJames!
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I wonder if it could be "Vive memor leti" - "Live remembering death". Here is an Edinburgh gravestone with it on, looks about the right period.

I think you can also have "Vive memor mortis".

[ 01. April 2014, 17:25: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
In a similar vein, has anyone any ideas about this stone (in a house wall in Whithorn, in Wigtownshire)? The text looks like 'Justitia … Regina" The writing above reads "…752 years…" and the letters above read 'Bra…' I think.

The arms clearly show some kind of balance, but that is all I can make of it. It may be original to the house, or, quite possibly, "salvaged" from the nearby priory. The stone underneath is interesting as well it looks as though it could be a mortar of some kind.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
This is a case of I do not know but I almost certainly know an organisation that does. I have a friend that was involved with them at one stage. However on exploring on the web and pages I think what you need to get hold of is a copy of the Whithorn Town Trail which looks at thirty buildings around Whithorn.

I have a memory of it connecting with a family who had a role in the town, but that is vague. I would however suspect that there is a "1" missing at the front.

Jengie
 
Posted by Mrs Shrew (# 8635) on :
 
It's a long shot I guess, but a friend, surname Seal, was explaining that his (late) father was a theologian, and diocesan expert on demonology (also professor of such but I didn't catch where) from area of St Albans.

He gave me his dad's first names, and it sounded familiar, but I was very tired at the time and promptly forgot the first names, making a quick trip to Google to find out whether he truly did sound familiar, and what stuff I had read or intended to read by the mystery person impossible (because Seal is a word as well as a name I simply don't have enough to go on).

Does anyone know who my friend's dad was? He was definitely ordained, possibly methodist or free church and will have died more than about two years ago but I don't know how much more than that.
 
Posted by no prophet (# 15560) on :
 
I'm picking up on Shine Jesus Shine a little late, but the problem with it is the same problem with any over-played Top 40 type of song. The same problem exists with You Raise Me Up, On Eagle's Wings and nearly every song ever sung by Celtic Woman, like I Can Feel Your The Wind Beneath My Wings. Cliché and ear worms.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
This is a case of I do not know but I almost certainly know an organisation that does. I have a friend that was involved with them at one stage. However on exploring on the web and pages I think what you need to get hold of is a copy of the Whithorn Town Trail which looks at thirty buildings around Whithorn.

I have a memory of it connecting with a family who had a role in the town, but that is vague. I would however suspect that there is a "1" missing at the front.

Jengie

Unfortunately the Whithorn Trust doesn't know. Last time I was there, they were going to mention it to an archaeologist working on this sort of thing in the town - but they forgot. I probably need to see if I can get a lead on the archaeologist.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
This is a case of I do not know but I almost certainly know an organisation that does. I have a friend that was involved with them at one stage. However on exploring on the web and pages I think what you need to get hold of is a copy of the Whithorn Town Trail which looks at thirty buildings around Whithorn.

I have a memory of it connecting with a family who had a role in the town, but that is vague. I would however suspect that there is a "1" missing at the front.

Jengie

Unfortunately the Whithorn Trust doesn't know. Last time I was there, they were going to mention it to an archaeologist working on this sort of thing in the town - but they forgot. I probably need to see if I can get a lead on the archaeologist.
I wonder if a herald would know? Lord Lyon King of Arms or someone like that?
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
Yes, they might do. I can send them a picture,I believe, and they will quote me a fee for researching it.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Might there be a Big Book of heraldic badges or something to be just looked through at a local reference library?

I had a thought about the stone underneath - it might not be a mortar, but could be the lower pivot (?) of a large wooden door, which would have had a vertical beam resting in it. I don't know where that idea has come from. Possibly from a film in which a giant stone door rotated in something similar, so don't take it too seriously.

[ 02. April 2014, 20:16: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Does anyone know if there is an iPhone app that includes the Catechism from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States of America, a.k.a. TEC? I'd ideally get the entire BCP, but I'd settle for just the Catechism.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Penny S
Some libraries may still have a copy of Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage; failing that, try Burke's Peerage.

Between the two there should be an entry for all armigerous families in the UK and Ireland - although I'm not sure whether Irish titles were kept up-to-date after partition.

Failing that, try The College of Arms or, if Scottish, the office of Lyon King of Arms.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Autenrieth Road:
Does anyone know if there is an iPhone app that includes the Catechism from the 1979 Book of Common Prayer of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States of America, a.k.a. TEC? I'd ideally get the entire BCP, but I'd settle for just the Catechism.

There is a link on this page that might help
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Penny S
Some libraries may still have a copy of Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage; failing that, try Burke's Peerage.

Between the two there should be an entry for all armigerous families in the UK and Ireland - although I'm not sure whether Irish titles were kept up-to-date after partition.

Failing that, try The College of Arms or, if Scottish, the office of Lyon King of Arms.

Debrett's only claims to cover
quote:
Every British duke, marquess, viscount, earl, baron and baronet, and the living members of their families in the male line
not all armigerous families.

Burke's Peerage is more ambitious in scope. It claims to be
quote:
the definitive guide to the genealogy and heraldry of the Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Landed Gentry of the United Kingdom
Burke's General Armory of 1884 is freely searchable online. The only motto close to the inscription on the stone is that of the Goldsmiths' Company, but the arms are very different.
 
Posted by Tubbs (# 440) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mrs Shrew:
It's a long shot I guess, but a friend, surname Seal, was explaining that his (late) father was a theologian, and diocesan expert on demonology (also professor of such but I didn't catch where) from area of St Albans.

He gave me his dad's first names, and it sounded familiar, but I was very tired at the time and promptly forgot the first names, making a quick trip to Google to find out whether he truly did sound familiar, and what stuff I had read or intended to read by the mystery person impossible (because Seal is a word as well as a name I simply don't have enough to go on).

Does anyone know who my friend's dad was? He was definitely ordained, possibly methodist or free church and will have died more than about two years ago but I don't know how much more than that.

Ran this past a Minister I know in that neck of the woods and he's not sure. Based on your friend's description and the use of the word "diocesan" your friend's dad sounds like he was Anglican or Methodist, even Catholic. Free churches don't use that term at all.

Is it not possible to admit to your friend that you've managed to forget the names, but wanted to read more so could he remind you?!

Tubbs
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
This is a case of I do not know but I almost certainly know an organisation that does. I have a friend that was involved with them at one stage. However on exploring on the web and pages I think what you need to get hold of is a copy of the Whithorn Town Trail which looks at thirty buildings around Whithorn.

I have a memory of it connecting with a family who had a role in the town, but that is vague. I would however suspect that there is a "1" missing at the front.

Jengie

Unfortunately the Whithorn Trust doesn't know. Last time I was there, they were going to mention it to an archaeologist working on this sort of thing in the town - but they forgot. I probably need to see if I can get a lead on the archaeologist.
You could try the Stranraer and District Local History Society which does cover that area (I know it should be Newton Stewart). Your best hope would be to look at M'Kerlie's "Lands and Owners in Galloway (Vol II)". It may have something in it.

However because of the Peter Stone and the Lost stone of Kirkmadrine the area has been absolutely scoured for stones of ancient origin that have been reused.

You might also like to look on the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland.

Jengie

Jengie
 
Posted by Mrs Shrew (# 8635) on :
 
Thanks Tubes, I shall do so. I had pretty much figured I would have to already when I suddenly had the thought that someone here might know.
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Thanks, BroJames. I can't seem to find the listed BCP app in the apple store, but I've gotten the Kindle version, and that has exactly what I want: Catechism, The Sacraments, What is grace?
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Penny S
Some libraries may still have a copy of Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage; failing that, try Burke's Peerage.

Between the two there should be an entry for all armigerous families in the UK and Ireland - although I'm not sure whether Irish titles were kept up-to-date after partition.

Failing that, try The College of Arms or, if Scottish, the office of Lyon King of Arms.

Debrett's only claims to cover
quote:
Every British duke, marquess, viscount, earl, baron and baronet, and the living members of their families in the male line
not all armigerous families.

Burke's Peerage is more ambitious in scope. It claims to be
quote:
the definitive guide to the genealogy and heraldry of the Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Landed Gentry of the United Kingdom
Burke's General Armory of 1884 is freely searchable online. The only motto close to the inscription on the stone is that of the Goldsmiths' Company, but the arms are very different.

OTOH, that device does seem like a technical sort of balance, with a means of raising and lowering carefully, such as might be required in the weighing of precious metals. A sort of precursor of the chemical balance.

[ 03. April 2014, 16:03: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
Yes it does, with something with two stars above it. There is strong evidence (from the title deeds) to suggest that that part of the house was built in about 1800, at which time it was owned by a merchant named Alexander Conning (who acquired in in 1768). Before him it was owned by somebody named Alexander McClelland, and before him by someone named James Broadfoot.

None of these names AFAICT are associated with arms anything like those shown on the stone.

[ 03. April 2014, 16:33: Message edited by: BroJames ]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
OTOH, that device does seem like a technical sort of balance, with a means of raising and lowering carefully, such as might be required in the weighing of precious metals. A sort of precursor of the chemical balance.

Doesn't look like any balances I ever saw. Real or heraldic. Balances are common symbols on arms and badges and so on but usually simple ones. Representing justice or sometimes trade.

That thing seems to have tree or four pivor points one above the other, a kind of 4-shaped frame at the bottom, maybe some sort of sliding ratchet, and two star-saheped things at the top like gnurled wheels or cogs or even some sort of - I don't know what...
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
It doesn't look like a symbol, does it, but a representation of something that existed. Someone needs to make a model of it and see what it does.
Or perhaps not - I've just been on the Dr Who thread - it affects my imagination...

[ 03. April 2014, 21:28: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Having had a more detailed look, I think the curved section that appears to run from the top of the incomplete 4 to the end of the left-hand arm is merely the edge of a layer that has spalled off, taking with it the left-hand bowl of the balance, for which evidence can be seen. The base of the 4 looks as though it was once symmetrical, and there seems to be evidence for a vertical completing the 4. That makes it much more simple.
 
Posted by Edith (# 16978) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

I've got to the part where he gets involved with Llanthony Priory. My question is: how should it be pronounced? I know how to pronounce the Welsh double L (and I can*), but it always looks to me as though it should rhyme with "lantern-y". Is it LlAN-thony or Llan-thO-ny? And is the O long or short?

(The book itself carries an ex libris sticker showing that it once belonged to a person delighting in the name of Seraphim Newman-Norton.)

*(although perhaps not to the satisfaction of a native Welsh-speaker)

He's a neighbour of mine, lives down the road, known also as Abba Seraphim, retired teacher of English, active member of our local community and a very nice chap indeed.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
Yes it does, with something with two stars above it. There is strong evidence (from the title deeds) to suggest that that part of the house was built in about 1800, at which time it was owned by a merchant named Alexander Conning (who acquired in in 1768). Before him it was owned by somebody named Alexander McClelland, and before him by someone named James Broadfoot.

None of these names AFAICT are associated with arms anything like those shown on the stone.

Right it is a Merchant Mark. The next source in your hunt is the source of that picture.

Jengie
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
I want to send some good chocolate, perhaps some flowers too, to someone in the UK whom I know from another place. Where would be a good place in UK where I can shop from down here and have it posted/delivered to her. She's been having a really rough time lately.

PM would probably be best, please, as answer. Or perhaps something else if anyone has any bright ideas. I don't know her age but she has grandchildren.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I'm not sure if you can get chocolates and flowers delivered together. Flying Flowers and Flowers by Post (both from the Channel Islands) are good, otherwise look at Interflora which is a network of florists around the country.

Fortnum & Mason will do chocolates - at a price! Selfridges deliver too, so do Harrods - both are big London stores.

Otherwise Ocado is a high-quality supermarket-style delivery service but I don't know if they cover the entire country.

What I don't know is whether you can order from overseas with these firms.
 
Posted by ElaineC (# 12244) on :
 
I'm sure you can do a postcode check on the Ocado site to see if they deliver to your required destination.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Edith:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

He's a neighbour of mine, lives down the road, known also as Abba Seraphim, retired teacher of English, active member of our local community and a very nice chap indeed.
Can't be the same chap, as Ignatius died in 1908. - you must be thinking of someone else.

Can't help with the pronunciation, but Llanthony is an amazing place with a great pub in the middle of the ruins (unless it's closed since I was last there, some years ago).
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ElaineC:
I'm sure you can do a postcode check on the Ocado site to see if they deliver to your required destination.

Yes, but do they take orders from someone outside the UK?
 
Posted by St. Stephen the Stoned (# 9841) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Edith:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

I've got to the part where he gets involved with Llanthony Priory. My question is: how should it be pronounced? I know how to pronounce the Welsh double L (and I can*), but it always looks to me as though it should rhyme with "lantern-y". Is it LlAN-thony or Llan-thO-ny? And is the O long or short?

(The book itself carries an ex libris sticker showing that it once belonged to a person delighting in the name of Seraphim Newman-Norton.)

*(although perhaps not to the satisfaction of a native Welsh-speaker)

He's a neighbour of mine, lives down the road, known also as Abba Seraphim, retired teacher of English, active member of our local community and a very nice chap indeed.
Thank you, Edith. Do you think he wants it back? I've no idea how the book came to be on our shelves. I can't remember if I bought it or if it belonged to my partner's late partner.

There's an interesting (for some value of 'interesting') emendation. The title of a photograph in the book (plate 7b, facing p. 208) of Joseph René Vilatte has been altered in biro to read 'Bernard Mary Williams'. The picture is the same as one that comes up on Google under 'images for joseph rene vilatte', and does not resemble any images I can find of Bernard Mary Williams. I wonder if it was altered by your neighbour or by another.

The book also contains a press cutting (undated) about efforts to raise money for the restoration of Fr. Ignatius' tomb.

Fr. Ignatius seems to have been a fascinating if deeply flawed character. If God was working through him, 'mysterious ways' hardly comes close!
 
Posted by St. Stephen the Stoned (# 9841) on :
 
I've just found out that Anna Calder-Marshall, the daughter of the author, was one of my partner's late partner's students at Bristol University Drama Department.

So maybe that's how we got it.
 
Posted by Rev per Minute (# 69) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

I've got to the part where he gets involved with Llanthony Priory. My question is: how should it be pronounced? I know how to pronounce the Welsh double L (and I can*), but it always looks to me as though it should rhyme with "lantern-y". Is it LlAN-thony or Llan-thO-ny? And is the O long or short?

(The book itself carries an ex libris sticker showing that it once belonged to a person delighting in the name of Seraphim Newman-Norton.)

*(although perhaps not to the satisfaction of a native Welsh-speaker)

Standard Welsh pronunciation would have the emphasis on the penultimate syllable, so Llan-TOE-nee would be correct. Given the Anglicisation of that area since about 1150, most locals would use an English L rather than a Welsh LL (see Lliswerry* in Newport)

* When I say 'see', I don't mean actually come and look - there's nothing there except housing and industrial estates. It is quite close to the Wetlands Reserve though...
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
I'm not sure if you can get chocolates and flowers delivered together. Flying Flowers and Flowers by Post (both from the Channel Islands) are good, otherwise look at Interflora which is a network of florists around the country.

Thanks for this. I had heard of Flowers by Post so have used them.
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
Does anyone know (I have tried Googling umpteen times and haven't been able to get a straight answer) when the Samsung Galaxy S4 Mini is likely to get Android 4.4 (Kit-kat) via EE?
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
Yes it does, with something with two stars above it. There is strong evidence (from the title deeds) to suggest that that part of the house was built in about 1800, at which time it was owned by a merchant named Alexander Conning (who acquired in in 1768). Before him it was owned by somebody named Alexander McClelland, and before him by someone named James Broadfoot.

None of these names AFAICT are associated with arms anything like those shown on the stone.

Right it is a Merchant Mark. The next source in your hunt is the source of that picture.

Jengie

Eureka Jengie! Thank you.

The source of the picture in the 'Proceedings of The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland' is available at http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-352-1/dissemination/pdf/vol_036/36_280_463.pdf. Sadly the author's researches did not extend into Galloway.

Looking at the stone again, the word above the numerals could be 'Broadfoot', and the space before it is about right for 'James'. And this Scottish Archive record suggests connections between the families I mentioned in my earlier post.

I'll keep poking around for more info on merchants' marks.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Originally posted by Bro James:
quote:
Vivat in æternis?
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Vive memor leti
quote:
Vive memor mortis
It's been raining all day, so I took Penny S's good advice to look at it when wet. There are three faint vertical lines which might be "in" or might be "m" so all three phrases are possible. I think Vive memor leti is least likely because I think the phrase is longer than that.

I'll take a look in other conditions, but I'd like to thank you all for your help.
 
Posted by Edith (# 16978) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
quote:
Originally posted by Edith:
quote:
Originally posted by St. Stephen the Stoned:
I'm reading a book in our collection called "The Enthusiast: An Enquiry into the Life Belief and Character of The Rev. Joseph Lyne alias Fr. Ignatius O.S.B Abbot of Elm Hill, Norwich & Llanthony Wales" by Arthur Calder-Marshall.

He's a neighbour of mine, lives down the road, known also as Abba Seraphim, retired teacher of English, active member of our local community and a very nice chap indeed.
Can't be the same chap, as Ignatius died in 1908. - you must be thinking of someone else.

Can't help with the pronunciation, but Llanthony is an amazing place with a great pub in the middle of the ruins (unless it's closed since I was last there, some years ago).

It's Henry William Seraphim Newman-Norton I'm speaking about. Known as Bill on the street.
 
Posted by Margaret (# 283) on :
 
I believe Bill is also known more grandly as Metropolitan Seraphim of Glastonbury.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Do Anglican ordinands graduating from theological college (in England) get an academic hood or is it different for theological colleges? If they do get a hood, what happens now for those studying outside Durham, now all the degrees are coming from there? Do they get the academic hood of Durham or where they study?

Asking because somewhat unusually for mainstream denominations, it's not a requirement to have a degree to be accepted for ordination in the CoE (I don't know about elsewhere in the Anglican Communion) - so if theological college doesn't provide an academic hood, many priests would presumably not have one.

[ 05. April 2014, 13:27: Message edited by: Jade Constable ]
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
I want to send some good chocolate, perhaps some flowers too, to someone in the UK whom I know from another place. Where would be a good place in UK where I can shop from down here and have it posted/delivered to her. She's been having a really rough time lately.

PM would probably be best, please, as answer. Or perhaps something else if anyone has any bright ideas. I don't know her age but she has grandchildren.

Moonpig and Funky Pigeon are best known for delivering customisable cards, but they also deliver flowers and chocolate and can deliver both together. M&S do also.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Do Anglican ordinands graduating from theological college (in England) get an academic hood or is it different for theological colleges?

If you get a degree you are entitled to wear the appropriate hood. Of course most graduates never do, apart perhaps from hiring one for the day if they go to the graduation ceremony (which many don't).

If you don't get a degree there is no hood.

Simple.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Do Anglican ordinands graduating from theological college (in England) get an academic hood or is it different for theological colleges? If they do get a hood, what happens now for those studying outside Durham, now all the degrees are coming from there? Do they get the academic hood of Durham or where they study?

Asking because somewhat unusually for mainstream denominations, it's not a requirement to have a degree to be accepted for ordination in the CoE (I don't know about elsewhere in the Anglican Communion) - so if theological college doesn't provide an academic hood, many priests would presumably not have one.

Not sure what you mean about all degrees coming from Durham.

Each university has its own hoods - different depending on arts'/science, bachelor, master or doctor.

You can either hire or buy them from Ede & Ravenscrofts.

I wear my Leeds hood with choir dress. I used to wear it for school speech days.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Do Anglican ordinands graduating from theological college (in England) get an academic hood or is it different for theological colleges? If they do get a hood, what happens now for those studying outside Durham, now all the degrees are coming from there? Do they get the academic hood of Durham or where they study?

Asking because somewhat unusually for mainstream denominations, it's not a requirement to have a degree to be accepted for ordination in the CoE (I don't know about elsewhere in the Anglican Communion) - so if theological college doesn't provide an academic hood, many priests would presumably not have one.

Not sure what you mean about all degrees coming from Durham.

Each university has its own hoods - different depending on arts'/science, bachelor, master or doctor.

You can either hire or buy them from Ede & Ravenscrofts.

I wear my Leeds hood with choir dress. I used to wear it for school speech days.

I meant all degrees from theological college being awarded by Durham now instead of eg Trinity graduates getting Bristol degrees. I realise that different university departments have different hoods but that doesn't apply to my question, which was regarding ordinands who do not have a secular university degree. My question was whether or not theological colleges have academic hoods.
 
Posted by Zacchaeus (# 14454) on :
 
Not sure about currently, but I know people 5 years ago with a theological certificates but not degrees from theological colleges, who were given hoods..
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
When preparing a service sheet for 16 March I looked on line for a good picture of Abraham or of the Transfiguration for the front of the service sheet.
I stumbled across a brilliant site where someone had assembled links to dozens of religious art sites of all kinds: traditional, modern, b/w, colouring-in, etc etc.
I thought I'd bookmarked it, but found later that I'd bookmarked one of the artists, and had no way by then of going back.
Does anyone have what I'm looking for???

GG
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Had you thought about checking your browsing history?
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Had you thought about checking your browsing history?

I've never tried to go that far back but I'll investigate.

GG
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Galloping Granny:
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Had you thought about checking your browsing history?

I've never tried to go that far back but I'll investigate.

GG

It goes back one month which might be the right day but clicking on an image that I used doesn't take me to further sites connected to the image. I think the exploration that led to the site might have been a few days earlier.

GG
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Another option would be to go look at the textweek.com site and see if any of the art links are the ones you were looking at. Every week they list art that is related to the lectionary scriptures. You could narrow it down by going to the scriptures that you used that week or, if you used the lectionary, going to the suggestions for that week. Feel free to pm if that doesn't make sense. [Smile]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If you have one of the artists' names, maybe try a search for that artist and see if one of the sites that comes up is the one you want.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
This lectionary site has art associated with each day's readings. Perhaps you may find it or similar there.
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lily pad:
Another option would be to go look at the textweek.com site and see if any of the art links are the ones you were looking at. Every week they list art that is related to the lectionary scriptures. You could narrow it down by going to the scriptures that you used that week or, if you used the lectionary, going to the suggestions for that week. Feel free to pm if that doesn't make sense. [Smile]

It makes sense but that's where I started; I know that at the time I followed a lead from an illustration that interested me but going back I don't recognise any.
Don't have artists' names unfortunately.
The site I bookmarked does have an interesting collection of interesting pictures so I've emailed the blogger to see if he knows where his site might be listed.
The one I'm looking for doesn't have actual pictures, just many web addresses listed in categories with helpful comments.

GG
 
Posted by Vulpior (# 12744) on :
 
Many, many years ago, I read a book or two consisting of columns by Keith Waterhouse. In one of these columns he recounted buying some Wensleydale from Family Purvis Grocer (that's what it said across the front of the shop: Family PURVIS Grocer).

I'd love to track down a copy of this particular article. Google gives me nothing. If anyone recognises it from the description and has the book containing it on their shelves, I'd be grateful to know which book it is, so I can go shopping online.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Up the thread, I asked about sending flowers to someone in UK. I used Flowers by Post who grow their flowers so send after picking a couple of times a week. I have just had a lovely reply from the recipient for the thought and their service. So thanks for the recommendation.

[ 09. April 2014, 10:30: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Vulpior:
Many, many years ago, I read a book or two consisting of columns by Keith Waterhouse. In one of these columns he recounted buying some Wensleydale from Family Purvis Grocer (that's what it said across the front of the shop: Family PURVIS Grocer).

I'd love to track down a copy of this particular article. Google gives me nothing. If anyone recognises it from the description and has the book containing it on their shelves, I'd be grateful to know which book it is, so I can go shopping online.

I half-remember that line too, and I think it came from a collection titled "Mondays, Thursdays". It might be worth tracking down.
 
Posted by Vulpior (# 12744) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Vulpior:
Many, many years ago, I read a book or two consisting of columns by Keith Waterhouse. In one of these columns he recounted buying some Wensleydale from Family Purvis Grocer (that's what it said across the front of the shop: Family PURVIS Grocer).

I'd love to track down a copy of this particular article. Google gives me nothing. If anyone recognises it from the description and has the book containing it on their shelves, I'd be grateful to know which book it is, so I can go shopping online.

I half-remember that line too, and I think it came from a collection titled "Mondays, Thursdays". It might be worth tracking down.
That's the one! I searched for the book by author and title, and was able to search inside the book using Google Books. I will now return and obtain myself a copy.

Thank you!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Happy to help!

How the heck did I manage to remember that? It must be at least twenty years since I read that book. [Confused]
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ken:
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Do Anglican ordinands graduating from theological college (in England) get an academic hood or is it different for theological colleges?

If you get a degree you are entitled to wear the appropriate hood. Of course most graduates never do, apart perhaps from hiring one for the day if they go to the graduation ceremony (which many don't).

If you don't get a degree there is no hood.

Simple.

My lovely bride has a hood!
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
If you are merely a graduate (and probably loaded with tuition debt) you could just rent your hood for the ceremony. If you are faculty, then you have to do this thing at least once a year, and you might as well invest in a hood of your own. My sister-in-law, a double doctorate in a couple veterinary fields, decided that she might as well buy one.
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
As did my wife, though she is unlikely to get a Ph.D. in the next thirty years!
 
Posted by Chorister (# 473) on :
 
Or if you sing in a robed choir. I choose not to wear mine as my degree is not in theology or music, but many people do - for festival evensong which, in our church, is approximately once a month.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
I only bother with a hood if I'm playing elsewhere and so am robed - choose which on a whim!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
okay, speaking of weirdo things...

has anybody run across a person who can point to an object, but maybe 30% of the time, their pointing is significantly off center for the object they are trying to point at? Similarly, if YOU point to an object and ask them to name it, about 30% of the time they name an object perhaps two feet away from the correct one (and always in the same wrong direction)?

We're talking about objects maybe 15 feet away or less, so the deficit is noticeable when you're paying attention, though not wildly, wildly wrong.

I'm wondering if this is some funky vision or processing thing. It would explain a lot.
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
Yesterday I bumped into a family of Nigerian origin whose two children were called Hosannah and Mohammed. Is hosannah a word used by Muslims or is it more likely the names are related to a mixed marriage?
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
Yesterday I bumped into a family of Nigerian origin whose two children were called Hosannah and Mohammed. Is hosannah a word used by Muslims or is it more likely the names are related to a mixed marriage?

I can't find any reference to it being used by Muslims.
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
Yesterday I bumped into a family of Nigerian origin whose two children were called Hosannah and Mohammed. Is hosannah a word used by Muslims or is it more likely the names are related to a mixed marriage?

I know some Nigerians who have both Christians and Muslims in their immediate family. Even brothers and sisters. Not neccessarily "mixed marriages", it can be choice or conversion.

I've also seen at least two baptisms/confirmations of someone named Mohammad - both child and adult.
 
Posted by leo (# 1458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
Yesterday I bumped into a family of Nigerian origin whose two children were called Hosannah and Mohammed. Is hosannah a word used by Muslims or is it more likely the names are related to a mixed marriage?

I can't find any reference to it being used by Muslims.
Hosanna is an Arabic word too.
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
Can anyone tell me the name of the highly irritating (in more ways than one!) chemical with which they impregnate 'easy iron/ easy care/ non-iron/ bloody itchy' shirts and why the hell it is well-nigh impossible to buy a short-sleeved work shirt which is not thus adulterated?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Matt: there are several products and two methods of making cotton clothing 'easy/non-iron'.

In less expensive garments either the fabric or the made-up garment is surface sprayed with a coating, sometimes including Teflon. Several reasons why this is not good: (a) often gives the appearance of being 60/40 polyester-cotton; (b) tends to wear off quite quickly so you're back to ironing before long; (c) as the product gets heated by being worn it can give off several chemicals including formaldehyde.


More expensive easy/non-iron garments are different: here the thread or yarn is treated before being made up into fabric and then into the finished garment. The non-iron property thus lasts far longer.

The chemical make-up is pretty much the same for both products.

There may be two causes for your itching: either the resin itself is causing irritation, or the perfume these products have added to give that 'fresh-cotton' smell.

