Thread: Tea and biscuits or GIN and tonic? Britain 2018 Board: All Saints / Ship of Fools.


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Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
It's not quite 2018 yet here, but probably time to fold up the old thread and unpack a bright, shiny new one for the New Year.

The kettle's on, the ice and lemon are chilling for the GIN, so off we go ...

In case I'm not around before midnight*, Happy New Year to one and all!

* I probably won't be, as I've got Things To Do before our friends come round, and it'll be well into tomorrow for you folk by the time they leave.

[ 31. December 2017, 15:11: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We had a spot of drama at church this morning: one of the ladies in the choir took not well during the service, and had to be taken off in an ambulance (which she tried to resist, bless her, as she thought it would be expensive ...)

Busy afternoon ahead once D. finishes the second service, what with making haggis, tidying the château ...

Be good over the New Year, and if you can't be good, be careful! [Devil]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Yes, Happy 2018 to all in Ukland, Canadia, Usania, and other countries whose names I forget (or can't spell).

A tad damp and gloomy here, though mild. Tomato and Basil SOUP for Tea, I think!

[Big Grin]

IJ
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Place marking as a frequent reader but infrequent poster. Happy New Year to all Little Britainers and in particular thinking of Our Indian Correspondent .
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Yes, Ferijen. I was thinking of him this morning. I have email but will not use it because I do not know how busy the household is. Twin toddlers can cause a commotion.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Indeed they do, but I can truthfully report that the old grump adores every minute of it. Except when they stomp on his feet.

I do so miss him here. He has been my friend for longer than we have been on the ship.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Happy New Year everyone. May 2018 bring good health and happiness to us all.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Happy New Year everyone.

And soon to be 'Happy New Ship'!

I like the new thread title [Smile]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Happy New Year everyone, I hope it is a good one for us all. I too miss WW, specially at this time of new 2018 threads.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Happy New Year to all!
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Raining here again, and the leaks in the Palace roof (I think there must be a crack in the flashing somewhere - difficult to tell exactly where, though) are letting a small but VERY ANNOYING drip of water into the Episcopal bedchamber.

[Mad]

Ah well - back to the WHISKY bottle, I think. Might as well start the year as I mean to go on, as I find that WHISKY cancels out all the adverse side-effects of the meds I have to take.

(I am being facetious).

[Two face]

IJ
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I'm just popping in to wish everyone a peraceful and happy 2018. God willing.

I often read this thread on a computer where I'm not actually logged into the Ship, but I am on my own PC today.

Tea, GIN, hot chocolate, whisky, wine - whatever your tipple is, I wish you many mugsfull of it!
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Raining here again, and the leaks in the Palace roof (I think there must be a crack in the flashing somewhere - difficult to tell exactly where, though) are letting a small but VERY ANNOYING drip of water into the Episcopal bedchamber.

Those sorts of leak are very hard to pin down - the place where the water comes out seems to have no relation to where it gets in! My late father-in-law struggled with such a drip for years!

We had a minor flood on Saturday with an overflowing toilet cistern leading to water dripping through the ceiling below, however no damage seems to be caused. Why do these things always happen on holiday weekends?

My wife - coming from North of the Border - is the whisky drinker of the two of us. But she only developed a taste for it fairly recently.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
I too have become a fan of whisky in my later years. It is frigidissimo here (12 degrees F) and tonight I think we must have whisky macs.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Popping in to say “Um, hello...” and wave a bit.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Brenda says:
quote:
I think we must have whisky macs.
No, no, WHISKY is only at all efficacious when completely undiluted, even by ice cubes!

[Eek!]

IJ
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
As I said elsewhere. [Angel]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
... WHISKY is only at all efficacious when completely undiluted, even by ice cubes!

I'd concur regarding the ice-cubes (heresy), but according to a friend who used to be the manager of the Highland Park distillery, the correct way to drink good whisky* is with just a splash of spring water.

We had a very enjoyable evening taking in the New Year with our friends; apart from a splash added to the haggis mixture, it was sans whisky, but avec rather a lot of wine, some with bubbles.

The only fly in the ointment is that D. seems to have caught the cold that I had a few weeks ago, and it's manifesting itself in him having almost completely lost his voice. He can get a word or two out, then sort of fades to a squeak, and I'm finding that I want to clear his throat for him.

[Frown]

* If you're drinking inferior whisky, you can put what you like in it. [Devil]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
If you're drinking inferior WHISKY, best put Poison in it, and finish the job properly....

Poor D., though - not a good start to the year. Hopefully, he'll recover before he next has to address the choristers in a Loud Voice.

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We have choir practice on Thursday: I hope he's got a bit of voice back by then!
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Which, if he doesn't, conjures up the horrifying image of the unfortunate D. completely unable to control his Unruly Regiment of Singers!

(I'm sure they wouldn't be so inconsiderate.....)

Some nice, soothing remedy is called for (apart, perhaps, from GIN). Honey, lemon, and glycerine, maybe, if it's still available? IIRC, very tasty, and comforting.

IJ
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Happy new year from the land of the frog [Big Grin] .

Back to Paris today after a bumpy flight from Toulouse yesterday evening due to storm Carmen, but we didn’t see the worst of it. It was much blowier around Bordeaux and in Brittany.

After much food, the en rouge diet is going to consist of soup, fish and easily digested vegetables for the foreseeable future.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
If you're drinking inferior WHISKY, best put Poison in it, and finish the job properly....

Poor D., though - not a good start to the year. Hopefully, he'll recover before he next has to address the choristers in a Loud Voice.

IJ

If an organist can't use his voice could he find a chord that shuts everyone up? Something slightly off, to make them cringe?
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
If an organist can't use his voice could he find a chord that shuts everyone up? Something slightly off, to make them cringe?

As a guitarist I find G on the low strings and G# on the three high strings is perfect for this, he could try G in the left hand and G# in the right.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
As for the thread title, that depends on the GIN, and on the tonic, no G*rd*ns or Br*tv*c for me.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
St. David's Hall in Cardiff has recently opened a Gin Lounge. There are over 30 gins on offer, and the bar staff carefully match the tonic waters to suit.

Or so my wife says (who likes Cardiff Eccentric Gin and H+ndr+cks).
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Noting from her post above that la vie en rouge's future diet is to include quantities of fish (and I guess France is a good country in which to indulge in such culinary necessities), I beg to announce that I am this evening cooking some nice Mackerel Fillets (from bonnie Scotland) for my Tea.

Yum. Yum.

Some new Potatoes, and some Bread and Butter, will accompany the said Repast.

This will hopefully negate the depressing Effects of a day of Gloom and Rain...

IJ
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We had finny haddock, roast potatoes and sprouts.

Very nice too [Smile]
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Fish fingers, oven chips and peas for us.
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St Everild:
Fish fingers, oven chips and peas for us.

That sounds an easy meal to prepare. I had an easy meal too. One son visited the other day and brought me three small pork fillets in a spicy marinade he had put together himself. I seared the last of them in hot pan last night and had some easy vegetables to prepare. A large salad at lunch upped the vege quota for the day.
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
Ours was an easy meal as well. Partridge stew put together and fridged last night, then put in the slow-cooker this morning before we headed out for a day at the British Museum. All that needed doing when we got back was turning it to high, making dumplings, and waiting 20 min whilst they cooked [Big Grin]

Perfect for a somewhat damp and breezy night. There was a little green veg on the side, just to try and be vaguely healthy!
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We had fish too - slightly spicy salmon pieces (reduced price offering from a local supermarket), stirred into portions of rice cooked with leeks, peas and spinach. The rest of the rice mix was put aside to make stuffed peppers with the leftovers of a meat loaf tomorrow.
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
Fish fingers, oven chips and peas for us.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We did leftovers today as well (our main meal of the day is usually a late lunch): D. had been making cottage pie a couple of weeks ago and, finding that he had more minced beef mixture than he needed, made a sort of cobbler thing with a scone topping. We had half of it before Christmas and froze the rest, along with some left-over cottage pie, so I mixed the two and heated them through. Not haute cuisine, perhaps, but a decent feed all the same.

I'm now contemplating some of the pâté that's left in the fridge with a slice or three of bread for supper, possibly with a glass of WINE.

D's voice is a bit better than it was: he went to the staff meeting this morning and rehearsed the band this evening, although he's still coughing like an engine and dosing himself with Mentho-Lyptus and hot Lem-sip.

If the weatherists are right, we might not be having choir practice on Thursday anyway: they're telling us we're going to get another foot of sn*w, which could cause a fairly major bollocks. [Waterworks]

[ 02. January 2018, 23:03: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Ian Climacus (# 944) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
St. David's Hall in Cardiff has recently opened a Gin Lounge. There are over 30 gins on offer, and the bar staff carefully match the tonic waters to suit.

Wow.

And here I was excited at a distillery opening near me.

Happy New Year Britons!

[ 02. January 2018, 23:09: Message edited by: Ian Climacus ]
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
St. David's Hall in Cardiff has recently opened a Gin Lounge. There are over 30 gins on offer, and the bar staff carefully match the tonic waters to suit.

Of course they match them carefully, as well as skilfully and after a deep (and meaningful) conversation to find the particular characteristics appealing to that customer. Then they remember the details for the next time the customer pays a visit. In other words. it sounds a bit like 99, 100 change hands to me.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
St. David's Hall in Cardiff has recently opened a Gin Lounge. There are over 30 gins on offer, and the bar staff carefully match the tonic waters to suit.

Or so my wife says (who likes Cardiff Eccentric Gin and H+ndr+cks).

I see your 30 and raise you 600.
In the hills not far from here.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I'd better not show her that ...
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
On similar lines, while hiking round Scotland with my parents a few years ago, we discovered this establishment, which is the official home of the Scotch Whisky Parliament. Yes, that’s really a thing. They have a “short” whisky list, featuring about 100 different types, or the “big” list, with 600 different choices. I’ll let you guess which one my Dad wanted to look at [Biased] .

I’m not much of a whisky drinker most of the time, but when in Rome… Usually my preferred poison is good Armagnac or Cognac. That said, all of the above are off limits at present, which surprisingly I actually don’t feel all that deprived about. Even if it was a bit cruel to buy a bottle for Christmas from the year of my birth. Go toast my health without me [Roll Eyes] . CHEESE, on the other hand – well, let’s just say I hope the Bubble appreciates the effort I’m making. We have some quite nice Cheddar in the house, which I’m allowed to eat, but we wants Camembert, precious.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
O well, if you're allowed to eat Cheddar, The End Is Not Nigh. Camembert is fine, but not the only CHEESE in the world...

The CHEESE Shop...

IJ
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
On similar lines, while hiking round Scotland with my parents a few years ago, we discovered this establishment, which is the official home of the Scotch Whisky Parliament. Yes, that’s really a thing. They have a “short” whisky list, featuring about 100 different types, or the “big” list, with 600 different choices. I’ll let you guess which one my Dad wanted to look at [Biased] .

Just a slight point but some establishments have over 3,000 whiskys.

Jengie
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
O well, if you're allowed to eat Cheddar, The End Is Not Nigh. Camembert is fine, but not the only CHEESE in the world...

If only it was just Camembert that was banned… I live in France, aka CHEESE nirvana. 90% of the production is off limits. ‘Tis woe and misery I tell you.

Over the holidays, and facing a particularly tantalising CHEESE platter, I did wonder if I could appoint my family as official tasters, Roman Emperor style. They’d all been eating the stuff for three days and none of them had died of listeria poisoning…

OTOH, I was not in the least bit upset about having to decline oysters. I have never understood the appeal of this supposed delicacy. Apart from not liking the taste over much, I can’t deal with food that isn’t dead [Help] .
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Agreed re oysters. Ewwww......

Commiserations re CHEESE, though.

[Frown]

IJ
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Clearly the throat lurgy is doing the rounds as MuminElmet and I were both struck down over the weekend. We saw in the New Year (or saw off the Old Year) with Father Ted repeats and doctored cocoa. The hard partying will have to wait for a few days.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
The Lunar Rogue, aka The Choir Pub, is known for its whisky collection, which is certainly pretty impressive, especially for this side of the Pond. The first time D. and I went there, I challenged him to try a nip of each one (not at one sitting, you understand).

His usual tipple is Steam Whistle, an Ontario beer; so far, he's had one dram of Highland Park* 12-year-old, which he had instead of beer one evening for medicinal purposes ... [Biased]

We're bracing ourselves for that weather-bomb: it looks as if we're going to be splat in the middle of it, and probably get at least another foot of sn*w. [Waterworks]

I blame Trump. [Devil]

I've just finished baking a batch of French sticks, so at least we won't starve, even if we get a power-cut (although we might freeze: our only source of heat is electricity).

* I don't think he could have brought himself to order any other brand. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I have made a new discovery - porridge with cinnamon and grated apple. I used to put cinnamon in my porridge when I tried 5:2, to make porridge made with water edible, so when I tasted the porridge I was making with soya milk and found it tasted as if made with water, I tried experimented.
 
Posted by Wet Kipper (# 1654) on :
 
sounds like a nice addition
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
Porridge with cinnamon is very good for the diabetic, or so they tell me (IANAD, but you knew that already)

Mrs. S, who ate too much porridge as a student ever to contemplate it these days [Projectile]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
I always cook porridge with cinnamon and add more after, since I dislike too much sugar.

As for adding grated apple Quaker Oats has been doing that for years with their instant mixes - disgusting stuff, but if you make your own cereal...
very nice
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
This is porridge without sugar, made with gluten free oats and soya milk for my daughter, ordinary milk and oats for me. Gluten free oats cook better in a pan rather than the speedy microwave trick I use. I was grating fresh apple over the porridge when made.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
... the speedy microwave trick ...

When we were in Belfast D's boss exploded a microwave by trying to cook porridge in it.

Serve him right. [Devil]

It's now been snowing and blowing a hoolie for the last 8 hours, and showing little sign of slowing down. D. cancelled choir practice* as the forecast was (correctly) pretty grim, and quite a few of the choir have to come from out of town (we're almost on the city limits ourselves, and practically out in the country).

Not looking forward to getting the Pigletmobile dug out tomorrow ... [Frown]

I may cheer myself up with the manufacture of SOUP.


* if the Almighty must dump a foot of snow on us, why does he have to do it on a Thursday? [Mad]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
If only it was just Camembert that was banned… I live in France, aka CHEESE nirvana. 90% of the production is off limits. ‘Tis woe and misery I tell you.

LVER, if you wish to announce the reason for lack of cheese to the wider ship, the traditional thread is here. you could bump (pun intentional) that one. http://forum.ship-of-fools.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=005767;p=5
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
... I may cheer myself up with the manufacture of SOUP.

I did, using leftovers from the Hogmanay party, and now I'm off upstairs to post it on the recipe thread.

[Smile]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
If only it was just Camembert that was banned… I live in France, aka CHEESE nirvana. 90% of the production is off limits. ‘Tis woe and misery I tell you.

LVER, if you wish to announce the reason for lack of cheese to the wider ship, the traditional thread is here. you could bump (pun intentional) that one. http://forum.ship-of-fools.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=005767;p=5
Balaam, LVER did announce it officially but I think it was on one of the threads set up for 2018.

[ 05. January 2018, 04:29: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Its Friday: wet, nasty and dull but never fear -

Beauty is in the eye...
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
[Eek!]

I rather like the Lincoln Cathedral one, though...

'JOSEPH! Wake up! It's happened...!!'

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Those are brilliant. [Big Grin]

When we were in Belfast, for no reason that can be fathomed by man, I got roped into "doing" the crib scene. I should explain one or two things first:


IIRC there were two actually male mannikins (one of whom was Joseph, the other a shepherd-boy). The rest of the shepherds were lady-mannikins with strategically-placed beards, tea-towels, etc. and voluminous robes.

At some point between the last chord of O come, all ye faithful on Christmas morning and D. and I heading across the Irish Sea for New Year, the transvestite shepherds had to be turned into transvestite kings, complete with gold, frankincense and myrrh, which I did with the help of the much-more-talented mum of one of the choristers.

I note from a picture on Facebook that they now have a normal-sized Nativity, which looks much nicer than anything I could have produced!

