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Source: (consider it) Thread: When Google Fails You: The 2018 General Question Thread
Trudy Scrumptious

BBE Shieldmaiden
# 5647

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When you have a question that doesn't fit neatly into any other Ship topic, but you really want Shipmates' input on it, this is the thread to do that on. Last year's general inquiry thread has been banished to Limbo.

Ask away!

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Books and things.

I lied. There are no things. Just books.

Posts: 7428 | From: Closer to Paris than I am to Vancouver | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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I will soon be in the US, assuming Trump lets me in.

I am brushing up on my tip mentality, it being not prevalent here; but one thing I am slightly concerned about it me having enough low denomination notes to go around. I tend to use card for everything.

Can I go to a bank on my first day and ask for $50 or $100 in $5s and $1s? Do I use an ATM and then break every note I can at a local convenience store? What tips have you found helpful to have tip money?

Posts: 7800 | From: On the border | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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You do know that it is accepted practice to add the tip money to the credit card bill? I don't know if they have it in Europe, but in the US the credit card slip has a place for you to write in the amount you are going to pay, a second line for the tip, and then a third line for the grand total to be charged to your card. There's a longer fourth line beneath all this, for your signature.

If you want to leave a tip in cash I would stick to paper money and not worry about coins. Fifteen to twenty percent is the going rate. The last thing you want in your life is a hundred dollars in ones; that's a fat wad of cash. It's not difficult to break bigger bills; get your $100 in three twenties (= $60) four fives ( =$20) and twenty ones.

[ 10. January 2018, 00:02: Message edited by: Brenda Clough ]

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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If you leave a tip in cash it is more likely your server will get the larger part of it; if you use a credit card, not only will the owner of the restaurant get the lion's share, but your credit card balance will increase and then (unless you pay it off monthly) be charged the increasingly large interest rate on the higher balance. FWIW I do my best not to use my credit card to pay for meals. Debit card or cash, all the way.

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Even more so than I was before

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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OTOH, if you are not spending a great deal of time here, exchanging money can be entirely evaded with plastic. We went ti Iceland for three days. I never saw a unit of Icelandic money, and am still not sure what it is -- the kroner? We put everything on plastic. It's tons easier.

Be warned that in the US we by and large do not have the handy devices that allow you to wave your cell phone over them and instantly transfer money from your bank account to the restaurant. I am tell these are standard in Asia. Although many stores/restaurants have the chip (allowing you to insert your card into a slot) may don't and you will still need to swipe the magnetic strip on the back of your card.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
but one thing I am slightly concerned about it me having enough low denomination notes to go around. I tend to use card for everything.

Cards are pretty common in the US these days. About the only places I regularly spend cash these days are the canteen at work and the bar, and both of those places will take cards (it's just that cash is faster).

US ATMs almost uniformly in my experience hand out $20s and nothing else. Buying something for a few bucks with a $20 is completely normal. (Yes, there are ATMs that carry other denominations - there's one in the downtown branch of my bank that has singles - but they're not that common.)

Usually if you pay for a service in $20s, you'll get change including the kind of notes that the server is hoping to get back as a tip [Big Grin]

As Brenda noted, change is almost completely worthless in the US. $1 coins exist, but you're unlikely to be given any in change. 25 cents is the largest coin you're likely to encounter. Don't leave change as a tip, but rounding up bill+tip to whole dollars and leaving that is OK.

You're going to want to tip 15-20 percent for a restaurant meal. A buck a drink is normal in a regular bar; more if it's a fancy place. 15% is about the going rate for taxi/limo drivers.

[ 10. January 2018, 00:37: Message edited by: Leorning Cniht ]

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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Thank you all; exceptionally helpful, and puts my mind at rest. I was not sure if tips could be given by card [and Pete expresses some of my concern about who gets them!], but that would make it easier. Luckily I have a fee-free (even OS) debit card.

Now to get in the mindset of tipping. Coming from a non-tipping culture, it is so easy to just forget.

My sincerest thanks again.

Posts: 7800 | From: On the border | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
georgiaboy
Shipmate
# 11294

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Also on the subject of restaurant tipping:

You will find very few -- almost no -- restaurants that include 'service' in the bill. (Which I found quite common in Europe).
The few which do so are found mostly in NYC, Chicago & California.

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You can't retire from a calling.

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Always glance over your bill to be sure they haven't already added 'service' in. This often happens if it's a large party. Also it's worth checking if the bill is correct, and (if you hand the server your credit card) that you're getting the correct card back again. All those dark-gray Visa cards, very similar in a dark restaurant.