I'm afraid the solution is two-fold: buy only pure cotton shirts without any treatment and always use a non-perfumed, non-bio washing product, preferably a liquid since the non-caking agent in powders can also cause irritation and NEVER USE FABRIC CONDITIONERS.

Chin-up: if you put shirts on a hanger to dry then require little ironing.

Most of the family suffer from eczema in one form or another so we've got a bit of experience in this...
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
Thanks! I actually quite enjoy ironing, which is the...er...irony here: I don't want 'easy iron' shirts in the first place! So heating them might get rid of the 'foul humours'...?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Sadly, no. Multiple washes may get rid of some/most of the coating, or you could try dissolving 2 dessertspoons of Soda Crystals (Sodium Carbonate) in warm water and add to the wash (40 degrees) - should get rid of the coating and is also brilliant for stain removal.
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
Aha! Will try that. Many thanks. In the meantime, hitherto the local Clothing Bank has benefitted from the gifts of such articles from well-meaning relatives!

[ 22. April 2014, 15:36: Message edited by: Matt Black ]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
While I was staying with my brother over Easter my nephew signed my new i-pod nano up with i-tunes, at least I think he did. As part of the sign-up he had to enter my email address. Does the fact that I haven't received an email confirmation mean that I haven't actually been signed up?

Huia the technopeasant. (can't spell either)

[ 23. April 2014, 01:31: Message edited by: Huia ]
 
Posted by ken (# 2460) on :
 
Possibly.

You would need a password to use it.


It will only take money from you if you give it your credit or debit card number. I hope your nephew doesn't know that!
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Thanks Ken. We didn't actually enter that so I'm safe from having them take any money off me, I just wasn't sure I was actually regustered.

I just might have to take the scary step of actually buying something, but I guess it isn't any more complicated that Amazon and I have managed to spen more than I should there [Roll Eyes] .

Nephew is a lovely young man, it's just that he has difficulty going slow enough for me [Hot and Hormonal] .

Huia
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
/tangent

quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
[...] I just wasn't sure I was actually regustered. [...]

I love the word 'regustered'. It sounds quite like 'flustered', and I think people should use it more often. [Smile]

/end tangent

[ 23. April 2014, 07:28: Message edited by: Wesley J ]
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
A vive la différènce question: is the blood sugar-regulating capacity of women different from that of men? I ask because my wife and indeed all the women in my office are always snacking between meals on something or other and, when asked why, invariably reply, "It's my blood sugar." Neither I nor any of the blokes I know seem to experience this phenomenon, so is it different and, if so, why/ how?

[ 23. April 2014, 11:19: Message edited by: Matt Black ]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Matt Black:
"It's my blood sugar."

Hmmm. Must remember to use that.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Matt Black:
A vive la différènce question: is the blood sugar-regulating capacity of women different from that of men? I ask because my wife and indeed all the women in my office are always snacking between meals on something or other and, when asked why, invariably reply, "It's my blood sugar." Neither I nor any of the blokes I know seem to experience this phenomenon, so is it different and, if so, why/ how?

And a related question - why don't men experience chocolate in the same way as women? Why doesn't it hit all their pleasure sensors? Why do you never hear a man claim that good chocolate is better than mediocre sex?
 
Posted by The Rogue (# 2275) on :
 
Because men can't admit that sex is anything less than fantastic every time.

[ 23. April 2014, 12:41: Message edited by: The Rogue ]
 
Posted by Starbug (# 15917) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Rogue:
Because men can't admit that sex is anything less than fantastic every time.

Which reminds me of an old joke:

Why are women so bad at parallel parking? Because men keep telling us that this...
|<---------------------->|
is 8 inches.
 
Posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider (# 76) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
quote:
Originally posted by Matt Black:
A vive la différènce question: is the blood sugar-regulating capacity of women different from that of men? I ask because my wife and indeed all the women in my office are always snacking between meals on something or other and, when asked why, invariably reply, "It's my blood sugar." Neither I nor any of the blokes I know seem to experience this phenomenon, so is it different and, if so, why/ how?

And a related question - why don't men experience chocolate in the same way as women? Why doesn't it hit all their pleasure sensors? Why do you never hear a man claim that good chocolate is better than mediocre sex?
Because it isn't. That's beer.
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
[Overused]
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Matt Black:
A vive la différènce question: is the blood sugar-regulating capacity of women different from that of men? I ask because my wife and indeed all the women in my office are always snacking between meals on something or other and, when asked why, invariably reply, "It's my blood sugar." Neither I nor any of the blokes I know seem to experience this phenomenon, so is it different and, if so, why/ how?

I think it is because women are more pressured about their appearance and feel the need to excuse.

quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
And a related question - why don't men experience chocolate in the same way as women? Why doesn't it hit all their pleasure sensors? Why do you never hear a man claim that good chocolate is better than mediocre sex?

I think it proof that men are actually responsible for The Fall. Not being able to experience Chocolate fully is their punishment. And single orgasms and shorter duration....
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Come again?
 
Posted by A.Pilgrim (# 15044) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Karl: Liberal Backslider:
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
quote:
Originally posted by Matt Black:
A vive la différènce question: is the blood sugar-regulating capacity of women different from that of men? I ask because my wife and indeed all the women in my office are always snacking between meals on something or other and, when asked why, invariably reply, "It's my blood sugar." Neither I nor any of the blokes I know seem to experience this phenomenon, so is it different and, if so, why/ how?

And a related question - why don't men experience chocolate in the same way as women? Why doesn't it hit all their pleasure sensors? Why do you never hear a man claim that good chocolate is better than mediocre sex?
Because it isn't. That's beer.
Karl - at last something we agree on! [Big Grin]
Angus
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
There does seem to be a physiological rather than psychological difference though: Mrs B gets 'the shakes' if she doesn't snack between meals, as does her mother and several other women I know. If I'm hungry, OTOH, I feel hungry and my stomach rumbles etc but I don't feel shaky or faint. Why the difference?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Matt Black:
There does seem to be a physiological rather than psychological difference though: Mrs B gets 'the shakes' if she doesn't snack between meals, as does her mother and several other women I know. If I'm hungry, OTOH, I feel hungry and my stomach rumbles etc but I don't feel shaky or faint. Why the difference?

I've read that many women are permanently anaemic. Could there be a connection to that?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Could it be that some women, particularly younger women, are more likely to go without breakfast? Perhaps young women, by going on diets, accustom themselves to ignore signals that they need food?

A garden-designer friend, female, starts every day with porridge: she learned some years ago that attempting a days' work without a proper breakfast left her prone to giddiness, and that any work she did on the drawing board wasn't going to be up to much.
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
Hmmm...don't think it's that: both Mrs B and her mum are avid consumers of breakfasts, so I suspect it's more hormonal (as in insulin etc) and/ or metabolic. Are there any medics on board who can shed any light?
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
I'm female and rarely snack, at least during the week (also, as an aside, I like chocolate well enough but not in the way some people talk about it). I don't get dizzy or anything between meals.

It sounds to me like some individuals might need to snack but rather more like to have an excuse to.

M.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
I know men and women who get the shakes from not eating and men and women who are chocoholics.
So, if there is a difference between men and women in either of those two things, there is also overlap.
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
Interesting. If you do get the shakes, could that be indicative of an underlying medical problem?
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Another one who gets the shakes, as does my daughter. I do eat breakfast, around 7am today. It's usually muesli or porridge and that helps, but I really wanted my lunch when I got to it at 2pm today. When I was cycling 7/8 miles each way to and from work, I found I had to eat a cereal bar before cycling home at the end of the day or I'd really shake, half way home.

When my daughter was small the Health Visitor recommended 5 small meals a day for her, rather than 3, which helped.

I do get anaemic.
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
Would you say though that such experiences are within the 'normal' parameters or is this indicative of some kind of medical problem ie: should I get Mrs B to go and see The Quack™?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Could it be that you are very sensitive to blood sugar levels? A small snack kicks your blood sugar back up again. I find I cannot do without food for too long (no fasting for me) because my blood sugar just dips too low.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I would like some legal advice. I don't want to avoid consulting a lawyer; I want to convince a friend that he needs a lawyer.

Daniel makes stringed instruments and sends some of them to a dealer to be sold. The dealer has gone bankrupt, owing Daniel money for Daniel's instruments that he has sold.

Daniel thinks there's nothing he can do. I think that the dealer must have some assets, and I think Daniel has a stronger claim to be paid than many other creditors.

Would any legal beagles care to comment?

Moo
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
People react in different ways to dropping blood sugar levels, and some are likely to be more sensitive as well. My standaard mode has always been to go from fine to nauseated in 15 minutes, usually with no time at all in the "pleasantly hungry" mode. Unless it's overnight, in which case i can easily fast till early afternoon without consequences. There are douubtless a host of factors playing into this, including the nature ( protein or carbs?) Of the last meal taken. But generally the adult most affected will have worked out their own quirks and found ways of coping, andwill resent being told how to handle their particular metabolisms by anyone but a doctor. If you re concerned, gentle encouragement tosee a doc is about the best you can do. (Just had a total stranger-- a cleaning person in my hospital room--demand to know how much i had eaten and render her judgement on the contents of my plate. Thanks everso, and would you please show me your MD? [Mad]
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
I think that the dealer must have some assets, and I think Daniel has a stronger claim to be paid than many other creditors.

He should certainly consider filing a claim.
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
Thanks for the responses re blood sugar.

Re the bankruptcy, I can only give limited comment re the law here but if the situation was in England and Wales, he should make his claim known to the trustee in bankruptcy: he should wind up with something even if it's only a few pence in the pound or cents in the dollar.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Re: bankruptcy. I hope that when the instrument maker consigned his product to the seller that he has a paper record. Receipts, an agreement to sell them, that kind of thing. He has not been just despatching the things to the store without any correspondence, right? With a paper trail he has a case. Don't let him wait too long to get going, however. Once everything grinds through bankruptcy there's no re-dos.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
My, extremely limited, knowledge of bankruptcy call to mind two factors of recovery.
One is size of claim and order of claims. In other words, as there are limited assets, the largest and the first claims are most likely to receive some recompense. Later and smaller, less or nothing.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
My, extremely limited, knowledge of bankruptcy call to mind two factors of recovery.
One is size of claim and order of claims. In other words, as there are limited assets, the largest and the first claims are most likely to receive some recompense. Later and smaller, less or nothing.

When I was a claimant (a former employer had gone belly-up) it was the attorneys handling the bankruptcy who were given first priority for payment (what a surprise!). After that there was a list, but of course there was nothing left after the attorneys were paid.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
I would like some legal advice. I don't want to avoid consulting a lawyer; I want to convince a friend that he needs a lawyer.

Daniel makes stringed instruments and sends some of them to a dealer to be sold. The dealer has gone bankrupt, owing Daniel money for Daniel's instruments that he has sold.

Daniel thinks there's nothing he can do. I think that the dealer must have some assets, and I think Daniel has a stronger claim to be paid than many other creditors.

Would any legal beagles care to comment?

Moo

It depends (as do so many things). The local Bankruptcy Act , which I can't quickly find, probably has provision for the order of payment of debts. Some creditors, such as employees and the tax authorities, have priority over others. Secured creditors may realise their security, but the local law might limit their recovery to that security. I'd be surprised if size or age of debts came into it, but there may be local provision for this. it is possible that the debtor had possession of the goods on consignment and that this might give Daniel some priority in recovery.

Daniel would be well advised to talk to a local community legal centre or similar, and the sooner he does so the better. Sorry I can't be of more assistance.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Moo, After some searching, I have found that bankruptcy law in the US, as here, is Federal. The relevant provisions about priorities can be found at:

Bankruptcy priorities

which will be a start for Daniel. The style of writing is not that I'm used to, but he may find something here which assists him. But he's best to seek advice from some community legal advice centre, being careful to describe fully the arrangements on sale.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
Sorry, that link does not seem to work. Thry this:

Bankruptcy priorities

Fingers crossed. I've cut out the http part.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I'm looking into getting a new washing machine for my elderly mother to use. The one she has is ancient and was quite easy to use (you just turned the dial to the wash you wanted and pressed the On button), but modern ones are altogether more complex with a number of potentially confusing options, dials, symbols and flashing lights, etc.

Does anyone have any recommendations for a suitable machine that would be straightforward to use?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I wanted the same thing (though in a dryer) so we went to a place that had dozens of models and just cruised the aisle. I suspect you could do this virtually by using one of the big search engines' shopping searces, set to show images...
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Yes, I could (and will be, on a rather slow old computer) but if anyone has any personal experience that would save me some time.
 
Posted by PeteC (# 10422) on :
 
I have a stackable washer/dryer set (10 years old) and relatively uncomplicated. Darn difficult to find.

Search stackable washer/dryer. Google, bless its pointy little head will come up with options
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Ariel, one strategy to make your searching easier, start with Google Images. It will let you see a photo of the models and you can look up any that are promising.

Lily Pad, proud owner of a Sears Kenmore washer and dryer from 1993!
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
We have a Zanussi jetsystem washer/dryer which is quite simple to use - turn a dial, choose length of drying programme, press button.

It's 7 or 8 years old now though, and the dryer is beginning to go home, so not quite sure how good this recommendation is!

M.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
M.
If you get a pack of Dr Beckman washing machine de-scaler (not deep clean) you may find the performance of the washing function improves.

De-scaling the dryer is slightly more tricky - try soaking an old towel in de-scaler and then putting it into the dryer with all the windows open.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Thanks, L'organist. It works fine as a washing machine, which is the more important thing.

M.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
OK all you technical genii out there, have you an answer to this: Why is it that every electric kettle bought in the past 6 years has lasted just over the 12 month warranty period before dying?

Household electrics checked - nothing wrong with wiring or with the specific socket.

All kettles kept in A1 order: regularly de-scaled, never over-filled, never spill water on base unit, etc, etc, etc. Kettles bought range from the basic 'value' range to state-of-the-art and wallet-busting £50+ - same problem shared by all.

Latest new kettle bought on Friday so watch this space from early May 2015. [Confused]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
The cynic within me suggests that most such items are designed to last just beyond their warranty period before failing ... it fits in with the Sale of Goods Act etc. And:

if things lasted too long, then (a) they'd be more expensive and (b) the firms that make them would go out of business. Mind you, cheaper simpler things sometimes last the longest as they have less to go wrong.

Or perhaps your water is possessed by an anti-kettle 12-month demon or sprite of some kind [Devil] .

[ 28. April 2014, 15:11: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
I think it is you! [Big Grin]

I purchased a Russell Hobbs kettle in 1986 and replaced it in 1992 as I dropped it on the floor and the handle cracked. The next kettle lasted until 2003 and the one that replaced it is the one I use now. All of them shut off automatically once brought to the boil and were/are used about about six times a day.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
It is said of Henry Ford that he was particularly interested in discovering which bits of the Model T endured the longest. Since it was the bits that expired first that forced a repair or replacement, the bits that were long-lasting were clearly over-engineered. Money could be saved by making them shoddier.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
There's a race to the bottom to cost engineer out the durability in most household appliances.
Also a lot of small appliances are now designed with chips to do nifty features. Unfortunately the chips are susceptible to the electric surges and spikes that happen in an environment where large loads are being switched on and off.

If yours are failing because the electronics are rapidly decaying appliances, there are two things worth checking. Check that the line voltage isn't higher than average on the line. In the US you can buy little meters that plug in the wall to show you the voltage. A 5% higher line voltage will cause light bulbs to burn out really fast.

Check for spikes. Get a power strip that has a surge protector on it . These are normally sold for home computers.

None of this will help if it's due to water with a lot of minerals in it.
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
Please does anyone drive a Toyota Camry sedan/saloon (not a hybrid)? I need to know the measurements in cm/inches of the trunk/boot. The Toyota website only gives the volume in litres or cubic feet.

Our travel agent has booked one for our holiday and as we will be travelling around a lot we want to be sure our luggage will be out of sight in the boot, not on the back seat. I have emailed the hire company and they will not tell me!

Thank you.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Do you know the year? I don't know if it varies from year to year...
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
Good question, Lamb Chopped - it's a large, respectable rental agency and as far as I can see, the car is unlikely to be over two years old. (Also, I know we are not guaranteed which make we will get within the same group, but if we arrive to find something much smaller we are prepared to do the firm but persistent act until the problem isa sorted!)
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
Here's a long shot, but does anyone know anything about renting a canal boat/houseboat in the Netherlands? If so, I may have a bunch of questions to follow up with via private message -- trying to make vacation plans for this summer.
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
While you wait for an expert: I have not rented a boat in the Netherlands, but I have (many years ago) used a UK company which now also hires out boats for touring in the Netherlands. There seem to be similar Dutch companies. You should find that they will hire bedlinen so you don't have to bring it with you and they might take an order for basic food ready for your arrival. You should expect a good introduction to how everything works and maps of the waterways and a contact 'phone number in case of disaster. If you want a permanent houseboat, sorry, no help to offer. Hope you have a wonderful time!
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
Thanks, Landlubber. We hired a canal boat for 5 days on our visit to England 8 years ago, and my husband, particularly, would love to do a canal boating trip again. I hoped we could combine this with our plan to visit Amsterdam, but I'm finding the info provided by the Dutch companies a bit different from the English one we dealt with. I'm sure part of it is just being unfamiliar with the country (and perhaps the fact that some of the websites are written in Dutch and then computer-translated into English?). Hopefully we'll figure it out as we go along.
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
Trudi, could this help? It's not the latest model, but I suppose the newer ones are unliely to be significantly smaller.

Cattyish, in internet mode.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cattyish:
Trudi, could this help? It's not the latest model, but I suppose the newer ones are unliely to be significantly smaller.

I think it was landlubber who was enquiring about car boot capacity, and Trudy who was interested in canal holidays.

Though bobbing down the Amsteldrecht in a Toyota would certainly be different.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
In 'Das Boot'? [Killing me]

Glad someone's found the measurements! I've been looking too, but only got the volume, like others.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
quote:
Originally posted by cattyish:
Trudi, could this help? It's not the latest model, but I suppose the newer ones are unliely to be significantly smaller.

I think it was landlubber who was enquiring about car boot capacity, and Trudy who was interested in canal holidays.

Though bobbing down the Amsteldrecht in a Toyota would certainly be different.

Yes ... I'll keep the Toyota in mind as a backup plan if the canal boat thing doesn't work out! (I know how easy it to get wires crossed about who asked what on a thread like this).
 
Posted by Landlubber (# 11055) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by cattyish:
Trudi, could this help? It's not the latest model, but I suppose the newer ones are unliely to be significantly smaller.

Cattyish, in internet mode.

Perfect for the Landlubber trip, thank you! and thank you to others for looking. Much better than towing a boat for our luggage and leaving a floating Toyota for Trudy.
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
I’m completely useless with houseplants (I think I’ve got whatever the opposite of ‘green fingers’ is) and I’m wondering if there are any plant experts out there who could advise me if there is any plant suitable for a shelf in the corner of a bathroom with no sunlight!

The bathroom faces north west and although it has a big window and is quite bright, it only gets sunlight on summer evenings, but the position of this shelf, in a sort of alcove, means that the plant wouldn’t get any even then. I’ve tried various ferns which I’ve been told like shade and I’ve tried spider plants which seem to live anywhere – but they all die pretty quickly. I don’t know if the problem is the lack of sunlight, the temperature, the humidity – or just my hopelessness with plants in general.

Thanks!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I believe you can get very convincing artificial pot plants.

There are non-photosynthesising plants, but it looks as if you'll need to start with a fungal growth (how damp is your bathroom?)
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Abigail - try an orchid (no, I'm not joking).

Some of the orchids that live in forest survive on only diffuse light.

Something else you could try is the so-called 'Hot Lips Flower' Psychotria poeppigiana which lives under the canopy.
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I believe you can get very convincing artificial pot plants.

There are non-photosynthesising plants, but it looks as if you'll need to start with a fungal growth (how damp is your bathroom?)

Well, an artificial plant is something I’d never thought of. It could be an answer, but I really wanted something actually alive and growing …

Non-photosynthesising plants – hmm… sounds a bit too complicated for me [Frown]
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Abigail - try an orchid (no, I'm not joking).

Some of the orchids that live in forest survive on only diffuse light.

Something else you could try is the so-called 'Hot Lips Flower' Psychotria poeppigiana which lives under the canopy.

Somebody gave me an orchid once, L’organist, but I managed to kill it off in a few weeks. [Hot and Hormonal]

Something to think about though. Thanks!
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Yes - orchid would be great, they like bright window ledges but not direct sun. Water the aerial roots every day, but only with a splash of water. Don't repot until desperate, they like sparse soil. Cut dead flowers to the next spike, but the flowers will last months. When no flowers are left put in a dull but not dark place and water much less, new flowers will come up after a few months.

I love orchids [Smile]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Perhaps it needs saying that the important thing is variety.

Jengie
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
Perhaps it needs saying that the important thing is variety.

Jengie

Oh yes!

I was talking about these ones - I am useless with the spiky leaved ones:)
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
You might consider an air plant (tillandsia), too. Those are used to doing without much in the way of water, light, etc. and I believe the humidity and low light of your bathroom would suit it just fine.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Abigail:
I’ve tried various ferns which I’ve been told like shade and I’ve tried spider plants which seem to live anywhere – but they all die pretty quickly. I don’t know if the problem is the lack of sunlight, the temperature, the humidity – or just my hopelessness with plants in general.

I too liked the idea of having a fern in the bathroom but have had no success with them either. Ferns tend not to cope in a bathroom because they don't get an even temperature. If you run a bath they get the sudden humidity and steam - sometimes a bit too much - then when you're done and leave, the temperature drops fairly quickly back again. Some bathrooms are colder than others, so the temperature variation could potentially be extreme and go below what would be normal room temperature in the rest of the house. Very few plants will survive that - except possibly desert plants. However, even those are used to intense light, rather than shade.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I've got an aloe vera, thriving, but it does get sunlight in the morning. It didn't in its last home, as there was a hill to the east, and it managed there.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
... and if you're willing to rotate the thingy, whatever it is, to a brighter place every week or so, you could probably have any not-full-sun plant.
 
Posted by TonyK (# 35) on :
 
Abigail

We had a 'mother-in-law's tongue' plant for many years, growing in a dark landing and later a dark hall.

See here for details.

We did manage to kill it recently, but it had been moved to the conservatory, where it got too much heat in the mornings, plus it was about twenty years old ...
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I have created some knitted houseplants which clearly I should market.
 
Posted by Graven Image (# 8755) on :
 
Another suggestion for Mother-in-laws tongue. I have had one in low light for several years.
 
Posted by Abigail (# 1672) on :
 
Thank you for all the replies. I was on the point of giving up the idea of having a plant in the bathroom but I'll definitely have another go now. Thank you for some great ideas.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
I need some advice among American newspapers. We get two papers currently in our South Bend, IN rectory: the South Bend Tribune and the Chicago Tribune. I'm committed to keeping the SB Trib for its local news and obituaries. However, having just looked at what we spend on the Chicago Trib, I'm thinking we should maybe cancel that. We do need two papers, as we are three priests living together, and all of us like to look over the paper while we have breakfast, which we do together most days. The Chicago Trib though isn't particularly wonderful journalistically, and is often too Chicago specific for us, given how far out we are. We want something that is more of a national paper.

We are, obviously, all Catholic, but reasonably diverse in terms of the secular political manifestations of that (how's that for diplomatic!). What would you pick?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
It really depends on what you're interested in. The newspapers of record in this country are the New York Times and the Washington Post.
The NYT is unparalleled for its arts coverage, essential for everyone who's interested in books or theater. The POST is the political junkie's mainline. Congress! The White House! Lobbyists! Elections! It's all here, and at least every fourth year it is essential.
Both of these in paper format are spendy; you might go and look and see if you can get the 'out of town' edition so as to not get all the local advertisements and junk. Also, subscribing in paper gets you their e-edition as well, which is useful in very different ways (searchable, for instance).
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
I suggest going to a book store and picking up copies of several of the national papers (NY Times, Wall Street Journal, even USA Today). Do that a few times and you will all know which one you prefer, then get a subscription to that one.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
Back with another holiday-planning question. I still haven't found the perfect canalboat in the Netherlands, but for now I'm moving my planning efforts on to booking an apartment for our family for the 5 days we're in London at the end of August. I have been through a dizzying array of apartments on the many many many websites dedicated to renting holiday flats in London -- my question here, as there are so many English people on the Ship, is: does anyone know of any "well kept local secret" channels for renting an affordable apartment for a few days, that might not be immediate apparent to someone enquiring from Canada?
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Trudy Scrumptious:
I'm moving my planning efforts on to booking an apartment for our family for the 5 days we're in London at the end of August. I have been through a dizzying array of apartments on the many many many websites dedicated to renting holiday flats in London -- my question here, as there are so many English people on the Ship, is: does anyone know of any "well kept local secret" channels for renting an affordable apartment for a few days?

Have you tried Citadines. It's not overly cheap, but London is one of the most expensive cities to live in (as I know, paying £1k per month for a matchbox [Waterworks] ).
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Is it a good idea to select a hotel near Victoria Station? (I know nothing of London.)
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Is it a good idea to select a hotel near Victoria Station? (I know nothing of London.)

It depends partly on where you want to go and what airport you might be using to get to London. Victoria is best for Gatwick, Paddington for Heathrow, Liverpool Street for Stanstead and King's Cross for Luton. Most of the major museums are around South Kensington which is close to Victoria, apart from the British Museum which is nearest Holborn station.

Just always check with Transport for London if you are travelling on the underground at a weekend as there are often tube line closures for maintenance then. It often leads to a lot of very confused tourists standing around and blocking the way through for everyone else, as they try to work out how to get from A to B given that the route they 1st planned is no longer available to them.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
Citadines would definitely be well out of our price range. To put in context the kind of travellers we are, we were planning to stay at the Lancaster Hall Y in a quad hostel room for 80 pounds/night. Then we realized that for not much more than that, we could rent a very cheap apartment and have our own kitchen and bathroom facilities.

We've found several things in the general price range we're able to spend -- about 400-500 pounds for the five-day stay -- but of course at that price there's always some fatal flaw -- too far out from the centre of London so we'd be spending too much time on the train, or more centrally located but generally a bit grotty-looking. Sooner or later we will of course compromise on one of those points, but I just wondered if someone who lives in London or has been there a lot might pop up and say, "Oh, you should check the places for rent on secretsonlyenglishpeopleknow.co.uk," or something like that. I know it's a long shot but travelling cheap with a family of four requires a certain level of optimism.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I am indeed arriving at Heathrow, but I will be staying several days. There are almost too many options.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
TS, not so much apartments (though there are some), but you might try some of the universities. The LSE has some good and inexpensive rooms (google 'LSE vacations')at good locations, some of which go up to 4 people; and they often have shared kitchen facilities too, I think. For example, at present LSA Bankside, just behind Tate Modern, is offering quad rooms in August for £107 a night including full breakfast. Also worth trying are University of London, (http://halls.london.ac.uk/visitor-accommodation), UCL and University of Westminster
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
That is a good suggestion, and I may look into that if the apartment thing doesn't work out. Thanks.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
Have now booked what we hope will be the perfect London apartment; thanks for suggestions given. If anyone's doing a similar thing anywhere in the world, of the zillions of sites I combed through looking for this one, I recommend looking on airbnb.com as they seem to offer a lot more of "Ordinary person renting out their house/apartment while they're not in it" as opposed to "Property management company with a lot of cheap grungy apartments hoping to make a quick buck off you." But then, that assessment is only based on booking the place -- hopefully I won't have a different story after I've actually stayed in it!!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Aargh, too late to suggest that if you're here at he end of August you don't stay in London but rather come to he Greenbelt Festival instead.
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
If I was coming on my own I'd definitely do Greenbelt! Everything is more complicated with a husband and two teenagers ... everyone's interests and priorities have to be taken into account (of course, that's part of the fun, but it does make trip planning more of a challenge).
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
And now I've just looked at the lineup for Greenbelt and am even sorrier I wasn't planning this trip to please myself alone. Lots of my favourite speakers are going to be there, people I would LOVE to hear live and never get a chance to. In fact I won't even be in England till it's all over, but if I were travelling alone I would definitely have planned differently.
 
Posted by JoannaP (# 4493) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Is it a good idea to select a hotel near Victoria Station? (I know nothing of London.)