We got a lot of Weather yesterday - about two feet of it. Because there's a storm-door that opens outwards, we couldn't get out of the front door, and D. had quite a time of it getting out the back (also with a storm-door, but with slightly less recalcitrant snow behind it). Between us we managed to dig along the path, but the Pigletmobile was up to its fetlocks, and a very kind lady in the choir (who always comes to D's recitals) offered us a lift in, so the recital went ahead. There were only three in the audience, but they all enjoyed it, and that's what matters.

When we got home, we met further manifestations of human kindness: a neighbour was busy attacking our drive with his snow-blower, so D. was able to get the Pigletmobile out with hardly any more shovelling at all.

[Overused]

Now the forecasters are telling us it's going to feel like -38° tonight. Even I'll admit that's in the bloody cold category! [Eek!]

[ 05. January 2018, 22:58: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Its Friday: wet, nasty and dull but never fear -

Beauty is in the eye...

A bit "dog-in-the-manger", wouldn't you say?
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Its Friday: wet, nasty and dull but never fear -

Beauty is in the eye...

One of those dogs is stressed by the situation - guess which one?
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
In all seriousness, no, I can't guess! Not being a dog-person....

(Frankly, that whole scene seems to me to be showing disrespect to an intelligent and useful species. Mind you, my sense-of-humour meter might need recalibrating).

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Frankly, that whole scene seems to me to be showing disrespect to an intelligent and useful species.

Now, if it had been meerkats ...? [Devil]
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Your request?

Jengie
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Hoist with my own petard! Thank you.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Wodders waves to all here. Had a nice chat with him this morning my time. He was also telling me he had a nice chat with a certain Annoying Penguin and would probably enjoy chats with anyone who has his phone number.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Good to hear, Uncle Pete! Any progress on his sight?

Still holding him in the Light. [Votive]

Christmas trees, decorations* and cards have been put to bed for another year. As we didn't really have much (a tall tree in the sitting-room window, a star hanging from the curtain-rail, a little tree in the corner beside the dining-table and a couple of sparkly little bent-wire trees), the place doesn't look too bare.

I was a bit worried about where I'd store the big tree: I didn't really want to have to dismantle it and re-dress it next year. Then had a brainwave** and found that it fits perfectly under the hanging-rack in the walk-in wardrobe, in that little bit of "dead" space in the corner. Covered with an old, unused downie cover, it'll be fine until it all comes round again.

* apart from candle-bridges and Nativity figures, which will stay up until Candlemas

** I wonder if a brainwave is the opposite of a brainfart? [Snigger]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks Pete for news of WW. I have his number but have been reluctant to ring.
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lothlorien:
Thanks Pete for news of WW. I have his number but have been reluctant to ring.

Give him my best. I don't phone people because of my hearing problems.

Moo
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
Pete, please could you say hi to WW for me, and send on my best wishes. I hate using the phone - phonophobia?
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Please say hello from Macarius and I as well.

M.
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
Please say hello from me too, wishing him well.

I don't like phones and don't hear very well either!
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
And from Darllenwr, Lord P and me, with fond memories of a Shipmeets in the Forest of Dean!
 
Posted by Yangtze (# 4965) on :
 
I have WW’s number and have been thinking about him. Will give him a bell.

Did anyone get anywhere with getting him audiobooks? If not, do you think Himself could put podcasts on his phone? Could be a good alternative.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I have his number, but am reluctant to ring because I'm not sure of the time-zone. How far ahead of GMT is he?

I wouldn't like to breeze in with a phone call and find it was three o'clock in the morning in Woddersville! [Eek!]
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Indian time is currently 10.5 hours ahead of EST. If NB is one hour ahead of Ontario, then you are 9.5 hours behind IT. Greenwich is 4 hours ahead of NB and 5.5 hours behind IT.

IT never changes. But in ADT, it would be 8.5 hours ahead on ADT.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Ran out of edit time: The above post was to PIGLET Please, if you are in other time zones, make your own adjustments.

It is currently (at 1300 EST, 2330 there.) He will be just a tad grumpy if you phone him now. Best time is between 0900 and 1000 your time.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
Piglet or others this webpage might help. This how I would do it after long experience of getting it wrong with relatives and they are only ever one or two hours before or after us, I can never recall which is current. Yes someone will tell me, but I will just forget.

Thanks

Jengie
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Thanks Jengie, this should help many. My iPhone clock function also has world times on it andt the ability to save specific locations. Useful when family is OS.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thanks, Pete and Jengie. I had a feeling when I lived in Newfoundland that WW was in one of the other "half-hour" zones, but wasn't sure how far ahead they were.

[ 08. January 2018, 04:04: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Good to hear some news of WW, he is much missed.
We celebrated my mother in law's 90th birthday yesterday. She had been saying all along she didn't want a fuss so we just had a simple buffet meal with all four of her children, their partners and 50% of the grandchildren. One of the missing grandchildren phoned and we got hold of the other (in China) on Facetime so it was more or less like she was there with us. I'm just annoyed we forgot to take a group photo as it is quite likely there won't be another such gathering.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Poor baby en rouge. Not even due until June and my family members are already arguing over footballing allegiances…

My brother, an Arsenal fan, mentioned over the phone to my parents that he’s hellbent on tracking down an Arsenal babygro and has been scouring the internet for same. My Dad is now outraged, and says that in that case, he’s definitely going to get hold of a Liverpool one.

(Personally I’m not all that bothered about the beautiful game. I’d much rather watch rugby.)
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
My sons used to wear Manchester United tops - a fashion thing. When we went to my friend’s house her husband used to put one boy under each arm and dump them in his garage.

It worked, they are now City supporters and mortified that I ‘let them’ wear Utd shirts 🤣🤣
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
I took delivery, yesterday, of a nearly new keyboard and stand which will facilitate my half-arsed attempt to teach myself piano. A nearby church was closing down and the priest, previously of my church, was trying to find a good home for it. Some friends (the deacon and pianist) were distributing various things including spare crib figures and an advent candle stand to other churches.

It felt like watching a whale carcass on a nature documentary being taken apart by colonies of smaller creatures.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
At least the vessels and so on are going on to an ecclesiastical use.
I have a friend who married again. Her new husband is of German extraction and on their honeymoon they went back to the old country and visited the village of his ancestors. The church there was completely on its uppers, almost in ruins. A vast huge altar painting, formerly hung behind the altar, had been taken down, rolled up, and stuffed into the back premises to preserve it from being rained on. The people in charge begged their rich American scion to take it home and keep it safe. So he did.
The canvas is about 20 feet by 30, and depicts St. Peter betraying Christ outside of the Temple, one of those florid early Victorian paintings. It is far too big to hang up in any ordinary room. He had to build a room onto the back of his house for it, and then hire conservators to clean and mount the canvas. It is lovely -- but it's no longer a church furnishing, alas. It's weird, to sit in front of the TV watching the game and then look back over your shoulder and see the mournful Christ giving St. Peter the fisheye.

[ 08. January 2018, 13:33: Message edited by: Brenda Clough ]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Wow. Sounds as though it really ought to be in some cathedral or other... [Eek!]

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
La Vie, as Arsenal and Liverpool both play in red, why not get a plain red baby-gro and keep everyone happy?

You could always tell them Baby Rouge is an Aberdeen supporter ... [Devil]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Red for Baby Rouge seems entirely appropriate, anyway.

IJ
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Red for Baby Rouge seems entirely appropriate, anyway.

IJ

Problem is that football teams that wear red are usually Scumbag FC. I give you Manchester United, Liverpool and Arsenal. Nottingham Forest (remember Brian Clough) were no better. When the first two play I want both to lose and for decades Arsenal would score a goal and, rather than go for another, play with two rows of five across the park and kill the game.

No, don't do it.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Meh. I’m working on the basis that any kind of free clothing not paid for by me has got to be a good thing. I can see the family rivalry working in my favour here [Snigger] [Two face]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
O indeed - make the most of it!

[Big Grin]

IJ
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
posted by Sioni Sais
quote:
Problem is that football teams that wear red are usually Scumbag FC. I give you Manchester United, Liverpool and Arsenal. Nottingham Forest (remember Brian Clough) were no better. When the first two play I want both to lose and for decades Arsenal would score a goal and, rather than go for another, play with two rows of five across the park and kill the game.
OTOH if you go to the website of the WRU they do a fetching red babygro or vest complete with PoW feathers... there's lovely!
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I don't know if it's a good thing you just showed me that...

I want the Captain Adorable one really, really bad [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... there's lovely!

I wondered about a Welsh rugger strip, but wasn't sure of La Vie's allegiance ... [Big Grin] Those are utterly adorable. [Smile]

The temperature here got up (briefly) into plus numbers today! [Yipee] An hour or two later it was blowing a blizzard, but it was what they call a snow-squall - nasty, with near-zero visibility, but usually mercifully short-lived.
 
Posted by Nenya (# 16427) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Its Friday: wet, nasty and dull but never fear -

Beauty is in the eye...

One of those dogs is stressed by the situation - guess which one?
Is it the one with his/her tongue hanging out?
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
Poor baby en rouge. Not even due until June and my family members are already arguing over footballing allegiances…

My brother, an Arsenal fan, mentioned over the phone to my parents that he’s hellbent on tracking down an Arsenal babygro and has been scouring the internet for same. My Dad is now outraged, and says that in that case, he’s definitely going to get hold of a Liverpool one.

The Intrepid Grandson, 2 on Boxing Day, is now the proud possessor of a complete Wales FA strip and a West Ham one - his parents have no interest in ball games so his uncle, Master S, sees it as his role in life to carry on the family traditions [Killing me] WHU is a family tradition, honestly, in his defence - when Mr. S's father moved to the East End he supported them, and used to take Mr. S along. They've never managed to shake it off, though it causes untold heartbreak.

Personally I have no idea when he'll be allowed to wear either of them - unless Miss S sends him to nursery in them, on muddy or painting days! [Two face]

Mrs. S, who thinks he looks impossibly cute in anything [Axe murder]

PS my nephew had a Liverpool babygro which read 'You'll never crawl alone!'
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
... a Liverpool babygro which read 'You'll never crawl alone!'

[Killing me] [Killing me]

We decided this afternoon that a forage around Costco was a good idea, and when we left the house I couldn't believe how warm it was.

It was actually -2°C, but it's been so bl**dy cold here for the last couple of weeks, it felt positively spring-like.

According to the forecast, it's going to be +12° on Friday, but back down to -19° by Sunday night - a plummet of more than 30° in the space of 72 hours.

At least the weather here's never boring ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Its Friday: wet, nasty and dull but never fear -

Beauty is in the eye...

One of those dogs is stressed by the situation - guess which one?
Is it the one with his/her tongue hanging out?
Yes it is.

He may look like he’s ‘smiling’ but panting when it’s not hot and they haven’t exerted themselves is a sign of stress. If it were hot they’d all be panting.

In other news I have two new GINs to try this evening with some excellent tonic.

A new Schwartzwald one and a bottle of Whitley Neill
[Smile]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Just checking in here while a batch of stock does its bubbling thing - will strain and decant it before choir practice.

There's a slight, but visible, decrease in the amount of sn*w on the drive chez Piglet; it's currently +4°. If the "January thaw" they're predicting happens it might shift some more, but even if it gets to 12° tomorrow, it's not expected to last nearly long enough to make much of an impression.

Back to shovelling, shuffling and sliding at the weekend ... [Frown]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
When I lived in New Hampshire, the January thaw typically started between January 20 and January 25.

Moo
 
Posted by betjemaniac (# 17618) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Red for Baby Rouge seems entirely appropriate, anyway.

IJ

Problem is that football teams that wear red are usually Scumbag FC. I give you Manchester United, Liverpool and Arsenal. Nottingham Forest (remember Brian Clough) were no better. When the first two play I want both to lose and for decades Arsenal would score a goal and, rather than go for another, play with two rows of five across the park and kill the game.

No, don't do it.

Of course, certainly in England, *proper* (ie XV man) football teams with a bit of red in them are usually the nice guys - Moseley, London Welsh, Gloucester, Rosslyn Park, Blackheath....

Not Quins so much, but then they play in virtually every colour under the sun so the red gets diluted...
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
I grew up with a scholboy's free season ticket watch Bath FC (as was) around 1970. Bath weren't the power they became in the 1980's so the matches against Bristol and Glaws were X certificate stuff. Gloucester could live with the worst any Welsh club could offer (with the possible exception of Pontypool) and as for Blackheath, well, they lived up to their nickname of "The Hackers" for a long time. 'Quins on the other hand were regarded as a bunch of wusses by all West country clubs and they got a good shoeing.

Rugby isn't what it used to be. I've got stud marks to prove it.
 
Posted by betjemaniac (# 17618) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:


Rugby isn't what it used to be. I've got stud marks to prove it.

thanks to Moseley's recent travails, I've been watching a lot of National 1 the past couple of seasons...not sure much has changed down here...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
D. (who detests most forms of sport) likes to quote the following (quite possibly unfair) definitions:

Cricket: a gentlemen's game played by gentlemen
Rugby union: a yobs' game played by gentlemen
Soccer: a gentlemen's game played by yobs
Rugby league: a yobs' game played by yobs

Obviously, the bit about soccer being played by yobs doesn't apply to Ipswich Town ... [Devil]

* * * * *

The predicted thaw is certainly happening - it's currently 11° and pouring. It's shifted quite a bit of the snow though: we have visible tarmac and grass. It's not going to last though - it's set to plummet back to freezing tomorrow morning, and all the water that's lying around will freeze again, which is Not A Good Thing.

It was nice while it lasted ...
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
+34°C forecast here, currently 33 at midday. No ice except in my water glass that I can see.
 
Posted by no prophet's flag is set so... (# 15560) on :
 
You must be somewhere else too. -36°C here. Windchill of -45.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
D. (who detests most forms of sport) likes to quote the following (quite possibly unfair) definitions:

Cricket: a gentlemen's game played by gentlemen
Rugby union: a yobs' game played by gentlemen
Soccer: a gentlemen's game played by yobs
Rugby league: a yobs' game played by yobs

Obviously, the bit about soccer being played by yobs doesn't apply to Ipswich Town ... [Devil]

* * * * *


In addition the Gaelic field sports* are, as they say, "Games for hooligans played by hooligans". By extension that includes Aussie Rules while American Football (Gridiron) is a computerised tank battle.

*Gaelic Football and Hurling.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
5°C here. I don’t mind what the temperature is, I just need to see some sun. There has been none here for weeks, just low grey clouds [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Much the same here, though the Great Yellow Face did show himself a few days ago (or was it weeks....?).

Grey is, alas, the predominant colour of most of Ukland - physically and mentally - at the moment. Whether there are more than fifty shades of it, I cannot say.

IJ
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
(By Great Yellow Face, I mean, of course, the Sun-Star, not the racist monster across the Pond).

IJ
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Orange, BJ, orange. We cannot give over our entire spectrum to him. (I was in New York City last January, and in the theater district the Tropicana people had set up a promotional tent, with coupons for orange juice, etc. They were doing little business, and I said to one of the girls, "Orange will be okay again some day.")
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Point taken, Brenda - I was suddenly afraid that what is usually Benign (unless you catch too much of it) might be confused with that which is Malign (even if you only catch a teeny bit of it).

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Not much in the way of sunshine here today, but all that rain we had last night has certainly shifted some of the snow. D. looked out the window this morning and said if it carries on like this he'll have to cut the grass ... [Big Grin]

As predicted though, it changed to freezing rain, and getting about today was not really much fun - there were Patches of Treachery™ all over the place. Salt has been applied to the path, steps and deck chez Piglet, and if the forecasters are to be believed, we should have a couple of cold but sunny, snow-free days before it all starts again.

Hurrah for January thaws! [Smile]
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Not terribly exciting weather here. Just grey and mibsy. I am staying in and surfing t'internet, reading, and zentangling.

Actually, what good things to do!
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Not so grey or mibsy (lovely word!) here today, but still conducive to staying in, reading, eating SOUP etc.

Mind you, it's been so mild overall that daffodils are beginning to appear already, not to mention the lovely little celandines next to the Vicarage drive...
[Eek!]

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Very grey here, we didn't eat soup but TOAST.
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Grey and shitty here near the oxen ford as we!!, but the first crocus is just starting to open up, and the snowdrops are heading up as well. It's coming...