If you're traveling, it's worth phoning your credit card before you leave, and telling that you're going to Georgia or wherever it is. (Use the customer service # on the back of the card.) This prevents them from tagging the unusual charge as a stolen-card charge, and freezing your card out. If your card is tied to your cell phone you might get a text or automated call, asking you to confirm that it was you who just charged $200 in Atlanta. But if you don't have a cell, or you fail to reply to the text, they could pull the plug on your card and you'd be stranded without it.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Lots of Yay

Cookies enabled
# 2790

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Many of the banks allow you to do that online. I know NAB and ING both have functions on their apps to tell them that you’re going overseas, which countries and which dates you’ll be away. Although I must say the ING people are very friendly when I call to tell them about my travels and always wish me a good trip.

What I found annoying in the US was how difficult it was to find an ATM that would give me money. My cards generally work everywhere... except there. I also dazzled the staff at one shop by showing them that their credit card machine had tap and go functionality. That was a few years ago now but fairly sure I could only use contactless payment at that one shop. Everywhere else wanted signatures. I had never ever used a signature with my visa debit card before that.

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Current status: idle
Tales of Variable Yayness
Photos of stuff. Including Pooka!

Posts: 2006 | From: the plasticine room | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
simontoad
Ship's Amphibian
# 18096

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Good on you Ian. Enjoy the trip. I almost never tip in Australia (although I did yesterday after 4 hours in the pub getting larger than standard whiskies). I tipped everywhere in the States - its necessary for those poor bastards in the service industries. We used the credit card to pay for the meal and left cash on the table. I'd also give people who took our bags to the room a tip, although if you are staying in mid-range Holiday Inn type places, you lug your own bags. For random services like that I'd give what I had, and hope it was a tenner.

Ordinary thing that freaked me out the most: No kettles in hotel rooms for making hot drinks. No kettles anywhere in fact. We tried to buy one so my MIL could have her powdered coffee drink fix.

One question to USA people: Is it considered appropriate politically to lower your tip below the 10% mark for bad or below-par service? Obviously, from a rich leftie perspective, but I'd also especially like to hear from someone who relies on tips, or did when younger.

Also if you stay at a mid-range Holiday Inn place, should you tip room staff and reception? Maybe not for a night, but what if that was your base for a week?

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Human

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simontoad
Ship's Amphibian
# 18096

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Ian, many petrol stations in the US have pay at the pump. That's their preferred method I think. But the pump wouldn't take my NAB visa. You just have to go inside and pay there. Don't tear your metaphorical hair out and be all stressed like I was the first time [Big Grin]

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Human

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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I do not believe one tips the reception person at a middling hotel, but you could leave a tip in the room for the chambermaid, who will surely be able to use it.
If you get bad service in a restaurant, see if you can determine who's to blame. Your waiter may have been panting to bring you your food, but the kitchen had fallen off the sled about cooking it. In nearly all cases it's worth complaining to the management instead.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

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Re kettles:

I'm surprised that there weren't any. There's usually *something*--I'm used to a glass carafe and a special hotplate. Some places provide microwaves, so you could heat water there.

You might look at a drugstore or department store for a "hot pot" or electric kettle. (Drugstores like Walgreen's or CVS.) Be mindful of whether it actually has an off switch, or if you have to unplug it to turn it off. (May sound obvious, but people don't always notice that sort of thing.)

You might also look for an immersion heater. Basically, pieces of metal attached to a cord and plug. You put the metal end directly into the liquid, and plug in the cord. That heats up the liquid. I've never seen one with any kind of switch, so you would have to unplug it *and* place the metal end on something non-flammable to cool.

You could also check with the front desk. They might have a kettle to lend or rent.

FWIW.

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

Posts: 18594 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
simontoad
Ship's Amphibian
# 18096

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we couldn't find any kettles at all in places like Walmart but I don't think we thought to look in Drugstores. That's one of the areas we differ I think. Drugstores mean Chemists and to us that means medication, perfume, health supplements, bandages and small bags of lollies for diabetics. The other possibility is that we just didn't have the eyes to see kettles because they were called something else or put in an area where we don't think to look. We will be back in California around Thanksgiving, so I think we will go explore a drug store. My wife likes to post pictures of stuff she finds weird or funny in shops on her facebook page. I think there is a Walgreens in Sutter Creek. It rings a bell. I think its logo is cursive script on a slant...

Thanks for answering my queries re tips too guys. If you give a stuff (and I do) it can be a bit of a minefield.