I would say yes; Victoria itself is pretty central and is also a transport hub, so you can get almost anywhere by tube or bus from there. It is not the best place to get to from Heathrow but, for a visit of several days, I would think that it is better to stay in Victoria with a slightly more complicated journey at the beginning and end than to stay in the Paddington area.

But then, as I live close to Victoria, I might be biased. [Biased]

On the other hand, you could get a coach from Heathrow to Victoria Coach station; not as quick and comfy as the Heathrow Express but cheaper.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
How long does it take to feel normal again after major surgery? I had a torn diaphragm with various organs coming up where they ought notter to harass my lungs and heart. Everything put back in place, but I am taking three hour naps still, a month later, and walking a mile is a monumental effort. To say nothing of cleaning house.

The doctors just smile and say "a while" which could mean ANYTHING. Ideas?
 
Posted by Gareth (# 2494) on :
 
The more effort you make to do the walking and other exercises, the faster you will recover.

I'm suggesting you should overdo it - but just that exercise helps.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
I think age and health play a big part. Mum had a big chest op last year and it took quite a while, I think she was allowed to drive at 6 weeks from memory but she was still weak and tired easily a while later (but continues to have underlying health problems). Hard to compare between people really.
 
Posted by Bene Gesserit (# 14718) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gareth:
[Q] I'm not suggesting you should overdo it - but just that exercise helps. [/Q]

There, fixed it for you - I hope?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
[Big Grin] That's sort of my problem--I get impatient easily and sometimes overdo because I don't know what's normal. And I hate not pulling my own weight.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
You're not my mum are you?!

She currently had a chest infection and is feeling grotty, miserable, less able to do things, having to rely on me more, guiltless about that, more miserable etc. and like after her op time seems to go slower.
Relax, you will heal, but sick time is slower than well time!
 
Posted by Scots lass (# 2699) on :
 
We have strange sticky grey pellets in our bathroom - we think possibly some form of egg. We don't know what they are, and fairly extensive googling has just freaked us out but hasn't given us any answers. They look like BB gun pellets more than anything else, but are clearly natural and clump together. Does anyone have any idea what on earth this might be, and how we get rid of it? So far we've opted for spraying bleach, vacuuming and then spraying a lot of Raid (inhaling near our bathroom probably unadvisable at present).
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
I am taking three hour naps still, a month later, and walking a mile is a monumental effort. To say nothing of cleaning house.

You're describing my life....

Recovery, like age, IMO, causes you to notice the limits of your energy. Time was, there was a rough equivalence between stuff to do/time in which it had to be done/energy to do it. But now the batteries don't seem to hold the same charge.

I find it best to plan more pitstops. I have an idea of how much I can do before needing a little sit down or a coffee or a nap. The idea is to stop before you absolutely have to.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Scots lass:
We have strange sticky grey pellets in our bathroom - we think possibly some form of egg. We don't know what they are, and fairly extensive googling has just freaked us out but hasn't given us any answers. They look like BB gun pellets more than anything else, but are clearly natural and clump together. Does anyone have any idea what on earth this might be, and how we get rid of it? So far we've opted for spraying bleach, vacuuming and then spraying a lot of Raid (inhaling near our bathroom probably unadvisable at present).

Sounds like a fungus. Suggest vinegar, baking soda or any fungus remover, plus make sure the room gets thoroughly aired out. I googled "bathroom fungus" and got pix that looked remarkably like your description.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
How long does it take to feel normal again after major surgery? I had a torn diaphragm with various organs coming up where they ought notter to harass my lungs and heart. Everything put back in place, but I am taking three hour naps still, a month later, and walking a mile is a monumental effort. To say nothing of cleaning house.

The doctors just smile and say "a while" which could mean ANYTHING. Ideas?

Cleaning house? That should be put off as long as possible. Get a note from your doctor if necessary.

(Hope you feel better soon!)
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
heheheh. I WOULD put it off if I could do so without being in danger of disappearing in the piles of stuff. I am training the LL, but Mr. Lamb is untrainable by any known power (well, God hasn't got around to it yet). To him, putting things in piles IS neatness. I need surfaces to eat/sleep/sit on!
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
For every half-hour that you're under a general anaesthetic you should allow one week to recover - double that if you're over 50. Any exercise should be taken in small 'bites' - so walk for 15 minutes then rest, the same with housework.

Yes, sounds dull, but otherwise you'll not only get disheartened but getting back to normal will actually take longer.

Do you swim and have access to a pool? Some gentle backstroke is not only relaxing but also beneficial for stomach/back surgery recovery.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Well damn. Not sure how long I was under, guessing two hours or so? As for swimming, I'm forbidden until the chest drain wound is healed over. Meh.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Chest drain? In that case NO EXERCISE as such, just gentle pottering. Either put stools around the garden and house or carry a lightweight one with you for what my family call pausettes.

As for the undomesticated partner, just tell him you can't do it all now and he must pick up the slack, end of. If he can't or won't fine, but he pays for a cleaner for the next two months.
 
Posted by Ann (# 94) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Scots lass:
We have strange sticky grey pellets in our bathroom - we think possibly some form of egg. We don't know what they are, and fairly extensive googling has just freaked us out but hasn't given us any answers. They look like BB gun pellets more than anything else, but are clearly natural and clump together. Does anyone have any idea what on earth this might be, and how we get rid of it? So far we've opted for spraying bleach, vacuuming and then spraying a lot of Raid (inhaling near our bathroom probably unadvisable at present).

I know you said they look natural but ... have you had cavity wall insulation recently - ours was done a few months ago and I'm still finding the stuff in the kitchen - there is a gap through the wall for the pipes. The insulation was little grey squashy beads mixed with some sort of PVA type glue squirted through holes drilled into the cavity.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Oh &%$^. (It is Heaven,after all)

This is almost as bad as the four months on bedrest when I was expecting LL.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Originally posted by l'organist:
quote:
For every half-hour that you're under a general anaesthetic you should allow one week to recover
I was signed off for four weeks after a four hour op, and was told it wasn't recovery time from the surgery per se, but recovery time from the anesthetic. Turned out, I needed it! I was still having a long lie, an after lunch nap, and early nights three weeks later. I was just tired! Even once my four weeks were up, I still wasn't back to normal.

The surgery was on my jaw, and recovery in that respect was almost instantaneous; I was eating normally the evening of same day I had surgery.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
The older you are, the longer it takes to recover from anesthesia. [Frown]

All anesthetics are poisonous, that's why they knock you out. Your liver has to get rid of the poison, and the older you are, the less efficient your liver is.

Moo
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I was thrilled to learn this year that there are blogs run by cardiac practices. They encourage their patients to blog about their stents or aortic resections, so that other patients can learn what to expect. I am sure other medical specialties do this, so you might just pop the phrase "(your procedure here) blog" into a search engine and see what comes up. To learn that EVERYBODY needs at least half a year to get back to normal is a comfort.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
It is. Though as far as I can find out there's no name for what they did to me--"general disaster repair" comes closest. It was an emergency response to a horrid internal mess involving several organs and structures.
 
Posted by Scots lass (# 2699) on :
 
Thank you Ann! That explanation makes a lot of sense (the walls were done recently) and means my household is no longer utterly freaked out and feeling incredibly girly for having done so.
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
I have a remote controlled garage door with two controllers, one in the car the other in the house. The house one is fine but the one in the car will SOMETIMES not operate when reversing down the drive.

When it acts up, I put the transmission into park or neutral, and bingo, it works. It's not a case of being too far away from the unit, I have just cleared the door at that point and when coming in it operates way down the drive.

It is going from reverse to park/neutral that intrigues me!!!!

Is there some sort of radio frequency generated by auto transmissions?
 
Posted by basso (# 4228) on :
 
My first thought is that it might be something to do with your back-up lights. If you can reach them, try jiggling the wires that go into the back.
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
Do you have backup sensors on your car? Maybe those are interfering. Whatever it is, you may be able to change the frequency on which your remotes operate to eliminate the interference. Check the manual for your garage door opener. Some fancy openers have a digital control pad for programming. Others may have pin jumpers or dip switches. Others are set at the factory and can't be changed.
 
Posted by Dennis the Menace (# 11833) on :
 
Thnaks for the replies.
Doesn't have back up sensors, will try changing the freq on the main thingy. As I say, it happens only occasionly.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Here is a history question. I am ISO an unsolved crime or mystery that takes place before 1857 in Britain. Ideally this crime takes place 1850-57, and in London. A great analogue would be the Jack the Ripper crimes, which alas are 40 years later. Was there an unsolved crime of similar heinousness or notoriety in the time period I need?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Here is a history question.

Just the one, Mmmmm?

Firenze
Heaven Host

 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
There are some archives of old newspapers online, maybe try them?
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
as a matter of interest, does anyone remember the title of a 1970s book in which some dude condemned almost all contemporary pop/rock music on the basis of its demonic underpinnings?
 
Posted by MrsBeaky (# 17663) on :
 
Zappa

I think it featured in more than one book my recollection is that it was a common theme at that time in certain circles...
I can't remember a whole book but I do remember a chapter in "Risky Living" by the late Jamie Buckingham which went into it a bit.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Here is a history question. I am ISO an unsolved crime or mystery that takes place before 1857 in Britain. Ideally this crime takes place 1850-57, and in London. A great analogue would be the Jack the Ripper crimes, which alas are 40 years later. Was there an unsolved crime of similar heinousness or notoriety in the time period I need?

Which is more important - the time period or London? The Madeleine Smith case was in 1857, but in Glasgow. However, it's not a complete mystery, as there are only two possibilities; a) Madeleine gave him the arsenic or b) L'Angelier took arsenic of his own volition, either to commit suicide, or to put pressure on Madeleine.

It was, (and remains), a notorious case and was reported in the London papers at the time.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
I am ISO an unsolved crime or mystery that takes place before 1857 in Britain.

I noticed a book in my public library today that may help. It is The Invention of Murder by Judith Flanders. I pulled it off the shelf to look at the blurb. It's about the tremendous surge of interest in murders in Victorian times.

Since I only looked at the blurb, I can't tell you what it covers, but I have the impression it contains references to real crimes.

Moo
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Oooh, I must seek that out. Flanders wrote a great book about the Victorian home which has been of great usefulness.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
A thesis question.....

I am going to create a large picture in the next 24 hours, basically I want to get it onto my computer tablet in such a form that I can scroll around it easily, viewing the whole thing is not really as important as being able to go in close on detail.

Any ideas how?

Tablet is Galaxy Note and Android based.

This is just for a day.

Jengie
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
as a matter of interest, does anyone remember the title of a 1970s book in which some dude condemned almost all contemporary pop/rock music on the basis of its demonic underpinnings?

"Pop goes the Gospel"?
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Seeking introduction to Old English. Something that would provide graduated readings that progressively familiarize you with the language.

Any suggestions? Either books or online sources are fine.

Why, why, why is Old English so completely unlike Modern English, or even Middle English? I know, I know, the Normans... I'm not helped by the fact that almost all my foreign language experience is in Romance languages, so I'm exquisitely attuned to those languages' cognates in English, and it's disorienting to have those completely gone.

Would Old English be easier if I learned Middle English first? Perhaps working my way back in time from Chaucer to Layamon, before leaping the 1066 divide into Anglo-Saxon?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I found Middle English to be the more annoying, as it looks as if you should be able to read it straight off, but you can't.

OEis simply another language - like Norwegian. A word of which I was once able to decode purely on shared roots - brandslukker = brand from the burning, slukker = slake, a fireslaker = extinguisher. And that is pretty much how I got on in OE. In my degree course, we were not taught it as a language, simply given the texts to Wanderer, Seafarer, Dream of the Rood, Beowulf and Sweets Anglo Saxon Reader and left to get on with it.

It does actually look worse than it is, with the thorns and edhs, but if you actually say it, the words become a lot more familiar sounding. The alliteration and the kennings make more sense as well, if you remember this is stuff for shouting at a room full of drunks.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
@Jengie - would Prezi do what you want?
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Autenreith Road, you could buy a copy of Seamus Heaney's Beowulf translation for starters. It has the Anglo-Saxon on the facing page.

Some people can figure out a lot with this kind of set-up; others can't. In any case, you'll have an excellent translation of Beowulf.

Moo
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
They have just published the translation of BEOWULF by J.R.R. Tolkien. If you read that and the other translation side by side you probably could get a real good grasp of what the original was like.
 
Posted by Frankly My Dear (# 18072) on :
 
Remarkable! I have a nagging question, but didn't want to start a new thread just for the sake of it - so my 'prayers' are answered!

FOR RUGBY ANORAKS:

Why is a 'maul' never even attempted in Rugby League? Which law, specifically, rules it out of the question ??
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I have found bits of OE which I have given to children. There used to be historical collections of documents and other stuff, and in the 1066 one a couple of pages of the AS Chronicle, in which there was a phrase something like "on thissan yeare com harold cyning to westminstere at eastran" (from memory, and without thorns or wens.) And we did a boundary walk round part of Rochester (I'd been on a placename course which did that.) "Fram suðgeat west andlanges wealles oð norðlanan to stræte. & swa east fram stræte oð Doddinghyrnan ongean bradgeat.

Fram Doddinchyrnan oð ða bradan gatan east be wealle. & swa eft suð oð ðaet east geat. & swa west be strete oð Doddinchyrnan." I did a version with modern lettering, and we looked at streets and walls. Unfortunately not Doddings corner, which, when I went on the course had a diner called Dodgers on it (Dickensian and pre-conquest) but by the time of the school trip had transmogrified into something Italian and neither.

Bits of it are deduceable. I suspect poetic stuff is less so.

There's an interesting dictionary (Clark Hall, Toronto). It's amazing the words they had words for, which open up a surprising vision of society, somewhat removed from what I was initially taught at 7 by a self-identified Norman, as being barbaric. Unfortunately, as it doesn't foresee the need for anyone to translate from modern to old English, it's somewhat hard to find examples randomly. So far, historian, and blowed if I can find the scientific and philsophical words I know are in there. But there was a society that ate dainty food, and recognised tesselated pavements, as well as having umpteen words for warriors and weapons, and religion. (Loads of lovely words for vestments!) And I have come across the word "eggian" which is translated as "egg on, or incite", which is a bit of a surprise. Obviously nothing to do with eggs.
Guess what I'm going to be spending the rest of the afternoon at?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
@Jengie - would Prezi do what you want?

Thank You

Prezi will not work on the tablet. However the default "Gallery" app works well enough once I had the picture across.

Jengie
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Frankly My Dear:
Remarkable! I have a nagging question, but didn't want to start a new thread just for the sake of it - so my 'prayers' are answered!

FOR RUGBY ANORAKS:

Why is a 'maul' never even attempted in Rugby League? Which law, specifically, rules it out of the question ??

I'm a rugby tragic but have never got league, so I won't attempt an answer, but I suggest the rugby fraternity down in the Circus wouldn't mind answering if you don't get an answer here ...
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Frankly My Dear:
Remarkable! I have a nagging question, but didn't want to start a new thread just for the sake of it - so my 'prayers' are answered!

FOR RUGBY ANORAKS:

Why is a 'maul' never even attempted in Rugby League? Which law, specifically, rules it out of the question ??

Here are the Laws of Rugby League.

Section 11 talks about the tackle, and it's all relevant, note 3 especially so. This is titled "No moving of tackled player" which is exactly what a maul is about. Rugby League doesn't have rucks, line-outs or contested scrums either.

Hope that helps.
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Thanks to all for the Old English advice. I'm looking forward to it.

Until I can get myself to a library for some Old English books, I'm reading The Canterbury Tales, and finding it strangely beguiling in a way I never have before all the other times I've started them, and this even though the word-lookup links aren't working on my iPhone, so I'm reading it punctuated by mysterious words of unknown meaning.

When reading The Canterbury Tales, is one reading "it" or "them"?
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I'm having an interesting time with the dictionary - not only does it give a picture of life then with words for everyday things, but also the feelings they needed to describe. And oddities like having separate words for astronomy and astrology, even back then. And words in everyday use now which had not struck me as that old, being that old. That stuff about the split between Norman and English usage is far too glib.
My favourite would come forward to modern spelling as "bookhoard" for library - definitely what I've got. And "bookhoarder" for librarian.
I haven't come across the word for slug, yet. I think I need it. It's probably slug, though.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
"Hell-slitherer," i think. Possibly "wrath provoker.""

[ 04. June 2014, 12:32: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
AR: rather than plough through the Canterbury Tales you might be better off with Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde as a Middle English halfway-house.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
So I skipped through to the s section - whatever it is, it isn't slug. There are the obvious ancestors of snail (snægl)' slow (slaw - given with one of its meanings as sluggish), slide, slip, slime, slink, plus some others for some of these.
Then there's slipor, slippery, filthy; slitere, gorger.
But slug isn't in there. Not under sl anyway.


You might like slegefæge - doomed to perish!
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
AR: rather than plough through the Canterbury Tales you might be better off with Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde as a Middle English halfway-house.

I would say Chaucer is early modern. Compare him for ease of reading with Sir Gawayne or Ancrene Wisse and he's practically Janet and John. The actual tales may be a mixed bunch, but the general Prologue is not to be missed, nor yet the Wyf of Bath, nor the Miller nor the Pardoner.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I've found an OE translator on line.

Old English to Modern and vice versa

This knows no word for slug.
But two for snail. There's snægl, and also regnsnægl, which is rainsnail, and I am wondering if that could be slug, on the grounds that they appear more often when it is raining, and though snails do too, they can be found about when dry because of their protection from drying out. I certainly find more slugs than snails about when it is wet, and might even think they fell with the rain, were I of that sort of mind. I wonder what the context of the source might be. (It's not in my dictionary, which would give that sort of information.)
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
And online dictionaries give, also, regnwyrm, which is an earthworm - similar behaviour. I bet the regnsnægl is a slug, doomed to perish in my garden.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
An ignorant American on her way to Britain wants to know:
If I should wish to rent a car in London, to drive to the north, how should I go about it?
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Same as you would do anywhere else. Google "car rental London" or "car hire London" and see what comes up. Some of the car hire agency names will be familiar to you as they're international. Mostly they won't be cheap, but that's par for the course.
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
Do you really want to drive in London? You definitely don't want to drive in Bristol: I made that mistake the last time I was in the UK. Cornwall is lovely though!
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
It might be an idea to use public transport to the suburbs and hire from there. I've been round Hyde Park Corner a couple of times. By mistake. And you don't want to go anywhere near Vauxhall. And that's without controls in unexpected places, and having to keep to the left, and get to the right lane well before turning. And congestion charging - look it up.
Garmin do satnavs which do photo-like pictures of junctions, which would help better than TomTom.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
If you, like most of us Americans, drive an automatic, you might have difficulty finding a rental car with automatic. (I drive a stick shift -- but I'd never shifted with my left hand until my one and only adventure driving in England!)
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Not to mention which of the sticks on the steering column are for signalling lights and which for the wipers.
My friend from California managed all right with a hire car he picked up at Heathrow and drove to and around Ireland and back, though. Apart from thinking the turn off for Chiswick came soon after the Severn Bridge.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
If you're going to 'the north' it may be an idea to get to a large town/city by rail and hire from there - all the major motorways/trunk routes from London northwards are hellish - M1, M6, A1.

You may also be surprised at the speed of some roads - an American friend still shudders at her first experience driving here (M4, in the rain, on a Friday).
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I have to go from London to Cheltenham and then on north. I am thinking of taking the train there, and then renting a car. Quite right, not wanting to drive in London. (We once drove in Heraklion, and still have not recovered.)
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
Yes, London to Cheltenham by train is easy enough (but make sure you book in advance, and if you can specify a train so much the better, otherwise you might get sting for a lot of money- our ticketing system is infamously complex).
Do you need/ want to drive? Depends where you're going, and of course a car gives you flexibility, but an hour or less on the train from Cheltenham will get you to Birmingham and you can get pretty much anywhere from there by train. Might be worth investigating the BritRail pass (about which I know nothing much).
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
On the other hand, driving from Cheltenham gives opportunites to pootle round looking at scenery and hilly bits, usually avoided by the trains.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
Yes indeed. I'd say drive if you want to explore or you are going off the network: consider trains if you just want to get from A-B.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
If you, like most of us Americans, drive an automatic, you might have difficulty finding a rental car with automatic. (I drive a stick shift -- but I'd never shifted with my left hand until my one and only adventure driving in England!)

It's easy enough to find an automatic in large places (especially airports) but you will pay about double the price of a manual car. All the big car rental chains have websites...

(And in terms of price, for a single person, you will always be better taking public transport than renting a car, assuming it goes where you need to go. For a couple, you're usually better off on the train as long as you buy advance purchase tickets (buy on the web, and collect from a machine at major rail stations), and for four people it's usually cheaper to rent a car.)

[ 06. June 2014, 12:27: Message edited by: Leorning Cniht ]
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:

You may also be surprised at the speed of some roads - an American friend still shudders at her first experience driving here (M4, in the rain, on a Friday).

To my mind, the big difference is not the speed of the roads, but the narrowness of the lanes. Much of America drives at the same speeds as most of the UK, but not in lanes that extend 6 inches either side of your wing mirrors.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
For an American it is the driving on the left that is actually the horrible adjustment. And of course when Brits come here there is a similar disjunction. Have you read PARADISE NEWS, by David Lodge? In which a British tourist in Honolulu looks the wrong way and gets creamed in traffic.
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
... For a couple, you're usually better off on the train ...

It may depend on how much travelling you're doing, and where.

When we go home, we have family to visit in Essex, Edinburgh and Orkney and in recent years we've found that for two of us renting a car is cheaper (and infinitely more convenient) than trains or even cheapie airlines (which aren't as cheap as they used to be).

As for driving in London, D. used to reckon that if you knew your way around it was easier to go through it than round it. These days, though, he'd begrudge paying the congestion charge, and I don't blame him.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
In a city I feel that on foot is the only way to really know it. Being closed in a car is distancing. However, to get over a distance, we are going to go by car. I am enough of an American to demand my own schedule and route. So I think taking a train to Cheltenham would be a fine compromise.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Of course, when it comes to which side of the road, we have much more opportunity to practice on the right, than anyone from a right driving country does to practice on the left. Most British wrong side accidents happen within a few miles of the Pas de Calais! And we, growing up in Channel ports, learned such useful phrases as "Tenez la gauche", "Links fahren". which were scattered alongside the roads.

Napoleon's fault, of course. There is evidence of driving on the left in Roman times - unloaded carts into a quarry, loaded ones out, on the left.

[ 06. June 2014, 18:11: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by no prophet (# 15560) on :
 
The fuel price in the UK is double in price to western Canada. Just so you know. Get a GPS, better from home than rented with the car.

Rent the car online for guaranteed price before you leave, and if you cancel there should be no charge even if at last minute.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I have a GPS here in the US. Must find out if I can get it loaded with British maps (and how much this will cost me). Rather than haul it along in my luggage I am thinking of renting one with the car.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by piglet:
in recent years we've found that for two of us renting a car is cheaper (and infinitely more convenient) than trains or even cheapie airlines (which aren't as cheap as they used to be).

The convenience is a big deal. If you're paying full price for a normal ticket I'm not surprised by the prices either, but I would have thought that advance purchase tickets (2-4 weeks in advance usually) might work out cheaper. Of course, then you're limited to a specific train.
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
For a couple, you're usually better off on the train as long as you buy advance purchase tickets

If you're a couple, you can buy a Two Together Railcard and get a third off the price.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I see that is good for a year; since I look to do one trip exactly by rail it is probably not a good buy.
If anyone has tips on where to stay in Cheltenham I would be happy to entertain recommendations.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
You might like to start a Visiting the UK thread in All Saints, Brenda; that kind of thread tends to do well there.
 
Posted by Jack the Lass (# 3415) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
I see that is good for a year; since I look to do one trip exactly by rail it is probably not a good buy.

The TwoTogether Railcard is only £30, and given the (noted above) complicatedness of our rail pricing, it could very well be that your one trip up north makes shelling out for the railcard worth your while. For example, next week my husband and I are travelling down to London for ken's funeral, and even if we never use the train again for the next year, the saving was substantial enough for it to have been well worth it buying the railcard - we saved considerably more than £30 just on the one journey.

Depending on what time you travel, it might even be worth buying it just for the train from London to Cheltenham. Seriously.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
I have been carrying out a cull of my books and have half a dozen or so Bibles of various translations and ages that I no longer use. I am reluctant to throw them in the bin, but my local charity shops will probably not take them. Can anyone suggest anywhere they might be useful?
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jack the Lass:

Depending on what time you travel, it might even be worth buying it just for the train from London to Cheltenham. Seriously.

Right now, an Advance Purchase single from London to Cheltenham Spa (valid only on the specific train that you choose at the time of purchase) is GBP 13.90 (assuming there are still tickets available for the day you want to travel). A standard super off-peak single (the cheapest ticket you can buy on the day) on that route is GBP 31.50, rising to GBP 96.50 for a single that permits travel in peak hours.

These are all in standard class.

If you are willing to buy a month or so in advance and commit yourself to a particular train, you can save a lot of money (the less than half the price of the cheapest ticket you can buy on the day shown here is typical). If you really need to travel at peak times, you're probably better off driving.

[ 07. June 2014, 20:33: Message edited by: Leorning Cniht ]
 
Posted by GCabot (# 18074) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sparrow:
I have been carrying out a cull of my books and have half a dozen or so Bibles of various translations and ages that I no longer use. I am reluctant to throw them in the bin, but my local charity shops will probably not take them. Can anyone suggest anywhere they might be useful?

I would assume that any Christian-affiliated charities would gladly take them.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
No, most Christian affiliated charities do NOT want second hand bibles. There is often no real purpose that they can be put to and these days if people hand out bibles here then they are normally new. However, there are some who would be interested.

Jengie
 
Posted by GCabot (# 18074) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
No, most Christian affiliated charities do NOT want second hand bibles. There is often no real purpose that they can be put to and these days if people hand out bibles here then they are normally new. However, there are some who would be interested.

Jengie

I cannot agree. I know that many charities use them for homeless ministry, prison ministry, missionary work, etc. The U.S. has a number of designated Bible collection centers for second-hand bibles, but I am unaware of whether these exist in the U.K.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Prisons normally require that books, including Bibles, be sent directly from the publisher for security reasons--which leaves out used ones. Missionaries in the US have limited use for used Bibles, particularly King James, as most people they work with can't comprehend it, and the rest (being by definition nonChristian and unlikely to place a value on the spiritual aspect of such a gift) demand to know why they aren't considered worthy of a new copy instead of a hand-me-down. Missionaries overseas can't afford shipping for many books and will also face language and literacy problems. Homeless ministry? Well, maybe--as long as the Bible is in a translation that the individual can read and understand. In my experience, about 80% of the Bibles we've been offered are unfit for any purpose, being either tattered and torn, or else in archaic English not understanded of the people. Which is a shame.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by GCabot:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
No, most Christian affiliated charities do NOT want second hand bibles. There is often no real purpose that they can be put to and these days if people hand out bibles here then they are normally new. However, there are some who would be interested.

Jengie

I cannot agree. I know that many charities use them for homeless ministry, prison ministry, missionary work, etc. The U.S. has a number of designated Bible collection centers for second-hand bibles, but I am unaware of whether these exist in the U.K.
I know of plenty of churches that have bookcases of passed on Bibles that are unused. Yes in the UK a church is a religious affliated charity; so are mosques and synagogues. I can not see them being pleased with more. If charities hand out bibles they tend to hand out new ones, not secondhand and it is really only those running secondhand shops who would want to take them here.

Jengie
 
Posted by GCabot (# 18074) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
quote:
Originally posted by GCabot:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
No, most Christian affiliated charities do NOT want second hand bibles. There is often no real purpose that they can be put to and these days if people hand out bibles here then they are normally new. However, there are some who would be interested.

Jengie

I cannot agree. I know that many charities use them for homeless ministry, prison ministry, missionary work, etc. The U.S. has a number of designated Bible collection centers for second-hand bibles, but I am unaware of whether these exist in the U.K.
I know of plenty of churches that have bookcases of passed on Bibles that are unused. Yes in the UK a church is a religious affliated charity; so are mosques and synagogues. I can not see them being pleased with more. If charities hand out bibles they tend to hand out new ones, not secondhand and it is really only those running secondhand shops who would want to take them here.