AG
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
SOUP and TOAST are both very comforting indeed. You know there'a new thread upstairs in Heaven about SOUP machines? Who even knew that such things existed?

It's a gloriously sunny but very cold (-12°) day here; the salt seems to have staved off the worst of the Patches of Treachery™ chez Piglet and I'm contemplating what sort of concoction I'm going to make for lunch with part of the roast chicken in the fridge.

Creamy-white-wine sauce or rosemary-and-lemon? Will have a browse round the interweb to see what I can come up with.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Hmm...rosemary-and-lemon sounds good!

Meanwhile, TOAST has been the chosen item for Tea this evening, with lashings of Butter and Marmalade (yes, I know it's usually eaten at breakfast, but I've run out of Jam...).

The month plods on, and in 10 days' time the ingrowing Episcopal Toenail is due to be removed. Some stout open-toed sandals are on order, and warm thermal socks have been bought, as the chiropodist advises me that the initial post-op dressing is HUUUUGE (or bigly, even).

Ouch. Ouch. Ouch.

[Waterworks]

IJ
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I have just spent an entertaining weekend with a team of Guides on indoor camp at the Pedal Car Olympics, the only Guides team present, although there were quite a few girl scouts there. We were there mob handed as we had a girl with epilepsy with us, and if she has a problem she takes out at least one adult.

Thursday night, I saw The Transports and Wednesday night attended the local panto with Guides, at what I suspect was the dress rehearsal: Cinderella with Prince Charming and Dando performed by girls in tights and boots, the Ugly Sisters as men in drag, and a number of fairly current hits.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
IMHO panto has to have the principal boys played by girls with good legs in tights and boots, and the dames played by blokes.

It's tradition, innit? [Smile]

In the end my lunch concoction included pretty much everything: lemon, rosemary, cream and mushrooms. It was OK, but I think I got the chicken/mushroom ratio wrong - D. really isn't all that keen on mushrooms - so if I do something similar again, I'll put in more chicken.

I do, however, now have half a lemon in the fridge, which provides an excellent excuse for GIN.

[Big Grin]

eta: BF, it doesn't matter what time of day it is - marmalade is always the right thing to put on toast. As Clement Freud put it, "only cads and Frenchmen eat jam for breakfast" (or, I would add, on toast any time of day). Jam is for eating on (preferably freshly-baked) bread.

[ 15. January 2018, 05:40: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Yes, marmalade on TOAST is a Good Thing, and yet more proof that God loves us, and that She wants us to be happy.

A lovely day here today, not grey and mibsy at all, but sunny, with a fresh north-westerly breeze, and some impressive cloud formations.

A successful shopping expedition has resulted in the acquisition of some nice new Tea Towels for the Palace, along with pea and ham SOUP for the Episcopal Tea.

I really need to get out more...... [Help]

IJ
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Marmalade on toast is one of the few things I'd rather have with a cup of tea rather than coffee, but it has to be STRONG tea, Assam is perfect, but Builders' (sans sugar) is also good.

When will it stop raining? It's been like this since before dawn. I have things that need doing. [Frown]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Of late I’ve been eating rather more in the mornings than usual. My regular “I hate mornings and I don’t want anything but I’ll force some yogurt down” routine has been replaced by toast AND the yogurt AND possibly some fruit as well. Oh and also a Pooh bear-style snack mid morning. My digestive system is behaving most oddly at present.

Now until now, I was spreading my toast with Marmite. And the Marmite was tasty, and I was perfectly contented. But now I have a longing for marmalade which I fear nothing will assuage. I may have to pass by Marks and Sparks on the way home (one place I am sure I can get the proper English confection).
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
This is currently a marmalade free zone, must get some. I wonder if the nice Mr Sainsbury has some of the Old English style, made from fermenting oranges, if there is a Marmite among marmalades this is it.

As for the weather, the rain I spoke about earlier stopped. By turning to snow, then, when I could defer going out no longer, it changed again. I went out in driving hail. Fun.

Current weather, sleet. Current status, warming nyself up with a coffee.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
lver, you are, of course, now eating for two, and it is clear that Bubble Rouge is in plain need of TOAST and MARMALADE....a visit to Marks n'Sparks little corner shop is definitely called for.

[Big Grin]

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
But - as far as I know - M&S doesn't stock that prince among marmalades, Wilkins' "Tawny". Better go to S++nsb+ry's.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Not stock Wilkins'!!

Is Outrage!!

(Thanks, BT, for reminding me of the name of Ukland's finest MARMALADE company. My Old Dad used to stock a few jars of it in his little corner shop).

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
They also do "Little Scarlet" strawberry jam ... but that can't be eaten in the close season, of course.

By the way, the Wilkinses were strong Congregationalists and endowed the chapel at Tiptree (now URC). The fascinating museum at the factory does have a small section dedicated to this.

[ 16. January 2018, 16:28: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
My favourite Wilkins' jam was Raspberry.....

...where's that drooly emoji when you need it?

IJ
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
BTW, the Chapel is quite an attractive building, as seen here.

Why, they've even painted the doors in Strawberry Jam Red!

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
My favourite Wilkins' jam was Raspberry.....

I like it too - but my son calls that Devil's Jam because of the seeds in it which get stuck in one's teeth!
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
IMHO panto has to have the principal boys played by girls with good legs in tights and boots, and the dames played by blokes.

When Miss S was very small - 2 and a little bit, perhaps - she was 'minded' by a lovely friend of mine called Thelma. Thelma - who was by profession a teacher - always played Principal Boy in the village pantomime, and my abiding memory is of Miss S standing on a chair and pointing out, in loud, clear tones, just at the quiet bit -

'FELMA'S GOT NO TROWSIS ON!'

Got the best laugh of the evening [Killing me]

Mrs. S, reflecting that children, drunks and leggings never lie
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
My favourite Wilkins' jam was Raspberry.....

Mine too - and there's a jar of it in the porcine larder! [Smile]

We always pay a visit to Tiptree when we're visiting D's mum - it's just a few miles along the road - and they have a lovely little café which does excellent ploughman's lunches or a wicked afternoon tea.

We usually top up the jam stock whenever we're there - I know we shouldn't really be bringing food into Canada, but it's in a sealed-up jar and is only for our own use - where's the harm? Also, it costs £2.50 for a jar at the factory shop, and $8.50 (about £5) in the shops here (and you don't get the same variety).

BT, you know they do seedless raspberry jam, don't you?

We were picked out for a random bag-search coming back to St. John's once, and when we confessed to having several jars of jam, the security lady just shrugged and said, "Oooh, I love jam!" and sent us on our way.
 
Posted by Uncle Pete (# 10422) on :
 
Factory sealed packaging of almost anything but perishables (meat or cheese, eg) will get through. Anything home made will not. I have been bringing kilos of tea back from India and jars of Marmite from the UK for a very long time.

Alas no more travelling. [Waterworks]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
We always pay a visit to Tiptree when we're visiting D's mum - it's just a few miles along the road - and they have a lovely little café which does excellent ploughman's lunches or a wicked afternoon tea.

You do know that they have other teashops, such as Dedham and Heybridge Basin? The staff at the former were extremely helpful to my wife when we went there for a "treat" while she was convalescing after an operation.

quote:
BT, you know they do seedless raspberry jam, don't you?
Yes. Well, even the best firms can make mistakes.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
The rouge family (having one branch in the South-West of France and another in LA), have become pros at smuggling foie gras through customs. My sister-in-law would sell her soul for same. Sealed tin cans have always made it through thus far – the sniffer dogs can’t find them.
 
Posted by Gee D (# 13815) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
The rouge family (having one branch in the South-West of France and another in LA), have become pros at smuggling foie gras through customs. My sister-in-law would sell her soul for same. Sealed tin cans have always made it through thus far – the sniffer dogs can’t find them.

I'm sorry, but that's just not on. There are good reasons why imports must meet strict standards. We missed out on the Mad Cow epidemic a few years because of restrictions on the import of meat products. TB has been eliminated here by either banning the importation of raw dairy products or only allowing in those which meet very strict standards. There on the plus side.

On the minus, smuggling azalea cuttings in from the US in a passenger's luggage introduced petal blight, which rapidly spread across the continent; that can only be controlled by the use of unpleasant chemicals. Who knows what illnesses could have been brought in by a film star's dogs a couple of years ago, undeclared passengers on his private plane when he was filming.

I apologise if this sounds rude, but controls have real merits and the failure to observe them can have disastrous consequences. And sealed cans do not guarantee that the contents are safe.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Actually the reason you can’t get foie gras into the US is nothing to do with contamination. In a sealed can the (cooked) contents are sterile. It’s about cruelty to ducks.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gee D:
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
The rouge family (having one branch in the South-West of France and another in LA), have become pros at smuggling foie gras through customs.

I'm sorry, but that's just not on. There are good reasons why imports must meet strict standards. [..]
I apologise if this sounds rude, but controls have real merits and the failure to observe them can have disastrous consequences. And sealed cans do not guarantee that the contents are safe.

From the US Customs and Border Patrol website:

quote:

Poultry and poultry products from a country not known to be infected with Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) and Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) generally are able to enter the United States. The product must be unopened and commercially label indicating the country of origin and meat type. Products containing raw egg ingredients are prohibited from most regions. See Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Animal Product Import Manual, Chapter 3-6 Eggs and Egg Products.

So on food safety grounds, foie gras would be importable. Note that US CBP requires you to declare all food items, even those that are importable.

We did import a home-made Christmas cake once - a gorgeous thing my mum made, covered in royal icing, trellis, and piped flowers. It came in a large tupperware box.

Importing it was fine - it was transporting it without breaking the icing that was a challenge.

[ 17. January 2018, 13:51: Message edited by: Leorning Cniht ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We've had a very lazy snow-day today. Small flakes fell in a gentle fashion for most of the day, leaving us with about 4-6 inches more than we had before. Not too bad in the grand scheme of things, and D. said it wasn't too hard to shift.

At least it shouldn't interfere with choir practice. [Smile]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:

We did import a home-made Christmas cake once - a gorgeous thing my mum made, covered in royal icing, trellis, and piped flowers. It came in a large tupperware box.

Importing it was fine - it was transporting it without breaking the icing that was a challenge.

My Dad made my wedding cake and sent it to France via Fedex [Big Grin]

A tiny bit of icing had to be retouched but apart from that it survived fine.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That's pretty impressive - it could have arrived looking more like a summer pudding ... [Eek!]

After the snow yesterday (which didn't really amount to too much - about 4-6 inches), it's been a beautiful day today, with the river and the snow on the opposite bank sparkling pink in the setting sun.

I love the view from the château! [Smile]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
After the snow yesterday (which didn't really amount to too much - about 4-6 inches), it's been a beautiful day today, with the river and the snow on the opposite bank sparkling pink in the setting sun.


Four to six inches of sn*w is way too much in Britain! Buses don't run, trains don't run to time (where they run at all) and bless'em, British drivers, unless they deal with it regularly' aren't competent on wet roads, let alone roads covered in snow and ice.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Indeed, although as I observed on Facebook, it's all a matter of what you're prepared for.

In the whole 15 years we lived in Northern Ireland, I think we saw a total of about 6 inches of snow; an inch would bring the whole province to a standstill and the rubbish wouldn't be collected. Because snow was such a rare occurrence, the infrastructure wasn't in place to cope with it.

A couple of inches of snow would barely register here: 6 inches is the base line where we start getting "alerts".

We're just back from a very enjoyable evening with some friends from the choir. When D. did his accompaniment to Phantom of the Opera back in October, some of them weren't able to be there, so one of their husbands recorded it, and synched it with the DVD of the film, which we watched while enjoying nibbles and wine, followed by excellent paella, an amazing cake shaped like an organ (with chocolate cigars as pipes [Cool] ) and more wine.

Good food, good company and good fun. [Smile]
 
Posted by Moo (# 107) on :
 
When I lived in Northern Ireland there was no measurable snow for two years. Then I had a baby and had to push a pram with very small wheels. It snowed several inches, and I had a terrible time.

Moo
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Certainly the prospect of pushing a pram in even the slightest amount of snow is not a pleasant one.

At the moment, we're just relishing being able to see bits of tarmac on the path and driveway - I don't imagine it'll last very long, but it's lovely while it does. [Smile]
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Certainly the prospect of pushing a pram in even the slightest amount of snow is not a pleasant one. [...]

People may need something like this! (I'm sure other brands are available.)

[Cool]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Those are rather cool bits of kit (albeit IMHO a tad expensive)!

Langlauf pram-pushing...... [Big Grin]

Some sn*w is trying to fall here, but it keeps failing to do so properly, transmogrifying into rain instead.

[Disappointed]

Never mind - we had a fair turn-out at Our Place this morning, despite a number of Mispers, due to the weather, and The Dreaded Lurgy (which is still rife).

Lamb and red cabbage for lunch!

With pineapple steeped in PORT to follow!

And CHEESE!

[Big Grin]

IJ
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Just back from a really interesting visit to Pevensey Castle (a mediaeval keep inside a Roman fort). I'd never been to Pevensey before! There's much more of the Roman walls left than I realised. I hadn't realised either that it was garrisoned during the Second World War and gun emplacements built into the walls.

We stayed in a dear little hotel just across the road from the castle, very comfy and very good food. And the castle is clearly prime dog walking territory, so we got to talk to lots of nice doggies.

Altogether lovely except for the freezing incessant rain. And the incense at the local church we visited, which always makes me feel ill.

M.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
... Lamb and red cabbage for lunch!

I'll be right over ... [Big Grin]

Actually, we're going to have D's internationally-renowned cottage pie, which is almost the next best thing to lamb. [Smile]

It's another beautifully sunny, cold day (currently -5°) here - just the sort of winter day I like.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Here it has been raining all day.

Solidly. Miserably. Soggily. Continually. Depressingly. Puddlingly. Welshly. Wetly.

But we had a quite a good turnout at Church, and a good "feel" to worship.

Did I say that it has been a bit damp, by the way? (Just in case you hadn't realised).

The roast is in the oven - that will cheer us up!

[ 21. January 2018, 17:53: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Soggily wet rain here too. I went out to lunch with a friend. Chicken biryani - very nice indeed.

Much deserved as I was up most of the night with a poorly puppy [Snore]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
We had snow from 10am to 2pm, when it turned to rain and slush. So slushy, grey, miserable, dull and wet here too.

Yesterday I met up with Yangtze to see the Rachel Whiteread exhibition in Tate Britain, and some of the London Lumiere lights which are spectacular, particularly Westminster Abbey, before the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse production of All's Well that Ends Well.

I was hoping to head in to see more of London Lumiere today, but not in these conditions: there's a set of points on the way home that is known to freeze after dark and take out about 6 miles of track, which is too far to walk home.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Much deserved as I was up most of the night with a poorly puppy [Snore]

Hope the puppy is doing better!
[Frown]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Boogie:
Much deserved as I was up most of the night with a poorly puppy.

Hope the puppy is doing better!

Thank you, he’s right as rain today, I’ve no idea what gave him his funny tummy - but I’m thankful he’s better! We had a church meeting this afternoon so his ‘work’ was sleeping by my feet, followed by a short walk home - a nice easy day.

(Yes, I would have slept too if I could - it was a typical church meeting [Roll Eyes] [Snore] )

[ 22. January 2018, 15:00: Message edited by: Boogie ]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
We're in the midst of slightly more interesting church meetings at the moment, it being Christian Unity week.

The main service was at my place last night with an excellent speaker from the Baptist church and I'm just back from the local Methodist church. We'll cover all the denominations one chocolate hobnob at a time [Smile]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Nowt much seems to be happening on the (official) Christian Unity front down here (or perhaps I just haven't noticed).

We do, however, have a number of things on which the various churches are currently working together, anyway - Food Bank, Night Shelter, monthly Prayer Vigils, and a major outreach event this coming June, with noted evangelist J. John. Check him out on YouTube - he is an excellent raconteur.

PCC meeting this Wednesday ( [Frown] ), but I won't be attending, on account of needing a quiet evening, and an early night, prior to having the ingrowing Episcopal toenail removed on Thursday ( [Votive] please!).

Meanwhile, it's fish-cakes for tea. They contain CHEESE as well as haddock! [Big Grin]

IJ
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Meanwhile, it's fish-cakes for tea. They contain CHEESE as well as haddock! [Big Grin]

I have had something like this which also had a little mustard (and was made with cod). They were delicious. Also [Votive] for the toenailectomy.

