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Source: (consider it) Thread: When Google Fails You: The 2018 General Question Thread
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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The water will boil in the microwave. Having tried this years back. The water will look still but if agitated with boil over. Sometimes explosively.

As an 8-10 cup a day tea drinker not a tea bag drinker, the water should be just still for black teas, about 80°C/180°F for green and yellow teas, just slightly more than green for oolong, slightly less for white.

The price for loose teas is more up front, but you get 225 cups per pound. You have to be careful in tea shops. They hang onto dried out old leaves and charge far too much. I've mail ordered tea for decades.

Posts: 11498 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
la vie en rouge
Parisienne
# 10688

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You can make tea in the microwave but I consider the result highly inferior to using the kettle. Kettles are now widespread in France since tea has become fashionable but this wasn’t always the case and the go-to for many French people was the microwave.

In my experience, it always leaves a layer of foamy scum on the top of the tea.

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Rent my holiday home in the South of France

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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quote:
Originally posted by Wesley J:
From what I've read about microwaves, they will not 'boil' your water, but bring it to just below that. <<snip>> I somehow miss the sound of the boiling kettle and the whistle.

Depends on the power of the microwave, I think. Mine brings water to a rolling boil that continues for seconds even after the cup is removed. And old age has robbed me of the ability to hear the tea kettle whistle anymore. [Waterworks]

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"I take prayer too seriously to use it as an excuse for avoiding work and responsibility." -- The Revd Martin Luther King Jr.

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Bishops Finger
Shipmate
# 5430

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The microwave is useful for heating up SOUP (in a mug, rather than a pan!) if the Episcopal Stove is taking too long (or I can't bear to wait any longer).

I have been known to boil water, and teabag, in the ping! machine, but yes, it does seem to leave a scum.... [Frown]

IJ

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Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. (Wilkie Collins)

Posts: 10149 | From: Behind The Wheel Again! | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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The scum may be minerals in the water. (I'm known to take my own water on road trips to make tea with, if the water is suspected to be inferior)

Boiling tea in water. Yes, I do this when making chai, though it's 50% fake milk (almond usually), which is lovely on a frigid winter's day. (we're in the mid -30s this week)

Posts: 11498 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Qoheleth.

Semi-Sagacious One
# 9265

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What's the most appropriate way to refer in print to those Indian cities that have changed their names in recent years?

quote:
Ms X served as a Mission Partner with the CSI in Madras (Chennai) for 37 years.
The place was Madras all the time that she worked there, becoming Chennai in 1996.

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The Benedictine Community at Alton Abbey offers a friendly, personal service for the exclusive supply of Rosa Mystica incense.

Posts: 2532 | From: the radiator of life | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Eutychus
From the edge
# 3081

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"Chennai (formerly known as Madras)" is how I, as a translator, would put it if I put the old name at all. Which I would do if my audience was more likely to have heard of Madras than Chennai and I felt they needed educating.

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Let's remember that we are to build the Kingdom of God, not drive people away - pastor Frank Pomeroy

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Huia
Shipmate
# 3473

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And I, as someone who needed educating on this [Hot and Hormonal] would be grateful that you did so.

Huia

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Charity gives food from the table, Justice gives a place at the table.

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Eutychus
From the edge
# 3081

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The whole art of being a good translator is pretending you always knew things that you have just learned through what you have just read [Biased]

[ 10. February 2018, 08:12: Message edited by: Eutychus ]

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Let's remember that we are to build the Kingdom of God, not drive people away - pastor Frank Pomeroy

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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This has come up in the course of writing a story about vampires. As you know from Bram Stoker, one may defend against vampires with the paraphernalia of Catholicism -- crucifixes, holy water, etc.
My question is: Is there a Protestant equivalent? Would reciting the Westminster Confession of Faith be sufficient to repel a vampire, or do you need a real physical artifact? Which would be a problem, since the Reformation cleared out all those relics and crucifixes and stuff.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Amanda B. Reckondwythe

Dressed for Church
# 5521

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Protestants still accept the cross (minus the corpus). I suppose if you brandish that, or perhaps the Bible (King James, of course), at a vampire it would put it to flight.