Jengie

Perhaps this is a regional difference then. As I said, I am unfamiliar with how things work over in the U.K.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Is there a way of finding out your passport number without actually having your passport? Son lost his passport and applied for a replacement, using the "lost or stolen" form. His application has been bounced back because he didn't fill in the number of the lost passport. But he doesn't know the number because he's lost his passport.

Are we missing something here? Is there a way of finding out the number of a lost passport that everyone knows about except us?

He's tried phoning, but hasn't got through yet.
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
NEQ - has he tried asking his HR office at work? To confirm eligibility to work it's normal practice to take a copy of someone's passport which they should hold on record.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Thanks. He's a University student, with no current employment. He's done holiday work previously, but I doubt they'd have his passport number.

[ 10. June 2014, 13:16: Message edited by: North East Quine ]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Is there a way of finding out your passport number without actually having your passport? Son lost his passport and applied for a replacement, using the "lost or stolen" form. His application has been bounced back because he didn't fill in the number of the lost passport. But he doesn't know the number because he's lost his passport.

Are we missing something here? Is there a way of finding out the number of a lost passport that everyone knows about except us?

He's tried phoning, but hasn't got through yet.

He couldn't get through on the phone, so had no idea what was happening but despite not filling in the forms they sent him, his new passport has appeared! YAY!
 
Posted by The Kat in the Hat (# 2557) on :
 
Has he made a note of the number in case he loses this one?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Is there a way of finding out your passport number without actually having your passport? Son lost his passport and applied for a replacement, using the "lost or stolen" form. His application has been bounced back because he didn't fill in the number of the lost passport. But he doesn't know the number because he's lost his passport.

Are we missing something here? Is there a way of finding out the number of a lost passport that everyone knows about except us?

He's tried phoning, but hasn't got through yet.

He couldn't get through on the phone, so had no idea what was happening but despite not filling in the forms they sent him, his new passport has appeared! YAY!
Looks like we have lurkers in the Passport Office too.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Kat in the Hat:
Has he made a note of the number in case he loses this one?

I have made a note of the number.

Plus we are running a family sweepstakes on how quickly the old one will reappear, now he's paid for and got a new one.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
That's the surest way of getting a lost object to reappear!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Okay, can anyone explain why I have curly hair but it only begins just below ear level? It's basically straight above that point, but there's a major change just at the bottom of the ear. Hair length and layers vs. no layers makes no difference to where the curl starts, so it isn't the weight of the strands (or lack thereof).

I am frustrated because, well, it just looks weird. And because in its less-than-infinite wisdom it has decided to flip UPWARD at the end, like a toddler's line drawing of a girl's hair, so I basically look incompetent with a curling iron. But this is natural. (and no, it isn't hitting the shoulder and curling upward as a result--it doesn't even touch the shoulder at the mo).


Google is my fiend, not friend, on this one.

Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.
 
Posted by GCabot (# 18074) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
Okay, can anyone explain why I have curly hair but it only begins just below ear level? It's basically straight above that point, but there's a major change just at the bottom of the ear. Hair length and layers vs. no layers makes no difference to where the curl starts, so it isn't the weight of the strands (or lack thereof).

I am frustrated because, well, it just looks weird. And because in its less-than-infinite wisdom it has decided to flip UPWARD at the end, like a toddler's line drawing of a girl's hair, so I basically look incompetent with a curling iron. But this is natural. (and no, it isn't hitting the shoulder and curling upward as a result--it doesn't even touch the shoulder at the mo).


Google is my fiend, not friend, on this one.

Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.

Perhaps you are part lamb?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Lamb Chopped

Very topical at present. Basically weight,thickness and various other physical properties determines how it behaves but I suspect that you need someone with a physics degree to get further than that. .

Jengie
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
As an avid listener to BBC Radio 4's Today programme, I'd like to look up the playlist of all the items treated on Tuesday, 24 June 2014.

For some reason or other, I don't seem to be able to find this. I know playlists are there for some of the older Today programmes, like early 2014. Can someone please kindly provide a link for 24/06/2014? This is as far as I've got.

Many thanks. [Confused]

[ 25. June 2014, 04:00: Message edited by: Wesley J ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
It looks as if they'e stopped doing the full listing - sometime in April
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Thanks, Curiosity killed... - that's what I feared.
 
Posted by Qoheleth. (# 9265) on :
 
As a local employer, I'm visiting the 6th form college for a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Maths) Day. We'll have carousel groups of about fifteen 16-17 year olds for 35-40 minutes, aiming to encourage them towards STEM courses and careers post-18.

We're presenting some good stuff drawn from our own industry (energy), but now need a simple 5 minute interactive element to challenge their thinking and balance out the programme. There's no time to do the typical STEM activities involving marshmallows and spaghetti, or whatever. I wondered if any shipmates might have an idea for something suitable? Quiz? Maths whiteboard challenge between two sides of the room?
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
You may have to set up free sign in accounts but there are resources at:
the British Science Association which has lots of ideas (including the marshmallows and spaghetti construction) but also quizzes and other materials;
ASE Association of Science Educators resource pages.
Hertfordshire Grid Science starter activities;
What topic are you covering? I'd probably come up with something more specific if I knew where you were heading.
 
Posted by Qoheleth. (# 9265) on :
 
Thanks, CK. We're majoring on combustion and energy conversion (power stations), but anything STEM related could work.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
OK - some suggestions:
Energy Loop game
National Science and Engineering Week quizzes (I have sign in to that one and can e-mail if you don't want to sign up)
Future Morph site with 16+ section which has games.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
A culinary question, and one that has bugged me for ages:

I love raddishes, especially the red, apparently 'European' variety.

However, some of them appear to be pretty hot, and in a different way from let's say horseraddish (which is not a problem, as you expect that from horseraddish!). I sometimes wonder if this depends on the variety and perhaps the soil it is grown in? Is this the case? They're not just randomly hot sometimes, and sometimes not, are they?

Question 2: what could you use to soothe the impact? I've heard advice like 'drink milk', 'drink (cold) water', 'eat bread' - but have no clue as to what really is good practice. This just for the occasional over-the-top-hottity raddish.

Any thoughts? Thanks. [Smile]

[ 29. June 2014, 10:20: Message edited by: Wesley J ]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
NB. I apologise for spelling 'radish' with a double-d. It is the red hot globe ones that made me do it. And it burns burns burns, like a globe of fire, a globe of fire. Honest, guv.

[ETA. Ravished by radishes: still can't spell.]

[ 29. June 2014, 14:03: Message edited by: Wesley J ]
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Besides the variety, radishes that have grown too slowly tend to have more heat.
As to the heat, drink water and breathe deeply. Unlike chili oils, the isothiocyanate in radishes is water soluble. And as it is more volition, the heat is often experienced in the nose, so breathing deeply removes the gases.
Carbohydrates should also help. With chilis, they form a barrier inhibiting binding with pain receptors.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Brilliant! Thanks, lilBuddha! Another mystery of everyday life solved! [Smile]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
The classic French way to eat radishes is to cut a cross in the bottom (where the leaves were) and stick a bit of butter in it. Very tasty and tones them down a bit.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Does anyone in the UK know a stockist of what used to be rice paper, now edible wafer paper, now that Dr Oetker has bought out Supercook, and discontinued it, concentrating on butterflies, flowers and cupcake cases with the stuff? I have found that Lakeland has it, but it is much more expensive than it used to be, for what it is, and would push the cost of macaroons and coconut pyramids sky high.
I've just used my last sheets with reckless abandon to wrap a sort of fudge that didn't quite work.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Whenever I can't find anything I always go search on line. Ebay, at minimum.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
There's a lot on line, and cheaper than Lakeland, but I do feel that it is an item that needs to be in shops.

Waitrose manages to stock edible gold leaf, which I would think has rather less call for it. (And having seen a lot of mining while I did my Earth Science degree, I don't think much of all the effort and lives going into the extraction of the stuff so it can be flushed away down the sewers.)
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
How far does being ordained in the CoE mean they are considered ordained in the rest of the Anglican Communion, avoiding the Dead Horse where those are an issue (Sydney, not sure about elsewhere)? Eg can a priest ordained in the CoE get a job in TEC, Church in Wales etc without doing any extra training?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Certinly interchangeable between Church in Wales and CofE; always used to be between Canada and CofE, similarly Church of Ireland.
 
Posted by Ricardus (# 8757) on :
 
I think the word you are looking for is 'licensed' rather than ordained. I don't think there is any doubt that an American Episcopalian would consider an Anglican priest to be a priest, but they might still require a licence to do priestly stuff in America.
 
Posted by Oscar the Grouch (# 1916) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
How far does being ordained in the CoE mean they are considered ordained in the rest of the Anglican Communion, avoiding the Dead Horse where those are an issue (Sydney, not sure about elsewhere)? Eg can a priest ordained in the CoE get a job in TEC, Church in Wales etc without doing any extra training?

Short answer is yes. As long as they are in good standing with the "home" church, they will be able to get a job in another part of the Anglican communion. The Church Times often has adverts for jobs in places like Barbados or Bermuda. Clergy moving between England, US, Canada, New Zealand, Australia etc is pretty common. Where I am now, there are priests who were ordained in Canada, USA, South Africa and England. There may be more countries. One guy has come from the Philippines, but I'm not sure if he was ordained there or here in Canada.

And as I can personally testify, you don't need anything "extra" (other than a lot of help in getting accustomed to a different country).

In practice, all someone needs is a letter from their bishop, sent to the bishop of the diocese to which they are going.
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
The priest that was vicar at my TEC church when I was little was an Anglican priest from Brazil. I believe he was educated and ordained in England.

[ 02. July 2014, 05:33: Message edited by: Lyda*Rose ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Does anyone in the UK know a stockist of what used to be rice paper, now edible wafer paper, now that Dr Oetker has bought out Supercook, and discontinued it, concentrating on butterflies, flowers and cupcake cases with the stuff?

You could get it from Amazon, but had you thought about making your own? There are recipes online if you wanted to try it.

[ 02. July 2014, 06:48: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
That's interesting - I'll look that up. But I abjure Amazon because of their tax practices.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
You need rice flour for it. The recipes I've seen suggest you also need a quilting hoop or embroidery hoop and some cheesecloth, you make a paste with some hot water, apply it thinly to the stretched-out cheesecloth and let it dry. It would take a bit of practice to get it right but if you can't get it easily in the shops, making your own might be an option.

[ 02. July 2014, 07:31: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I couldn't find a recipe, but that is roughly what I expected, from making actual paper (I've got rid of the frame I had!). On-line is easier! (But just as expensive as Lakeland when postage taken into account.) But it doesn't answer the problem of it's withdrawal from the shops, for a basic ingredient.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Edible rice paper.

If you did order it from Amazon, it would be with free delivery.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
And a tax fiddle.

But thanks for the recipe.

[ 02. July 2014, 16:16: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Maybe a Chinese supermarket would stock it.

Jengie
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Unfortunately, there isn't one near here. I'm also thinking cake decorating shop, other than Lakeland or Hobbycraft. Lakeland's nearest, and I can go there on my trip to the local cherry farm.

And I have now found such a place, with lots of the stuff, cheaper than Lakeland, in the other direction, but where I can combine it with a trip to a large garden centre, the bigger Waitrose, the posher Lidl, two Edinburgh Woollen Mill sales and the Oxfam bookshop ( I really should abjure that.)

Hooray - and thanks all for the suggestions, which have kept me thinking about it until I tracked it down.

[ 02. July 2014, 17:14: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
You seem to be able to order it online from here.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Hugal and Honest Ron Bacardi both have the same Ship avatar; the Lamb of God with the pennant. The pennant looks like the St George's Cross to me - but is it? And if it is, why the St George's Cross?

I'm trying to figure out the symbolism of a stained glass window which shows the crucified Christ (i.e. Christ with nail marks in his hands and feet), carrying that same pennant whilst speaking to a woman.

I assume it's supposed to represent John 20 14-17 - Christ speaking to Mary Magdalene - but why is he carrying a large pennant?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
That flag commonly appears in pictures of Jesus risen from the dead and signifies the resurection, whether it appears in the hand of the human Jesus or with the lamb symbol. IMHO it has nothing to do with St. George--it is simply a reminder of the cross, and of victory.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Sorry, LC, I knew there was another Shipmate with that avatar, but couldn't think who!

So, without the pennant, if someone didn't notice the nail marks on the hands and feet in the stained glass picture, it could be Jesus talking to any woman. The pennant is there to draw attention to the fact that this story references the Resurrection, which in turn lets us identify the woman as Mary Magdalene?

That makes a lot of sense as, TBH, the lead edging to the pieces of stained glass make the nail marks harder to spot, in fact I can only see the nail marks in the feet because I know to look for them.

Thank you!

[ 03. July 2014, 11:32: Message edited by: North East Quine ]
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
No worries! There are a lot of us here with that avatar. Yes, I think it's mostly for ID purposes, as the holes ARE hard to see. Another tipoff is when you see the fullgrown Jesus either half-clothed or basically naked, but with this banner/shawl thingy (yes, I know there must be a proper liturgical name for ít! draped across hs middle, or even flowing through midair. I'm not sure whether that is supposed to display the risen Body or whether it's just the thought that he was probably buried naked, with winding cloths...
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
In this stained glass window, Jesus is fully clothed, with a hood, full length robe, and a bit round his shoulders which looks like a cloak. The robe is pale blue/pale lilac and the visible bit of the cloak is pale pink. The effect is ethereal. Mary Magdalene (assuming that's who it is) is in deep blues and purples. The pennant is flying above their heads.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Having looked at the stained glass windows in the local church I wondered if the colours were symbolic, red for humanity and blue for heavenly - so Mary is in red and has a blue cloak, starts human takes on heavenly aspect. Jesus wears blue as he comes from heaven and has a red cloak as he took on human form. That idea came from a discussion ages ago in Eccles I think. Does anyone know if this is right?
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
Before the minor remodel of our local RC cathedral, Jesus looked like he was sailing a ship fully dressed in a cape and some sort of cloth; he now has his nether regions modestly covered and visible nail marks with no flag.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Having looked at the stained glass windows in the local church I wondered if the colours were symbolic, red for humanity and blue for heavenly - so Mary is in red and has a blue cloak, starts human takes on heavenly aspect. Jesus wears blue as he comes from heaven and has a red cloak as he took on human form. That idea came from a discussion ages ago in Eccles I think. Does anyone know if this is right?

Blue is associated with Heaven, certainly. I think red was used in Medieval art because it was a readily-available and strong colour rather than any symbolic use - though I'm happy to be proven wrong! So the use of red is more of a habit than anything else - lots of Catholic images of Mary have her in white and blue or just white, for instance.

I believe the Orthodox portray Mary wearing red and not blue, but I don't know the reason for this.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
The tradition for portraying Mary in blue in Western art also came from the fact that in the case of painting, blue paint was the most expensive.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Another strange question - a hot lazy summer makes me find all sorts of weird observations... [Biased]

Why are flies attracted to us? Is it purely for the salt we transpire? (This was put forward in a recent TV documentary about a rainforest area.)
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Does anyone out there on the decks carry an Epipen? I've just been prescribed one as a precaution when on the allotments following a reaction to a bee sting, and I'd like to find a belt pouch or something similar to carry it in - as we have hives (scratch scratch) I will only really need it out there, so something I can pick up and pop on my belt would be ideal. Something that would also hold my knife would be ideal! Does anyone already use something that might fit the bill?

Many thanks,

AG
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
quote:
so something I can pick up and pop on my belt would be ideal. Something that would also hold my knife would be ideal! [/QB]
Bugger...

AG
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
It seems like a small flashlight belt pouch might work. Check out this page and choose the link in the table for "CO142" to get to the section for pouches with multiple uses. Maybe that will give you some ideas.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
Another strange question - a hot lazy summer makes me find all sorts of weird observations... [Biased]

Why are flies attracted to us? Is it purely for the salt we transpire? (This was put forward in a recent TV documentary about a rainforest area.)

Animals tend to produce dung which make flies happy as a food source.
They may be attracted to your breath.
Industrial mosquito killing machines burn propane to produce hot CO2 and water vapor as a lure.
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
Does anyone out there on the decks carry an Epipen? I've just been prescribed one as a precaution when on the allotments following a reaction to a bee sting, and I'd like to find a belt pouch or something similar to carry it in - as we have hives (scratch scratch) I will only really need it out there, so something I can pick up and pop on my belt would be ideal. Something that would also hold my knife would be ideal! Does anyone already use something that might fit the bill?

Many thanks,

AG

When I had the traditional epi-pen, I used a neoprene pencil case - narrow tube with a zipper. Now I carry Allerject and it is much simpler.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
If you have the sort of shop that has army surplus stuff, or camping stuff, try them. And I think I've seen things in garden centres for holding pruning knives that might answer.

[ 09. July 2014, 13:16: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I carry an epipen, but I have a gigantic handbag.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
What did we call the colour orange before the fruit orange was discovered?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
'Geoluhread' apparently - meaning yellow-red.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Perhaps 'flame'? I recall that Beatrice, in Dante, wore that color. Plus green and white.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spike:
What did we call the colour orange before the fruit orange was discovered?

Come to that, what did we call that beigy-green before we discovered avocados?
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Khaki? Sludge green? (I remember reading khaki in books but what we said was sludge-green.)
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
My point was rather that the colours exist, and are referred to (geoluhead/yellowred) until something comes along that so typifies the shade that it becomes the common referent. Hence orange, eggshell, chartreuse, avocado, ultramarine, cobalt, amber, slate, silver, gold, rose (and every other colour name which is also a thing).
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
Unless we called the fruit an orange cos we already had that word for the colour.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Actually, this whole question was thrashed out in Notes and Queries a while back.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
On a similar point, I've been wondering for some time: what did people call vegetables before the word came into common use?

"Vegetable" is an awkward, spiky kind of word that's often shortened to make it easier, small children struggle with the pronunciation as well as the concept, and it's one of those Latin-based words that sounds as if it was originally a scholarly term rather than what ordinary people would have called them.

It may be that they were just referred to as "crops", or by their individual names like "turnips" and "onions", as in previous centuries the range available wasn't that great and people didn't much like eating them anyway, but it would be interesting to know.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
At Kentwell our pottage is often 'roots and worts', that is, onions, carrots and cabbage so worts is probably the carry all term for leafy and above ground veg.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Greens?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Ordinary people probably called them "Food".
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
My point was rather that the colours exist

Actually, that depends what you mean. Sure, *individual* colors exists (however you spell them!). Each thing that can be seen, with its current lighting doesn't indeed reflect a specific hue, saturation and value, and I'm happy to say that that exists. But, our color words never refer to just one specific color, they refer to some range. "Blue," for instance, commonly refers to a whole range of wavelengths of light between 450 and 490 nm.

Did this range 'exist'? Well, I guess that depends on your metaphysics. But, my point is that there's no a priori reason we need a word to identify things in between 450 and 490 nm, rather than one to identify things in between 475 and 515, say. In a sense, as color words are coined, colors are created, in the sense that regions of the color space are circumscribed and deemed worthy of having a name.

It's a bit like creating a new country. The land was there before, but the boundary (even if it's invisible) and the decision to have a specific name for what's inside that boundary is a new creation.

There are some very interesting comparative linguistic studies that look at how different unrelated language systems divide up the color space into different named regions. I forget the details, but there do seem to be some things that are genuinely cross-cultural and some that are very variable, in terms of where it's seen worth making what distinctions.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I'm not unaware of that, Hart. There was a BBC Horizon on, I think, the Himba of southern Africa who divide up colours completely differently.

Different times and cultures live in different colour worlds. Preindustrial (no aniline dyes) peasant living in Northern Europe (no tropical fruit/flowers) could well inhabit a more muted palette - lot more greens, browns, russets and pastels - than we do.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
And more fugitive. Unless the color was natural (the sheep has black wool, etc.) any color you applied tended to fade out, wash out, or change fairly rapidly. In this movies and TV are highly deceptive; there was a ferocious appetite for bright colors because they were so rare, hard to achieve, and fleeting. Only modern people, jaded by their chemically stable dyes and paints, can develop a taste for beige, taupe, and gray.
 
Posted by georgiaboy (# 11294) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
That flag commonly appears in pictures of Jesus risen from the dead and signifies the resurection, whether it appears in the hand of the human Jesus or with the lamb symbol. IMHO it has nothing to do with St. George--it is simply a reminder of the cross, and of victory.

Noticed this morning that the floor tiles in front of our high altar depict the Lamb of God with flag, and that the flag is attached to a cross (I think I've seen this elsewhere) but also the hooves of the lamb are pierced with the nail-marks. This latter I've never seen (or never noticed) before. Is this the standard iconography?
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I don't know about that, but it fits in nicely with the verse in Revelation where John sees "a Lamb, looking as if it had been slain..."
 
Posted by Just Me (# 14937) on :
 
quote:
On a similar point, I've been wondering for some time: what did people call vegetables before the word came into common use?
The glossary of the 'Lady Grace Mysteries' book I bought my 10 year old niece defines 'potherbs' as vegetables. I think I've seen that used for vegetables in historical novels I've read too.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
What do americans call cordials?

Jengie
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
This site (from Pennsylvania) gives a decent definition of the term "cordial" as used in the U.S.
 
Posted by Zacchaeus (# 14454) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hedgehog:
This site (from Pennsylvania) gives a decent definition of the term "cordial" as used in the U.S.

Cordials don't ahve to be alcoholic in theuk they can be fruity type drinks..
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zacchaeus:
Cordials don't ahve to be alcoholic in theuk they can be fruity type drinks..

Yes, I think we tend to refer to the non-alcoholic versions as just "fruit drinks."
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Iirc, the traditional Colonial fruit and herbal drinks eventually became the syrups used in sodas. You can see the connection in things like birch beer and Utah apple soda.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Thanks, we were translating a paper written in British English into American English and could not think what the term should be. We went with "fruit flavoured drink".

Jengie
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
Fruit punch?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Punch here is nearly always alcoholic so probably not a good term. Cordial here refers to a flavoured syrup that is diluted with water to drink. By analogy it also refers to the diluted form.

Jengie
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Cordials are also clear, unlike squashes, which are also diluted, and are derived from fruit. Unlike elderflower cordial.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Cordials are also clear, unlike squashes, which are also diluted, and are derived from fruit. Unlike elderflower cordial.

Cordials can be derived from fruit, they just tend to be thicker/more of a syrup and more often homemade. I do know people who use cordial and squash interchangeably too.
 
Posted by Pearl B4 Swine (# 11451) on :
 
Being one of those American English speakers, I had never seen the word squash be anything but the vegetable- yellow, crookneck, zucchini, and so forth. It still seems wrong for it to mean a pleasant fruity drink.

"Cordial" isn't used here very often (the word, I mean) except by ladies over 80.

That PA website says: A liqueur added to coffee makes a decadent after-dinner drink. I, naughtily, like it in my morning coffee. [Biased]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Or a somewhat madcap young peoples' fun-and-games evening (that will tell you something about both my age and my social background ...).

"Squash", that is, not "cordial".

[ 30. July 2014, 17:18: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
You know that colas, and other carbonated drinks of that type, are sold as syrups. The syrup comes in large containers and is combined with carbonated water at the drinks station, or when you buy it at the counter, so that the fizzy is good and fresh when you drink. So maybe the word is 'syrup.'
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I don't think I suggested that cordials were not derived from fruit - most are. It was the clarity I was stressing - squashes are cloudy, and less syrupy, as you say.
 
Posted by Sir Kevin (# 3492) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
...noticed this morning that the floor tiles in front of our high altar depict the Lamb of God with flag, and that the flag is attached to a cross

Before we got a life-size crucifix hanging from the ceiling a few years ago, there was a wooden sculpture of a robed Christ standing up in a medium-sized boat waving a rather large flag!

My parish is the local Roman Catholic cathedral and this sculpture was attached to the back wall, very high up. I like the crucifix better, though my wife who is Anglican is intimidated by it and thinks that there is too much blood!
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
A Facebook question.

A couple of weeks ago I got a notification on FB that X had "accepted my Friend request" and we were now FB friends. X is a young teen at church and I definitely hadn't sent him a Friend request. I was baffled, but I just defriended him immediately - I don't want FB friends under the age of 18.

Yesterday, I got a notification that Y had "accepted my Friend request." Y is an older lady at church - I am FB friends with her daughter. Again, I was sure that I had sent no such request. I spoke to her at church and she was equally baffled, because she said that she hadn't received a Friend request from me, and that even if she had, she probably wouldn't have accepted it.

How has this happened - I didn't send a request to Y, she didn't receive a request from me, and yet we ended up "Friends"?
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Go to your profile and click on "Friends". You may see some "Friend Requests" waiting there.

Some of them, I know that the person actually sent it. For others, I have been notified that my brother or another friend recommended that we should be friends.

Sometimes it says things to say you are now friends but if you check your actual list of friends, their name is not there. I think the notification is a little premature and they are hoping you will click to accept that person as a a friend.

You can also see "Friend Request Sent" and see which people have been sent a request. I had several people in there and I did not send requests.

Facebook is sometimes very mysterious!
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
So a third party can send friend requests? Because I have been mightily puzzled by receiving a friend request from the head of the company that fired me.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Help!

I hve spilled tee on my keybord nd the 'ehy' doesn't work eny more - is there enything I cn do??

[Confused]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If you only just did this, it could be that when it dries out, the key might work again. I assume you've dried it out as thoroughly as possible and run a bit of kitchen towel under the key to remove as much liquid as you can?

Otherwise replacement (of keyboard) may be the answer.
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
other that the posh perfume/fragrance versions you see at Christmas (like CK one, or Hilfiger etc), does anyone (UK) know of a deodorant stick which is NOT an anti-perspirant ?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
If you have a quantity of white rice, try burying the entire device in it -- rice absorbs moisture.
Buy a can of canned air and blow it around the difficult key.
My husband the computer guy says that if you take sugar in your tea it may be too late. The sugar is bad for he contacts.
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Wet Kipper:
other that the posh perfume/fragrance versions you see at Christmas (like CK one, or Hilfiger etc), does anyone (UK) know of a deodorant stick which is NOT an anti-perspirant ?

From the first page of the Walmart website...
Dove Men+Care Clean Comfort Deodorant
Speed Stick Active Fresh Deodorant
Speed Stick Ocean Surf Deodorant
Tom`s of Maine makes several
Old Spice makes several

And there were pages and pages on that site so it might be worth a look. Personally, I only use scent-free and fairly natural products so just looking at these was close to setting me off but I was curious. [Smile]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Wet Kipper

You mean like this?

Jengie
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I am horrifically allergic to Lush deodorant, including all the ones they say are hypoallergenic, even worse than I'm allergic to the normal antiperspirant deodorants. One I've found I can use is the salt crystal deodorants, and there are a couple of others I can use with care.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
I am horrifically allergic to Lush deodorant, including all the ones they say are hypoallergenic, even worse than I'm allergic to the normal antiperspirant deodorants. One I've found I can use is the salt crystal deodorants, and there are a couple of others I can use with care.

Have you tried the Body Shop's aloe deodorant? It's with the aloe skincare range. Also, Dr Organic (available in Holland & Barrett) is a nice brand and does several deodorants.

Wonder why you have a reaction to all the Lush deodorant as the dry ones are just bicarb, clay and essential oils - I wonder if it's an essential oil you're allergic to.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
In colonial days, there were shrubs... fruit drinks with vinegar added. There were also rickeys which were usually alcoholic but also survived in New England as a soda fountain drink; I remember fondly the cherry lime rickey which was made with s small lime, cherry (or raspberry) syrup and soda water.

Fruit punch could mean alcoholic or non-alcoholic and there were the citrus drinks, orangeade, lemonade. limeade and grapeade which are juice, sugar and water. And there are ciders which since prohibition are most commonly non-alcoholic.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Not over here, ciders aren't. And some are very powerful indeed. Tread warily should you visit. (There used to be brands called Cydrax and Peardrax, which were non-alcoholic, but I haven't seen them for ages.)
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
The US Food and Drug Administration sets definitions for words describing food. Legally, "cider" refers to fluid extracted by pressing and "juice" to fluid extracted by the application of heat.

It isn't uncommon to see "apple juice" and "apple cider" side-by-side on the shelf in nearly identical jugs, neither of which is alcoholic.