It was the funeral of my aunt today. I got a little weepy at the end of the cremation service (there was a service in church too) but there is not the same sense of loss when they die aged 101.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Thank you.

[Votive] for Auntie, but, as you say, 101 is a good innings! May she RIPARIG.

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Votive] for Auntie Balaam - may she rest in peace.

I've just been doing a spot of typing for D., who's sorting out the choir library, and mooching about on here while I wait for him, but as he's just walked in, I'll head off.

Boogie, glad to hear your puppy is feeling better.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
[Votive] for Auntie, but, as you say, 101 is a good innings! May she RIPARIG.

Thank you.

It was a good send off.

I had the strangest accident. Brother and Sister-in-Law were up for the funeral from the wilds of Kent. They brought their chocolate labrador, Cocoa.

Not being used to disabled people, Cocoa greeted be as enthusiastically as she greets everyone whose scent she recognised and knocked me over. I was not hurt. You cannot blame the dog, as she was not trained to recognise the difference between people with crutches and those without. Not only that, but she is such a lovely animal.

In fact my favourite dog is the same as my ideal job. - Chocolate lab.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:

In fact my favourite dog is the same as my ideal job. - Chocolate lab.

[Killing me]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Love it! [Killing me]

There's a bloke who used to sing in our choir who's moved to another province and runs a chocolate company called the Chocolate Lab.

I never got the significance of the name until now ... [Hot and Hormonal]

Piglet, a bit slow on the uptake

* * * * *

We had a day of snow and freezing rain today [Waterworks] , but it's now turned to proper rain, the temperature's shot up to 9° and a good bit of the accumulated icy treachery seems to have gone. [Yipee]

As it wasn't a nice day, I made SOUP. Do help yourselves.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Thank you! It'll go nicely with TOAST and MARMITE for a comforting late breakfast, as it's rather dull, wit, and wendy here.

[Big Grin]

IJ
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
I too have made soup - butternut squash, coconut, ginger & chilli. To be eaten with ham sandwiches (I roasted a Christmas ham from IKEA yesterday) Although it is sunny outside, and reasonably mild for the time of year, inside our stone walled house it is COLD.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I have just come in after Braving the Elements by virtuously going by bus to the supermarket (it's windy, wet but not particularly cold). I'm now enjoying a nice cup of coffee and a Welsh cake with marmalade.

There's soup for lunch, however that may be DELAYED due to a dentist's appointment at noon ...
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
It’s warmed up a bit here. It’s a mostly damp and wet week here.

I made porridge this morning (and no piglet, it didn’t explode [Biased] ). I’m getting quite into this breakfasting lark (which is new for me) and I’d got bored with toast every day.

I have half a jar of leftover mincemeat sitting in my fridge. Any ideas what I can do with it? Making mince pies in January feels wrong.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
My Old Mum used to make mincemeat tarts (same size as a jam tart), which she then topped with icing, like what you do with CAKE, finishing off this super-sweet confection with a glace cherry.

[Help]

(BTW, how was the visit to the dentist, BT?)

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I'm no cook. Apparently you can freeze it, although it may not be terribly appetising afterwards.

Here are three recipes I got off the web: No.1, No.2, and No.3.
 
Posted by Kitten (# 1179) on :
 
Mix it with stewed apple and make a crumble
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Bake it under a frangipane or similar cake topping and throw some custard at it?
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
Remove the core from apples, insert mincemeat, bake for ?? and eat with cream or custard.

(nb, if it is being prepared by A N Other for you to put in the oven remember to take off the clingfilm!)
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I like the baked apples idea. Custard will be Marks and Sparks’ finest because I am Bad™ at custard and have given up trying when I can buy something readymade in a pot which is nicer than anything my laborious efforts have ever produced.

I just googled to see how long/how hot one bakes apples for. Apparently the first thing I need to do is ask a grown-up to turn the oven on for me [Cool] .

ETA: BF, it seems entirely appropriate that you describe those tarts in a post that also mentions a trip to the dentist...

[ 24. January 2018, 15:45: Message edited by: la vie en rouge ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Pure coincidence and the assumption that I've actually been thinking! [Cool]

I think my wife has made baked apples with mincemeat though I suspect she adds a few (stoned!) dates as well - yummy.

[ 24. January 2018, 15:50: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
Remove the core from apples, insert mincemeat, bake for ?? and eat with cream or custard.

(nb, if it is being prepared by A N Other for you to put in the oven remember to take off the clingfilm!)

Score through the apple peel in an equatorial manner to prevent the peel from splitting.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
... I made porridge this morning (and no piglet ...)

Thank God for that! [Eek!] [Devil]

As regards your mincemeat, I don't really see why you shouldn't have mince pies (or a variant thereof) in January. Why not make it into a big pie (covered or not as you like) and serve it as a pudding, cut in wedges, with indecent amounts of cream poured over the top?

If you need any help finishing it off ... [Biased]
quote:
Originally posted by Dormouse:
... a Christmas ham from IKEA ...

IKEA sells hams??? This makes me even sadder that our nearest one is about four hours away in Halifax, Nova Scotia. [Frown]

Bishop's Finger, don't you dare come anywhere near my nice SOUP with your Marmite! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
We promises, yess, we promises! (cowers in fear) Don't hit us, please! [Help]

BTW, your idea of a large mincemeat tart sounds, once again, like one of My Old Mum's efforts. She left the top open (i.e. no icing [Waterworks] ), but criss-crossed it with a lattice of pastry-work. My Old Dad used to drown his wedge of it in custard, but I (rather austerely) preferred Ice Cream instead.

IJ
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Sadly IKEA only sells hams (cooked, frozen) at Christmas so once they've gone, they've gone. It's something I find quite hard to find in France, so a nice roasted ham is a treat - I made a honey/marmalade/mustard/orange juice glaze for it. So far it has done 2x 2 main meals, 2 lots of sandwiches and there's still lots left. Miam-miam!
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
...your idea of a large mincemeat tart sounds, once again, like one of My Old Mum's efforts. She left the top open (i.e. no icing [Waterworks] ), but criss-crossed it with a lattice of pastry-work. My Old Dad used to drown his wedge of it in custard, but I (rather austerely) preferred Ice Cream instead.

No need to be austere. Serve with a RUM on the side, pour the Rum over the ice cream.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Now, I hadn't thought of RUM. What a Good Idea.

[Big Grin]

The Episcopal Toenailectomy went well, with not too much pain (so far). I did consider retaining the bits as Holy Relics, but perhaps not, as I'd probably have to be dead for them to be efficacious....

A kind friend gave me a lift to and from the clinic, and fed me afterwards with PIE and ALE, so all-in-all, quite a good day!

IJ
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
It being MuminElmet's birthday today, I roasted a chicken (shoved an onion and a lemon up it's bum, spread some miso on it's skin) and baked a lemon, ginger and date cake.

We had our Burns Night haggis yesterday. Anybody reeling tonight?
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Sadly no reeling for me (we've got choir practice on Thursdays). Now I think about it, the last time I indulged in Scottish country dancing (the Strip the Willow at my nephew's wedding) it nearly finished me off.

I do, however, still have some lamb liver in the freezer, so with the addition of minced lamb and appropriate spices and flavourings, I could make another haggis. Will contemplate for future eatings.

Glad to hear the surgery went well, BF - take it easy now for a wee while. [Smile]

It's getting a bit chilly again - currently -11°, feeling like -19, but set to sink to -20° and feeling like -27 overnight.

Brrrrrr ... [Eek!]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
I have just discovered that the Monoprix downstairs from my office sells chocolate digestive biscuits [Yipee]

They also now make DOUBLE chocolate ones (the biscuit part is also chocolatey, with chocolate chips in). They aren’t the same as proper normal chocolate digestives, but very pleasant all the same.

I have made the beginnings of fishcakes for tonight’s dinner. Currently a bowl of potatoey-fishy stuff sitting in my fridge because it’s easier to mould when cold and falls apart less in the pan. Top cunning tip I saw in a Jamie Oliver recipe (not that I really followed his version apart from that) – steam the fish in a colander on top of the pan of potatoes, thus economising on gas and washing up.

The mincemeat baked apples will follow. I am feeling extremely domesticated.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Can you provide a link to these wonderful double CHOCOLATE biscuits?

The Monoprix website shows 647 varieties of biscuit, and I began to feel faint with CHOCOLATE-deprivation after just one page....

I'm only 2 hours from Paris by train, and I gather there is a Monoprix at the Gare du Nord.

[Snigger]

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
You don’t even need to go as far as Paris, BF - there's a Monoprix in Calais. How far are you from the Tunnel? That way, you can take the Episcopal Carriage and bring back as much CHOCOLATE as you like (and WINE, obviously [Big Grin] ).

It's been very cold here, which is sort of good, as the Fredericton Frostival is on at the moment and some enterprising and very talented soul has been making ice-sculptures. We went to a cafe called the Chess Piece for lunch after D's concert today, and outside was a beautiful sculpture, about 4' high, of a chess knight. It'll be safe enough tonight, as it's currently -12° and heading down towards -18° overnight, but I don't think it'll survive the +8° we're apparently getting on Sunday. [Tear]
 
Posted by Huia (# 3473) on :
 
Piglet I wish I could donate you some heat. Those temperature sound brutal.

On Tuesday, which is the day school starts after the holidays, 32c if forecast here (89.6 f). I hope the Met Service has got it wrong.

Huia
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
The biscuits are McVities. I'm sure you can get them somewhere closer than France.

They are very pleasant but lack the salty hit of normal digestives.
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
La Vie en Rouge, how are things in Paris? I'm thinking about the weather & the Seine rising.

M.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Anyone else check the Styx every time they visit the Ship to see if the New Vessel has set sail yet?

I think it’s time for a little light hearted speculation .

[Smile] 🚢
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Sound the trumpets, I actually managed to get something I wanted in a sale! A rather nice thick Craghoppers sweatshirt reduced from £60 to £18! I NEVER find bargains [Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That is a bargain.

I love a good bargain (and not just because I'm a canny Scot). There's a pharmacy/grocery chain over here called Shoppers who, as well as having a very generous loyalty card, have some excellent special offers, which they brag about on your receipt (YOU HAVE SAVED $XX.XX TODAY!).

I went in the other day to get nail-polish top-coat; the brand I like is usually $11.99 and was reduced to $5, so I bought two. Along with a tube of toothpaste (also reduced) my bill came to $13.09 with tax*, and the receipt informed me that I'd saved $13.50 - more than I'd actually spent.

[rant ON]
* I'll never get used to the fact that you have to add Harmonised Sales Tax to the ticket price of almost everything you buy here - if the tills can work out what it is, why can't the machines that produce the tickets?

And before any of my fellow-Canucks drop in to say it's because the rate varies from province to province, if petrol stations and off-licences can do it, why can't other shops?

[Mad]
[/rant OFF]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

[rant ON]
* I'll never get used to the fact that you have to add Harmonised Sales Tax to the ticket price of almost everything you buy here - if the tills can work out what it is, why can't the machines that produce the tickets?

And before any of my fellow-Canucks drop in to say it's because the rate varies from province to province, if petrol stations and off-licences can do it, why can't other shops?

[Mad]
[/rant OFF]

The answer is *rounding*. If the tax is added to each item then the rounding adjustments for each of these can easily exceed the tax added to the total of all the taxable items.

It's one of my peeves about VAT.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
My bargain of the day was a dressing gown, in the colour I wanted, in a size I never, ever thought I'd fit into, for £10.00 from £25.00.

Like St Gladwys, I never get good bargains. I was very excited.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:

[rant ON]
* I'll never get used to the fact that you have to add Harmonised Sales Tax to the ticket price of almost everything you buy here - if the tills can work out what it is, why can't the machines that produce the tickets?

And before any of my fellow-Canucks drop in to say it's because the rate varies from province to province, if petrol stations and off-licences can do it, why can't other shops?

[Mad]
[/rant OFF]

The answer is *rounding*. If the tax is added to each item then the rounding adjustments for each of these can easily exceed the tax added to the total of all the taxable items.

It's one of my peeves about VAT.

If they are rounding fairly and not just up then it can also be less.

Jengie
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I think you may have misunderstood me, SS. The price you pay at the till is the ticket price plus 13% (or whatever the current rate is - it sometimes varies). It's even worse in restaurants, because you have to add the tax (13%) and a tip (15% is usual), so you're paying the cost plus over a quarter again.

We have rounding-up and down on top of that, as the 1¢ piece was taken out of circulation a few years ago, and although things might still be marked as $5.99 or whatever, that'll be rounded up or down if you're paying in cash, but not if you're paying by card.

Confusing or what??? [Confused]

* * * * *

I'm somewhat knackered - we were a bit short of sopranos today and I had to fill in. I'm not averse to singing the odd descant (in fact I enjoy it immensely), but singing the top line for a whole service wipes me out.

Fortunately the setting and anthems weren't too high, but once I'd sung the last hymn (which D. played up a tone from what was printed [Eek!] ) I was feeling decidedly bushed.

We're supposed to be having a friend come round for supper this evening, but the sudden thaw on top of very frozen ground has left her driveway almost impassable (that was one reason we were short-handed this morning). If she can get their ploughing/sanding people to come, she'll be coming; if not we'll postpone it until tomorrow.

I hope she can get out, as I've made a great big beef casserole ...
 
Posted by Wesley J (# 6075) on :
 
From culinary enjoyment, which is always read about with pleasure, I'll have you know that I've rediscovered the Paul Temple detective mysteries from the Beeb.

Lots of them are here: Link. (There are also other sites.)

A bit of (supposedly) 1940s/1950s mysteries and romance is doing me the world of good! [Big Grin] One of the great things is that the more of those Francis Durbridge episodes you listen to, the more you can guess certain turns of the plot. Which is brilliant, and puts a huge grin on my face. Good ole Durbridge certainly had a nice sense of humour and irony.

Oh, and Steve, Paul's (ex-journalist) wife! She's just so independent and clever - although in as good as every series, she tends to get abducted, or near-abducted! Currently, she's playing dumb and talkative wifey in a shop to spread some rumours in a German village. We'll see who goes for the bait! [Big Grin]

Now, back to some of the last Mince Pies, mmmmh! These are Lyons brand, more from Walkers are good until March, but will probably not survive until then! Bon appetit!

[ 28. January 2018, 17:21: Message edited by: Wesley J ]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I have vague memories of the Paul Temple television series from the late 60s/early 70s, although I wasn't really old enough to appreciate it.

Our friend's drive remained impassable, so as she's busy tomorrow and Tuesday she's coming round on Wednesday instead. I hope we don't get any more silly weather before then ... [Eek!]

Not that the weather was all that bad today - it was a mild 7° - but the combination of thaw-water on very frozen ground was treacherous if the surfaces weren't treated.

D. and I had some of the casserole for supper (quality control, you understand [Biased] ), and it's going into the fridge where it should be happy enough until Wednesday.
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
We're trying to declutter our freezer, preparatory to moving [Yipee] so last night's dinner was two separate portions of boeuf bourguignonne, mixed together and reheated *yum*

Mr. S, who was responsible for the above, said that the only thing they had in common was a) beef and b) red wine [Killing me]

This has the added benefit that I can throw away the old ice-cream tubs they were frozen in. Tonight we are using up the home-made pizza dough *double yum* [Smile]

Mrs. S, preparing for another trip to the Household Waste Amenity Recycling Point (or tip)
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by M.:
La Vie en Rouge, how are things in Paris? I'm thinking about the weather & the Seine rising.

M.

I haven’t seen much of the flooding. All well in my neck of the woods, although we should probably check our cellar’s dry just to make sure.

The main people affected are those living right next to the river whose cellars are definitely flooded, and the poor sods who travel to work on the line C – all the ventilation shafts have had to be closed to keep the water out of the tunnel and the line is consequently suspended right the way through the city centre.