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"I take prayer too seriously to use it as an excuse for avoiding work and responsibility." -- The Revd Martin Luther King Jr.

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Robert Armin

All licens'd fool
# 182

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Read the 39 Articles! That should settle their evil vampire ways.

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Keeping fit was an obsession with Fr Moity .... He did chin ups in the vestry, calisthenics in the pulpit, and had developed a series of Tai-Chi exercises to correspond with ritual movements of the Mass. The Antipope Robert Rankin

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Nicolemr
Shipmate
# 28

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I think it's in the Roman Polanski movie "Fearless Vampire Killers" that a vampire who was Jewish in life is presented with a cross and says something along the lines of "Oy vey, have you got the wrong vampire".

(Just checked on IMDB.com and yes, that's the line)

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On pilgrimage in the endless realms of Cyberia, currently traveling by ship. Now with live journal!

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Hedgehog

Ship's Shortstop
# 14125

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There was an X-Man comic where Kitty Pryde (Jewish) holds a cross before Dracula. He laughs and brushes it aside and grabs her by the throat, because she has no belief int he cross--but Dracula then gets burned anyway because she is wearing a necklace with the Star of David.

This sort of ties in with the approach taken in Doctor Who's "The Curse of Fenric." The object isn't important--its the faith. A Communist soldier is protected from the vampires (although they weren't called that) because he has faith on the Communist Revolution. And it is suggested that the Doctor protects himself by reciting the names of his past companions--those whom he has faith in.

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Yes, that's also a common feature, which I may well use. But does it have to be something physical? Is a generalized belief in the Communist Party sufficient, or do you need your Lenin pin? (And, if the Communist Party would do, would Star Wars? What about SoF?)

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Rossweisse

High Church Valkyrie
# 2349

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
... Would reciting the Westminster Confession of Faith be sufficient to repel a vampire, or do you need a real physical artifact?...

Well, it would repel me - but I'm not a vampire.

I would think a regular cross or a Bible would do the trick.

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I'm not dead yet.

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ArachnidinElmet
Shipmate
# 17346

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quote:
Originally posted by Hedgehog:
This sort of ties in with the approach taken in Doctor Who's "The Curse of Fenric."

Yes, and the vicar who has a bible in hand but no faith comes to a sticky end.

There's a Buffy episode where Willow wonders why a Star of David doesn't work against vampires, but they don't come to any conclusions.

Also the scene in The Mummy (1990s) where Kevin J O'Connor tries to ward off the Mummy by showing him a cross and when that doesn't work working through various symbols before trying a Star of David which the 'ancient Egyptian' recognises.

I think it's a recognisable trope, but no two people can agree what the rules should be. Post-Dracula crosses rather than crucifixes are more in use. You don't have to be Catholic to cross two candlesticks a-la-Peter Cushing.

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'If a pleasant, straight-forward life is not possible then one must try to wriggle through by subtle manoeuvres' - Kafka

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Gill H

Shipmate
# 68

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It comes into the German musical ‘Tanz der Vampire’ too. The Jewish innkeeper becomes a vampire and laughs when someone tries to use a cross to stop him.

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*sigh* We can’t all be Alan Cresswell.

- Lyda Rose

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Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

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Also in the film "Love At First Bite". Dracula is having a restaurant dinner with his romantic rival (RR).

RR is talking D towards a confrontation, and suddenly pulls out a Star of David necklace from his shirt, in great triumph.

D flinches, reflexively, then takes a closer look. "I think you should find a nice *Jewish* girl, and leave [name] alone".

Really good scene in a fun movie. [Smile]

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

Posts: 18594 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

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BTW, good cast in "Love At First Bite"--especially George Hamilton as Dracula.

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

Posts: 18594 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

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Nicole--

quote:
Originally posted by Nicolemr:
I think it's in the Roman Polanski movie "Fearless Vampire Killers" that a vampire who was Jewish in life is presented with a cross and says something along the lines of "Oy vey, have you got the wrong vampire".