Cider that has fermented is called "hard cider". It is regaining popularity, with more small orchards making hand-crafted varieties. But by volume sold, most cider is non-alcoholic.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Penny S:
Not over here, ciders aren't. And some are very powerful indeed. Tread warily should you visit. (There used to be brands called Cydrax and Peardrax, which were non-alcoholic, but I haven't seen them for ages.)

Apparently Trinidad & Tobago is the place to get them
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
But please somebody tell me that this is a spoof

[ 11. August 2014, 15:55: Message edited by: Albertus ]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Sadly not, Albertus: although it is officially 'unusual' the Jones Soda Company really do make a Bacon flavour fizzy drink.

They don't manufacture all of their most esoteric flavours all the time but their output of bizarre (or weirdly named) drinks is impressive - they used to do a juice called a Big Boob Betty [Confused]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Does anyone have the words to a Fisherfolk song - "I walk with you my children" - the chorus runs "And all creations waiting on tiptoe just to see, the sons of God come into their own". It might actually be called "On tiptoe"
 
Posted by Eutychus (# 3081) on :
 
It looks like at least some of them might be here.
 
Posted by Jonah the Whale (# 1244) on :
 
Page 42 of this document has all the words (including mottled sticklebacks and rainbows arching over smiling tearful eyes) and chords. The song is called "on tiptoe". I used to really like it when it was new.

JtW
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
I have a rather idle question that doesn't seem to lend itself to googling: how does one wear wellies? Just outdoors? If so, what does one wear when one goes indoors? Does one carry extra shoes in a tote? Go about in socks? Wear the wellies over street shoes and then take them off? [Confused]

I think it's easy to see I live in a much drier climate than many.
 
Posted by Eutychus (# 3081) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jonah the Whale:
this document

Wow, that's quite a find! How on earth did you dig that up??
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
My question of randomness is how did Donald Tusk the prime minister of Poland get his first name? As far as I know Donald is an Anglicisation of a Scottish Gaelic name and I've never come across another Pole called that.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
It's a while since I wore wellies, but as I recall they were not that comfortable. They ate your socks and made your feet sweat and chafed your calves. You wore them because outdoors was, as they say at home, clabber to the knee.

Maybe today there are comfy, stylish, well-fitting wellies, but I still think they're a thing you change out of directly you get anywhere dry.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
I only wear wellies if I'm gardening, or doing something that involves mud. I don't think I've ever gone to someone else's home wearing wellies. I put them on and take them off at the back door step.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lyda*Rose:
I have a rather idle question that doesn't seem to lend itself to googling: how does one wear wellies? Just outdoors? If so, what does one wear when one goes indoors? Does one carry extra shoes in a tote? Go about in socks? Wear the wellies over street shoes and then take them off? [Confused]

Outdoors only. They're intended for wet or muddy conditions, and the soles are patterned for extra grip in these conditions. This can often mean that when you get to your car or home, the boots have acquired a thick layer of mud that needs to be scraped off before you can get in. It's not advisable to drive in them and they aren't worn indoors, especially if you've been near livestock and manure.

They will probably be brought along in a carrier bag of some description, changed into, and then changed back out of after use.

You do need thick socks to wear inside to stop rubbing, though they're usually roomy enough to tuck your trouser legs into - which you do need to do if in wet/muddy surroundings.

You can get fashionable ones and there is a range of "ladies" ones which have colours, designs, floral patterns, etc etc but nobody who actually uses wellingtons on a regular basis for garden, allotment, muddy venues, farm work, etc, would be likely to buy them. Plain green, navy blue or black are what you'll mostly see on sale.

They are good in snow if you can get ones with the right kind of soles and also some really thick socks. The downside is they aren't insulated, they can rub the back of your legs and cause blisters if you don't cushion the impact, but apart from that, they're very useful.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Sadly not, Albertus: although it is officially 'unusual' the Jones Soda Company really do make a Bacon flavour fizzy drink.

They don't manufacture all of their most esoteric flavours all the time but their output of bizarre (or weirdly named) drinks is impressive - they used to do a juice called a Big Boob Betty [Confused]

I shudder to think what that's about, although I fear I have an idea.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
re Wellies

It can be trying going in to make drinks, answer calls, etc, when in wellies.

What you need are things called Sloppas - a stupidly simple but effective felt overshoe you can slide your booted feet into. Available online.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
chive: My question of randomness is how did Donald Tusk the prime minister of Poland get his first name? As far as I know Donald is an Anglicisation of a Scottish Gaelic name and I've never come across another Pole called that.
He was named after his father, who was born in 1930. So the question would be: how did his father get this name?
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
chive: My question of randomness is how did Donald Tusk the prime minister of Poland get his first name? As far as I know Donald is an Anglicisation of a Scottish Gaelic name and I've never come across another Pole called that.
I've found the answer here: his grandmother Juliana spent some time in England in her youth, and became enamoured with a Lord called Donald. She gave her son this name, who passed it on to his son who is now the PM. Of course, the children at school quickly nicknamed him 'Donald Duck'.
 
Posted by chive (# 208) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
quote:
chive: My question of randomness is how did Donald Tusk the prime minister of Poland get his first name? As far as I know Donald is an Anglicisation of a Scottish Gaelic name and I've never come across another Pole called that.
I've found the answer here: his grandmother Juliana spent some time in England in her youth, and became enamoured with a Lord called Donald. She gave her son this name, who passed it on to his son who is now the PM. Of course, the children at school quickly nicknamed him 'Donald Duck'.
Thankyou. It was really frustrating me not knowing (for no reason at all)
[Overused]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
re Wellies

It can be trying going in to make drinks, answer calls, etc, when in wellies.

What you need are things called Sloppas - a stupidly simple but effective felt overshoe you can slide your booted feet into. Available online.

Or a couple of the better sort of carrier bags. Because of the mud. It is also halpful to have a device to remove them. Thus
One wedges one foot in the fork, and presses the other foot on the ribbed part, thus enabling the foot to be easily pulled out of the wedged boot. This has, of course, put mud on the ribbed part, so taking the second boot off requires some ingenuity, in order not to get one's socked foot muddy. (I have a pair of croc type mules nearby for non wellie gardening which enable this.)
 
Posted by Lyda*Rose (# 4544) on :
 
Thanks, all, for the info. [Smile]

I think that I've seen too many ads for the bright, decorative wellies. The ads make them look like fashion statements.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
The colourful wellies are for festival going, in mud. The way many people dress (for example for Glastonbury) is in shorts and wellies. I have seen people (young girls, mainly) wandering round in that outfit at other times too, but it usually means a festival of some sort or another, especially if they are in groups. And then you see them on trains, tubes and inside generally.
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:
Does anyone have the words to a Fisherfolk song - "I walk with you my children" - the chorus runs "And all creations waiting on tiptoe just to see, the sons of God come into their own". It might actually be called "On tiptoe"

Maggie Durran who,wrote that was a curate at my church and is now a regular columnist on the Church Times
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Current wellie fashions (which change every year for festival season) are mostly ankle-length ones, especially ones that look like Dr Martens or ones that look like chelsea boots. Source, me looking for new wellies for Greenbelt (out of necessity not fashion!).
 
Posted by Jane R (# 331) on :
 
CK:
quote:
The colourful wellies are for festival going, in mud.
I've seen women wearing them to walk the family dog. Can't understand it myself; wellies are not that comfortable to walk long distances in. Proper walking boots are better.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
If you want warm wellies go to equestrian websites and get a pair or neoprene (or neoprene lined) boots.

The boot-removing device (a bootjack) - buy a robust type you can keep outside by the door in all weathers so boots off and stockinged feet into the house. A handy plastic bootjack lives in the car October-March.
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
Sandemaniac's current wellies have steel toe-caps (and I think plates in the soles too). Very good at stopping him putting another fork through the toe whilst gardening, but apparently means that walking to the allotment is like wearing diving boots. Mind you, they were bought from a farm supply firm, so are Proper Wellies.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
The colourful wellies are for festival going, in mud. ....

Or to church, in the rain. When it gets madly rainy here, the easiest footwear for me is wellies, but for church I won't wear my green allotment ones and instead have "posh" ones for street wear.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
This area is farming country, so there are a lot of waterproof boots about in the towns. The fancy ones are on sale, but I've never seen anybody here actually wearing them.

I got a pair of green half-wellingtons at Malvern one year - they had a zip and came up to just above the ankle. Best soles I've ever had on a boot, they gave a good grip on snow and ice as well as mud. Unfortunately the upper part of the boots split and perished but while they lasted they were great. And a lot easier to chuck into a bag and cart about.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jane R:
CK:
quote:
The colourful wellies are for festival going, in mud.
I've seen women wearing them to walk the family dog. Can't understand it myself; wellies are not that comfortable to walk long distances in. Proper walking boots are better.
Yes that is a puzzler - you can get waterproof walking boots (and gaiters/waterproof trousers), and they are much comfier than wellies and support the ankle properly.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
This area is farming country, so there are a lot of waterproof boots about in the towns. The fancy ones are on sale, but I've never seen anybody here actually wearing them.

I got a pair of green half-wellingtons at Malvern one year - they had a zip and came up to just above the ankle. Best soles I've ever had on a boot, they gave a good grip on snow and ice as well as mud. Unfortunately the upper part of the boots split and perished but while they lasted they were great. And a lot easier to chuck into a bag and cart about.

Dr Martens now make wellies - ordinary Dr Martens are great as it is on ice, but now you can get waterproof ones they'll be ideal for winter.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
... but very expensive. I'll stick with the boots I got at B&Q.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I read a story about a man who was struck by an electrical discharge from a power line while in his field with a long pole (for some agricultural reason). At the hospital, he was surprised when the doctor told him that he had been wearing green wellies, which he had, and asked how on earth he knew. "Because," said the doctor, "if they were black, you would be dead."

At the time I saw that, only the expensive boots were green - now there are green ones which may not be so insulating.
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
The little frog eyes look better on green wellies than black ones too [Big Grin]

(Beware of autocorrect when typing wellies....)
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
thanks for the Deodorant tips, we don't have Wal-Mart here, and I can't cope longer than 10 seconds in a Lush Shop.
I did find Old Spice stick deo on the Boots website, but am not quite ready to smell like my Dad yet - even if I am probably older than he was when I first remember him using it, if you see what I mean.
 
Posted by Horseman Bree (# 5290) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by chive:
My question of randomness is how did Donald Tusk the prime minister of Poland get his first name? As far as I know Donald is an Anglicisation of a Scottish Gaelic name and I've never come across another Pole called that.

My mother's mother came from an estate in what is now Poland, but was then part of West Prussia. Some of her cousins were descendants of a Scottish trader who had come on business, but who married a local girl and settled on another estate near by. His family name was Gordon, and the Polish family eventually became von Gordon. Some of the Scottish names may have come through that sort of connection, since, at least until the 1930's, there was an ongoing trade to the UK from that part of Poland.

Nice theory anyway: looking up the family tree, I don't see any particularly Scottish names in that line. But there were similar intermarryings.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I don't really expect a solution to this, but I thought I'd try.

My church is getting ready for a yard sale, with all the proceeds earmarked for local needs. I always help in the preparations. Since I am allergic to dust and mildew, I stay in the kitchen polishing silver and washing whatever needs it.

My problem is severely tarnished and worn silverplate. I spent five minutes vigorously rubbing a silver bowl this morning. I managed to polish less than one-thirtieth of the bowl, and what I polished didn't look all that good. I wasn't about to spend more time and energy on it. Is there any way to improve the appearance of something like that without spending inordinate amounts of time and energy? Someone suggested spraying it with kitchen cleaner and letting it sit for awhile, but that didn't work.

Moo
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
If you did that using ordinary silver polish (I'm sure you did!) then I'm afraid that the silver has simply worn off in the non-polished areas--in other words, you're down to the base metal. [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I know I'm down to the base metal in spots. The thing is that using lots of polish and rubbing hard, I did get down to the silver that's left. I was wondering if there is a shortcut for this.

Moo
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I came across this method which seems simple enough. I wonder if it would work on bronze?
 
Posted by ChastMastr (# 716) on :
 
Can't you just rub toothpaste on it and then rinse it off? Silver, I mean. Or will that hurt it over time?
 
Posted by Jonah the Whale (# 1244) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Eutychus:
quote:
Originally posted by Jonah the Whale:
this document

Wow, that's quite a find! How on earth did you dig that up??
I googled a phrase from one of the verses. I only got a couple of hits so it seems like it must be pretty obscure.
 
Posted by ChastMastr (# 716) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jonah the Whale:
quote:
Originally posted by Eutychus:
quote:
Originally posted by Jonah the Whale:
this document

Wow, that's quite a find! How on earth did you dig that up??
I googled a phrase from one of the verses. I only got a couple of hits so it seems like it must be pretty obscure.
... "Dropkick me Jesus"??

Good Lord.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I came across this method which seems simple enough. I wonder if it would work on bronze?

I wouldn't do that on bronze. Bronze is an alloy of copper and usually tin, but it can be different metals, including arsenic. The two different metals are going to react differently in an electrolyte situation, before I bother to look up the electrolyte tables / reactivity tables and work out which metals you should use to make this work. And before you start heating up something that may contain arsenic.
 
Posted by Morgan (# 15372) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
My problem is severely tarnished and worn silverplate.

Our church has a shop where we sell recycled goods. We try to present them at a standard of as clean and sparkling and attractive as possible. For silver of this quality (severely tarnished and worn) the best result comes from a preliminary clean with Gumption followed by a finishing polish with silver polish. This is quick and cheap as most of the work is done with the Gumption. It would even pass to sell at this standard but we like to give it the extra shine. If Gumption is not available elsewhere, it is a mildly abrasive paste used for cleaning stubborn marks on virtually anything in the kitchen or bathroom. You may have a similar local product.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Any heavily tarnished silver - proper 925 sterling or plate - works by soaking in biological washing powder for 24 hours then gentle handwash.

If its proper silver DON'T rub - silver loses its value if the hallmarks can't be read.
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
I have a problem with my shower. The weird thing is, its intermittent. Shower is over bath, pretty much brand new (well we had it installed with the new bathroom just months ago), and is a standard type fed from the domestic hot and cold water (ie not an electric shower, and not a power assisted shower).

I turn the control lever to about halfway round (which is the place for ideal temperature) and water starts to emerge. But then, quite often (but not every time) it just stops. Until this morning I have managed to coax it back into life by adjusting the lever back and forth a bit. But today no, wouldn't produce a drop, however far I turned it. I gave up. Half an hour later I have just tried it again, and it works. What is going on?

My housemates(who are away at the moment) never seem to have this problem with it. The only difference between our shower using habits that we have noted when we have discussed this before, is that I tend to remove the shower head from its hook on the wall initially, to run the water with it in a handheld position, waiting for the right temperature (as I don't like standing under a shower of cold water, and frankly I can't imagine why anyone else would want to do this, when it can be hand held and directed away from the body during this phase). The others don't do this, and claim to have never had the problem.

Any ideas?
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
That does sound odd. It could be some kind of airlock, brought on by moving the hose. What we do is leave the shower on its hook, switch it on tentatively, beat a rapid retreat (and shut the shower cubicle door), going back 30 secs. later when we know it's hot.

Another thought: have you ever taken off the shower head and descaled it? We have to do that every month or two. You can buy fancy descaling stuff, but we just put the head in a bowl of cheap vinegar overnight (you don't need to immerse the whole head, indeed that might go for the chrome finish: just make sure the holes are covered). You will know it needs descaling if (a) you can see the scale (b) if some of the holes aren't emitting water or (c) if the general flow seems to be less powerful than it used to be.

Now: can anyone tell me how to descale a kitchen mixer tap?

[ 18. August 2014, 08:59: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Gracious rebel (# 3523) on :
 
Thanks for the tip, you might be right about the airlock. Weird though.

<Complete aside to BT - look at our post counts, you have just overtaken me, but have been onboard for just half the time I have ... now what were we saying yesterday about addiction?! [Devil] [Biased] >

[ 18. August 2014, 09:13: Message edited by: Gracious rebel ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
Complete aside to BT - look at our post counts, you have just overtaken me, but have been onboard for just half the time I have ... now what were we saying yesterday about addiction?! [Devil] [Biased] >

Aaargh ... and whose fault is that????! The dangers of largely working from home! [Cool]

[ 18. August 2014, 10:00: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Can anyone suggest a way of getting water scale marks off a plastic shower screen? I've tried Windolene and a good scrubbing with Cif but nothing seems to shift them.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Sparrow:

What you need is a non-scratch scourer and either vinegar and warm water or lemon juice and water.

Spray on the solution of your choice from the top and follow it down, as it were, with the scourer. Rinse off and dry at once with either a soft cloth or kitchen paper.

If that doesn't work then try using descaler but water it down.

Once you have the screen cleared then make sure every family member uses a squeegee after showering and treat as for limescale roughly every two weeks.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Rub undiluted shampoo on then rinse off.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
What are beets (in an American list of foods)? We have silverbeet (a dark green leafy vegetable with a white spine running down the middle - sort of like a large feather shape)and beetroot - a dark red roundish root vegetable. But when I just see the word "beets" I'm not sure what they are.

Can anyone translate please?

Huia
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
What are beets (in an American list of foods)? We have silverbeet (a dark green leafy vegetable with a white spine running down the middle - sort of like a large feather shape)and beetroot - a dark red roundish root vegetable. But when I just see the word "beets" I'm not sure what they are.

Can anyone translate please?

Huia

Beets are beetroot, the dark red roundish root vegetable.
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Huia:
What are beets (in an American list of foods)? We have silverbeet (a dark green leafy vegetable with a white spine running down the middle - sort of like a large feather shape)and beetroot - a dark red roundish root vegetable. But when I just see the word "beets" I'm not sure what they are.

Can anyone translate please?

Huia

'Beets' are beetroot. Silverbeet is known as swiss chard (or sometimes just chard) in British English, not sure about US English.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Silverbeet is known as swiss chard (or sometimes just chard) in British English, not sure about US English.

Same in US English. It seems to be more popular in the Midwest than anywhere else I've previously lived, including England. I have to admit to not being a fan.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Silverbeet is known as swiss chard (or sometimes just chard) in British English, not sure about US English.

Same in US English. It seems to be more popular in the Midwest than anywhere else I've previously lived, including England. I have to admit to not being a fan.
We find that with garlic, chilli and ginger it makes a decent stir fry. Mind you, the same effect can probably be obtained with 120gm pastel paper.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Huia

Just to confuse matters more there is also sugar beet.

Jengie
 
Posted by no prophet (# 15560) on :
 
Swiss chard (the leaves) and beet or beetroot, are the same plant. Cultivars (varieties) for the root or the leaves have been created by traditional breeding methods.

Same holds true for broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage.

On the plant angle, this pleased me to read: http://chemse.oxfordjournals.org/content/37/9/869 , because it means that people may begin to appreciate the experience of this plant for some of us, which is far beyond any other foul taste I've ever experienced.

quote:
New associations were detected between cilantro (coriander) and variants in three genes (TRPA1, GNAT3, and TAS2R50) [that make it taste awful for some people].
I cannot abide the least bit of cilantro leaves, and only very very small amounts of coriander (the seeds). I suspect I must have all 3 variants, because it tastes just horrible, worse than any other flavour I have ever experienced. They often say it is like soap, but for me, it also has a sewage-like odour combining with the soap.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
no prophet: I cannot abide the least bit of cilantro leaves
Don't go to North-East Brazil. It's in everything.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
About that shower problem. Some showerheads have a thermal cut off valve built in or screwed the shower head where it's normally screwed into the shower pipe. They shut off if the water is too hot to prevent scalding the skin. This can happen if the water heater is delivering hot water at too high a temperature and it is not being mixed with enough cold water. You may be doing something that temporarily reduces cold water supply so the valve trips in such as flushing the toilet or having a dishwasher running.

The long term fix is usually to turn down the temperature on the hot water heater so it's not above a safe temperature. The thermal cutoff may also be defective and need replacement.
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
quote:
Originally posted by Jade Constable:
Silverbeet is known as swiss chard (or sometimes just chard) in British English, not sure about US English.

Same in US English. It seems to be more popular in the Midwest than anywhere else I've previously lived, including England. I have to admit to not being a fan.
We find that with garlic, chilli and ginger it makes a decent stir fry. Mind you, the same effect can probably be obtained with 120gm pastel paper.
Two good things to be said for swiss chard: (i) it looks pretty in the garden (if you like bright colours) (ii) it is extremely easy to grow and just keeps on cropping into winter. Doesn't taste of much (I prefer the leaves to the stalks on the whole) but it does give you fresh green veg when other things are running out.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
Swiss chard also works as a green to toss into a cup or bowl of broth to make you feel the meat or dumplings aren't too unhealthy. That would be hard to do with pastel paper.
 
Posted by Pearl B4 Swine (# 11451) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by no prophet:
Swiss chard (the leaves) and beet or beetroot, are the same plant. Cultivars (varieties) for the root or the leaves have been created by traditional breeding methods.
<snip snip>
...[cilantro] it tastes just horrible, worse than any other flavour I have ever experienced. They often say it is like soap, but for me, it also has a sewage-like odour combining with the soap.

About beets: the only kind I've ever grown or seen in MD or PA is the dark-reddish purple globe shape kind, which is nothing like those British beet-root things. And our beets, though related to chard, are far from being similar. Young leaves of beets are delicious. Beets need to be thinned, so the ones that are pulled up are not wasted.

As for cilantro, it disgusts me. It smells, and therefore tastes like, cat pee. I once grabbed a bunch of cilantro by mistake, thinking I had gotten flat leaf Italian parsley. What a horrible mistake. [Razz]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Is it just me or does the coriander leaf/cilantro in Britain differ from that in the US and Canada?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I am here in the UK, fresh from the US. So far as I can tell there is no difference.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
To me coriander has no flavour at all, so it makes no difference if it is the UK, USA or missing from the recipe.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
How are the "the dark-reddish purple globe shape kind" of beets nothing like the British beetroot things? British beetroot

[ 24. August 2014, 10:04: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
I like coriander!
 
Posted by Galloping Granny (# 13814) on :
 
Re: silver beet. My aunt (b.1900) reported that in her early nursing days the white stalks were cooked and served in a sauce and the green part of the leaves thrown away.
There is a red stalked variety grown as a decorative plant in public gardens, though it's the same as the white stalked sort as far as eating goes.

GG
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
I like coriander!

Ah, but you're in Brazil. I suspect (correct me on this) that coriander was brought to Brazil by the Portuguese, from India. The coriander used by the British is, AFAIK, also from India. hence the coriander in Brazil may not be the same as that in North America.

Brenda Clough: maybe this is one of those things that tastes the same if you like it, but different if you don't.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Sioni Sais: I suspect (correct me on this) that coriander was brought to Brazil by the Portuguese, from India.
No need to correct you here, I think you're spot on.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
The coriander used by the British is, AFAIK, also from India.

Actually, if you buy fresh coriander in the supermarket it can come from a variety of different countries.

It's probably my favourite herb. Too much of it and it can be revolting - I know what people mean about the soapiness and it's not particularly nice eaten on its own - but if it's used sparingly as a garnish it can work very well. A little in a toasted garlic chicken sandwich, together with some lemon and maybe a bit of mayonnaise, makes a very fine sandwich. A pinch as a garnish on some curries or as a minor ingredient in herb salads is good too. As with many strong flavours, best kept to a minimum.
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
It's a must in guacamole and salad/salsas - it was born to go with lime juice and chilli.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
And it's perfect (IMHO) on black bean soup!

There is your hostly hat trick!
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
jedijudy: And it's perfect (IMHO) on black bean soup!
Have you been in Brazil perhaps? [Smile]
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Not yet! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Am I right in thinking that whether or not fresh coriander/cilantro tastes like soap is a genetic thing, rather like being able to roll one's tongue?

For myself, I can take it or leave it, but I love the flavour of coriander seeds, especially with sautéed cauliflower or in carrot and tomato soup.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
piglet: Am I right in thinking that whether or not fresh coriander/cilantro tastes like soap is a genetic thing, rather like being able to roll one's tongue?
This appears to be the case.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
For myself, I can take it or leave it, but I love the flavour of coriander seeds, especially with sautéed cauliflower or in carrot and tomato soup.

I have bread recipe with coriander seeds and cooked carrot in it. I usually use pumpkin. It's great and keeps moist.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Yes, the genetic thing is true. I used it once in a short story, which was published in Christianity Today.
 
Posted by cattyish (# 7829) on :
 
Small Parish Kirk is considering whether to buy a data projector. If it's to be used for mainly youth film clips/ Alpha videos but also sometimes in evening services then how much should we spend, and any suggestions for good options?

Cattyish, non-technical for the most part.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
I don't have any particular suggestions, but I do know that in your budgeting you need to both factor in the initial outlay (possibly a capital expense, depending on how you define those) and also the ongoing cost of replacing the bulbs, which can be pretty expensive.
 
Posted by itsarumdo (# 18174) on :
 
Why not contact a supplier and ask what typo of projector they recommend for that task - that will at least give you a price range - Video projectors come in at anything from £120 up to maybe £5000 or more, and in my experience ( [Roll Eyes] ) if you get the wrong one by trying to buy on too small a budget, it's money well wasted.
 
Posted by TonyK (# 35) on :
 
cattyish

Enter 'projector for church' into Google - plenty of advice and offers!
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
My mum had to buy a new projector recently as the existing one didn't have the correct connectors for the new laptop, and it would have involved a lot of connecting different cables to get it to work. It didn't have HDMI which the new laptop needed.
The old projector type is still being sold. So basically see what your PC needs to connect, and if there is any chance it might be connectors to different PCs get one with lots of connector options.
(Trying asking in eg PC world)
 
Posted by no prophet (# 15560) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
It's probably my favourite herb. Too much of it and it can be revolting - I know what people mean about the soapiness and it's not particularly nice eaten on its own - but if it's used sparingly as a garnish it can work very well.

This states a preference, and is not at all the same as those of us who apparently have the genetics to have it taste really, really, really awful. Soapiness does not begin to describe the revolting taste. I mentioned sewage and someone else cat pee. Because of my experience with it, I have been keen to talk with others who respond similarly. The level of revulsion is beyond any other taste for those who are cursed with the genes it seems. It is emotional because of intense foulness of it. There must be a special area of the brain which stores the memory of something so obnoxious. I does not harm our gut like gluten does to those with Coeliac Disease, but is to be avoided as stringently.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Please get one using led technology. The cheap ones are likely to be incandescent bulb ones. The big problem is that you will have to change the bulb far more often the led technology ones (I believe that led bulbs last longer than other parts of the projector). The problem is only partially the cost involved, it is also that Led ones are the newer machines and I can see with church use that you might end up with a perfectly good machine that you cannot get bulbs for.

Jengie
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Question for home improvement geeks:

(Is there a dedicated thread on this, like for gardening or cooking? If yes, please feel free to transfer. Thanks!)

I've got lots of connected bookshelves in one room, which are all IKEA Ivar of the 30cm depth, and mostly the 226cm height. They're made from solid pine.

I'm planning to replace the remaining 176cm-high ones with 226cm ones (which will be fixed to the wall!). To save cash, I've got myself several 2nd hand side units, which leads me to ask for Shipmatian advice on the following:

Thank you very much for your thoughts!
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
If they are solid wood the answer is probably yes.
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
Have you considered putting storage underneath the shelving instead?
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
I have some Ivar shelves that are ten or 15 years old. The wood does get a bit harder,making drilling fun but I suspect they're good for a century. The only problem is some shelving will warp under long time heavy load. If it does, then it won't hold heavy loads as well. Attaching them to the wall or using a diagonal brace is a good idea.