This being Candlemas weekend, pancakes (in the British sense – crèpes if you prefer) were produced in the rouge household yesterday. A rather generous quantity having been made, there’s still some left if anyone wants some. We have no lemon, but sugar, salted caramel spread, strawberry jam and orange marmalade are available. There is no Nutella, however.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Glad you are not flooded out LVER, and hope your cellar is still lovely and dry. I guess you won't be sampling the contents of it for a while.
We went for a walk today. We did the shortest version as heavy rain was predicted. We were sitting on the bus home being annoyed as the weather was looking lovely and we could have gone for the middling version of the walk instead. By the time we got back the sky was black and it started to rain hard just as we got in.Phew.
While digging out my walking boots, that have been languishing under the bed in a plastic bag since I wore them over Christmas I came across the bottle of damson gin we'd made to give to my mother in law, we'd been wondering where that had got to. Oh well that's her Mothering Sunday present sorted.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Did someone mention damson GIN??? **sigh**

I heard about the Nutella riots - I don't really understand, as I've never tasted it and although I like hazelnuts and CHOCOLATE, I'm not sure that they appeal together. Same principle as Reece's Pieces - I like peanut butter and I like CHOCOLATE, just not together.

We're not long back from a v. nice lunch with a friend who used to be D's organ scholar and is now the vicar of a parish about an hour and a half from here. Good food and good company - and he brought along a very nice young lady friend - I wonder if there may be romance in the air?
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
I rather wondered what Sarasa was thinking of by keeping GIN under the bed along with boots.....

Thanks to la vie en rouge and others re CHOCOLATE digestives - I thought perhaps those mentioned were a French delicacy.

I'm afraid I don't relish the idea of driving the Episcopal Carriage to Calais, preferring the first-class comfort of Eurostar/TGV trains on my expeditions to Frogland... [Big Grin] It's worth travelling by train in France just for the SNCF jingle.

Incidentally, some of the tastiest CHEESE I've bought in recent years was at a French market in Dumfries (SW Scotland) of all places. The lads concerned came from Brittany, and thought nothing of the perils of the trans-Manche ferry, plus 500 miles of Ukland roads, to get there... [Eek!]

IJ
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Mmm, damson gin! A colleague very kindly gave me some damson gin he'd made, just before Christmas. It was very more-ish but we rationed ourselves to small glasses as a treat.

He collects the damsons on the Downs. A very worthwhile thing!

M.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
You might find it of interest to travel west of the Severn rather than north of the Solway ...
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Well, I just happened to be in Dumfries, with my sister, what time the French market happened to be there too! (Our Ma used to live nearby).

I like the idea of specialist CHEESE shops, though.

Damsons, BTW, make excellent JAM, if you like your JAM a little piquant...

IJ
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
The French attachment to Nutella is quite bizarre, when you think how proud of their gastronomy they are.

It’s not unpleasant to the taste, BUT when you read the list of ingredients, it’s truly appalling. IIRC it’s about 80% palm oil and sugar. A mere 2% is actual chocolate. We never have it in the house.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Baptist Trainfan, although we're only about 20 miles from the M Cardiff, we've never visited that cheese shop. However, we'll be in Cardiff Saturday, braving the match crowds - we have to pick up an order, not realising Wales are playing Scotland at home.
I know it's a bit further, but there's a very good cheese shop in Capuchin Lane in Hereford. Most visits to Hereford involve picking up some Hereford Hop and some cheddar with fig and honey, which the shop assistant describes as "decadent"!
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by St. Gwladys:

I know it's a bit further, but there's a very good cheese shop in Capuchin Lane in Hereford. Most visits to Hereford involve picking up some Hereford Hop and some cheddar with fig and honey, which the shop assistant describes as "decadent"!

We rarely visit Hereford because it hits the wallet too hard! Very close to the cheese shop is Doughty's, a quilting fabric shop, and there's a shop specialising in model railways too. With those and a pub lunch it can easily be a £500 round trip!
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Wally's in Cardiff also good, as is the (admittedly small) delicatessen in Monmouth.
 
Posted by MaryLouise (# 18697) on :
 
Oh the Mousetrap cheese shop in Hereford! I was there about eight or nine years ago and bought some local goats' milk cheeses (Ragstone and Dorstone), creamy and pleasant with the pale Powys honey, imported figs and homebaked biscuits. I went back to get some Stinking Bishop for a friend. The Hereford cheeses were expensive but very different from cheeses here in the Cape, much milder and more delicate.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
We rarely visit Hereford because it hits the wallet too hard! Very close to the cheese shop is Doughty's, a quilting fabric shop, and there's a shop specialising in model railways too. With those and a pub lunch it can easily be a £500 round trip!

I hope your pub lunch is at The Lichfield Vaults, my favorite Hereford pub* -- and very near the cheese shop. I believe there was a Shipmeet there a number of years ago. (Unfortunately I was thousands of miles away.)

*I've done extensive research. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
There's always the Marches Delicatessen in Abergavenny...
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
I think they're the same folk I referred to in Monmouth.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I love Hereford Hop - we had it as part of a cheese-board at the end of an utterly fabulous meal at Howarth's in Ballasalla on the Isle of Man, and it was quite heavenly. I've very rarely seen it since, although we found some in Gunton's in Colchester when we were over a year or two ago.

There used to be a lovely CHEESE shop on the concourse at Liverpool Street station - I don't know if it's still there, as it's ages since I've travelled that way.

It's been snowing gently (but blowing about quite a lot) for most of the day - the forecasters are offering us about 6 inches of the stuff - so I'm in the process of making SOUP.

It should be ready for virtual tasting by the time you read this, so help yourselves!
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
The cheese shop is still there - and I never noticed it!
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
O fie upon you all, with this talk of CHEESE shops, GIN, and other such Frivolities!

With the 'State Of The Union' speech imminent over in Usania, we should all be preparing our immortal Souls for the End Times!

IJ
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
(I'll take up that offer of virtual SOUP, meanwhile. Pass the bread, please, someone - and where's the BUTTER?)

IJ
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
O fie upon you all, with this talk of CHEESE shops, GIN, and other such Frivolities!

With the 'State Of The Union' speech imminent over in Usania, we should all be preparing our immortal Souls for the End Times!

IJ

All the more reason for GIN, and lots of it!
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
You’re doing it again.

Cruel shippieses torments us. We wants cheeses, precious. Must have the Roquefort.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:


I'm afraid I don't relish the idea of driving the Episcopal Carriage to Calais, preferring the first-class comfort of Eurostar/TGV trains on my expeditions to Frogland... [Big Grin] It's worth travelling by train in France just for the SNCF jingle.


IJ

If you like the SNCF jingle (which I find becomes a total earworm after a bit!) you might like this

David Gilmour "Rattle That Lock"

Apparantly Gilmour heard and recorded the jingle on his iPhone at Aix-en-Provence station while travelling to visit friends...It is definitely inspired by the jingle. In fact now when I hear the SNCF jingle I tend to continue singing the song. I'm surprised to find that apparentyly the lyrics are based around Book II of Paradise Lost. Who knew?!
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Thanks for that linky, O Dormouse!

Yes, the jingle does become an earworm, but I love it, and find that somehow it makes train travel in France even more special than it already is!

You may have gathered that I am a bit of a Francophile... [Big Grin]

(I refrain from mentioning the C-word, however).

IJ
 
Posted by Gill H (# 68) on :
 
It is probably the sexiest train announcement jingle ever.

Oddly enough, at Charles de Gaulle airport last year we heard their jingle and wondered why they would use “Don’t Cry For Me Argentina”.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Yes, it does sound....er....rather creepy, IMHO.

CdeG Airport Jingle

[Ultra confused]

IJ
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Pigwidgeon:
quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
We rarely visit Hereford because it hits the wallet too hard! Very close to the cheese shop is Doughty's, a quilting fabric shop, and there's a shop specialising in model railways too. With those and a pub lunch it can easily be a £500 round trip!

I hope your pub lunch is at The Lichfield Vaults, my favorite Hereford pub* -- and very near the cheese shop. I believe there was a Shipmeet there a number of years ago. (Unfortunately I was thousands of miles away.)

*I've done extensive research. [Big Grin]


 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Sorry, pressed the button too soon!
The Litchfield Vaults to s the only pub I know which has Greek Icons over the bar. They now don't a small stifado which you can order with fresh bread - gorgeous! [Yipee]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
The voice of the SNCF is a lady called Simone Hérault. She is something of a minor celebrity.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
The voice of the London Underground used to be an actor Oswald Laurence, who died in 2007. "Mind the Gap" - I think one station still uses the recording, although his announcement has been generally superseded.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Simone Herault's mellifluous and clear announcements are something of which France, and the SNCF, can be truly proud.

Here she is in action!

BTW, do we have the name of the chanteuse who actually sings the jingle?

I'd better get me coat, and go and 'ave me Tea, as we're drifting away from Britain...... [Ultra confused]

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Dragging us back to the Proper Side of the Manche, John Betjeman had something to say about station announcers.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm a bit late in checking in today - we had a friend round for supper (her husband's away and we thought we ought to keep her company). She brought her wee dog, an adorable Havanese called Tilly, who commandeered D's side of the sofa and tried to eat me (but in quite a gentle, affectionate-doggy kind of way).

Decent food (my beef casserole seemed to go down a treat), good wine and good company.

Now bracing ourselves for some more sn*w tomorrow ... [Frown]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
I was in Boots yesterday, queuing to ask when my medicines might have come in. Behind me, a lady in a lime-green coat. At the do-it-youself print machines, a young woman with a child in a pushchair,accompanied by an older woman, possibly her mother.

The two at the photo-print place started to discuss how big an 8"x 6" print was - '8"x 6", did you say?' 'yes, 8"x 6"' repeat ad lib . Eventually my new friend in the green coat could bear it no longer and pointed out a suitably-sized frame to the older one, who looked at her disbelievingly and said 'Nah, that one's 6"x 8", she wants an 8"x 6"'
[Killing me]
With more patience than I could have mustered, my new friend pointed out that it could be hung in either direction, so amounted to the same thing; then returned to the queue where I was shaking with suppressed laughter.
[Killing me]
We agreed that it was just as well Boots had changed the sign which used to read 'Hand in prescriptions at the healthcare counter', because the healthcare counter was marked with a big sign saying 'Medicines'
[Killing me]
Mrs. S, who used to write instructions on the back of cans of paint [Help]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
What a cheering picture of modern English life.

It reminds me of a Sunday afternoon in Homebase (God forgive me for violating the Sabbath), when I observed a family (Mum, Dad, two teenage girls) arguing VERY LOUDLY about the correct size of ironing-board cover they needed...

'You said 30 centimetres! (or whatever)'
'NO - YOU said 25 centimetres!!!'
'THAT'S TOO SHORT - we MUST have 30 centimetres'...

...and so on.

How sad - that was the best way they could think of of spending a Sunday afternoon. Fair enough - it was quite early, so maybe they hadn't had lunch yet.

'You said you wanted THREE roast potatoes!'
'No - I said only TWO! You know I'm on a diet!'
'Muuuummm....you know I HATE cabbage! It's not FAIR....'

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Intrepid Mrs S:
The two at the photo-print place started to discuss how big an 8"x 6" print was - '8"x 6", did you say?' 'yes, 8"x 6"' repeat ad lib . Eventually my new friend in the green coat could bear it no longer and pointed out a suitably-sized frame to the older one, who looked at her disbelievingly and said 'Nah, that one's 6"x 8", she wants an 8"x 6"'

Perhaps they didn't understand Imperial measurements. A good thing it wasn't a field, to be measured in yards, chains or furlongs.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Or even rods, poles, or perches....(which are all the same thing, IIRC).

Somehow, life was more interesting when we had halfpennies, farthings, half-crowns, etc., as well.

Mind you, adding up £sd was certainly more difficult....

IJ
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Adding up proper money was more difficult? Hmmm.

My small infant school employed two motherly ladies who decreed that we play "shops" at least twice a day: cardboard money, etc, etc, etc. You were started off by being asked to give change for one item, then add to items and give correct thange - I'm sure you get the picture.

By the time you graduated to being a Senior Infant (!) you could work out complex sums and give correct change.

I also remember being sent off to measure the playing field for marking out for Sports Day - very exciting because we could get close to the flamethrower used to mark out the lanes!
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
Name and address of school please. Need to organise for some from the local Co-OP to visit.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
School no longer in existence - and it was the staff who made it, and I doubt that Mrs Carter is still teaching because she'd be about 120 years old by now, and her sidekick was older than her.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
So you were an an infant not a teacher?
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Definitely an infant when playing shops.

Of course, one had to have the dizzy seniority of being a Junior to measure out the field...
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Somehow, life was more interesting when we had halfpennies, farthings, half-crowns, etc., as well.

Mind you, adding up £sd was certainly more difficult....

Those tables on the back of exercise books were truly fascinating ... especially the little box in the corner mysteriously labelled "Troy Weight".

Mind you, we learned to count in base 12, base 20, base 14, base 16 ,,, without even knowing! And how do divide £1 into three equal parts, which we can't do today.

PS I am not old enough to remember farthings, though my sister is (just).

[ 01. February 2018, 17:32: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
We moved to England from South Africa in 1969 so I had a cou-le of baffling years with £sd then, thankfully, 1971 arrived and I was back to the decimal currency I’d always known [Smile]
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
As Minister in a rural Zimbabwean Circuit in 1958 I was also the Circuit Treasurer. And we recorded everything in £SP. It took some doing.
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Baptist Trainfan:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
[qb]Mind you, we learned to count in base 12, base 20, base 14, base 16 ,,, without even knowing! And how do divide £1 into three equal parts, which we can't do today.

Even 47 years on from decimalisation, I instantly thought 6s 8d.

Talking of pre-decimal currency, my mother kept a number of old 3d coins — no, not the many-sided brass things, the old silver ones — which would go into the Christmas pudding every year. One year the whole pudding, made to feed 13 people with large portions, was eaten by the dog. We got the coins back, but they were never cooked in the pudding again.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
You would have been quite OK, providing the pudding was well-cooked....

I'm old enough to remember farthings in use, and I still have some (along with other pre-1971 coins), kept against the day when Sanity will prevail, and the Proper Money will be reintroduced.

[Razz]

IJ
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
The coins were sterelised so they would have been fine. However the thought of eating them...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
... the dizzy seniority of being a Junior ...

That's making my brain hurt ... [Confused]

Mrs. S's story about the picture frame calls to mind a thing I saw on Facebook yesterday, which purported to be someone in Texas advertising house-numbers for sale.
quote:
I accidentally bought number 54, but I live at number 45.
Needless to say, the accompanying photograph was of a number 4 and a number 5, in separate packages.

The person who passed it on suggested that the original poster may have voted for Trump.

[Killing me]

It's been snowing (mostly big, wet flakes) for most of the day, but now appears to have stopped, which is fine by me. We don't need another cancelled rehearsal when we've got Evensong on Sunday (although looking at Sunday's forecast, that may be something of a moot point). I always worry when it just says "snow", as opposed to "light snow" or "flurries".

[Eek!]
 
Posted by basso (# 4228) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Or even rods, poles, or perches....(which are all the same thing, IIRC).

4 rods to a pole/perch.

Not that I learned that in school. In very non-agricultural suburban California, rods were a mysterious notation in the tables at the end of the book. I don't recall them ever being even mentioned in class. I doubt that any of my teachers knew what to do with them.

Some of my reading while digging in my family history suggests a time when they were well-known and widely used.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
We were expected to know all the units of measurement up to a league - very useful when studying The Charge of the Light Brigade if you know how far is "half a league" (one-and-a-half miles, for those cursed to know only metric).

Of course, a knowledge of imperial measurement is still useful for students of horse racing.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
We were expected to know all the units of measurement up to a league - very useful when studying The Charge of the Light Brigade if you know how far is "half a league" (one-and-a-half miles, for those cursed to know only metric).

Exactly what sort of sense would 'one -and-a-half miles' make to someone who knows only metric. Last time I checked miles was another Imperial unit with the kilometer being the nearest equivalent metric unit. Yes I know a kilometre is 5/8 of a mile.

Jengie
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I must admit the only metric units I use are for measuring rain and snow (although I usually mentally convert them, and D. will always ask "what's that in English?") and litres for petrol. The kilometres on distance signs I have to convert to miles if I'm going to have any idea of how long it might take us to get there.

One area in which I've gone "native" is measuring things in cups for cooking, although if I'm using a British cookbook I revert to pounds and ounces.