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Human

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Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

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Target stock kettles. They'd be the first place I would look.
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Gill H

Shipmate
# 68

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Re tipping for housekeeping - it is worth taking some envelopes to put the tip in and writing ‘for housekeeping’ on them. If you just leave money lying around, they may just think it is your loose change.

Kettles in rooms are rare in much of continental Europe too. Coffee makers are becoming more common though.

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*sigh* We can’t all be Alan Cresswell.

- Lyda Rose

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Gill H

Shipmate
# 68

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Bear in mind that to many in the US, a kettle is the old fashioned metal thing you put on a stove. The electric kettle is not ubiquitous in people’s homes as it is in the UK.

I have friends who take a travel kettle with them.

As for tipping - on the other message board I frequent, that is the equivalent of a Dead Horse! It gets very heated. I would say, if there is a problem, bring it up politely with the manager and give them a chance to sort it. If the service is really bad, let them know why your tip reflects that, otherwise they will just think you are another foreigner who doesn’t understand tipping. But I have to say, I have never had bad service.

Things to bear in mind (from the perspective of a UK visitor, I can’t speak for Oz):

If you tend to order starter and main course at the outset, you may find they bring the main before you finish the starter. This is due to cultural differences. To avoid it you can either ask for a break between courses when you order, or just order one course at a time.

Incidentally, appetisers = starter and entree = main course, not starter as it would be in France.

The other cultural difference is clearing plates. I have seen so many Brits complain about rude service in the US because the server cleared their dirty plate before others in the party finished eating. But this is good service in the US, they don’t want you sitting looking at a dirty plate.

Also you may find the server puts the check (bill) on the table before you have finished eating. Again, Brits may feel they are rushing you to finish and pay. Nope - it just means you don’t have to flag someone down when you finish.

[ 11. January 2018, 05:33: Message edited by: Gill H ]

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*sigh* We can’t all be Alan Cresswell.

- Lyda Rose

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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You people are wonderful! [Overused]

Thank you all so much.

Posts: 7800 | From: On the border | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
Bear in mind that to many in the US, a kettle is the old fashioned metal thing you put on a stove. The electric kettle is not ubiquitous in people’s homes as it is in the UK.

Bear in mind that some US electric kettles are set not to come to the sort of rolling boil that is required to make a decent pot of tea. In Northern states nipping into Canada for a kettle is not unknown. So that is not a bad thing.

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Last ever sig ...

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Posts: 9049 | From: Hen Ogledd | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
Target stock kettles. They'd be the first place I would look.

Also, Bed, Bath and Beyond where I got mine. Mine also comes to a rolling boil for about five seconds or so. Good for making tea!

It used to be when you would have very bad service at a restaurant, you would leave a penny. That would let the server know that you really were displeased. I haven't heard of folks doing that for a while, however. Conversely, if you have outstanding service, you would leave a good tip with a penny added. Again, I haven't heard of folks doing this for a while, but is probably something servers would be aware of!

I'm showing my age, aren't I?

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Unless you have vast luggage it's a bore to carry a kettle with you. I like the notion of an immersion heater, but even with that be sure they'll work with the local plugs/wattage. (There are jacks you can buy so that you can power your coffee machine -from the port in your computer.- If you plug your computer in to charge up then it works great.) As long as your hotel isn't of the most economy class, I'd ask at the desk -- they'll lend you one. Most hotel rooms now have a coffee setup en suite.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Unless you have vast luggage it's a bore to carry a kettle with you. I like the notion of an immersion heater, but even with that be sure they'll work with the local plugs/wattage. (There are jacks you can buy so that you can power your coffee machine -from the port in your computer.- If you plug your computer in to charge up then it works great.) As long as your hotel isn't of the most economy class, I'd ask at the desk -- they'll lend you one. Most hotel rooms now have a coffee setup en suite.

Electric coffee pots do not typically boil the water, so aren't suitable for making tea.

Standard computer USB ports provide up to 0.5A at 5V, which is a mighty 2.5W. The specific heat capacity of water is 4.184 J /g /K. At 2.5W, and assuming perfect insulation (!) it would take 8.5 hours to raise the temperature of an 8 oz mug of water from room temperature to 100 degrees C. A standard 1.5 kW US electric kettle will accomplish the task in 50 seconds.

Or there's always the microwave (many hotel rooms have a microwave), but it's a little tricky to judge when the water has reached boiling point in a microwave (although dropping a teabag in superheated water is always amusing).