I'd be a bit more nervous about stacking shelves for several reasons. One is, can your floors hold the weight. The second is attaching the butt joints together with screws seems a recipe for the wood splitting. I'd at least try using piece on each of the verticals that spans the gap by a bit and then put screws in the side of both pieces. You certainly want to fasten it all to the wall and probably use diagonal braces on both sections so they don't diagonalize in a bad way.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Never had Ivar shelves. But given the thickness and size, they should handle quite a bit of weight. Warping, to an extent, should have little effect on their load bearing capability. I would have much less confidence in the plastic brackets that are attached to the ends.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
I've had some of my Ivar for about 20 years and the only ones that have warped have been the ones in the conservatory in sunlight, though these do also carry considerable weight.
My Ivar are mostly the wider ones. I've used them in my fabric store room, floor to ceiling, for about 7 years with no problems, holding heavy bolts of fabric. I use them in the conservatory to hold Really Useful boxes full of heavy craft stuff and the children's room as desk and shelving. We've used smaller shelves above larger too. We do have some shelves that have be joined together but not quite as high as you are suggesting. No problems though.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by lilBuddha:
Never had Ivar shelves. But given the thickness and size, they should handle quite a bit of weight. Warping, to an extent, should have little effect on their load bearing capability. I would have much less confidence in the plastic brackets that are attached to the ends.

I've not seen Ivar recently, the units may have plastic brackets now. But some which we have (15 years old) have only metal pins and brackets.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Mine have been going for about 25 years with no problems afaik.

Jengie
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
IME flat pack furniture usually builds up OK and can give years of faithful service UNTIL you decide to move it. With the best will in the world, the joints aren't often strong and secure enough, and it's all too easy for them to get loose or break entirely. They start as a kit of parts and all too easily can revert to that state.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
To be fair, IKEA furniture is often made of bonded wood particles, where the shelf being spoken of here is solid wood.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
Aha! Manifold manifestations of manly and womanly insights! Thank you! [Yipee] [Overused]

So, while it may not necessarily be a good idea to top up one shelf with another - especially as the lower side units would have to carry even more bookian weight then -, the age of the shelves doesn't seem to play a big role. That's good to know.

I agree that the new grey plastic shelf brackets could be the first to go eventually, but so far they seem ok. I've got a mixture of the old metal and the new plastic ones. (BTW: I seem to remember a brandnew IKEA policy that they now replace or reimburse EVERYTHING you take back!!)

Re diagonal x-braces: I'm using them on every other shelf (they're all with 83x30cm boards) - the end shelves are both fixed to corner shelves, and these to a short 42cm shelf each, which makes a U-shape, and the whole thing amazingly stable. Each of the shelves has 7 or 8 boards filled with books, while the corner sets and the 42cm ones have 5 or 6 boards.

The new set of 226cm ones goes on the other wall though.

Re the weight they can support: I've just noticed IKEA actually say this on the site: the Ivar 83x30cm board can carry max. 35kg, the 42cm ones 18kg and the corner boards 30kg each. - But perhaps I should really go and weigh the books on each shelf to get an overall impression!! Thanks for the hints re the floor. I'll bear that in mind.

Mertide: saw that, but I just can't be bothered to disassemble the whole bleedin' lot again now! [Big Grin]

Sioni and lilBuddah: agreed. I've got several of the old Hopen wardrobes (238cm tall or similar - great for my rooms). All of them are 2nd hand, and I've had to purchase several of them in order to replace the bits and pieces that tend to come off when moving! That is a bit of a disaster story, but they're on the market quite cheap now, so it doesn't really matter.

* * * * *

Again - a great thank you to all! Long live our shelves, and long live the Ship! [Smile]
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
A small etiquette question.

Once a girlfriend broke up with me, and one of the reasons she stated for this is that sometimes when we ate together at a restaurant, the waiter would bring my plate first before hers. She interpreted this as some kind of sexist gesture from the waiter, and I should have done something.

I'm not sure what reaction she expected from me. Obviously, whenever my plate came first, I would wait with eating until hers arrived too. That goes without question. But she seems to have expected something more from me. Should I have protested with the waiter? Refused my plate?

My question is: is there some kind of etiquette rule that a waiter should bring a woman's plate first? And if this is so, what should a man do if this doesn't happen?
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I have seen this, but only in the most posh and fancy restaurants. In more casual places they're more careless.
IMO (as a female) your ex was overly picky. And that says to me that this was just an aegis, an excuse to dump you. She had some other issue.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
I'm not couth but I think that etiquette says that the host is served first, so they can approve the food being served the guest. This frequently happens with wine. However your ex may have been objecting to the assumption that you were paying for her dinner.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
Unless you are going to extremely posh places, the waiter wasn't even thinking about whose food to put down first. He/she was thinking about how to manage the scramble without a) dropping anything, b) having the food get cold, bb) putting the food in front of the wrong person, c) getting yelled at by you, her, or the manager, and d) handling the next challenge to come along--like in 30 seconds or so. Gender doesn't make it within a mile of those preoccupations.

As for you, you were being a decent human being and not contributing to the waiter's load. Your ex is WAY too self-absorbed. She'd do well to take a stint in some service industry--say, six months as a waitress or a retail clerk.

[ 01. September 2014, 21:05: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
Always? In every restaurant? My perception is that restaurant kitchens try to get all the orders from one table out together, and whose plate gets plonked down first is a matter of chance, and what the waiter grabbed first.

If she was perceiving the oppression of the patriarchy in the fact that she was being served her Entrecôte De Boeuf Sauce Poivre and chips 30 seconds later than you, then it strikes me she does not have enough to worry about in life.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
Thanks for your answers. That's what I thought, more or less.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
Once a girlfriend broke up with me, and one of the reasons she stated for this is that sometimes when we ate together at a restaurant, the waiter would bring my plate first before hers.

In all the years I’ve been eating out it’s never occurred to me to notice this. The poor waiter is damned before he even starts in this case – he can’t lay down both plates simultaneously, he’s got to put one down first and it’s not even the same waiter doing it each time in the same place, surely.

That frame of mind is only a step away from "He’s getting served first because he’s a man" and "I’m getting served first because he’s sexist," where nobody can win. It would have been unreasonable to ask the waiter to comply with what your girlfriend wanted. Besides, if you had she’d only have found something else to be annoyed about. It sounds as if it would have come to a head sooner or later.
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
I stand corrected about the serving etiquette.

According to this posting on Serving Etiquette
quote:
When people are served, the tradition is to start with the guest of honor, followed by the women in the party, the men, the hostess, and finally the host. If the delineations between guests are not clear, servers start with the oldest woman at the table, and work their way down to the youngest man. The same order is followed when taking orders in a restaurant.

So apparently your ex was correct that etiquette was not being observed. Of course that seems rare at casual dining places today.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
In my experience, waiters frequently don’t know whose plate is whose anyway, either because they’ve forgotten or because one of their colleagues took the order. Generally they arrive with two plates, say “Who is the [plate in my right hand] for?” and put that one down first. There’s no patriarchal masterplan behind it.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
A related question - we invited a visiting Chinese colleague of my husband's to a family meal. I would normally serve guests first, then other adults, then children, then myself.

He was adamant that we should serve our children first. Is this how it's done in China?
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I've only eaten once in the company of a child in China - but that was in a restaurant where there are are a number of dishes put on the table and you help yourself.

This link is also about public banqueting, and stresses Elders First. Trouble is, because homes are small and restaurants plentiful, it's rare for visitors to be invited to a meal in a domestic setting. Nevertheless, I would have thought in every culture, Honoured Guest is trumps.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
We weren't sure if he was politely demurring, and we were supposed to politely insist, or not.

He was quite intrigued by our two, as he had rarely met sibling pairs.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
A related question - we invited a visiting Chinese colleague of my husband's to a family meal. I would normally serve guests first, then other adults, then children, then myself.

He was adamant that we should serve our children first. Is this how it's done in China?

However it is done in China, I think it's extremely rude for him to be a guest in your home and expect you to follow his rules from back home.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
We didn't think he was being rude, we just thought he was being polite in a way we didn't understand and weren't sure how to respond to.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
In a really 'posh' place the food will arrive at the same time, using however many waiters that requires. The only exception will be if a dish needs to be flambeed at the table.

In most restaurants if there are just two of you then you'll be served at the same time. Again, there is an exception and that is that one of you has ordered something - well-done meat perhaps - that takes longer to cook.

The vast majority of places will bring out the food when the chef calls 'service' and it may be that sometimes there is a delay between one dish and another. Its no big deal.

This woman didn't have a problem with the order of serving - she didn't have the balls to tell you the relationship was over for whatever (?) reason so picked this lame excuse.

Look upon it as a lucky escape.
 
Posted by Eloise (# 4292) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
We weren't sure if he was politely demurring, and we were supposed to politely insist...

This would be my guess. When I have been invited for a meal in China (whether in a home or in a restaurant) I was nearly always offered each dish first. He probably would have deferred to an elderly person if one had been present, but failing that children (especially if young) will do. I found in homes especially the child was usually encouraged to offer me food (and practice their English at the same time). I was often unsure how hard to push back to be properly polite - having children in the mix can mitigate the awkward a little, so perhaps that's what he was going for.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
We didn't think he was being rude, we just thought he was being polite in a way we didn't understand and weren't sure how to respond to.

He could have been attempting to adapt to what he thought might be your view of proper. Or it could be idiosyncratic.
We often read the negative in an unusual situation, good on you for not doing so.

[ 02. September 2014, 17:06: Message edited by: lilBuddha ]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
It could have been worse! We were invited to the home of a Muslim couple who were here on sabbatical. We might have been their first non-Muslim guests. In their culture it is polite to leave food uneaten on your plate to indicate that your hosts have provided generously, but we didn't know that and, as course after course appeared, attempted to eat everything that was placed in front of us.

I have never eaten so much. When we got home I looked at my toothbrush and realised that if anything else went into my mouth I was going to be very, very sick. It was 24 hours before I could face anything else except ice lollies.

Meanwhile they were probably equally dismayed as I'm sure we'd eaten them out of house and home.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
To muddy the waters a bit more--

In Vietnam (culturally close to China in many ways) children are often fed first, for several reasons: a) A general tenderness toward children, b) A desire to get them out of the way and occupied while the adults enjoy dinner, c) a belief that they can't handle waiting till others are served first (though I think this would apply mainly to kids under ten). So if I'm right, yes, he was attempting to be polite by insisting that you feed the kids first. I would probably have pushed back just a little ("No, no, they're fine, they can wait, you are our guest!") and then gracefully given in ("It's very kind of you") and allowed him to win the politeness battle and feel good. It's rather like the politeness battles when several people pile up at a door ("After you" "No, no, after YOU" and etc.). The wee bit of a fuss allows everyone to feel courteous, no matter who ends up going first in the end.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
When I was a girl, my entire extended family would go out to a Chinese restaurant. The adults would sit at one table (my mother has 4 sisters and a brother, plus everybody's spouse and the grandparents) and all eleven of us children would sit at another. Our food would always come first.
I learned that this was not because they were serving us more rapidly, to keep us quiet. It was because we were getting the fast, cheap and easy foods: pork buns, spring rolls, egg rolls, noodles. The really delicious and elaborate dishes, the whole fish steamed with ginger and scallions, the crispy duck -- all those dishes were going to the adult table.
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Zack Moir, the musician in these pictures -- what kind of saxophone is he playing? or is it a different kind in different pictures?
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Autenrieth Road: Zack Moir, the musician in these pictures -- what kind of saxophone is he playing? or is it a different kind in different pictures?
Tenor saxophone in all of them except this one, which is an alto saxophone.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
It could have been worse! We were invited to the home of a Muslim couple who were here on sabbatical. We might have been their first non-Muslim guests. In their culture it is polite to leave food uneaten on your plate to indicate that your hosts have provided generously, but we didn't know that and, as course after course appeared, attempted to eat everything that was placed in front of us.

I have never eaten so much. When we got home I looked at my toothbrush and realised that if anything else went into my mouth I was going to be very, very sick. It was 24 hours before I could face anything else except ice lollies.

Meanwhile they were probably equally dismayed as I'm sure we'd eaten them out of house and home.

It is my understanding that, in traditional Peruvian culture, it is a sign of impoliteness to your host unless you eat and drink yourself sick.

All those potatoes. Think of it.
[Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Thanks, LeRoc! And this one too: is this a tenor sax?

Zack again

They all look huge to me. A baritone sax must be monstrously large.

Yikes, yes, the bari sax is huge!

So I guess the Zack picture at the top of this post must be another tenor sax, am I right?

And this is cool, saxophone quartets, where I can compare the size side-by-side.

Thanks for your help. (Flutist and pianist, dated a sax player for several years but didn't examine the size of his, uh, instrument [Biased] ).

[ 05. September 2014, 00:38: Message edited by: Autenrieth Road ]
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Autenrieth Road: Thanks, LeRoc! And this one too: is this a tenor sax?

Zack again

Yes, a tenor.

quote:
Autenrieth Road: And this is cool, saxophone quartets, where I can compare the size side-by-side.
It's easy:
In a wind band that marches on the streets, a baritone sax player sometimes mounts wheels below his/her instrument.
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Cool, thanks for the geometric taxonomy of saxophones!

If flutes and piccolos weren't such clearly different sizes, it would be hard to provide such a taxonomy. "Well, the flute goes straight across out to the player's right. And the piccolo, uh, goes straight across out to the player's right." But we could distinguish on color: flute, silver; piccolo, black.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
Exactly. Determining saxophone on size can be hard, especially in a picture where you can't estimate the size very well. It's much more easily done on the shape of the tube right after the mouthpiece. This picture shows the differences well.
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Thanks for the nice lined-up picture. That helps me understand the requirements of tube length, and putting the hands in a reasonable place but then having to fit a certain amount of tube between hands and mouth, which leads to the different top shapes.

And here is a super duper califragilistic expialidocious sized sax.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I have a very simple beginner's question about Spanish. Could someone help me get the difference between "ser" and "estar" straight, please? When you're learning from a book you can't ask it questions to clarify, and I could just memorize the examples but I'd rather get the distinction clear first so I'm confident about it.

(The other problem is that I keep instinctively thinking of the Italian equivalents of various Spanish phrases first off, which does, and doesn't help. It doesn't in this instance.)

[ 05. September 2014, 07:11: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
Whole books have been written trying to codify rules for what native speakers intuit by the time they're five or so! Non-native speakers will always make some slight mistakes with ser / estar. But, there are some clear lines in the sand. The basic idea is often expressed as "use ser for what something is, estar for what it happens to be right now." It's a decent rule of thumb, but won't always answer every question. There are some clear categories, some of which could be seen as applications of this, some as exceptions.

- estar is always used in composing the present progressive: estoy jugando (I am playing). It's what I happen to be doing now, but it's not essential to what it means to be me.
- estar is used for locations of things, even things that don't move. Mi casa esta en Guadalajara. (My house is in Guadalajara)
- ser is used the locations of events. El concierto es en el teatro. (The concert is in the theater)
- ser is always used with time. Son las dos (it's two o'clock)
- ser is used with profession, nationality, religion. Soy ingles, sacerdote y catolico (I'm English, a priest and catholic)
- sometimes you can make some subtle distinctions by changing the verb. Es linda (she's a pretty person); esta linda (She looks pretty right now).

To really get this you do need to keep reviewing examples and trying to pattern spot in your head. Why don't you ask about some specific contexts where you'd be unsure and that can help form your intuitions?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
This is a post that could go in two places. either here or on the exercise thread in All Saints. I will post it here.

I have for about the last four plus months been attending a gym. This is new to me. I was told at the start that I needed to have trainers with decent cushioning (i.e. not none) but anything else would do.

As at that time all the actual trainers I had were falling apart, I bought a pair that were labelled "for running and gym". For or five months down the line I am deciding they are not a good buy. They are clearly aimed at people who either run on the treadmill or do other exercise that involves a lot of impact on the feet. They are very well cushioned but are also designed to encourage a rolling motion in the foot. I, however, tend to work more on strength building and would value a greater ability to interact with the ground; that is ability to put more of the sole of my shoe on the ground and to be more able to bend my toes when required.

If I replace them, what should I look for?

Jengie
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Court shoes would do that and some cross-trainers would too.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Autenrieth Road: And here is a super duper califragilistic expialidocious sized sax.
And this is how it sounds! [Cool]


PS I agree with Hart about ser / estar. Easiest rule of thimb ser is forever, estar is for a short time. But like he showed, there are many exceptions.
 
Posted by Polly Plummer (# 13354) on :
 
This is what I've heard about the Spanish verbs:

How you feel and where you are,
This is when you use "estar".
What you're called and where you're from
Here you use the other one.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
[Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
quote:
Autenrieth Road: And here is a super duper califragilistic expialidocious sized sax.
And this is how it sounds! [Cool]

WOW! That's fantabulous!

Do you play the sax, LeRoc? How do you know all about them?
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Autenrieth Road: Do you play the sax, LeRoc? How do you know all about them?
No, I'm a semi-professional trumpet player. But I spent a lot of time with saxophone players who bragged about their instruments (in both senses).
 
Posted by ChastMastr (# 716) on :
 
This drove me nuts when I was studying Spanish, but for slightly different reasons--the whole question of using "estar" when referring to being a Christian as opposed to "ser," and I was very firm about using "ser" because to me being a Christian was an ontological change rather than something merely temporal, whether that was the way the language was normally used or not. (Mind you, I'd apply this principle to English also. The whole idea that perhaps this might be an obstacle to actually communicating with people (in English, Spanish, binary, etc.) was not really my focus at the time... [Hot and Hormonal] )
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Semi-professional trumpet player? I'm very impressed!
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
ChastMastr: This drove me nuts when I was studying Spanish, but for slightly different reasons--the whole question of using "estar" when referring to being a Christian as opposed to "ser," and I was very firm about using "ser" because to me being a Christian was an ontological change rather than something merely temporal, whether that was the way the language was normally used or not.
But the correct form is (yo) soy cristiano, using a form of the verb ser. See for example this song.

quote:
Autenrieth Road: Semi-professional trumpet player? I'm very impressed!
Thank you. Playing music is nice.

[ 05. September 2014, 22:11: Message edited by: LeRoc ]
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ChastMastr:
This drove me nuts when I was studying Spanish, but for slightly different reasons--the whole question of using "estar" when referring to being a Christian as opposed to "ser," and I was very firm about using "ser" because to me being a Christian was an ontological change rather than something merely temporal, whether that was the way the language was normally used or not. (Mind you, I'd apply this principle to English also. The whole idea that perhaps this might be an obstacle to actually communicating with people (in English, Spanish, binary, etc.) was not really my focus at the time... [Hot and Hormonal] )

[Confused]

But you do use 'ser' with religion, not 'estar.' Google has 858 hits for "estoy cristiano" and 831,000 for "soy cristiano." That's about 1:1000 in favor of using 'ser' for religion. I don't think I've ever heard "estar" + religion.

[Edit to add: and most of those 858 seem to be the phrase "aqui estoy cristiano soy" where the estar form actually goes with "aqui" (here) not "cristiano"]

[ 05. September 2014, 22:45: Message edited by: Hart ]
 
Posted by ChastMastr (# 716) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
But you do use 'ser' with religion, not 'estar.' Google has 858 hits for "estoy cristiano" and 831,000 for "soy cristiano." That's about 1:1000 in favor of using 'ser' for religion. I don't think I've ever heard "estar" + religion.

Good Lord.

I was right after all!!! I was right after all!!! [Yipee] [Yipee] [Yipee]
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
Congratulations!

(And I'm 1:1000000 in favour of 'ser' for religion [Biased] )
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
So "estar" is basically used for more ephemeral things...

estoy... bored/in Madrid/reading a book

soy... European/50 years old/a bus driver

Thanks all! and especially Polly for that useful rhyme [Biased]
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Ariel: So "estar" is basically used for more ephemeral things...

estoy... bored/in Madrid/reading a book

soy... European/50 years old/a bus driver

In principle yes. Age goes with the verb tener (Tengo cincuenta años) and as Hart said there are exceptions, but this is a good first rule of thumb.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Lilypad - court shoes? Is this a Pond difference? From the UK side, [URL=http://court shoes uk]these[/URL] are court shoes!

M.
Bottom! The UBB code worked when I tried it on the Styx thread. Court shoes in the UK being plain heeled smart-ish shoes that one might wear at court, rather than on court.

[ 06. September 2014, 11:23: Message edited by: M. ]
 
Posted by saysay (# 6645) on :
 
Even in the US it's one of those things where it's wise to find out what kind of court someone is talking about.
 
Posted by TurquoiseTastic (# 8978) on :
 
Who is the guy in IngoB's avatar? I always think of him as being IngoB himself, but I know that's not true. [Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Portrait of Dominican (or Trinitarian) Friar by El Greco.
 
Posted by Pyx_e (# 57) on :
 
Anyone use a VPN or similar app to view BBC from abroad? Any recommendations for my android tablet? Ta. Free or trail period (or from play store).
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
My husband has just received a letter fining him for being in a bus lane. The accompanying photo clearly shows that there was a wide load coming in the other direction, which was partially in the lane my husband should have been using i.e. if my husband hadn't gone into the bus lane, our car would have been hit by the oncoming lorry, or alternatively both vehicles would have had to come to a standstill as there was no way for them to pass each other on the non-bus lane part of the road.

I've googled appealling bus lane fines, but they all seem to involve arguments that the signage wasn't clear etc.

FWIW, the lorry is clearly identifiable; the number plate is fuzzy, but it belongs to a well-known company.

Do we just write a letter saying WTF? Look at the photo! Of course we went into the bus lane!
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by M.:
Lilypad - court shoes? Is this a Pond difference? From the UK side, [URL=http://court shoes uk]these[/URL] are court shoes!

M.
Bottom! The UBB code worked when I tried it on the Styx thread. Court shoes in the UK being plain heeled smart-ish shoes that one might wear at court, rather than on court.

Lol - nope, not those. More like these.
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
In the notice you were sent, the council should have included a copy of the regulations in the area which should include a list of grounds of appeal.

There may be a traffic advocate (or angel) in your local area, who is generally someone rather miffed with the council and has trained themselves to be an expert in traffic law. You could seek them out if you know of a forum that is more local than The Ship.

I'm not such an expert, so any opinion is best left in my head, lest it mislead.
 
Posted by Cottontail (# 12234) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
My husband has just received a letter fining him for being in a bus lane. The accompanying photo clearly shows that there was a wide load coming in the other direction, which was partially in the lane my husband should have been using i.e. if my husband hadn't gone into the bus lane, our car would have been hit by the oncoming lorry, or alternatively both vehicles would have had to come to a standstill as there was no way for them to pass each other on the non-bus lane part of the road.

I've googled appealling bus lane fines, but they all seem to involve arguments that the signage wasn't clear etc.

FWIW, the lorry is clearly identifiable; the number plate is fuzzy, but it belongs to a well-known company.

Do we just write a letter saying WTF? Look at the photo! Of course we went into the bus lane!

You could give the Scottish Parking Appeals Service a ring and ask them for advice.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Originally posted by The Alethiophlie:
quote:
In the notice you were sent, the council should have included a copy of the regulations in the area which should include a list of grounds of appeal.
They did, but none of them apply.

Apparently the correct procedure would have been for my husband to stop in the correct lane, forcing the oncoming lorry to also stop, and for them to wait until a uniformed policeman arrived to authorise my husband to go into the bus lane, thus enabling the lorry to carry on.

And, in fairnesss, since doing this would have resulted in gridlock pdq, they wouldn't have had long to wait for a policeman to appear to find out what was happening.

Thanks, Cottontail, I've phoned that number, but they can't help until Aberdeen City Council have refused our appeal. And as far as Aberdeen City Council are concerned, we don't appear to fall into any of the appealable categories.

The photo is so clear that I can't honestly believe the council won't see sense. The oncoming lorry has its offside wheels and the whole of its numberplate in the lane my husband should have been in. Only the lorry's nearside wheels are in its own lane.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Can anyone remind me which television programme this tune was backdrop to? I wrongly thought of Butterflies. It's one of my next exam pieces, and I'm enjoying getting to know it as a player - if only I play like the master himself on the day I'll be fine!
 
Posted by Jonah the Whale (# 1244) on :
 
I suspect Buffy.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Maybe Buffy as well - but I've never seen that. Maybe it was a TV ad ?
 
Posted by Scots lass (# 2699) on :
 
The Buffy theme was by a band called Nerf Herder - the opening bit has similarities but they're not the same. I have no idea where it does come from though! My geekery stops at Buffy...
 
Posted by mertide (# 4500) on :
 
IMDB shows it as used in an episode of Buffy, a documentary called My Sister Maria and a movie from 1996 Breaking the Waves.
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Thank you - I've not seen any of those so maybe it was background music in a local shop.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Mathmatical question, which sounds like a school exercise. I want to buy a big pot (3 litres or more). The place where I went looking had pots labelled 20 cm - but they were different depths, with no indication of the volume of liquid they might contain.

If I take a tape measure so I can measure the depth, diameter and circumference, what is the magic formula that will give me the volume?

I think I must have missed the maths that covered volume as I once ordered 9 big truckloads of shingle for a strip down my driveway - fortunately my brother pointed out I'd put the decimal point in the wrong place so I was able to ammend the order before delivery [Hot and Hormonal]

Thanks in advance.

Huia
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
If the diameter is 20cm then the radius is 10cm.

The area of the bottom of the pot is pi (3.14) times the square of the radius, or about 300 square cm. Multiply that by the depth (in cm) to get the volume.

Since 1 litre is 1000 cubic cm, the pot will hold about 1 l for every 3.3cm of depth, and a 3 litre pot will be 10cm deep.

[too many words]

[ 12. September 2014, 22:58: Message edited by: Carex ]
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
That's the volume if the pot is a cylinder.
If it's a truncated cone the formula is

V = π × h × (R²+r²+R×r) ⁄ 3

where r and R are the radius of the top and bottom of the pot and h is the height (depth). Measure from the inside.

this may help:
calculate the volume of a truncated cone

And for pot bellied pots, you're on your own.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
The laziest way of doing it is to find a neighbor with the right size pot (or an online picture of one with some visual in the pic for comparison) so you can eyeball it.

Failing that, get a big waterproof container of any sort, the closer to the shape and diameter of the pot you want to buy. Then measure out 3 L of water into it, and either eyeball it or mark the depth of the water on a chopstick. Take the chopstick with you when you go shopping.

Math does my head in.
 
Posted by itsarumdo (# 18174) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Palimpsest:
That's the volume if the pot is a cylinder.
If it's a truncated cone the formula is

V = π × h × (R²+r²+R×r) ⁄ 3

where r and R are the radius of the top and bottom of the pot and h is the height (depth). Measure from the inside.

this may help:
calculate the volume of a truncated cone

And for pot bellied pots, you're on your own.

if you assume that pi is approx 3, then pi/3 is about 1

and the equation simplifies to

V = h.(R^3 - r^3)/(R-r)

Since most vessels are not particularly conical and have almost straight sides, it's easiest to just guess what the average radius is and say V = 3.h.r² approx. Same goes for a pot bellied pot - if you guess the equivalent average depth, you can still calc it as a simple cylinder. I find this works pretty well.

[ 13. September 2014, 10:18: Message edited by: itsarumdo ]
 
Posted by Chocoholic (# 4655) on :
 
If it is a cylinder and you google "volume of a cylinder" a little box at the top before the web addresses has a place you can enter the height and radius to give the answer. It doesn't have dimensions though so just be careful of your units. If you put them in in cm you will get an answer in cubic cm, or ml. So divide by 1000 to get no of litres.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
The other simple way is to go shop on line. Find a similar pot on a kitchen supply web site, or on Amazon or something. The description should tell you things like the volume the pot holds. I assume you do not need this accurate to the ounce? So a good-enough approximation should be sufficient.
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Does anyone know why, when graphing functions, we put the independent variable on the horizontal axis?
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
Well technically it can be either, and some specialist charts do not. However here are two possible. Firstly the dependent variable is normally the variable of interest. Putting it on the vertical axis makes it easy to say whether it is going "up" or "down" because they map literally onto the terms. Secondly we read from left to right so horizontal is the way we make "naturally"* comparisons. Independent variables (explanatory** variables) are normally used for interpretation by comparing different values of them. Therefore, it seems sensible to have them going across.

Jengie

*"naturally" because if you really pushed me I would say "due to the wider culture" rather than completely natural. However, in everyday events that is how we think.

**"Explanatory", the term I prefer; if you really push me "Explanatory Factors" but I tend not to feel the need to flag up that theoretically these have no random component as much as I do not want to assume these are "Independent***". It refers to the fact that the theory sees this variable as indicative of something that allows explanation of the other dependent variable. Note "explanation" not causation.