* * * * *

It snowed fairly steadily for most of the morning and a good bit of the afternoon, dumping about 6-8 inches, but seems to have taken a breather. And D. has just come in, and said that the gentleman across the road has cleared our drive with his snow-blower. What a total hero. [Overused]

I'm currently waiting for a batch of bread to finish baking, then we're going out for dinner; there's a restaurant not far from us called The Back 6 (it's part of a golf club) that's participating in Dine Around Freddy, and they're doing lamb shanks.

They'd better not have run out of them ... [Eek!]

We're treating it as my birthday celebration (my actual birthday's next week), but on the day we've been invited to some friends for a curry.
 
Posted by Leorning Cniht (# 17564) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:

I observed a family (Mum, Dad, two teenage girls) arguing VERY LOUDLY about the correct size of ironing-board cover they needed...

'You said 30 centimetres! (or whatever)'
'NO - YOU said 25 centimetres!!!'
'THAT'S TOO SHORT - we MUST have 30 centimetres'...

That's a ...rather small ironing board [Biased]
 
Posted by Pangolin Guerre (# 18686) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
We were expected to know all the units of measurement up to a league - very useful when studying The Charge of the Light Brigade if you know how far is "half a league" (one-and-a-half miles, for those cursed to know only metric).

Of course, a knowledge of imperial measurement is still useful for students of horse racing.

Another problem is that metric units scan ill in poetry. Metric vs. metrics, as it were.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:

I observed a family (Mum, Dad, two teenage girls) arguing VERY LOUDLY about the correct size of ironing-board cover they needed...

'You said 30 centimetres! (or whatever)'
'NO - YOU said 25 centimetres!!!'
'THAT'S TOO SHORT - we MUST have 30 centimetres'...

That's a ...rather small ironing board [Biased]
Width! .... Not length.

(I presume). [Cool]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Probably - I didn't stay around to find out!

IJ
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
I have a tiny ironing board, one of these. I do so little ironing there’s no need for a full size one cluttering up the place.

[Angel]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I have both a sleeve board and an ironing board - which are both used when dressmaking and ironing shirts and jackets. Although the sleeve board is currently in the bathroom, where all things that smell go to be sorted out, covered with bicarbonate of soda, in the hope that I will be able to clean it.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
We were supposed to be going to Lyon for a birthday party (about 1.5 hours drive away) but it's snowed quite heavily. Although the roads are clear, we are happy to have the excuse not to go. Coupled with "my illness" Mr D has texted Pierre to say we won't be there. Huge relief.

As we would be one of 50-odd people, and only know 2 of them, plus French liking very late-night revels, neither of us really wanted to go, but neither of us had admitted it to the other until yesterday evening!

Instead it's home made pizza, and "The Last Leg" on catch-up. A much more preferable evening for 2 introverted English!
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Ah, 'my illness', or 'my condition', do have their uses!

[Two face] and [Votive]

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
We had a very nice feed at The Back Six last night. Although the place was rather noisy (it was, after all, a bar full of golfists) and we were right underneath one of the speakers, making the music a bit "in-your-face", the food was very good and the service efficient and friendly.

The way the Dine around Freddy thing works is that the participating eateries publish a short menu (two or at most three choices for each course) priced at $31 (about £17) so you can decide which one you want to go to in advance. As they were doing lamb-shanks, there really was no contest.

We were on to a winner right from the start - we happened upon Happy Hour, meaning that the wine was ridiculously cheap - between us we had three glasses of Malbec for $13 (£7.50). I've been in restaurants where they'd charge more than that for one.

D., as is his wont, started with the soup, which was squash, coconut and maple, and although it was rather sweet, it was also quite subtle. I had fried paneer with leaves, tomatoes and lemon dressing, which was lovely.

We both had the lamb-shanks, which were done to a turn, and served with very good mashed potatoes, root veggies and a lovely jus-type sauce.

We finished with puddings: pecan pie for me and white cake with dulce de leche for him, both v. good. We probably wouldn't have bothered with pudding if it hadn't been part of the deal, but we enjoyed them nonetheless.

I think it's somewhere we'll go again - the whole thing came to under $90 (about £52), and the place is only about 10 minutes' drive from the château.

[ 03. February 2018, 17:46: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Lamb shank for lunch at the Palace today, with some nice mint Sauce to go with it.

ION, a member of the congregation this morning delighted in warning me that sn*w is forecast for later today..... [Help]

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'll be right over with a bottle of red, BF. [Smile]

The sn*w that we got this morning is apparently going to turn to rain later - lots of rain. While this is normally something to be welcomed, as it does help to clear what's already there and you don't have to shovel it, large quantities of H2O on top of sn*w on top of ground that's frozen too hard to be able to absorb it is No Fun At All, and horrible to drive or walk on.

This could have fairly adverse effects on Evensong, as three members of our already-depleted choir who live out in the country have said they won't be coming back this afternoon.

I seem to have survived (and actually quite enjoyed) singing soprano this morning; whether my voice will continue to co-operate until the end of the afternoon is yet to be seen.

[Eek!]
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
Pork in cider this evening. It was delicious.

And thanks to Dormouse for the reminder that I have yet to catch up on The Last Leg. Next week's program should be interesting do to Adam and Alex having played disabled rugby league this weekend on opposing sides.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Thanks for the bottle of red, piglet.

Very passable - not bad at all!

No sn*w yet, but Ukland is duly Braced....

[Help]

IJ
 
Posted by mark_in_manchester (# 15978) on :
 
Snowed on me yesterday, crawling around a rather mouldy scrap car in a breakers' yard in Burnley. Uurrkk.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Serves you right for seeking after selfish pleasure... [Razz]

IJ
 
Posted by Fredegund (# 17952) on :
 
(it was, after all, a bar full of golfists) Piglet

I obviously haven't had enough coffee yet - I read that as a bar full of goldfish. Couldn't understand why they would be loud.
[Hot and Hormonal]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
It is seriously parky here. A few flakes of snow this morning. It makes a change from rain at least (the river hasn’t gone down any) [Roll Eyes]

The upside is that a good cold snap – especially if it’s dry and cold, which it is now – would go a long way to killing off all manner of evil viruses that are circulating. It might also do something to reduce the mosquito population this summer.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
A light sprinkling of sn*w this morning (think icing-sugar), but it's mostly gone now.

How you D.s, piglets, and all, put up with feet of the stuff, I know not.

Time for some SOUP.

IJ
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
A cold night plus the possibility of snow later leads me to believe the buses won't run tomorrow. WTF is it with our buses? It is Wales FFS, there are lots of hills and our drivers ought to have some idea, but after all these years I do wonder. I don't think any of them could have coped with Bannerdown Hill, (off the old A4, east of Bath) which is a mile-plus of 1:12) and that was with gutless fifty-year old double-deckers.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
The weather is utterly baffling. I was in the library café earlier watching the light sprinkling of snowflakes outside while trying to shield my eyes from the sun. It's windy until it's not and dry until it rains. [Ultra confused]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
... How you D.s, piglets, and all, put up with feet of the stuff, I know not ...

You get used to it, BF, although you don't have to like it.

The rain (which I don't think was quite as plentiful as was forecast) has certainly made a dent in the snow, but as it's to go back down to -14° tonight, it won't be a big enough one - and there's more on the way on Wednesday night. [Frown]

Evensong actually went very well - two of the three who thought they might not get back actually did, so we weren't quite as short-handed as we might have been. I still had to sing soprano, but the Almighty must have been on my side, as I managed it without too many squeaks.

I also got a few really nice comments about my reading of the second lesson: "where's that lovely accent from? Glasgow?

[Killing me]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Lo, it snoweth muchly. Not really sticking at this stage but it’s forecast to keep falling until late afternoon at least.

Given that the roads here are gridlocked as soon as there as there are three drops of rain, the rush hour is going to be SLOW.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
We have new neighbours! This may not seem very exciting, but next door to us is a Hotel/Restaurant. For several years this has been run by the Most Unsuitable Man Ever to be in the hospitality business. He is racist and has threatened to beat up a friend of ours; he accused us of not paying our taxes while employing "yellow faces" (his words) on the black to do building work. Slowly he lost practically all local clientele

Anyway - he has gone and a nice couple have moved in. Opening day was yesterday, and we had a very nice 4 course Menu du Jour for 13,50€ So much meat that two of us couldn't finish it - so I snaffled it for the Poor Cats.

We hope that the locals will return & support this new ownership. The food was good, so there's hope.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
That’s great news Dormouse - spread the word!

Snow here, the fine stuff which sticks.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Four courses for €13.50? That's a gift!

It looks as if we may be crossing the Pond sooner rather that later - my dad, who turned 93 today, has taken a turn for the worse and they're talking about "end-of-life" strategies (see my post on the prayer thread).

We can ill afford it, but we'll have to try and find the means somehow.

In other news, I've got a job interview on Thursday. [Eek!]

It never rains ...
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
[Votive] Piglet and Daddy Pig [Votive]

Good luck with the job interview anyway, Piglet [Smile]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Sorry to hear about your father, piglet. But good luck with the interview on Thursday.

Light icing of snow here, which wasn't there on my way home last night, just a sprinkling on grass and roofs. I came back from Five Guys Named Moe at about 11pm, staged in a specially built pop-up theatre at Marble Arch - so basically a dressed up circus tent with glorified portacabin bar, festival toilets and a brilliant decoration job. The show was fun, loosely stringing a story together around Louis Jordan's greatest hits, with a lot of energetic song and dance numbers from the tiny cast.

I went with a work colleague from my last job after trying to meet up for a while. Apparently the job advertisement which ended on Monday was my old job: the person who took over from me doesn't want it either. (My fellow Guide leader flagged up the ad to me and got a response of: I've just escaped from there, no way.)

I also saw a recording of Domestic Science on Monday with someone else who attends BBC recordings as my daughter is not repeating tube trips for a bit. We tried to see Shake the Chains on Saturday, which was kiboshed by someone getting on the tube, sitting next to my daughter and eating a nut covered cupcake. Cue my daughter stopping breathing. We avoided a hospital visit, just, but saw two songs at the gig and heard three outside in the lobby. Next time I will do what I should have done, which is hit the passenger alarm at the next station, jab my daughter with the Epipen and ask for an ambulance. (Using the Epipen means an immediate hospital visit and she's not safe to get there under her own steam, bus, cab ...)
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
A whole four inches of snow here and… pandemonium. I could get quite hellish on this subject, but suffice to say that a significant number of colleagues have not made it into the office today.

For some reason, despite the fact that it was snowing hard and settling at 6 pm yesterday, and forecast to continue all night, the Town Hall felt no need to grit the roads. Consequently all bus services are suspended.

Snow is the death of chic. It looks quite strange to see all the Parisians out in their various ski boots, hiking boots (that was me) and wellies. The less well equipped are wearing trainers and uggs, and have wet feet.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Hope your daughter is recovering CK, that sounds scary.

Sorry to hear about your father Piglet, but good luck with the interview.

LVER - glad you have sensible footwear. A friend once told me about meeting someone wearing stilettos on a snowy, icy day, who thought they were a sensible option as the heels would dig in the snow [Confused]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
[Killing me]

The triumph of hope over actuality!

Another light sprinkling of sn*w here earlier, but fortunately I find that I have no need to leave the Palace today, other than to fetch in coal and logs for the stove.

I am, therefore, improving the Shining Hour by listening to classical piano music, as interpreted by this young lady.

IJ
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sarasa:

LVER - glad you have sensible footwear. A friend once told me about meeting someone wearing stilettos on a snowy, icy day, who thought they were a sensible option as the heels would dig in the snow [Confused]

Melania felt they were appropriate for visiting flood victims. Maybe she figured the high heels would keep her feet out of the water.
[Roll Eyes]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
O, bless her. At least she wasn't wearing socks, which would indeed be uncomfortable if wet.

Without wishing to sound sexist or dirty-old-mannish, I do admire all you ladies what can gracefully walk or dance in high heels without falling over!

There must be quite an Art involved...

[Overused]

IJ
 
Posted by Celtic Knotweed (# 13008) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
It looks as if we may be crossing the Pond sooner rather that later - my dad, who turned 93 today, has taken a turn for the worse and they're talking about "end-of-life" strategies (see my post on the prayer thread).

We can ill afford it, but we'll have to try and find the means somehow.

In other news, I've got a job interview on Thursday. [Eek!]

It never rains ...

((Piglet)) From me and from Sandemaniac. [Votive] Fingers crossed for the job interview.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thanks for all the good wishes, folks - much appreciated. My sister went up to Orkney today, and will be keeping me informed of what's what.

La Vie, you've hit it on the head about chicness v. snow. It's been snowing here since mid-afternoon (it's now about 8:30 in the evening) and set to continue until midnight, leaving us with somewhere between 6 inches and a foot of the stuff.

This does not bode well for (a) actually being able to get to the interview - we'll need to dig out the Pigletmobile and probably shift a whole load of snow that'll have been ploughed up at the end of the drive; and (b) looking smart. What the heck do you wear if you want to both look smart and not have your legs frozen solid?

I seem to have two options: a skirt or dress with knee-length boots, or trousers with ankle boots that are not the smartest. Having said that, this is Canada, where sense tends to prevail over style when it comes to winter clothing.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
piglet, I hope the job interview went/is going/will go well (delete as appropriate).

Sensible Canadians, to sacrifice style for comfort in Interesting Weather!

A pleasant, milder day here, with a modicum of hazy Sun-Shine. The church grounds are bustin' out all over, with daffodils, bluebells, celandines, primroses etc., popping up out of the grass in merry English spring fashion.

We Shall Pay For It Later, You Mark My Words.

[Ultra confused]

IJ
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Wishing you well Piglet x
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Our garden is very soggy, with just a couple of pots of snowdrops and iris reticulata in bloom.

Yesterday I was in Pembrokeshire and there was a sprinkling of snow on the beach.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
We Shall Pay For It Later, You Mark My Words.

It Won't Stay Like This For Long.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Will you hold your wheesht about your spring flowers? We got about a foot of snow by the time it gave up last night. [Frown]

D. has been quite angelic re: snow-shovelling; he went out quite late last night (while it was still snowing) and cleared the path and a bit of the drive; it was quite well-covered again by the morning, but it was nice soft, fluffy snow that's relatively easy to shift, and it was a beautiful morning with hardly any wind, so getting the car out wasn't too bad. And I think our friend with the snow-blower had a go at it while we were out (BLESS HIM!).

The interview went off OK (in as much as you can judge these things); the only trouble is, the hours are fixed at 8:30 - 4:30 on alternate weekends, which is a total pain from my singing point of view.

I'd still take it if it were offered (they had other people to interview), but wouldn't it just be my luck that a job would come up where I had to work on the one day of the week that I didn't want to? Also, being only 16 hours every other week, I wouldn't get rich on it (although it would still be more than the zilch I'm getting now).

[ 09. February 2018, 22:48: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
I come bearing news and a request for prayer for our own Uncle Pete. Some of you may know that he was taken into hospital with pneumonia. He is still in hospital but they have now diagnosed colonic cancer. He is due laparoscopic surgery on Saturday in the hope that no further intervention will be necessary.
He has family living locally and supporting him in hospital.

Please remember him in your prayers.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Oh feck - very sorry to hear that.

{{{Uncle Pete}}} [Votive]
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Damn it
[Votive]
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
Prayers ascending for Uncle Pete.
Annoying about the hours of that job Piglet, but hope you get it if you want it.
 
Posted by Banner Lady (# 10505) on :
 
May Uncle Pete be given all he needs as he needs it, and prayers for those gathering around him too. It doesn't sound too good.

BL (Bracing ourselves for another heatwave here)
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
[Votive] Pete xx
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
[Votive] Uncle Pete.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
(((Uncle Pete)))
 
Posted by Nicodemia (# 4756) on :
 
[Votive] Uncle Pete
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
[Votive] Uncle Pete
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Amen.

Updates, please, as and when.

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Prayers ascending for Uncle Pete here too.

I've had a very enjoyable, if somewhat snowy, birthday.

We didn't have too much trouble getting out to have lunch with a couple of friends (v. nice soup, a sort of minced meat pie thingy and wicked triple chocolate cake in my case), then home for a spot of Quality Bear Time™ and then out for supper at the home of a couple in the choir, which was most couth* despite their wee dog occasionally trying to eat me.