[ 11. January 2018, 14:18: Message edited by: Leorning Cniht ]

Posts: 5026 | From: USA | Registered: Feb 2013  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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There's probably a kettle and tea thread in here somewhere. Having shorted out a hotel wing with an immersion heater, I have 800 ml dual voltage kettle, you can get them down to about 500 ml. I take it everywhere. Hotel rooms like to have little coffee makers in them, which make hot water but leave it under-cooked for tea. I also hold that there are two drinks: tea and tea bag, which is another story (I have been known to take my own water for tea with me on road trips)
Posts: 11498 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Moo

Ship's tough old bird
# 107

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Getting back to the money issue, you will need coins if you do your own laundry. Most laundromats have money-change machines which will change a $1 bill. Some will change a $5.

Moo

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See you later, alligator.

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Bishops Finger
Shipmate
# 5430

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Just supposing (yes, I know....if only) Hillary Clinton had become President of the USA. What title would have been given to her husband, Bill?

'First Man' sounds a bit odd, and 'First Gentleman' may be, er, inappropriate. 'First Husband' sounds rather unfortunate.....

'First Lady', OTOH, just suited Michelle Obama down to the ground. Not sure about poor Melancholia - 'First Prisoner', perhaps?

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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Bill Clinton said he wanted to be the First Laddy.

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"...that is generally a matter for Pigwidgeon, several other consenting adults, a bottle of cheap Gin and the odd giraffe."
~Tortuf

Posts: 9835 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
John Holding

Coffee and Cognac
# 158

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quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
Bear in mind that to many in the US, a kettle is the old fashioned metal thing you put on a stove. The electric kettle is not ubiquitous in people’s homes as it is in the UK.

Bear in mind that some US electric kettles are set not to come to the sort of rolling boil that is required to make a decent pot of tea. In Northern states nipping into Canada for a kettle is not unknown. So that is not a bad thing.
Nipping into Canada is always a good thing.

John

Posts: 5929 | From: Ottawa, Canada | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Barnabas Aus
Shipmate
# 15869

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Lots of Yay wrote
quote:
Many of the banks allow you to do that online. I know NAB and ING both have functions on their apps to tell them that you’re going overseas, which countries and which dates you’ll be away. Although I must say the ING people are very friendly when I call to tell them about my travels and always wish me a good trip.

Double-check on this process. We did notify NAB of our travel intentions, but when we made a couple of big purchases in the first day or two of our trip, the card was flagged and we were left embarrassed at the check-in desk of a five-star hotel when the card was declined. It took a large chunk of my roaming credit on the phone to get it sorted.
Posts: 375 | From: Hunter Valley NSW | Registered: Sep 2010  |  IP: Logged
simontoad
Ship's Amphibian
# 18096

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quote:
Originally posted by Leorning Cniht:
quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
Unless you have vast luggage it's a bore to carry a kettle with you. I like the notion of an immersion heater, but even with that be sure they'll work with the local plugs/wattage. (There are jacks you can buy so that you can power your coffee machine -from the port in your computer.- If you plug your computer in to charge up then it works great.) As long as your hotel isn't of the most economy class, I'd ask at the desk -- they'll lend you one. Most hotel rooms now have a coffee setup en suite.

Electric coffee pots do not typically boil the water, so aren't suitable for making tea.

Standard computer USB ports provide up to 0.5A at 5V, which is a mighty 2.5W. The specific heat capacity of water is 4.184 J /g /K. At 2.5W, and assuming perfect insulation (!) it would take 8.5 hours to raise the temperature of an 8 oz mug of water from room temperature to 100 degrees C. A standard 1.5 kW US electric kettle will accomplish the task in 50 seconds.

Or there's always the microwave (many hotel rooms have a microwave), but it's a little tricky to judge when the water has reached boiling point in a microwave (although dropping a teabag in superheated water is always amusing).

This is an amazing post. Truly wonderful. I knew a fellow who was absolutely fanatical about tea. He would print this post out and keep it in his wallet, I'm sure.
[Overused]

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Human

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Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

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If I may ask, what is the advantage of bringing water for tea to a rolling boil?

Thx.

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

Posts: 18594 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

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BF--

I've heard "First Gentleman" most often. I like it--it's the exact counterpart of First Lady.

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
If I may ask, what is the advantage of bringing water for tea to a rolling boil?

Thx.

Boiling water hitting the tea releases tannins that would otherwise not be released. More flavour = better tea.