(Just checked on IMDB.com and yes, that's the line)

Thanks for this. I heard and used the line quite a bit, decades ago, but I don't think I knew the source.
[Smile]

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

Posts: 18594 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Golden Key
Shipmate
# 1468

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Brenda--

quote:
Originally posted by Brenda Clough:
This has come up in the course of writing a story about vampires. As you know from Bram Stoker, one may defend against vampires with the paraphernalia of Catholicism -- crucifixes, holy water, etc.
My question is: Is there a Protestant equivalent? Would reciting the Westminster Confession of Faith be sufficient to repel a vampire, or do you need a real physical artifact? Which would be a problem, since the Reformation cleared out all those relics and crucifixes and stuff.

Brenda, are you familiar with the book "Sacred Space", by Denise Linn? Her professional specialty is clearing and protecting spaces, using feng shui and many other methods. I remember there's a Jewish method of using...um, kosher salt and vodka, flaming, to clear out a bad spirit. I don't remember anything specific to vampires, but there might be something, and she may list other resources.

There's also "Sister Karol's Book of Spells and Blessings". Karol Jackowski is an RC nun, and basically considers prayer, magic, etc. to all be part of the same thing. The edition I have is really beautiful--done up like a prayer book, with a hard cover; gilt-edged, quality paper; and ribbon markers. I don't think there's anything vampire specific; but there are ways to make bad things go away.

Oh, and do a search on "deliverance ministry", for the Prot. fund./char. angle.

Good luck!

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Blessed Gator, pray for us!
--"Oh bat bladders, do you have to bring common sense into this?" (Dragon, "Jane & the Dragon")
--"Oh, Peace Train, save this country!" (Yusuf/Cat Stevens, "Peace Train")

Posts: 18594 | From: Chilling out in an undisclosed, sincere pumpkin patch. | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sipech
Shipmate
# 16870

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Question for any of the ship’s sparks.

A few weeks ago, a bulb blew quite spectacularly. I went to turn the light on and there was a momentary bright blue flash of light that lit up the whole flat. It tripped the circuit breaker and the bulb had a distinct scorch mark on it. Now, though, any bulb I try in that fitting doesn’t work. Yet the same bulbs work in other light fittings. I’m wondering if the fitting itself might somehow be dead. Is that possible?

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I try to be self-deprecating; I'm just not very good at it.
Twitter: http://twitter.com/TheAlethiophile

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Honest Ron Bacardi
Shipmate
# 38

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Yes it's definitely possible. It's also happened to me on a mains socket I had to replace. In that case there had been an arcing event which had caused the metal contact to burn out. You can also get tracking occurring (where the scorched plastic of the fitting starts to conduct current through the carbonised track).

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Anglo-Cthulhic

Posts: 4857 | From: the corridors of Pah! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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Electricity is not a good thing for the DIY person. Hire a professional, unless you are very certain of what you are at. (And if you were, why would you be here asking us?!?)

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Honest Ron Bacardi
Shipmate
# 38

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Wise advice, Brenda. (Even more so in the case of would-be amateur gas-fitting).

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Anglo-Cthulhic

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Leorning Cniht
Shipmate
# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by Honest Ron Bacardi:
Wise advice, Brenda. (Even more so in the case of would-be amateur gas-fitting).

Gas is about the only thing I don't want to mess with (well, I've changed the ignitor in my oven, and a few bits and bobs in the gas dryer, but nothing that involves opening up a gas line and then sealing it again.)

I know how to, and could probably do it perfectly safely and so on, but I don't really want to.

For Sipech, yes, I agree that your light fitting is probably toast, and needs replacing. It'll take someone who knows what they're doing just a few minutes to replace it.

ETA: A suitably explosive subject for post 5000?

[ 13. February 2018, 21:05: Message edited by: Leorning Cniht ]

Posts: 5026 | From: USA | Registered: Feb 2013  |  IP: Logged
no prophet's flag is set so...

Proceed to see sea
# 15560

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quote:
Originally posted by Sipech:
Question for any of the ship’s sparks.

A few weeks ago, a bulb blew quite spectacularly. I went to turn the light on and there was a momentary bright blue flash of light that lit up the whole flat. It tripped the circuit breaker and the bulb had a distinct scorch mark on it. Now, though, any bulb I try in that fitting doesn’t work. Yet the same bulbs work in other light fittings. I’m wondering if the fitting itself might somehow be dead. Is that possible?