* I assume couth is the opposite of uncouth, and means very nice indeed.

Having stopped snowing for a while, it seems to have started again, so getting about tomorrow might be rather more exciting than we'd like. [Eek!]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Glad to hear your birthday was enjoyable piglet.

Because I went looking, there's a NY Times article about the use of kempt, gruntled and couth. Apparently couth originally meant "known and familiar" and uncouth, "unknown, foreign, strange". Couth then died out but was revived by Max Beerbohm in 1896, as a retronym, as PG Wodehouse did famously with gruntled:
quote:
“I could see that, if not actually disgruntled, he was far from being gruntled.”
eta - I started this post to ask if there was anything we could do for Uncle Pete or Welease Woderick practically.

[ 11. February 2018, 08:21: Message edited by: Curiosity killed ... ]
 
Posted by Lothlorien (# 4927) on :
 
Ck, I do not know about any way of helping Pete. There are others heree who may know.

Pete and I have had a lengthy discussion about helpoing WW. I think the conclusion was the he desperately wanted podcasts to listen to. We covered a wide range of helps and new developments in that area but it was podcasts he was after.

[ 11. February 2018, 09:06: Message edited by: Lothlorien ]
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
Pete's surgery was tricky, apparently, but they believe they have got all of the tumour. He is now recovering. I have spoken to family and they cannot think of anything that he needs right now but, once he is feeling a bit better, they will ask him. He said he didn't want cards, but it's always nice to annoy him just a little bit so if anyone wants to send one and does not have his address, feel free to send them to me and I will parcel them up and send them with mine.
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
Thanks for the update, Smudgie. I like the idea of being slightly naughty and sending cards anyway. Glad to hear that he is through the surgery okay and hope he mends up quickly. (Yesterday, I tried to send you a pm but I fear I clicked the wrong button and sent you an email instead!)
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Thanks for the positive update, Smudgie.

[Votive] continuing for Uncle Pete.

Meanwhile, couth in more recent times has apparently meant 'sophisticated', or 'refined'.

In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, however, if I recall my Middle English correctly, it did indeed mean 'known', as in 'couthe in sondry londes' ('known [of] in various countries').

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thanks for the definitions, folks - interesting stuff! I do like the idea of being gruntled. [Big Grin]

Glad to hear Uncle Pete's op. went well - wishing him a full and speedy recovery.

The weather didn't get too much worse today, although D. decided that discretion was the better part of valour and we went down our road rather than trying to go up, as you can be sure that if you need to get a good run at it, some eejit will come along the main road at the top in a truck* and you'll have to stop, losing all your hard-earned momentum.

* in our experience, most eejits drive trucks. [Devil]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Transfiguration today, which was a good thing because it meant we could have cheery hymns [Smile]

Now I can spend the evening trying to draw-up a list for a Deanery confirmation later in the year to cover music/worship traditions from our place (NEH) to one place that only uses an overhead projector for the words of songs that are played on a tape [Eek!]

In other news: we're expecting a few extras on Wednesday because it seems half the churches in the deanery aren't having a service for Ash Wednesday.
 
Posted by shamwari (# 15556) on :
 
I assume you had Stay Master stay
 
Posted by Smudgie (# 2716) on :
 
My friends, the news from Canada is not good. Uncle Pete has suffered multiple organ failure. He is unconscious and on a ventilator and his family are meeting with the doctors tomorrow to discuss some difficult decisions.

Please hold him in your prayers, together with P and S as they meet with his doctors. And remember Wodders - I am contacting him to break the news which will hit him very hard.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Smudgie:
My friends, the news from Canada is not good. Uncle Pete has suffered multiple organ failure. He is unconscious and on a ventilator and his family are meeting with the doctors tomorrow to discuss some difficult decisions.

Please hold him in your prayers, together with P and S as they meet with his doctors. And remember Wodders - I am contacting him to break the news which will hit him very hard.

Oh, no! [Waterworks]

But prayers for Pete and his family and Wodders.
[Votive]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
[Votive] Pete and Wodders, hoping and praying
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
[Votive] Pete and Wodders [Votive]
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
[Frown] [Votive]
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
[Votive] for Pete and those who love him.

Sometimes life is just shitty.
 
Posted by Fredegund (# 17952) on :
 
[Votive]
For Uncle Pete, WW, and all who care for them.
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
((Uncle Pete))
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I imagine that many of you will have already seen the other threads here letting us know that Uncle Pete was promoted to Glory earlier today.

Rest eternal grant unto him, O Lord, and let light perpetual shine upon him.

[Votive]
 
Posted by The Intrepid Mrs S (# 17002) on :
 
RIP, Uncle Pete [Votive]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm afraid it's not been a very good week; my dad passed away peacefully earlier today. My brother and sister both managed to see him before the end, and I think he'd have understood that logistics prevented me from being there.

They're hoping the funeral can be arranged for a week on Saturday, which should give us time to get ourselves over without too much of a rush.
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Sorry to hear this!
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
So sorry to hear your news Piglet.

I know your Dad had missed your Mum and that the decline was a gentle one. Love and Prayers for you all [Votive]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Yes, sorry to hear your news, Piglet.

M.
 
Posted by Japes (# 5358) on :
 
I'm so sorry to hear about your dad, Piglet.
 
Posted by Dormouse (# 5954) on :
 
Piglet, may God hold you, D, & all those who loved your father, in the palm of his hand.
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
{{Piglet}}, I'm so sorry.


[Votive] for Piglet's Dad's friends and family [Votive]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
((Piglet))
 
Posted by daisydaisy (# 12167) on :
 
[Votive] {piglet}
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
[Votive] piglet and family
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
((Piglet))
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
Oh Piglet, what can I say?

PM me if you need a blart or a shoulder.

AG
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
((Piglet))

Be kind to yourself.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Yes indeed.
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Thanks, everyone.

The funeral is a week from Friday (23rd), which should give us plenty of time to get over the pond and up to Orkney. We're now in the process of working out our best timetable - we think flying to Edinburgh, picking up a hire car and driving north for the funeral, then back down, drive down to Essex to see D's mum (we couldn't really be over there and not see her) then back up to Edinburgh for flights home.

It may look like a big faff, but we'll have to travel the length of the country each way no matter how we cut it, and this looks like the least faff ...
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
You live in the Americas. Driving the length of a nation is culturally appropriate for you!
 
Posted by St Everild (# 3626) on :
 
I am so very sorry, Piglet.

I hope all the arrangements work as you hope they will, and that travel is as stress-free as it possibly can be.
 
Posted by Barnabas Aus (# 15869) on :
 
Deepest condolences Piglet. I still miss my dad after 20 years.

We flew into Edinburgh a couple of years ago when visiting my cousins in Dunfermline. It's such a civilised experience compared with the zoo at Heathrow.
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
Brenda’s blanket arrived!

It is blue and stripy and snuggly and now I’m all emotional.

[Axe murder] and also [Waterworks] (that’s the hormones)

You are a very nice lady, Brenda.
 
Posted by Sarasa (# 12271) on :
 
What a wonderful thing LVER.
One of the nicest things that ever happened to me was when a teenage girl of my aqauintance turned up to my wedding (I got married rather late) with the shawl I'd knitted for her when she was a baby. She might have been seventeen but she said it was still her comfort blanket.
I'm sure bébé en rouge will love it too.

[ 16. February 2018, 09:19: Message edited by: Sarasa ]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
Oh super, it arrived! You never know, when sending items over the pond. I have had good success with baby blankets; one of mine was carried by the little boy until it was essentially nothing but a handful of ratty threadbare strands. He continued to drag it with him everywhere, until finally when they were staying at a hotel at Disney World the maids thought it was trash and swept it up. I believe his mother told him that Mickey is keeping it.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
lver - pass most of the snuggliness you find in Brenda's blanket on to bebe en rouge, but do keep a bit back for yourself.

Snuggliness is always a Good Thing to have.

[Big Grin]

IJ
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Snuggliness for the win [Smile]

The only thing that is keeping me warm at the moment in this Godforsaken draft trap of a house is a jumper that I inherited from my Granddad. It's not anything special, not handmade or knitted, but it is lovely and toasty. The strangest things can become heirlooms.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Yes, my Favouritist Pullover In All The World was acquired years, nay, eons ago, from a charity shop.

It had holes in the elbows, and at the front (IIRC), but was the snuggliest garment I think I've ever possessed.

It passed into the Great Ball Of Knitting In The Sky some years ago, having been damaged beyond salvation when I fell into the river adjacent to the Episcopal Palace (don't ask - it was one of those days).

I do still have some snuggly pullovers, though - I'm wearing one now.

It has a nice hole in the right elbow!

[Razz]

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
That'll be to let the air circulate ... [Big Grin]

In the previous château I was often glad of snuggly sweaters (and blankets - there was always one on the sofa during the winter), as it was a very draughty old shack. The new one, being new (well, about 12 years old) is much better sealed against the Interesting Weather™ we get in these parts, so I rarely feel the need any more.

We've got our flights booked - we're heading over the Pond on Monday. We managed to get a reasonable deal, apart from the $127 (about £72) we're having to pay to put a suitcase into the hold.

$127??? [Mad]

I'm beginning to think they should charge you to take hand-baggage instead; after all, it holds everyone else up while some blithering idiot tries to squeeze a suitcase the size of a small car into the overhead locker. And really, don't they think you might need a full-size case if you're travelling half-way round the world?

In other news, I heard today that my cousin L., with whom I was best mates before we left Orkney, but with whom I'd rather lost touch, died this morning of complications following surgery. She was 53.

This really hasn't been a very good week. [Frown]
 
Posted by M. (# 3291) on :
 
Oh, piglet, I'm so sorry to hear this.

M.
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
[Votive] for Piglet and your upcoming travels. I hope they pass without incident. Is there any chance your cousin’s funeral will take place while you are there?

Could you not just wear all your clothes at once, Michelin man style, and hand luggage for shoes and toiletries? I mean it might get a bit warm but think of the savings [Two face]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Really sorry to hear that piglet.

Hope your scramble across the Pond is not too exhausting and you manage to cram everything you need into your one suitcase. There's been news coverage on the charging policies of airlines, where the headline price looks good, but if you want to take any luggage or sit together surcharges apply. (I was going to be naughty and suggest if you were in Essex on Saturday 24 you could make the Absent Friends Meet, but I doubt you're in the mood now.)

Yesterday had its moments. Tesco has stopped stocking the one and only washing powder that neither of us is allergic to. I am currently washing rather too much of my wardrobe in the forlorn hope that I will have some work clothes at the end of this and am fast running out of safe washing powders. Tesco stocks the liquid version from the same manufacturer, but it contains lavender which makes my daughter as ill as the cannabis I'm trying to wash out. And who wants to smell strongly of lavender?

We were cautiously sniffing the hypoallergenic options wondering if any was suitable when my daughter reacted to one of them. Cue leaving fast, via the checkout, with her glued to the inhaler and spacer. Usually she prefers to tough it out as using the Epipen means calling an ambulance and trip to A&E. First bench she collapsed, I misused the Epipen and was sent two ambulances, one a paramedic car. Partly because I was with her, partly because we were so blasé* about it and partly because we'd been sent a paramedic doctor, she didn't have to go to hospital so we were dropped home by the ambulance, but that little episode took an hour and a half, plus my daughter trying to sleep it off yesterday afternoon.

The Job™ I escaped at the end of October is begging me to come and help out as one of the administrators is off sick for a month and the other is new, replacing someone on maternity leave. I am reluctant on so many counts, including the hour and a half commute each way when we are still trying to get the flat safe for my daughter and she cannot leave the flat safely alone much of the time. I am already committed locally two days a week and am negotiating for that to continue when the current cover ends, but The Job™ are so desperate that they are prepared to work around anything, having to work hours to get home. My collywobbles were added to by my successor phoning me up this week delighted I will be available to help her. Fortunately this has not been organised with the agency, who I contacted yesterday to see if they knew anything about it.

* blasé - she looks like this whenever her dose of antihistamine is running out - first thing in the morning particularly.
 
Posted by ThunderBunk (# 15579) on :
 
CK, I'm really sorry to hear of your ongoing struggles.

My life has been transformed by using Ecover's Zero washing products, with just a bit of their laundry bleach as a whitening agent/stain remover when necessary. I get out of bed still able to breathe, and don't have to dodge any room in which my washing is drying. Until I made the switch, I hadn't realised how allergic I'd become to everyday perfumes.

Apologies to hosts wary of adverts, but I think this is apposite and might be helpful given CK's dilemma. I have to get it from my local health food shop because it's not in supermarkets, but it is definitely worth the effort for me.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
It's Ecover we use too - and it's what Tesco has just stopped stocking.
 
Posted by ThunderBunk (# 15579) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
It's Ecover we use too - and it's what Tesco has just stopped stocking.

The Zero range is quite specific and, for me, completely transformative. Its bottles have 'zero' on them in large capital letters, and they contain absolutely no perfumes of any kind, or any ingredient with a detectable odour.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Ah, we've been using the washing powder, whether I'd prefer to use liquid given the option, or not. That is also scent free. It looks as if I will le taking a circuitous route to tomorrow's destination, via a big Waitrose; they apparently stock the Zero liquid, as does Tesco, just not my local one.
 
Posted by ThunderBunk (# 15579) on :
 
The fabric conditioner is also excellent, doing its job faultlessly and without leaving suffocating odour behind.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Here you go CK
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I did check Amazon, and also which shops sell it. The possible issue is that we're also dealing with dermatitis, and Zero doesn't have brilliant reviews from people with sensitive skin (both of us). Sadly.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
They do a Zero fabric conditioner for sensitive skin, not sure about the washing liquid [Smile]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I don't use fabric conditioner, full stop. It's bad enough finding a washing powder/liquid that doesn't bring me out in hives (literally), without adding another set of chemicals to make me itch. For anything that touches my skin, there is often one product, and one product only, I am using because it's all I can find. So if it isn't necessary I'm not using it.

That includes cotton clothing - I am allergic to viscose, modal, nylon, wool, 100% polyester and whatever is used in elastics for socks and some knickers. I can cope with a small percentage of polyester in a cotton polyester mix. Another current irritation is that most high street stores are using viscose cotton mixes for their cotton rich clothes, which is another reason I'm having to dressmake so much.
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
A lot of eczema in our family - aka itchers-and-scratchers-and-snifflers - so we tend as a larger family group to have a routine:
I'm not saying its foolproof but most of the time it seems to work. On the rare occasions it doesn't then anoint with a mixture of aqueous cream and honey.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Nothing to do with the above - but did anyone else feel the earth tremor this afternoon? Quite scary here in Cardiff although it didn't last long.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Nothing here, AFAIK, but I'm a few miles south-east of London, which seems to be as far as the effects were felt.

Scary, I'm sure, but not unknown in the UK. I recall trying to get to London by train one day, and finding that services were disrupted by an earthquake at Folkestone which had caused some considerable damage to houses etc.

I blame Tr**p.

IJ
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
There are historical accounts of earthquakes in London.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
And in lots of other parts of the UK.

Few do any real damage, thank God.

I still blame Lonald Lump - he's upsetting the Whole World.

IJ
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm about to come across the pond and you start having earthquakes ... [Eek!]

We've now got everything booked - flights, car-hire and the ferry to Orkney.

Ferijen - I doubt that L's funeral will be while we're there; she died in hospital in Aberdeen, and will have to be brought home. [Frown]

Wearing all your clothes at once is all very well, but not if you're all hot and hormonal like me. [Killing me]

TBH, one of the reasons I'd always have hold luggage is for toiletries: I really can't be bothered faffing about with a load of exactly 100ml bottles and see-through plastic bags; and for some inexplicable reason, the contact-lens cleaner that I use comes in a 105ml bottle - how brainless is that? I find it easier to have all that out of sight and out of mind in the hold where I don't have to worry about it.

This of course places an inordinate level of trust that the airline will reunite me with my suitcase at the appropriate time ... [Paranoid]

[ 17. February 2018, 19:00: Message edited by: Piglet ]
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
We're about 20 miles from Cardiff and our neighbour posted on f/b that the house shook. A friend in Merthyr reckoned he'd felt it We were in Hereford and didn't feel anything.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Thoughts and prayers to all affected by the earthquake in Wales.