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balaam

Making an ass of myself
# 4543

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Additional re: tea,

On a kettle that will not reach a rolling boil operate it with the lid open, that should work.

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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
# 3523

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I have taken a dual voltage travel kettle to the USA before (knowing about the lack of kettles in rooms) but we found it frustrating to use because it took so long to come to the boil (due to 110V system in the USA compared with 240V at home). We also had a thermos flask with us, so we came up with an inventive solution to brew an early morning cuppa in reasonable time ... the night before we would boil the kettle (when we weren't in a rush) and put the boiling water in the thermos overnight. The following morning, the already hot water could be reboiled in the kettle in a short time, and hey presto tea could be made on waking without waiting too long.

More recent trips to the US have mostly involved giving up on the idea of trying to drink tea, and just switching to coffee only for the duration of the holiday. Even the cheapest motel chains such as Motel 6 will have coffee available in the lobby, if not in your room. Also ice machines ... something I have never seen in the UK.

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Bishops Finger
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# 5430

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@Golden Key - yes, 'First Gentleman' sounds OK.

My rather uncharitable thought was that Mr. Clinton rather spoiled his presidency at one point by not behaving in a gentlemanly fashion...

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

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bib
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# 13074

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Re tipping: Are there any services in the US for which one doesn't have to tip? Why do I have to tip, particularly if the service is bad or non existent and what will happen if I don't tip?

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Brenda Clough
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# 18061

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Probably nothing. As far as I know, you do not tip mailmen, the staff at gyms or pools, librarians, staff in retail stores (bookshops, clothing stores, shoe shops, etc.).

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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lilBuddha
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# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by bib:
Re tipping: Are there any services in the US for which one doesn't have to tip?

All of them. Tipping is expected in some places, but not required.
quote:

Why do I have to tip, particularly if the service is bad or non existent

Unlike the civilised world, wait-staff in America are paid very poorly in the expectation the customers will tip and make the difference. Essentially, the customer is directly paying part of the salary of their wait-staff. By not paying, you are also cheating their assistants as they share tip money, so it is not just the server. Also, the server might not be responsible for your bad service, they cannot control the kitchen.
quote:

and what will happen if I don't tip?

Nothing. Unless you go back and the staff remember you.

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cliffdweller
Shipmate
# 13338

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I really wouldn't go to a sit-down restaurant and not tip at least 15% unless the waitstaff did something truly dreadful that was clearly their fault-- not the management (for understaffing) or kitchen staff (getting food out late). It's just not done, for reasons mentioned above.

But it's considered OK to not tip in self-serve cafeteria style places-- the type where you order stand in line to place your order to a cashier, including coffee places like Starbucks. There's usually a "tip jar" where it's nice to throw a dollar or two, but it's not essential. This is the one exception to the "no change" rule-- if you've got some quarters that are weighing you down, it's OK to throw some in the tip jar, or the change you get back if paying cash. But no pennies. That's just rude.

Sorry about the kettles! Being married to a Canadian, I know how beloved they are. But us Americans-- we're just not that into tea. We're much more fanatical about our coffee-- you'll find heated debates about pour-over vs French press, Starbucks vs. Peets, much more than any concern about getting water to boil for tea. You'll always find a coffee pot in every hotel room and a microwave in most so if you can find a way to make that work, it's probably your best option.

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"Here is the world. Beautiful and terrible things will happen. Don't be afraid." -Frederick Buechner

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simontoad
Ship's Amphibian
# 18096

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Never heard of Peets. Starbucks, I have heard of. I've only ever had one drink there that I remember. I ordered a small flat white. I was very unhappy. My belief is that the staff forgot to put coffee in the drink.

Espressos can be found in the US, and I frankly don't care about the quality of the brew, as long as I get my hit. I frequently get cheap espressos out of coffee machines here in Australia.

Do the Americans have any tips for locating an espresso? Are they available in service station coffee machines for instance? Is there maybe a coffee brand sticker on windows or awnings that would signify espressos?

Coffee is quite important to me. I am ashamed to say that if I don't have coffee early, I will be grumpy and probably rude. Espresso is not vital. I will happily drink strong brewed coffee with a little milk, and even instant coffee.

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Ohher
Shipmate
# 18607

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quote:
Originally posted by cliffdweller:
But us Americans-- we're just not that into tea.

Speak for yourself, and/or your region of the country. In New England, there are still many tea drinkers (I am one), though coffee is also common. We have kettles. We have actual teapots, with internal holes at the bases of spouts for aerating hot tea as it's poured. Grocery stores here still stock loose tea (though the number & varieties of brands and types are shrinking. I've had to order some favorites online of late).