***"Independent" means uncorrelated but independent variables can be correlated!
 
Posted by TheAlethiophile (# 16870) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Autenrieth Road:
Does anyone know why, when graphing functions, we put the independent variable on the horizontal axis?

*dons the mathematician's hat*

Convention. There's nothing that compels us to order things this way round. It can be argued that it is a form of traditionalism, whereby any original reason for doing something is lost and now we end up doing it "because that's the way we've always done it".

It can be helpful, as well as refreshing, to look at things from another perspective every now and then.

*takes off the mathematician's hat*
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
It is just convention, but the interesting question is why the convention settled that way. I would link it the way we write left to right (rather than top to bottom, etc). If I measure the temperature of my bubbling chemical each minute for five minutes, say, I could record what I saw as:

70, 72, 75, 90, 88.

It might be helpful to replace those numbers with bars of that height. It's a short line from there to plotting a curve.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
I think you're right, it was the direction of reading that settled the matter. If graphing had first become a Thing™ in (say) Chinese, we might have had the axes reversed.
 
Posted by Autenrieth Road (# 10509) on :
 
Thanks for the replies.

I want to probe deeper than "it's just convention." If there is no specific reason that can be found, I'd like to at least get to the point of "as far back as we can find people making graphs [reference sources back to the year dot], we find people making their graphs this way."

What Lamb Chopped and Hart say about it being about the direction we write sounds plausible to me. The indepedendent variable might typically come in increments (if only ordinal increments of "this is the first value I recorded, this is the second value, this is the third value, etc.") which one might write horizontally as usual. Tabular ways of recording the data, as an ordered vertical list of x,y values, one pair per row, might have led to the independent variable on the x-axis, but those methods of organization might have come later.

Just hypothesizing here. I'd love to find some historical math sources that talk about graphing.

[ 16. September 2014, 14:13: Message edited by: Autenrieth Road ]
 
Posted by itsarumdo (# 18174) on :
 
I don't know if there are cultural differences (like Chinese) but mostr people represent past to their left and future to their right - so e.g. if you remember, you tend to look to the left and if you think about possibilitiues you would tend to look to the right. So this may be a basis for axes directions, and it is afaik something to do with representation of time/space in the brain and sensory system, so it is to a large degree hardwired.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
I don't know about that. In Hebrew, the word for "East" also means "past / ancient," and maps were drawn with East at the top.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Can anyone recommend a good (=readable) book about the Cathars?
 
Posted by itsarumdo (# 18174) on :
 
quote:
Crap spouted by Hart:
* don't know about that. In Hebrew, the word for "East" also means "past / ancient," and maps were drawn with East at the top.

So culturally, Hebrew looks to the past, not only as a direction of reference, but at the dawn of each day? That's curious.
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
The answer maybe because that is the way William Playfair did it.

Jεngiε
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
quote:
Crap spouted by itsarumdo:
quote:
Crap spouted by Hart:
* don't know about that. In Hebrew, the word for "East" also means "past / ancient," and maps were drawn with East at the top.

So culturally, Hebrew looks to the past, not only as a direction of reference, but at the dawn of each day? That's curious.
Considering that dawn is mid-24hour day in their system of time keeping (which starts with sundown), maybe not.
 
Posted by itsarumdo (# 18174) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lamb Chopped:
quote:
Crap spouted by itsarumdo:
quote:
Crap spouted by Hart:
* don't know about that. In Hebrew, the word for "East" also means "past / ancient," and maps were drawn with East at the top.

So culturally, Hebrew looks to the past, not only as a direction of reference, but at the dawn of each day? That's curious.
Considering that dawn is mid-24hour day in their system of time keeping (which starts with sundown), maybe not.
Interesting - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hour - I hadn't considered there might be different ways to do this.
 
Posted by Doublethink (# 1984) on :
 
Has anyone else noticed their freeview reception getting worse since the most recent reordering of the digital channels ?
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
Ours is always excellent on one TV and varies from bad to appalling on the other, and I haven't noticed a change on either.

Last night, though, one of the TVs told me that there is a further reshuffling at the beginning of October, so that might well suggest that there are some problems after the previous rearrangement.
 
Posted by Tukai (# 12960) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
The answer maybe because that is the way William Playfair did it.

Jεngiε

x-y co-ordinates go back to Descartes (17th century), which is why they are also called Cartesian co-ordinates. And he plotted y as a function of x (i.e. y dependent , x independent).
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
Quick one- how do I permanently alter my Facebook settings so that my posts never show my location? Is this possible at all? Thanks.
 
Posted by Hart (# 4991) on :
 
There may not be a simple answer to this question, but do detectives really just work one case at a time? Almost every cop show seems to present it like that.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
IANA detective, but I really, really doubt it. There have to be long delays where you're waiting for a witness to get back into the country, or out of the hospital; or for test results to come back; etc. etc. etc. You'd be working your other assignments at those times.

[ 01. October 2014, 01:54: Message edited by: Lamb Chopped ]
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Hart:
There may not be a simple answer to this question, but do detectives really just work one case at a time? Almost every cop show seems to present it like that.

It is hugely variable depending on the location, type of crime, personnel available, etc. Anywhere from one case for months to multiple.
The telly gets so much wrong.
 
Posted by jedijudy (# 333) on :
 
Dear S-i-L had a stack of five cases (last we talked about that), and he's still in training! (He's liking the detective gig...he gets to actually eat lunch now, unlike most of the time he was a road deputy!) [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Albertus:
Quick one- how do I permanently alter my Facebook settings so that my posts never show my location? Is this possible at all? Thanks.

Mine never show my location. Did you type yours in at some point? Or are you posting from a phone which has GPS enabled?
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
No, don't think I ever did type it in, and I usually post from the laptop on my desk. That's why I'm puzzled it comes up. I don't particularly mind when I'm at home, but I don't necessarily want to advertise it if I am away.
 
Posted by Matt Black (# 2210) on :
 
OK, another techie question: I just manually upgraded by Galaxy S4 Mini from Jellybean to Kitkat via my PC using the Odin firmware patch. It flashed up an error during installation but it seems to have 'taken', save for the fact that the Wi-Fi setting seems to be disabled. Any ideas?
 
Posted by Martin PC not & Ship's Biohazard (# 368) on :
 
HELP! There was a British sci-fi mini-series in the naughties that I never saw because I was always SODDING working or drinking and it had a Russian / Soviet angle and possible had Red in the title and probably not and it DIDN'T have Robson Green in it and I thought it did ... DING!!!! Oktober.
 
Posted by Martin PC not & Ship's Biohazard (# 368) on :
 
'98 Stephen Tompkinson
 
Posted by Martin PC not & Ship's Biohazard (# 368) on :
 
Thank you SO much!
 
Posted by bib (# 13074) on :
 
Can anyone tell me what is meant by the instruction I hear on the radio "download podcasts, represent as blogs" because I am so computer illiterate that I find the instruction to be meaningless.
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
Martin PC not & Ship's Biohazard: Thank you SO much!
You're welcome [Confused]

(Glad you found it.)
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I have a laundry problem. On turning out my airing cupboard to admit the plumber, I found that some nice pillow cases I had brought from my Dad's place, and which looked fine when I put them in there, had developed patches of yellow stain where he put his head. I have been trying to remove them, firstly by my usual method of spraying with a stain remover, then soaking with Biotex, then washing (in this case the hottest synthetic wash) with a boost of a powder oxygen stain remover halfway through. A lot went, but not all, so I repeated the process. I hung them out to dry, but there was still a stain visible, very pale. So I tried another stain remover, rinsed, and as it hadn't worked, went for a peroxide liquid bleach and another wash. And then repeated that. I was able to give them a little sun yesterday, but had to bring them in wet and leave them overnight. Hung them in the sun again today, looking nearly like an old Persil ad, only to find that two had developed new pale yellow stains in different places as if they have travelled as in chromatography - the one at the bottom has clear signs of the creases from last night's resting wet. I washed them again, with yet another so-called stain remover - went to hang them out, and saw that the stains were still visible, and the others on the line had developed them too.
Four of the pillow cases have embroidered lily of the valley on them, my mother's favourite flower, so chlorine bleach isn't an option.
Any ideas?

[ 05. October 2014, 15:49: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Jengie Jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
quote:
Martin PC not & Ship's Biohazard: Thank you SO much!
You're welcome [Confused]

(Glad you found it.)

Rubber Duck Problem Solving

Jengie
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Cloth that is wet with peroxide should not be exposed to light until it dries. Otherwise, you end up with yellow stains. (I learned this the hard way.)

Moo
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Cloth that is wet with peroxide should not be exposed to light until it dries. Otherwise, you end up with yellow stains. (I learned this the hard way.)

Moo

Thank you - serious rinsing follows. The cloth should have been rinsed adequately in the machine, I would have thought. And I think the manufacturers of the liquid peroxide bleach, and the other oxygen generating stuff should mention it on their packaging!
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
So, the manufacturers of Ace say don't let the stuff dry on the fabric or damage will follow, and Waitrose, on their own brand, add to that not to expose it to direct sunlight. The damage is not, in either case, specified. But I was careful about that. I don't even use delayed washes when I use the stuff, things start in the wash immediately. So there is the detergent phase, and the rinses as well before things go out on the line. Moreover, there wasn't direct sun, as the line was to the west of a three storey terrace, and the worst staining appeared before the sun got round there. (There would have been scattered UV and blue, which I was counting on for sun bleaching.) If this is peroxide damage, it's had to work really hard to do it.
Double rinsing hasn't removed the marks. I'm drying indoors now. They are much better than when I started with dark head stains, quite faint really. And they hardly show indoors. (I'm trying to convince myself.)
I've one inner case which I can experiment on with some last possibilities.

[ 06. October 2014, 08:14: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Since the stains are from hair oil, you might try a degreasing spray as a last resort. Then wash as usual.

Moo
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
The other thing to try might be a specialist stain remover they make for getting rid of sun tan lotion marks?
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I think the degreasing has happened - I wish that the makers of stain removers would put the ingredients on the bottles, but one of them has a distinct smell of citrus, which goes with that sort of thing. And they've had enough detergent. Also, I don't think the stain was hair oil, since my own under covers can get the same - I think it's people oil! (Or saliva, or - I don't want to go there.) However, tanning lotion remover sounds a good addition to the collection of advice I'm getting - pet stains is another. One of the bottles says it will do those, but seems to have been able to determine that these were not from pets! I have a paste from Lakeland which claims to do "reappearing" stains, which I haven't tried yet.
I tried looking through an illuminated magnifier to see what the stains looked like - but the light failed! It did, however, look as if the actual fibres have changed colour, which is not good.
I wish I hadn't let them sit wet overnight - that seems to have been when the damage was done, with the stain moving about.

[ 06. October 2014, 19:14: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
A curious day. This morning I took the test case and applied Lakeland's White Wonder (which made no difference) and on taking it back to hang up with the other cases in the front bedroom with the sun shining through the double glazing, noticed that on the others the stains appeared to have gone, except on a part of a case which was in shadow. So I put that in the light. I couldn't see any other stain, but the test one. Hurray! Then, this afternoon, I had another look, and the stains were back, in the daylight. Now, under energy saving bulb light, I have to look really hard. And still can't see them.
So I've got invisible stains...unless viewed in daylight (not sun indoors). And they're on pillow covers. Hmmm.

[ 07. October 2014, 18:32: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by monkeylizard (# 952) on :
 
Whatever you do....don't get a blacklight..... [Smile]
 
Posted by Zoey (# 11152) on :
 
What's the advice in the UK about disposing of leaking batteries? Can they go to the council battery recycling place along with their non-leaking cousins?
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
That's what I do - the important chemicals/metals are still in there. In fact, mine don't go to disposal until they are leaking, since I have one of those gizmos that perks up alkaline batteries as well as recharging NiMH and NiCad versions.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I don't expect anyone can answer this. Today I had to go up the garden to open the back gate for the window cleaner. I found that I had to move some soil from the path below the bottom step down from the veggie patch to the flagged part. It was lovely crumbly loam, such as does not come in a bag, and very neatly arranged to cover one flagstone.* To one side is a flower bed with young primroses I planted out about a month ago, and there is no soil disturbed. I remember that some soil had come out from the seed tray in which they had grown, but see below. To the other, another bed with a lavender bush and a rose bush, and a low dry-stone wall where I built up the soil level about a month ago, and where that soil has not been disturbed. The veggie patch has no disturbed soil. The step rests on bricks and sand, so nothing has been digging tunnels out there.
On return from being away, last week, I went up the garden to carry out war on caterpillars on the brassicas, and saw no soil. I took the hose up to wash the results off, and saw no soil. The soil had no trace of the hose lying on it, nor footmarks. I went up this week to pick beans and blackberries and saw no soil.
It has been raining on several occasions, and the soil has not become muddy.
I think I need to check for a rathole I have missed, but otherwise have no idea what has gone on.
*My native soil is yellowish clay-with-flints, but I have been working on the beds with compost and purchased top soil.

[ 10. October 2014, 14:21: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Drifting Star (# 12799) on :
 
Ants? In my experience they've always been the source of lovely fine loam in strange places.

I'm not sure why they do this, but have wondered whether they were starting to build an ant hill and then changed their minds for some reason - and the wet weather could have been a reason.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
They would have to have been very large ants - the loam grains aren't ant-heap size. But, in the meantime, I have been out to rescue my washing from its extra rinse, and to tidy up the soil better than I did this morning to allow free access to the window cleaner, and have discovered that there is now a rat run along behind the flower bed, against the clay subsoil of the veggie patch, and sheltered until now by lavender and geraniums. One has to admire the neatness of the workratship. (I have just asked my friend to let me have my humane trap back, since he rang at thst moment.) I may put down some of the lion poo I used to keep Weasley* and Douglas, the local ginger cats, out. Or ask to borrow W & D.
*W's owner was very apologetic when she told me the name - it wasn't their choice, he was a rescue cat.

[ 10. October 2014, 14:48: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I have not found that cats will hunt on command. Nor are rodents all that smart. I have three cats, and the voles still come into the yard in spite of tremendous mortality!
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
My grandmother's cat hunted rabbit for her - at least once. And see Egyptian wall paintings. But W&D wouldn't actually have to hunt - just leave the scent around.
And rats have rather more brain than voles, or why would they be used for maze-running to test models to be applied to humans.
And I have seen a hamster apply a considerable amount of intelligence to the task of getting a carrot to its cache, which took 20 minutes of concentration and forethought.
1. Attempt to get carrot through entrance to tube while holding in mouth like pirate's sword, and fail.
2. Go down tube to position where it can turn, return and pull carrot down by one end, and push it past.
3. Climb over carrot and go all the way to the cache, which involved turning 90deg down into a cage, up another tube, another 90deg turn, along another tube and down to the cache.
4. Return to carrot, chew it in half so it was in manageable portions, take first part to cache and return for second part.

We stopped a maths lesson to watch.

[ 10. October 2014, 15:24: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Jade Constable (# 17175) on :
 
Indeed, rodents are much smarter than you may think. I've seen a (small but cheeky and feisty) guinea pig show intelligence in moving a hay rack (wooden manger-type one that folds up) in order to create a barrier so she had all the hay to herself.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
...Nor are rodents all that smart...

Oh, I don't know. We have a mouse living in the front room at the moment who keeps jumping over the mousetraps. It's like a mini-steeple chase.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Rodents may be smart, but my brain is fraying. Can someone come to my rescue please? I have set this computer on full screen using the F keys at the top of the keyboard and have forgotten how to undo this function.

Laptop running windows7

This means I can't access some of my favourite places. [Waterworks]

Huia - having a senior episode.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Have you tried F11?
 
Posted by quetzalcoatl (# 16740) on :
 
I use ESC.
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Ariel, thank you so much. I kept trying F10 and going to a really weird place, then having to log out.

Computers can be so frustrating when you are a Bear of very little Brain

Huia
 
Posted by Frankly My Dear (# 18072) on :
 
Whilst we're on the subject of computers, when mine says 'Not Responding' - well, if it knows it's not responding,, why doesn't it start responding?! ... I've never had a plain answer to this from a techy person ..
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Right to keep computers running several programs at the same time they all operate in their own little box. Then the Operating System tries to coordinate all those boxes so you get the right info at the right time.

Well not responding means the OS has knocked at one little boxes door and instead of getting the expected reply has got silence. Now it could be because: the program in there is really busy, it has gone deeply to sleep or it simply has died. Like schroedingers cat it could be in any of those states but as the box is sealed so that other programs can't interfere with it, you can not tell which. If you open the box to look it will automatically die. Your choice is to wait and see if it starts responding or kill it and start again.

This is a crude explanation because the boxes are nothing like boxes in reality but that helps the visualisation.

Jengie
 
Posted by itsarumdo (# 18174) on :
 
quote:
"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge
thesis progress (back as I was)

I wish I'd seen that quote while the Scientism debate was going.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
Does anyone know any good apps (Android for preference, but also iOS) or good online resources to enable a native Cantonese speaker to negotiate English? There is a newly arrived family at our child's school, and very few ESL opportunities round here.

Thank you [Smile]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I will ask a friend who adopted a teenaged girl from Guangdong.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
Has anyone tried a laser keyboard? If so, I'd be interested to know what you thought.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
Has anyone tried a laser keyboard? If so, I'd be interested to know what you thought.

Not great for sensitive fingertips.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
I was wondering about that...
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
This is mostly for anyone with a knowledge of Scottish authors of books for children. I've been trying to track down a book I read some time ago (30, 40 years, even).

The way my subconscious filing system works, two books with similar themes which I read on separate occasions have been merged and identified as "The Big House" by Naomi Mitchison. (The system has on a previous occasion linked to articles in Scientific American, published several years apart, about archaeological research into prehistoric drift mining and solution hollows in the Netherlands and Austria. Very clever, but can be confusing.) I have now acquired the Mitchison, and found that although some of what I remembered is in it, other material is not there.

Both books involve 20th century children having to deal with the Sidhe in a quest to put something right. I suspect that the one which is not by Mitchison is less deep, and has less to say about society. (The introduction suggests that the book was originally criticised for its political stance. Deano wouldn't like it.)

In the other book, the children had to travel across the country, possibly by magical means, to find their way into the fairy mountain of Schiehallion. In doing so, they had to visit three ostensibly ordinary elderly ladies in Pitlochry who advised them on the safest way to do this. (Are these three ladies found in Celtic mythology? I don't think spinning and weaving were involved. Not sure about knitting. And I don't think there was anything odd about their sight.) It was more like Diana Wynne Jones' work than Mitchison's, though not by her.

Does anyone have an idea about what it might be? I know that some authors have had little presence south of the border, though this book had arrived in Dartford. I didn't read it in class, so the details didn't stick well, apart from attaching themselves to Mitchison.

[ 31. October 2014, 21:28: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
I have long been familiar with the saying, "Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." I never saw it attributed to anyone until recently. Nowadays, I keep hearing it attributed to Einstein.

I don't know a lot about Einstein, but this just doesn't feel right. Does anyone know if he said it? If not, does anyone know who did?

Moo
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
It wasn't from Einstein. Here is more information.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Penny S

Are you mixing your book up with Auntie Robbo by Ann Scott-Moncrieff?

It has a boy on the run from his stepmother with his eccentric great aunt and they pick-up more stray children on their journey through the highlands.

I remember a cousin getting this for Christmas years ago and she did nothing for the rest of the season until she'd finished the book - at which point the rest of us passed it around too.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Odd Facebook question. I'm one of the admins of our church FB page. Another admin posted about preparations for the children's nativity play - just a routine post. As an admin I get notifications of "likes" etc which I don't pay much attention to; there are always a couple of dozen "likes" per post.

However one has just popped up from someone whose profile picture is a gun and bullets. It seemed odd so I checked it out. The "liker" appears to be a young Muslim in Pakistan.

How / why would a young male Muslim Pakistani who likes "sexy guns" find, let alone "like" a request for donations of blue and white material and tinsel posted on a Scottish Presbyterian church's FB page?

Is this odd? Is it some sort of FB spam?
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
North East Quine: How / why would a young male Muslim Pakistani who likes "sexy guns" find, let alone "like" a request for donations of blue and white material and tinsel posted on a Scottish Presbyterian church's FB page?
An opportunity to convert him through decoration material!
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
I've checked through all our "likers" (all 23 of them!) and found a second young male Pakistani; he had a photo of himself as his profile picture, so wasn't noticeable.

Originally posted by Le Roc:

quote:
An opportunity to convert him through decoration material!
What, like - "Come to Scotland, join our church and you could donate offcuts of material and empty 2 litre fizzy drink bottles to make new outfits and props for our Nativity!"

It would be a new approach to evangelism, I suppose.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Penny S

Are you mixing your book up with Auntie Robbo by Ann Scott-Moncrieff?

It has a boy on the run from his stepmother with his eccentric great aunt and they pick-up more stray children on their journey through the highlands.

I remember a cousin getting this for Christmas years ago and she did nothing for the rest of the season until she'd finished the book - at which point the rest of us passed it around too.

Thank you, but I'm pretty sure that wasn't it. Few adults of the real world taking part, and I don't think I would have picked out a book with that title. A further memory has surfaced - interpreting a Pictish Stone was involved in the plot, possibly with an elephant-like image.

It was almost like a child's version of a later Tom Holt story!

[ 04. November 2014, 15:52: Message edited by: Penny S ]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Tangent//
quote:
Originally posted by LeRoc:
quote:
North East Quine: How / why would a young male Muslim Pakistani who likes "sexy guns" find, let alone "like" a request for donations of blue and white material and tinsel posted on a Scottish Presbyterian church's FB page?
An opportunity to convert him through decoration material!
Actually, you might be onto something there. This post has already had a better response than our real-life attempt to bribe people into the church hall with free pizza.

// End tangent
 
Posted by LeRoc (# 3216) on :
 
quote:
North East Quine: What, like - "Come to Scotland, join our church and you could donate offcuts of material and empty 2 litre fizzy drink bottles to make new outfits and props for our Nativity!"

It would be a new approach to evangelism, I suppose.

You never know, it might work [Smile]

I don't know very well how FB works, but have you considered asking him why he likes your page?
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I've just been searching with the terms I included above - there are some daft ideas out there. Would you believe a connection between the Dogon (you know, the tribe who know, without access to powerful telescopes, about the very small companion of Sirius) and the carvers of Pictish stones?

I'm trying to get synopses of Mollie Hunter's many books.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Not that it helps, Penny S, but the Pictish elephant-like image is the one in my avatar - it's known as the Pictish beast, because it's not clear what it's supposed to be. One suggestion is that the Romans might have brought an elephant across and it's a representation of that.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
Thanks for that - I hadn't realised that that was what your avatar was! I did know about the Pictish beast - but couldn't be quite sure if I had added it later. The way my brain works, it would be perfectly capable of doing that without notifying me.
I've just checked the photos from a recent trip to Ultima Thule - I have actually seen one in situ on the Maiden Stone near Aberdeen before going on to Orkney and Shetland. (It was passing the Aberdeen Waterstone's that started me on this hunt - if I'd known I was looking for two books, I might have found more about it in their Scottish Children's section.)
 
Posted by The Machine Elf (# 1622) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tukai:
quote:
Originally posted by Jengie Jon:
The answer maybe because that is the way William Playfair did it.

Jεngiε

x-y co-ordinates go back to Descartes (17th century), which is why they are also called Cartesian co-ordinates. And he plotted y as a function of x (i.e. y dependent , x independent).
Have a little history of visualisation . There's a link between cartesian co-ordinates and artillery which would have made sense to have range horizontal and altitude vertical, but the examples there are much older.
 
Posted by SusanDoris (# 12618) on :
 
Has there been a discussion in Ship of Fools about twins Agnes and Margaret Smith, (Mrs Lewis and Mrs Gibson)? I have just finished listening to a book called 'Sisters of Sinai' about themI had never heard of them before. . It was an excellent book and as they were so famous because of their involvement with translation of ancient manuscripts and the Presbyterian Church, I thought they might well have been mentioned. I'm afraid I'm not good at searching forthings so would be grateful for help here.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
... the Pictish elephant-like image is the one in my avatar ...

I never really looked closely, but I saw your avatar as a kind of sea-horse ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Now that I've seen bigger images of it, it's not like a sea-horse at all. [Big Grin]

[ 07. November 2014, 14:35: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
SusanDoris - nothing coming back from Google. I think I would have remembered such a thread cropping up on The Ship.
 
Posted by SusanDoris (# 12618) on :
 
Firenze

thannk you. It is clear from the book that the sisters' faith never wavered throughout their lives. I'll see if I can come up with some point which would start a discussion!
 
Posted by spork (# 18260) on :
 
Boyfie and I have been together about a year and as he has limited speech the way we communicate is through him writing, using signs, I do understand a little of what he says and when not together Facebook and texting.
He uses Makaton extensively while my knowledge is sketchy* and I would love to learn more. My question is can any one give me any pointers to sources for an adult who wants to learn Makaton.

*toilet, brother and sister etc
 
Posted by Firenze (# 619) on :
 
I take it you've checked out the website?
 
Posted by spork (# 18260) on :
 
Thanks Firenze, you're an angel I'd seen that site briefly a few years ago when A and I first became friends and had forgotten all about it.
 
Posted by Doublethink. (# 1984) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by spork:
Boyfie and I have been together about a year and as he has limited speech the way we communicate is through him writing, using signs, I do understand a little of what he says and when not together Facebook and texting.
He uses Makaton extensively while my knowledge is sketchy* and I would love to learn more. My question is can any one give me any pointers to sources for an adult who wants to learn Makaton.

*toilet, brother and sister etc

I am confused, are you saying you have boyfriend type relationship with this person ? Or is Boyfie short for something else ?
 
Posted by spork (# 18260) on :
 
Boyfie is shorthand for boyfriend sorry if that wasn't clear. I sometimes refer to him as A though.
 
Posted by Doublethink. (# 1984) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by spork:
Boyfie is shorthand for boyfriend sorry if that wasn't clear. I sometimes refer to him as A though.

In the UK makaton courses are often taught by speech and language therapists attached to services for people with a learning disability. I am unclear if this is appropriate for the two of you.

[ 12. November 2014, 17:41: Message edited by: Doublethink. ]
 
Posted by spork (# 18260) on :
 
Both A and myself have Cerabral Palsy. Some of my friends (incl. A) who attended special schools were taught it a there.
 
Posted by Sipech (# 16870) on :
 
Does anyone know if there exists an English translation of Ernst Bloch's Thomas Müntzer als Theologe der Revolution and if so, where one might obtain a copy?
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
German Suhrkamp Publishers have Bloch's complete works. Why not send them an e-mail (in English) asking about an English-language edition? I'm sure they can help. [Smile]
 
Posted by Scots lass (# 2699) on :
 
I'd expect the British Library would, if such a thing had been published in the UK. Their catalogue says not though - they have other works in translation but not that one.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
A research query, for a novel set in England in the 1860s:

I have here a (fictional) church that is no longer in use, part of a ruinous castle. It was probably closed down as part of the Reformation in England. The local (fictional) peer keeps it more or less in shape because of the ancestors buried within, but services are now held in the Protestant church in the village.

Is it possible for the peer to continue burying his relatives in this church, or the churchyard, even if it is deconsecrated and no longer in use? I assume that his Protestant clergyman can preside over any obsequies. Perhaps someone knows of a real-life instance of this kind of thing.
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
Seems like you can bury someone anywhere on private property in England. . As long as you fill in a form. And it's not too near water.

But are you sure the church in the village is a protestant church and not a CofE church? [Snigger] (Actually bit serious, protestant to me living here in England would imply non-conformist - Baptist or the like - rather than the village CofE church.)
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Really! I did not know that. (How very different from the habits of the US!) Yes, it is CofE, but I doubt they used the term in the 1860s.
 
Posted by Mudfrog (# 8116) on :
 
Coronation Oath 1953

quote:

Archbishop:

Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the Laws of God and the true profession of the Gospel? Will you to the utmost of your power maintain in the United Kingdom the Protestant Reformed Religion established by law? Will you maintain and preserve inviolably the settlement of the Church of England, and the doctrine, worship, discipline, and government thereof, as by law established in England...?

Queen:

All this I promise to do.


 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Yes, it is CofE, but I doubt they used the term in the 1860s.