I understand from one report that TEA was spilt...

IJ
 
Posted by Sandemaniac (# 12829) on :
 
I hear it's done millions of pounds worth of improvements in Newport....

AG
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Seriously, though, we're fortunate in (usually) not having quakes of the much greater magnitude that some countries suffer.

IJ
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
Nothing to do with earthquakes, but I saw my first lambs of the year on the way back from Hereford.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sandemaniac:
I hear it's done millions of pounds worth of improvements in Newport....

AG

It started a few days ago when a chimney fell off a house just down the road. That improved things no end.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
We have had a superb evening at the opera - La Forza del Destino in Cardiff. [Cool]
 
Posted by la vie en rouge (# 10688) on :
 
CK, would these work for you?

They get your clothes clean without using any detergents at all (the plastic thing is filled with porcelaine beads). I used them for quite a while and they work pretty well. They are also very ecological.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Opera??

In Lent??

Is Outrage!!

IJ
 
Posted by L'organist (# 17338) on :
 
Not an outrage having opera in Lent on a Sunday though ...

At our place we marked the First Sunday in Lent with proper Choral Matins: Jubilate Deo sung to Stanford in C, Almighty and Everlasting God by Gibbons and finishing with The Litany.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Not an outrage having opera in Lent on a Sunday though ...

I'll be enjoying 'The Barber of Seville' without a touch of guilt two weeks from today. [Smile]

There are, however, some operas (I won't name names) that might be considered penance.
[Snigger]
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
I'm going to confess it now: in my humble opinion, all opera except Gilbert & Sullivan would be penance. Sorry about that.

[Devil]

I'm not a huge fan of Matins - it doesn't quite float my boat the way Evensong does - but that sounds like a nice one you had, L'Organist. Actually, anything that includes a bit of Gibbons is all right in my book. [Smile]

They're doing the Litany next week at our place, but we'll still be away, which is a shame - I rather enjoy it in procession.
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Opera??

In Lent??

Is Outrage!!

IJ

As it is Lent, will the fat lady be present, let alone able to sing?
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
She could certainly sing, but she wasn't fat.

The bass, on the other hand, was fairly well-proportioned ...
 
Posted by Piglet (# 11803) on :
 
Anyone want to come over here and try to squeeze clothes for two people for nearly a fortnight (including smart funeral clothes) into one medium-size suitcase?

Oh yes, and they also need to include something warm enough for Toronto and cool enough for the south of England.

[brick wall]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
Anyone want to come over here and try to squeeze clothes for two people for nearly a fortnight (including smart funeral clothes) into one medium-size suitcase?

Oh yes, and they also need to include something warm enough for Toronto and cool enough for the south of England.

[brick wall]

I would investigate the cost of hiring some decent outfit for the funeral, buying the cheapest acceptable clothes possible in the UK then (ideally) selling them on before you have to return to Canada.

I don't suppose you can leave cold-weather clothes at Toronto? Have you friends there who could look after them while you over here, taking them from you on departure and being there to hand them back on your return? A bottle of something old may help.

[Votive] Hoping it all goes smoothly, could be a challenging trip.
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Left luggage in Toronto? Layering so that you can just shed layers for southern England?
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Hope the trip goes sell, Piglet - the logistics do sound a bit complex... [Eek!]

[Votive] for the funeral, too.

The weather is mild and lachrymose in southern Ukland just now, but set to get a bit colder (well, cold to us effete Southrons) later in the week.

IJ
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Hope the trip goes well, I mean...

(Actually, the idea of buying cheap clothing here, and then selling it, is OK as far as it goes, but how would you go about the selling, given your limited time here?

If your budget can stand it, you could always pass it on to the homeless, if a convenient agency is to hand, or simply leave it with a charity shop.)

IJ
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
A quick trip to your local charity shop or two when here?

Jengie
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Do you mean in order to buy clothes, Jengie?

Cos that's a Very Good Idea!

IJ
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
I know of some people who ship their luggage to their destination because they find it is more economical that paying the airline rates.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Piglet:
We've got our flights booked - we're heading over the Pond on Monday.

Oops! I guess it's too late for suggestions.
[Frown]
 
Posted by Brenda Clough (# 18061) on :
 
There's always the final resort -- wearing two or three jackets one on top of the other, with four shirts beneath.
 
Posted by Jengie jon (# 273) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Do you mean in order to buy clothes, Jengie?

Cos that's a Very Good Idea!

IJ

Yes.

pack essentials
buy others from charity shops
give back to charity shops excess clothing

It is standard backpackers advice iirc and I am prepared to bet there will be something from the charity shop that becomes an essential.

Jengie

[ 19. February 2018, 14:39: Message edited by: Jengie jon ]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Excellent advice, though I suspect Piglet and D. are on a tight schedule, and may simply not have enough time.

In other circumstances, yes....

IJ
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Just to brighten your day, if you live in the damp parts of Ukland (i.e. most of it), here is a cheerful rendition of a little musical snippet by Dmitri Shostakovich, courtesy of Yuja Wang and an anonymous trumpet player.

Enjoy!

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Today it was sunny nearly all day! [Cool] [Cool]
 
Posted by Ferijen (# 4719) on :
 
Piglet's journeying seems to have slowed down this thread. Hoping her travels have gone as well as one could expect [Votive]

Happy Friday everyone. Sunny and cold in this bit of the South...
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Just to brighten your day, if you live in the damp parts of Ukland (i.e. most of it), here is a cheerful rendition of a little musical snippet by Dmitri Shostakovich, courtesy of Yuja Wang and an anonymous trumpet player.

I heard this live in Heidelberg, played by the Heidelberg symphony orchestra - simply marvellous.


[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
Piglet's journeying seems to have slowed down this thread. Hoping her travels have gone as well as one could expect [Votive]

Happy Friday everyone. Sunny and cold in this bit of the South...

At 8am it was -2C in South Wales (and *not* up in the hills either). Quite a bit of ice to scrape off the car. Happily it is half-term so a quick journey to work. It will all be different next week when the little darlings will have to be ferried to school - we have two primary schools and three large secondary schools close to my office so that's a lot of SUVs/People Carriers and Chelsea tractors to contend with, especially with a lot of road works going on.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Horrid east wind here - the one that makes your ears seem tight, as though they need a quarter-turn on order to feel right again....

Sn*w is forecast for next week, as in 'KILLER SN*W STORM ALERT!!!!' on the front page of the tabloids. Maybe it's to make Piglet feel welcome [Paranoid]

Though I'm sure we all hope that she and D. are OK, and that her Dad's funeral went as well as could be expected (it was today, IIRC).

IJ
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
LRP and I have had a pleasant but cold trip to Wakefield at the Food, Drink and Rhubarb festival, and met with Arachnid in Elmet for what could be the last mini shipmeet before Ship II sails. Unless you know otherwise.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
The east wind persists, but we have some Sun-Shine today, and, as the Palace possesses a sequestered Nook or Den, I am able to take some advantage of it.

However, on visiting the corner shop this morning, I found that, with the threat of SN*W next week, the population of South-East Ukland has decided (as per usual) to stockpile bread, milk, and toilet rolls.

Not that I particularly need any of those commodities, but why do Uklanders persist in buying stuff that they obviously know will make them incontinent?

The Palace is, I am happy to say, replete with SOUP, logs, coal, and WHISKY, so it can sn*w as much as it likes.

[Big Grin]

IJ
 
Posted by St. Gwladys (# 14504) on :
 
People obviously like stale bread and milk, otherwise there's going to be a craze for bread and butter pudding.
 
Posted by Boogie (# 13538) on :
 
Bread and milk was what Mum used to give us when we were poorly - that and stewed apple 🍎
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
No need for bread and butter pudding at Chez Arachnid as we've just had a very tasty rhubarb frangipane tart from yesterday's Rhubarb Festival meeting with Balaam and LRP. There's some rhubarb waiting to be stewed for tomorrow.

It's definitely crumble weather. I'm writing this from under a duvet supplemented by a hot water bottle.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Yes, indeed - Comfort Food required! I've just had some nice chicken-and-mushroom SOUP.

My Old Mum used to stew a mean apple (Bramleys, mostly, IIRC, as we had a huge old tree in the wilderness that passed for a garden), and we were so fed whether we were poorly or not.

But it was delicious (where's that drooly emoji?).

IJ
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
More Black Breath of Putin (i.e. east wind from Russia) today, but a most beautiful cloudless, and clear blue, sky.

[Big Grin]

However, Siberian temperatures, along with SN*W, are on their way, which will interfere (possibly) with My Arrangements.

Thank you, Uncle Vlad.

Not.

[Disappointed]

In mitigation of which, I have today (despite it being the Sabbath) been to the shop, and bought some nice SAUSAGE ROLLS, and smoked CHEESE, together with PEANUT BUTTER, for the adorning of TOAST.

Isn't comfort food wonderful?

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
For lunch we had some most excellent and large Sardines (from Asda!) on toast. Mmmm ...
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
How very Frugal, and, indeed, Lenten.....

Yes, I like the occasional dose of sardines or mackerel on TOAST. When Ah wor a lad, My Old Mum used to sometimes give us pilchards and boiled potatoes (accompanied by bread and butter) for lunch on Saturdays.

In winter, it would be tomato SOUP (Heinz, of course) with boiled potatoes in it.

Mmmmmmmmm......

IJ
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Just because this amuses me, apparently the next "tenant" in my daughter's flat was a young looking police officer. The drug dealing neighbour leafleted the letterbox as normal. He then set up a deal with his new neighbour. There's now a certain amount of sorrow on the Book of the Face that supplies have dried up. The policeman only lived there for two days.
 
Posted by lily pad (# 11456) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Just because this amuses me, apparently the next "tenant" in my daughter's flat was a young looking police officer. The drug dealing neighbour leafleted the letterbox as normal. He then set up a deal with his new neighbour. There's now a certain amount of sorrow on the Book of the Face that supplies have dried up. The policeman only lived there for two days.

Okay, now this is news! [Smile] Too bad she couldn't have employed the strategy of inviting someone like this over regularly.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Curiosity killed ...:
Just because this amuses me, apparently the next "tenant" in my daughter's flat was a young looking police officer. The drug dealing neighbour leafleted the letterbox as normal. He then set up a deal with his new neighbour. There's now a certain amount of sorrow on the Book of the Face that supplies have dried up. The policeman only lived there for two days.

[Killing me]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
I did work two days at The Job™ last week around the cover gig locally. I was supposed to be going in today, but the travel disruptions are huge, UK snow!, so getting home in a hurry does not look an option, and I am not working anywhere where I cannot get home quickly atm.

I am also feeling a whole lot less like going in because, although I had agreed the work to cover, on Thursday my successor told me that she had been authorised to use me to sort out the exams with her. So I spent most of the day refinding and retyping up the information I had given her before I left at the end of October (finding the spreadsheets and How To™ notes saved on the Exec Drive where I'd left them, but nothing updated). The narrative was on an email, with attachments, but I don't have access to my old email account to reforward her previously composed emails, because that would have saved half a day. Another one who'd like a Grr emoticon.

Currently it's very pretty here - light icing of snow, occasional flakes drifting past.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Yes, heavy sn*w here in North Kent - it's been quite a few years since we had this much (4 inches or so, and still coming down thick and fast).

I blame Putin. The Russian tanks etc. will be moving in soon, under cover of his Black Breath.

Fortunately, I don't have to leave the Palace today, but [Votive] for all who do have to be out and about...especially the emergency services, carers etc. [Axe murder]

IJ
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
I worked in North Kent for a couple of years (at an MoD establishment between Orpington and Sevenoaks) and we had some serious snow there. Over the winter of 1983-1984 we had snow on the ground for six weeks!
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Ha! I recall the great winter of '62-'63, when sn*w lasted pretty well from Boxing Day until Easter!

[Help]

IJ
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
Yes, we went to a matinee performance of "Emil and the Detectives" on Boxing Day and it was snowing when we came out. Fortunately my parents had installed central heating that very summer!

I sledged after school nearly every day (school closed early during the snowtime, and the park was almost next door).
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Yes, we had central heating, too.

My Old Dad would stand in the middle of the living room, smoking a fag. Every time he took a drag, we'd stretch out our hands to the glowing tip of his roll-up......

I'll get me mittens....

IJ
 
Posted by balaam (# 4543) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Ha! I recall the great winter of '62-'63, when sn*w lasted pretty well from Boxing Day until Easter!

I remember going to school in shorts.
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
I remember going to school in shorts.

We weren't allowed to wear shorts to school even when it was over 100F (38C). Girls weren't even allowed to wear slacks until the year after I graduated, when they relaxed some of the rules.

But of course this was back when we drove our horse and buggy to school. [Biased]
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
I was still in shorts, too, back in the Great Ice Winter....the bloody sn*w was deep enough to come over the top of my wellies, thus soaking and freezing my poor little toes and matchstick legs.

We were too poor to afford Thick Sox.

[Disappointed]

More sn*w is falling as I write, but the forecast for the weekend is not too bad (cloud and rain!).

The resultant thaw will doubtless reveal more leaks in the Palace roof, complete with Annoying Drips.

IJ
 
Posted by ArachnidinElmet (# 17346) on :
 
Just been having a conversation about people who wear shorts no matter the weather, sparked off by the local school caretaker. Apparently there's someone in this category who, in especially cold weather, may consider putting on a hat...
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Proper snow here - suspended trains and tube and a pretty delicate sunrise following a sunset showing orange through falling snow. I expect a snow day for everyone else. Good thing I forgot to contact The Job™ agreeing times to go in this week.
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by ArachnidinElmet:
Just been having a conversation about people who wear shorts no matter the weather, sparked off by the local school caretaker. Apparently there's someone in this category who, in especially cold weather, may consider putting on a hat...

Won't they need two hats ... one for each knee?

[ 28. February 2018, 06:25: Message edited by: Baptist Trainfan ]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
You know who we ought to blame for snow in this area? piglet - all her fault for bringing it over with her! [Two face]
 
Posted by Sioni Sais (# 5713) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
Ha! I recall the great winter of '62-'63, when sn*w lasted pretty well from Boxing Day until Easter!

[Help]

IJ

We were living on a airfield in Lincolnshire at that time. I can't remember much beyond the cold but with one fire and no central heating we hunkered down in one room with blankets round the chairs, only moving to feed and go to bed. I started school in the January and I'm sure there was snow on the ground for weeks, possibly until we moved in March to the south coast.

btw, our postie wears shorts, but he moves pretty fast!

[ 28. February 2018, 11:22: Message edited by: Sioni Sais ]
 
Posted by Baptist Trainfan (# 15128) on :
 
They were putting out a display of sledges in the supermarket this morning ... so far we've only had the lightest of dustings and the sun is now out, but there is Much Worse To Come tomotrrow. [Frown]
 
Posted by Curiosity killed ... (# 11770) on :
 
Snow day around here - genuinely - it's been snowing all morning. Currently I'm looking out on to sunshine on lots of white, but it's clouding over again, which suggests more fluffy stuff descending. The schools that did try to open are sending children home early and we've cancelled Guides tonight. One school opened at 10am and shut at 11:30am. The tube has had severe delays all day, as had the overground.
 
Posted by Bishops Finger (# 5430) on :
 
Nice Sun-Shine here, though the East Wind is beginning to pick up again.... [Disappointed]

The environs of the Palace are workaday, not to say ramshackle, but the frost and sn*w in the Sun-Shine earlier this morning made it all look quite beautiful-ish.

The other noticeable thing about sn*w, of course, is how it muffles sound. This, I like.

(BTW, spare a thought for poor piglet, over this side of the pond for Daddy Pig's funeral. Let's hope the Siberian-style weather doesn't incommode her, and D., too much on what is probably not a particularly pleasant trip.)

IJ
 
Posted by Pigwidgeon (# 10192) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
The other noticeable thing about sn*w, of course, is how it muffles sound. This, I like.

IJ

When I lived in New York City (Manhattan) I loved major snowstorms if I didn't have to travel more than a block from home. It's so QUIET with automobile traffic reduced to almost nothing, and -- as you say -- the snow muffling what sound there is. Not even any planes when the airports have to close.

I felt sorry for all for whom the weather was a major inconvenience and a health and safety concern, but oh, it was lovely if you were safe at home.
 


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