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Ian Climacus

Liturgical Slattern
# 944

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My friend, a fellow worshipper of the demon brew, dragged me to Peet's on numerous occasions. The look of horror when my other friend suggested Starbucks had to be seen. I quite liked Peets: good coffee.

Thanks for the continued tips (ha!) all.

I'm staying at 2 B&Bs: may I ask the rules for tipping there?

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Ohher
Shipmate
# 18607

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Well, here's my query: Do any shipmates have experience with wearing tabi-style shoes?

As I age, I've developed a bunion and a hammer toe, and wondered if the split-toe tabi shoes from Japan might be helpful in preventing further damage.

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From the Land of the Native American Brave and the Home of the Buy-One-Get-One-Free

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Ohher
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# 18607

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quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:
My friend, a fellow worshipper of the demon brew, dragged me to Peet's on numerous occasions. The look of horror when my other friend suggested Starbucks had to be seen. I quite liked Peets: good coffee.

Thanks for the continued tips (ha!) all.

I'm staying at 2 B&Bs: may I ask the rules for tipping there?

Starbucks is the spawn of Satan. Must be; they burn the stuff in the fires of hell before they brew it. Awful, awful stuff. Stick with Peet's.

[ 13. January 2018, 02:03: Message edited by: Ohher ]

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From the Land of the Native American Brave and the Home of the Buy-One-Get-One-Free

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Golden Key
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# 1468

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BF--

quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
@Golden Key - yes, 'First Gentleman' sounds OK.

My rather uncharitable thought was that Mr. Clinton rather spoiled his presidency at one point by not behaving in a gentlemanly fashion...

IJ

That part aside: at his best, he'd be an excellent First Gentleman. E.g., he'd have great fun arranging who would sit next to each other at state dinners. Much mischief. [Biased] Unfortunately, he hasn't been at his best for a long time.

If Hillary had become president, I figured there should be a rule that he couldn't meet with a woman alone, unless the door was open. He's an admitted sex addict. Or he could go into a cloistered monastery for several years.

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

Posts: 18594 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

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Ohher--

quote:
Originally posted by Ohher:
Well, here's my query: Do any shipmates have experience with wearing tabi-style shoes?

As I age, I've developed a bunion and a hammer toe, and wondered if the split-toe tabi shoes from Japan might be helpful in preventing further damage.

I think I tried some, long ago. Big toe separate from the others? That's like flip-flops. If you try *those*, you might get an idea.

Tabi *socks* felt weird to me.

Good luck!

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

Posts: 18594 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
lilBuddha
Shipmate
# 14333

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quote:
Originally posted by Ian Climacus:

I'm staying at 2 B&Bs: may I ask the rules for tipping there?

The general rule of thumb I have heard and use is that if the owners are also the staff, then no tip. If they employ others as staff, tip housekeeping ~$5 per day and meal service the standard 20%.

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I put on my rockin' shoes in the morning
Hallellou, hallellou

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Rossweisse

High Church Valkyrie
# 2349

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quote:
Originally posted by Ohher:
Well, here's my query: Do any shipmates have experience with wearing tabi-style shoes?...

Yes, in performances of "Madame Butterfly."

They're like flip-flops. Since I've never cared for flip-flops, I don't know how helpful I can be to you, but there you have it.

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I'm not dead yet.

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cliffdweller
Shipmate
# 13338

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quote:
Originally posted by Golden Key:
Ohher--

quote:
Originally posted by Ohher:
Well, here's my query: Do any shipmates have experience with wearing tabi-style shoes?

As I age, I've developed a bunion and a hammer toe, and wondered if the split-toe tabi shoes from Japan might be helpful in preventing further damage.

I think I tried some, long ago. Big toe separate from the others? That's like flip-flops. If you try *those*, you might get an idea.

Tabi *socks* felt weird to me.

Good luck!

Haven't tried those, but my son who has rather widely spaced toes swears by Vibrams which have all 5 toes separated. He loves them and says his feet actually hurt if he uses regular shoes. They have a similar feel as being barefoot, some runners swear by them.

Word of caution: you MUST get the five-toed socks that go with them and wash them every day or your 5-toe shoes become impossibly stinky. We tried everything-- baking soda, soap & water, lysol-- once they develop the funk there's no getting rid of it. So socks washed every day is a must.

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"Here is the world. Beautiful and terrible things will happen. Don't be afraid." -Frederick Buechner

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