No, I think they probably would just have referred to the church or village church. Methodist and Baptist etc would have been 'the chapel' and a Catholic church would have that descriptor. (But IAN an historian.)
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
... but if said place of worship is 'part of a ruinous (think you mean ruined?) castle then it would be referred to as the chapel.

Burial: you can be buried where you like, by whoever you like, so long as you have the death certificate and have notified the registrar of what the plans are for the disposal of the body and the location of the disposal is noted.

DYK that if you scatter remains in rivers or at sea you are meant to notify the relevant authority - NRA M&CA or local harbour wallahs - before doing it?
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I would check in contemporary novels written to see how people spoke of the church - Trollope, perhaps? Parish church, I would hazard a guess, because of the concept that the vicar, or rector - with a big house thereabouts I would guess the latter, had the care of all in his parish, regardless of whether they were Anglican or not.
 
Posted by chenab (# 18278) on :
 
Brenda - I'm almost tempted to say pass but very very probably and I can't see why not. Your date is around the time legislation and attitudes changed which makes a simple answer not easy to give.
And for various reasons issues like being near the watertable and needing planning permission to do a second burial would not apply - so much of what has already been said, while correct, need not have applied then.
However given it's location as part of a castle then I don't see that the reformation would have closed it down, rather it would have been less used as the castle was steadily abandoned. However it would have remained a private chapel still in the hands of the family concerned.
Which means that we probably assume incorrectly it was deconsecrated and it probably wasn't - that comes in more with the rise of council cemeteries and of passing the maintenance of closed churchyards over to the civil authorities.
It is effectively already a churchyard in private hands so there are no planning issues, and being a private chapel/burial ground then it would very probably not be closed and quite possibly could not be closed depending on any, probably ancient, documents between the pre-reformation church, the local nobility and possibly the monarch of the day.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Thank you, one and all. The point became so knotty that I decided to resurrect the fellow after all. He is not dead but gone before.
 
Posted by chenab (# 18278) on :
 
Obviously that works as well. [Biased]
 
Posted by Pomona (# 17175) on :
 
Also the CoE would have been more markedly Protestant in the 1860s, and members would have thought of themselves as such.
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
I am considering ways to put the library catalogue of my local Quaker meeting online.
I've looked at Library Thing but don't really need the social networking aspect of it.
I think I remember a ship thread on this subject in the past; can you give me any other recommendations?
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
Didn't the law change relatively recently - less than 20 years ago - allowing burial anywhere? There was a lot of speculation about the suitability of having granny buried in the back garden!
 
Posted by Garasu (# 17152) on :
 
@TreeBee

You might like to check out the guidance provided by the Library of the RSoF at http://quaker.org.uk/meeting-librarians
 
Posted by Tree Bee (# 4033) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Garasu:
@TreeBee

You might like to check out the guidance provided by the Library of the RSoF at http://quaker.org.uk/meeting-librarians

Thank you. Very interested that Library Thing is recommended as Wikipedia says it's 40% owned by Amazon which we are trying to avoid using for book purchasing.
 
Posted by Garasu (# 17152) on :
 
I don't know that it recommends LibraryThing... and it was, I think written before concerns about Amazon became mainstream..

I suspect that if you want free you may have to accept some negatives... and, actually, even professional library packages aren't without problems!

Couple of other things you could check out:
http://www.abtapl.org.uk/
And
http://lists.quaker.eu.org/mailman/listinfo/librarians
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
In a Victorian novel, a character refers to "Letsome", apparently a reference work. Does anyone know what this might be? A friend suggests this is :An Index to the Sermons Published Since the REstoration" by one Sampson Letsome. Does anyone know more?
 
Posted by Doublethink. (# 1984) on :
 
If you google letsome reference you can find a digital version of Letsome's Preacher's Assistant.
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
This has bugged me for a while: in my (relatively) new flat in a lovely mid-1800s building, I've got one 8-metre-long and 4-metre-wide room with two casement windows on the long side.

If I open both windows, which are about 3 metres apart, at the same time and if there is no wind - no problem. When there is a slight breeze, however, the window closer to the corner of the house tends to get sucked (or blown?) closed, and the curtain drawn outside. Sometimes, with somewhat stronger wind, this may happen with both of the windows and the curtains.

As I'm not that educamated re physics: what exactly is happening here pressure-wise?

In my windowian innocence, I'd always imagined this: the wind blows from one side, and both windows are facing the same side (not necessarily the wind direction), so there must be the same influx of air into both windows. With the door open, I must then have thought that the air blown (or sucked?) into the room would mysteriously spread into the rest of the flat, but I guess this would just lead to increased pressure inside the house, which perhaps then makes the door go shut with a bang.

It seems to me I didn't take into account differences in pressure nor turbulences. I find this less irritating than very fascinating!

Anyone have an insight into what exactly is happening here? - Thank you. [Smile]
 
Posted by Palimpsest (# 16772) on :
 
Some of this may be the Bernoulli principle where a flow of air causes a drop in pressure at right angles.
Do the windows open in or out?

Two other possibilities; is there a column on the outside of the building between the windows? That would cause different pressures.

Is there a chimney or stack on the house. Air going by the chimney may cause the air pressure to change.

There are people who do insulation studies on houses for you where they find leaks and pressure flows that cost heating fuel bills to increase.
So you might see something with smoke or fog or a fan.

[Url made clickable. - Ariel]

[ 03. January 2015, 09:01: Message edited by: Ariel ]
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If anyone finds that a url doesn't seem to display so it can be clicked on (sometimes there's no visible reason for this) or it's simply too long, just pop it into Tinyurl and copy the result it gives you for a short, easy-to-use link instead.
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
I've got a book on Siberian flora and fauna, published in the 1990s ,which shows a picture of a flame-coloured flower that looks like a lily to me but is described as Iris Pennsylvanicum. Pretty odd name for a flower found in Siberia.

Have tried Google generally and RHS - no luck. I've found something called a Siberian Lily, but it's white. Any suggestions?
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Oddly try "Lilium Pennsylvanicum" which reminds me strongly of a plant which I seem to recall has an English name with contains iris.

This is going back to childhood (pre-teens) when we had a bed filled with what looks like these plants. If it is what I think it is, it grows in this country and its stamen dye things orange very easily. I can remember being forbidden to touch them.

Jengie
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
It sounds as if it might be a typo and they put "iris" when they meant "lily". Does it look like this?
 
Posted by Adeodatus (# 4992) on :
 
Wesley J - first of all, yes, what Palimpsest said. (And it would be great fun to do some experiments releasing smoke into the room and seeing what happened... What? What do you mean, what about your nice clean curtains? - this is science!) Bernoulli has a lot to answer for, including aeroplanes. But also, generally, air flow in city streets is incredibly complex. Meteorologists have made careers out of studying it. Within about 10 metres of any solid surface (such as a building) air flow will be modified and won't be anything like a simple horizontal flow of air in one direction. One interesting effect, for instance, is that wind can sometimes move in a sort of spiral down a street (down one side, across the road, up the other side, etc.). Also, you can get little whirlwind effects at the corners of buildings - you can see them sometimes, on dry windy days, showing up as little flurries of dust. All of this and more makes the differential pressure on your windows a lot more difficult to predict than the people who built your building ever thought!
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
Wesley J,

What Adeodatus & Palimpsest said. with the addition of that it unlikely that the wind blows at a strict right angle to the wall the windows are in. This will also influence the motion of the curtains. What you need also for Adeodatus' experiment is an exterior wind vane. of course, a very sensitive vane could be used inside with no need for smoke.

quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
It sounds as if it might be a typo and they put "iris" when they meant "lily". Does it look like this?

IF this is the plant, here is the reason for the name.

quote:
The Latin name is misleading due to an error by the botanist John Bellenden Ker.


[ 03. January 2015, 18:25: Message edited by: lilBuddha ]
 
Posted by QLib (# 43) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
It sounds as if it might be a typo and they put "iris" when they meant "lily". Does it look like this?

Yes! Thanks, Ariel, and thanks also to Jengie and lilBuddha. And it won't Siberia, it was Ussuriland, which is much closer to Pennsylvania in terms of latitude, so that makes sense.
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
They don't usually let you take photos in a courtroom during a trial, yet they permit artists' illustrations. What's the reasoning behind this?
 
Posted by Carex (# 9643) on :
 
I think originally photographs were banned as being (potentially) disruptive, and sketches were used as a workaround to the ban. I seem to remember a court decision that sketching was no different in practice to note-taking, so couldn't be prohibited.
 
Posted by Penny S (# 14768) on :
 
I understand that, in the UK, the court artist cannot make sketches while in the court, either, but has to do it afterwards.
 
Posted by Lucia (# 15201) on :
 
My daughter has been invited by American teenage friends to a "Nacho Average" birthday party. Googling tells me that this is a common phrase but I am still none the wiser as to its meaning! I know what nachos are and I presume they will eating them but what's with the 'average' bit?? Anyone able to enlighten me?

[ 10. January 2015, 08:23: Message edited by: Lucia ]
 
Posted by Garasu (# 17152) on :
 
I believe the phrase originated with the film Nacho Libre : "He's not lean. He's not mean. He's nacho average hero."
 
Posted by Trudy Scrumptious (# 5647) on :
 
I assume it's a play on "Not your average birthday party." But with nachos.
 
Posted by Lucia (# 15201) on :
 
Ah, that kind of works! Especially if I try and say it with an American accent.
 
Posted by lilBuddha (# 14333) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ariel:
They don't usually let you take photos in a courtroom during a trial, yet they permit artists' illustrations. What's the reasoning behind this?

They are different in nature. If you are in a park and a person is sat there with an easel, do you feel the same level of intrusion as if it were a person with a camera?
A drawn or painted image is seen as a representation where a photograph is seen as a verified reality. Both can create the same false impression, but they are judged differently.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
Also, a drawing can show just one person, but a photo may show more than that. I think it is forbidden to show members of the jury.

Moo
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Also, a drawing can show just one person, but a photo may show more than that. I think it is forbidden to show members of the jury.

That makes sense. I wondered if it had something to do with "data protection". Though the accused is always portrayed.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
I've come across an entry in my church records:

3 Jan 1714. Collection for Mrs England, wife of a minister, whose husband and six children had been murdered by the barbarous natives of the town of Golloun.

I've been trying to google to find out more about this incident, to no avail. Even a suggestion as to the whereabouts of "the town of Golloun" would help.

[ 13. January 2015, 14:41: Message edited by: North East Quine ]
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
Also, a drawing can show just one person, but a photo may show more than that. I think it is forbidden to show members of the jury.

I have seen UK courtroom sketches that show jurors, but they have been rough sketches - not sufficient to identify a juror. I had always thought that this was connected to the fact that it is contempt of court to ask jurors about their deliberations, or for jurors to disclose such details.
 
Posted by Cottontail (# 12234) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
I've come across an entry in my church records:

3 Jan 1714. Collection for Mrs England, wife of a minister, whose husband and six children had been murdered by the barbarous natives of the town of Golloun.

I've been trying to google to find out more about this incident, to no avail. Even a suggestion as to the whereabouts of "the town of Golloun" would help.

A decent possibility would be Goulon in Cameroon. This website puts it in the department of Mayo-Louti, in the North province. The nearest large town seems to be Guider.
 
Posted by Cottontail (# 12234) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cottontail:
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
I've come across an entry in my church records:

3 Jan 1714. Collection for Mrs England, wife of a minister, whose husband and six children had been murdered by the barbarous natives of the town of Golloun.

I've been trying to google to find out more about this incident, to no avail. Even a suggestion as to the whereabouts of "the town of Golloun" would help.

A decent possibility would be Goulon in Cameroon. This website puts it in the department of Mayo-Louti, in the North province. The nearest large town seems to be Guider.
Though thinking about it, 1714 seems awfully early for a British missionary to be that far inland in Africa, especially with a family. 1814 would have made more sense. The only possible explanation I can think of is that he was more like a chaplain to a small white settlement, perhaps at a trading post on a major river, or something. Or maybe some misguided attempt at setting up an early colony. But chances are I have the wrong Goulon/Golloun. [Frown]
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Thank you! Google isn't helping at all, partly because a surname like "England" confuses things. I'm trying out various combinations of "Rev England" and "Mr England" - what would an early C18th missionary have been called?

Also the entry doesn't say when the minister and children were killed - I'm assuming 1713, if the collection was held in Jan 1714, but might it have been earlier?
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
NEQ--

You might try genealogy sites, like Ancestry.com. (Sorry, I had trouble with the URL button.)
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Thanks, Golden Key, I've tried Ancestry.com and it's not helping.
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
NEQ--

How clear is the handwriting?

How would a minister have gone on foreign missions then? Through the denomination, or another organization? Would someone have records?

I see you're in Scotland. English spelling was quite different from now, and if you add in Gaelic... Maybe something other than "galloun" is meant?

You might try the variant "Englund".
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
A web search turned up this page from the National Library of Scotland. It says that the Glasgow and Edinburgh Missionary Societies, were both founded in 1796 and represented both the Church of Scotland and the Secession Church, and initiated evangelization in West Africa, the Caribbean (from 1800), the Caucasus (from 1802) - so the timescale might fit.

Does that give you another place to look? It would take considerable time and effort, I guess.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Sorry, got muddled between 1714 & 1814 - the former does seem too early in the history of British Protestant missions.

Might they have been with the East India Company? - not that it was particularly friendly to Christians.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Thanks. The handwriting is quite clear. It was written either by the minister or the Session Clerk, who at that point was the local schoolmaster, so whoever wrote it was a University graduate. (Although they must have received the news by letter, and who knows what that handwriting was like!)

However, the information is limited to that one single sentence. I don't know if describing Mr England as a "minister" implies that he was a Church of Scotland minister (my church is, and was then, the parish church) and I'm assuming that "barbarous natives" implies overseas mission, although he could have been a minister attached to a colony?
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
The East India Co. definitely did have Chaplains at that time: there is a book about them. But I may be barking up the wrong tree.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
Goullon seems a French word so possibly a French colony? But 1714 was a time of colonisation and emigration in the Australias so there is a possibility.
A quick google of Goullon Australia just shows lots of people called Le Goullon in Australia, which just seems to confirm we're looking at a French colony.
 
Posted by Cottontail (# 12234) on :
 
Taking another angle, I have had a look for early 18th century missionary societies. Like I said, it is really early for Protestant missionary work of this kind. But it turns out the SPCK was founded in 1698, and there was a Scottish branch as well. According to their wikipedia page, they focussed initially on the Americas, and then in 1709 they sent a printing press and trained printer out to East India. There may also have been some involvement in the Spice Islands. So the Americas or East India might be your best bet.

You could try contacting the SPCK, who I am sure will have records. There are also other related societies, such as the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (the SPG). I found some archival material for this at Lambeth Palace Library. There are some books mentioned on that page about the history of the society, at least one of which you can find in Edinburgh University Library.
 
Posted by Heavenly Anarchist (# 13313) on :
 
There's plenty of massacres in the French Americas in that period, though I can't find that name.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
There's an area of Louisville called Goullon - could be that somewhere around the Kentucky/Indiana border there was a small settlement at the time of the big French expansion?

Just a thought...
 
Posted by Eutychus (# 3081) on :
 
A bit of Googling turned up a Golloun Street in an old Indiana newspaper, so maybe.

[ 14. January 2015, 11:56: Message edited by: Eutychus ]
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by North East Quine:
Thank you! Google isn't helping at all, partly because a surname like "England" confuses things. I'm trying out various combinations of "Rev England" and "Mr England" - what would an early C18th missionary have been called?

Also the entry doesn't say when the minister and children were killed - I'm assuming 1713, if the collection was held in Jan 1714, but might it have been earlier?

I think you should assume that the killing took place *no later than* 1713, but it could have been earlier. Was the collection taken for her because she had returned and was now resident in the parish - perhaps under her maiden name? Is there a marriage record from earlier on in your parish records, consistent with her having time to bear six children before 1713? In general, was there some local connection which led to this collection being made, and which might help you find out more?
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
A search of the Marriage records on Scotland's People might reveal something, or if Mr England (he would have been Mr England or the Reverend Mr England, I think, in 1713) was a Church of Scotland Minister, then maybe he can be found in Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae (referred to on the Church of Scotland's web site.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
I don't think it's a parish matter, as a widow and children should have been provided for routinely - my impression is that when a collection was taken, it was for something outwith the parish, and contributions were voluntary.

A neighbouring parish had a collections in 1709 for "banished Protestants that were come to England" and "for the Canongate inhabitants their lose by fire" and somewhere I've seen a collection to raise a ransom for men captured by pirates in the Mediterranean.
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
i've come across that last in Patrick O'Brian's novels where the otherwise wholly unattractive Admiral Harte gives Capt. Aubrey a sum of money to redeem men captured for slaves by Mediterranean pirates.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
Tangent //I can't find the record of collecting a ransom, but came across this while looking:

Grange Kirk Session record.
5 March 1704. Contribution for relieving John Thomson, son to John Thomson in Turriff, slave in Algiers, and the Collection appointed to be nixt Sabbath.
12 March 1704 Collected for relieving John Thomson, slave in Algiers £3 6s 8d

I wonder how someone in North East Scotland went about buying their son from slavery in Algiers? // End tangent
 
Posted by Ariel (# 58) on :
 
If the entry is early in January 1714 then it's likely that Mrs England underwent this horrible experience in summer/autumn 1713, maybe even up to a year earlier. I'm guessing that if it was overseas it'd have taken a few months, say maybe three, to return home by ship - once she was fit to travel.

It's also possible that while she may have returned to her home town and her own family, it may not necessarily have been her husband's home town. He might not even have been Scottish. If he wasn't attached to NEQ's church, and there's no record of him having served as clergy at that church (or having been married or christened there) it may be difficult to find out what his first name was which makes tracing quite difficult.

Having said that, Scotland's People might be useful here. The Latter Day Saints FamilySearch site pages may be useful as well if you can find out what his or her first name was. Not sure how much Scottish information they have but you'd be surprised how far back some of their records go.
 
Posted by North East Quine (# 13049) on :
 
There's no record of anyone with the surname England / Englund / Ingland ever having served as clergy, or been baptised, married, or buried in our parish, though there have been families with that surname a couple of parishes away. There records pre 1700 are sketchy, though. I think if there had been a local connection it would have been mentioned.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
I suspect he is not a missionary. I have looked in this Google Book and there is only one England and he is a Roman Catholic Priest.

Jengie
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
I am trying to remember a hymn I knew from school, back in another century, that I thought was set to a tune very close to one by Sir Arthur Sullivan from The Mikado. The song is from the second act, the first line being The criminal cried, as he dropped him down.... The hymn tune I remember is from the chorus, Oh, never shall I Forget the cry, etc.

I can't identify it from any lists of Sullivan's hymns. Anyone out there have the faintest idea what I'm talking about?
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I've just looked in an online archive of Sullivan's hymn-tunes, and I can't find any that look as if they ought to sound like the song from The Mikado.

Then again, as any G&S aficionado will tell you, you can segue from almost any given Sullivan tune to almost any other - especially if the second one is For he is an Englishman ... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Golden Key (# 1468) on :
 
Don't know if this will help, but here is the "Trio and Chorus" score, which you quoted. (#7, pg. 142,)

Maybe the tune was just borrowed for the hymn?
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Problem

Hymns quite often do not go to a specific tune. So if it has the meter then a G&S organist can substitute the G&S tune for the more usual one. If you can get the meter of the G&S song then you can find lists of hymns by meter.

Jengie

[ 18. January 2015, 11:43: Message edited by: Jengie jon ]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
I've tried this out with 4 other organist friends (lunch party!) and none of us can come up with anything, apart from a very vague resemblance to the Sullivan tune Golden Sheaves which is for "To thee, O Lord, our hearts we raise" - the harvest hymn.
 
Posted by Pine Marten (# 11068) on :
 
I have searched in vain for this May song we used to do at school. I can remember most of the tune, and some of the words go like this:

'Come now [or Haste, haste] shepherds and neighbours...

Then come! come! come! Good shepherds all,
Good friends and neighbours, leave your labours,
Pipes and tabors are tuning their lay,
Then trip so neatly, smile so sweetly, down the meadow and back again...

Hearts are beating in tune with the music of May...'

The words are a bit screwed up, but if anyone knows this and can post some info it would save me from going completely demented. I've tried googling and so on, but with no luck. Over to you, knowledgeable shipmates.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I asked D. (who has studied hymnody) about the Sullivan tune, and he suggested that the hymn-tune, while sounding reminiscent of Sullivan, might be by someone else, possibly Barnby.

One of the girls in our choir's maiden name was Sullivan, and whenever we do a Sullivan hymn-tune, we refer to "J's Great-Uncle Arthur". [Big Grin]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
The only Barnby tune that I can think of that might fit would be Sheltering Wing, and then only if sung roughly twice usual hymn speed...

<tangent> Anyone else out there know that JB recycled Sweet and low for a hymn tune called 'Joy and light'?
 
Posted by Albertus (# 13356) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I asked D. (who has studied hymnody) about the Sullivan tune, and he suggested that the hymn-tune, while sounding reminiscent of Sullivan, might be by someone else, possibly Barnby.

One of the girls in our choir's maiden name was Sullivan, and whenever we do a Sullivan hymn-tune, we refer to "J's Great-Uncle Arthur". [Big Grin]

Good job you haven't got a boy there whose surname's Rank, then...
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I need to get the screen of my iPad repaired...has anyone else had to have such a repair and was it successful? I am in the UK...
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
I have a colleague who is hard on electronics. To my knowledge, he's replaced three screens on iPhones and one on an iPad mini. In all cases, he went to the place in the mall that does it, the guy ripped off the broken screen, got a new one out and fixed it on. It was done while he waited, in rather less time than it takes to get a pair of shoes re-heeled, and the repaired device works fine.

I am not in the UK...
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
I asked D. (who has studied hymnody) about the Sullivan tune, and he suggested that the hymn-tune, while sounding reminiscent of Sullivan, might be by someone else, possibly Barnby.

One of the girls in our choir's maiden name was Sullivan, and whenever we do a Sullivan hymn-tune, we refer to "J's Great-Uncle Arthur". [Big Grin]

I think you are probably right. I'll know it as soon as I hear three or four words, but meanwhile, my memory still plays games with me. I wish it would stop doing that.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Some years ago, on a plane I think, I watched a British comedy (film) about re-enactors. It might have had Mark Addy in it: if it didn't, it should have!

I would really like to see it again, but can't remember anything else much about it, and although I've looked, can't find anything remotely like it. I'm beginning to wonder if I dreamt it.

I feel sure the collective memory and knowledge of the Ship can help me!

M.

PS, I don't know why I felt that the fact I saw it on a plane should help!
 
Posted by The Rogue (# 2275) on :
 
Not sure why this stuck in my memory from a year ago. Replacing an ipad screen.
 
Posted by Sparrow (# 2458) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by M.:
Some years ago, on a plane I think, I watched a British comedy (film) about re-enactors. It might have had Mark Addy in it: if it didn't, it should have!

I would really like to see it again, but can't remember anything else much about it, and although I've looked, can't find anything remotely like it. I'm beginning to wonder if I dreamt it.

I feel sure the collective memory and knowledge of the Ship can help me!

M.

PS, I don't know why I felt that the fact I saw it on a plane should help!

Do you remember what it was they were re-enacting?
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Not really; I know it's a long shot! It's just really bugging me.

It was probably about 3 to 7 years ago.

M.
 
Posted by Hedgehog (# 14125) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by M.:
Some years ago, on a plane I think, I watched a British comedy (film) about re-enactors. It might have had Mark Addy in it: if it didn't, it should have!

I would really like to see it again, but can't remember anything else much about it, and although I've looked, can't find anything remotely like it. I'm beginning to wonder if I dreamt it.

Is there any chance that it was Faintheart (2008)?
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Hedgehog, you are brilliant! Yes, that's it.

I knew Ship of Fools would find it for me.

Thank you so much!

M.
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
I am fascinated by the pronunciation "pastoral" as against "PAStoral" that I hear from time to time. Is this a sort of theological differentiation from farming, a dialectical difference, or something else?
 
Posted by Zappa (# 8433) on :
 
No, hang on ... that was pasTORal as against PASToral

[ 31. January 2015, 05:52: Message edited by: Zappa ]
 
Posted by Spike (# 36) on :
 
How/why does salt melt snow?
 
Posted by Amanda B. Reckondwythe (# 5521) on :
 
Google is your friend.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
The impurity caused by adding salt to water reduces the melting point of snow so that it freezes at a lower temperature. Which is why it melts in the UK, sometimes (it also raises the boiling point for cooking). Rock salt is used as it contains grit which makes the ice less slippery.

If you want the full answer about melting and freezing points it goes into entropy and the Gibbs coefficient. (I got to write an essay on that one).
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Zappa:
I am fascinated by the pronunciation "pasTORal" as against "PAStoral" that I hear from time to time. Is this a sort of theological differentiation from farming, a dialectical difference, or something else?

No I don't think it means anything. I encounter a similar thing with ADversary and adVERsary. Naturally I know one is right™ and the other wrong™, but I never correct anyone on it - just grind my teeth inwardly!

Also there's a cross-pond thing about some other words -
REsearch/ reSEARCH is one that comes to mind, but I know there are some others as well, two syllable words mostly where they are stressed differently. In UK English the different stress is sometimes used to distinguish nominal from verbal meanings. But basically it's all just weird and irrational [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
I hear this all the time. The American TV pronunciations generally pump up the first syllable and sometimes extend its length (or second or first and second in longer words), or lower the tone of voice at the word's end. I've heard the same thing in the UK but it seems to differ accent to accent. It also seems to function sometimes to shorten the final syllable, e.g. candidate becomes candidit.

ROBIN hood - robin HOOD
MARSHmallow - marshMALLOW
 
Posted by BroJames (# 9636) on :
 
This site states that
quote:
In the speaking of French loan words, General American tends to stress the last syllable, whereas Received Pronunciation tends to stress and earlier syllable
and offers this list:
-adult
-ballet
-brochure
-buffet
-chalet
-croissant
-detail
-garage
-salon
-vaccine
-nonchalant
-attaché
-moustache
-démodé
-denouement
-fiancé
-escargot
… to which I will add a name - Bernard!
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Never, under any circumstance, assume that American place names are pronounced as they would be in their home country. Versailles, IN is not pronounced the way they say it in France. Cairo, IL is better assumed to be an entirely different word from that town in Egypt. (Although Memphis TN and Athens GA are okay.)
 
Posted by Porridge (# 15405) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by BroJames:
This site states that
quote:
In the speaking of French loan words, General American tends to stress the last syllable, whereas Received Pronunciation tends to stress and earlier syllable
and offers this list:
-adult
-ballet
-brochure
-buffet
-chalet
-croissant
-detail
-garage
-salon
-vaccine
-nonchalant
-attaché
-moustache
-démodé
-denouement
-fiancé
-escargot
… to which I will add a name - Bernard!

Where I live (and where we are a Bit Different), "adult" is pronounced A-dult when used as a noun, but a-DULT when used as an adjective. I've never heard anyone say "de-TAIL," only "DE-tail." Likewise, it's MOUS-tache, never mous-TACHE, and "fi-AN -ce" not fi-an-CE."

I've never heard anybody say "démodé" at all.
 
Posted by Lamb Chopped (# 5528) on :
 
There are regional differences in America regarding which syllable get accented for certain words. Also, in some cases it depends upon whether the word is being used as a noun or a verb.
 
Posted by Kelly Alves (# 2522) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by M.:
Hedgehog, you are brilliant! Yes, that's it.

I knew Ship of Fools would find it for me.

Thank you so much!

M.

That sounds like a hilarious movie!

And my grandma was an Addy!

[ 01. February 2015, 03:05: Message edited by: Kelly Alves ]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Kelly, yes, it's not a bad little film at all - we watched it last night! And all filmed around Ludlow*, so very pretty to look at.

M.

*sorry, but trying to post a link keeps buggering up my ipad, so anyone interested will have to wiki it themselves..

edited to add, Mark Addy isn't in it, I was wrong.

[ 01. February 2015, 10:45: Message edited by: M. ]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Found a copy in the cupboard...

Who wouldn't laugh at something containing the immortal line I've washed your jerkin and your chain mail is drying on the landing [Snigger]

Seriously, if you haven't seen it, get hold of a copy or download it.
 
Posted by Stercus Tauri (# 16668) on