Are there any other fittings that are on the same circuit? Check all the plugs in the room if all of the lights work. My experience is that sometimes some things are on the same circuit you'd not expect. With older homes they sometimes simply run wires from one fitting to another and not establish a new circuit. It's unlikely that this light is all alone. If it alone does not work, your light fitting is probably the problem.

Checking wall plugs: just carry around a small lamp and plug into all of them. If they all work, it's probably the light. But then you can turn off the breaker which popped when this light failed and recheck each plug-in fitting. Then you can see which are on the same circuit as the failed light. My 2¢ or .02d

Posts: 11498 | From: Treaty 6 territory in the nonexistant Province of Buffalo, Canada ↄ⃝' | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
simontoad
Ship's Amphibian
# 18096

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Back to Tourism USA. Back in 2016, we had a month travelling around America. We didn't enjoy the food, which surprised us. The standout place was Bryant Park Grill in New York , where I would happily eat for the rest of my life.

We took a casual approach to eating last time, which was possibly a problem, but I think that many times we just ordered incorrectly, or misread what type of place we were in, and had our hopes dashed.

For instance, I had a steak at a place in Sutter Creek - an upscale tourist town it is fair to say. They asked my how I liked it cooked - great sign - and I said rare. The steak I got was huge and cooked to my instruction, but it was gristly and tough. It would still have been that were it cooked to medium or well done, but I think the faults of the cut would have been less obvious. It was also quite a fatty cut - good for well done, not so much for rare. So I think I misordered by asking for rare in that instance, but also that I didn't realise that I was in a place that would serve what I regard as a cheaper and poorly prepared cut of meat.

Our next trip will be in November. We'll be going from LA to the Grand Canyon, possibly via a Mexican border town, then up to Sacramento via Death Valley and Yosemite, then over to the Monterrey area for Thanksgiving with my Yankee family and then up to San Francisco, from where we fly home.

We both know that American cooking is great, really great. We just need help trying to find it. We consider quality in ingredients and preparation to trump volume of food. For example I had an exquisite young parsnip, roasted, that I am still raving about from Sunday lunch. It was next to a strip of slow-cooked beef that melted off the fork and was a marvel in itself, but I think I shall dream about that parsnip tonight.

Any recommendations would be appreciated. Also, are there any high-quality franchises we should look out for, or any sort of weird code words you think we should know about. Also, what resources are good for finding a quality place? I am leery of trying to get into a first tier restaurant, because while it is no problem here to walk into such an establishment in the clothes you mow the lawn in, I fear there may be a tighter code in the USA. I am definitely a food wanker, but I will only wear a suit at a funeral. Also, we booked a place from home when we went to England and missed the booking by not quite knowing travel times or exactly where the place was. I don't like doing that. I absolutely LOVE going into a place full of suits with stains on my shorts and t-shirt.

What a ramble. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I did writing it.

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Human

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Brenda Clough
Shipmate
# 18061

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California is the most casual state in the union. The most you will ever need is a necktie, which is easily carried in your jacket pocket. I guarantee you that people only wear suits when they are being buried. Bring something warm, however -- in the mountains and even at the Grand Canyon it'll be cold.a
Do you follow the various online restaurant rating sites? They are very reliable in a crowd-sourcey way; a place that is adored by many will be fairly certainly good. It's easy to arrive in a town and survey the top ten or twenty eating places on Yelp or something, and make your pick. California is highly tech-savvy, so everything is ranked on the websites. There are some for the devoted foodies.
I would avoid all chains if you can manage it, unless you positively yearn for the experience.
One of the top burger places worldwide is near Calistoga CA, if you are going up the Napa valley. Also in Napa is French Laundry, which is not a laundry but one of the best restaurants in the region. If you are in San Francisco get to Alice Waters' restaurant in Oakland -- make a reservation as soon as you can because it's a small place.
I'm going to San Francisco in a couple weeks, and I'll let you know where my siblings are taking me for dinner. They live there and are up to date on the latest and greatest.

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Science fiction and fantasy writer with a Patreon page

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Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

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quote:
Originally posted by simontoad:

Our next trip will be in November. We'll be going from LA to the Grand Canyon, possibly via a Mexican border town, then up to Sacramento via Death Valley and Yosemite, then over to the Monterrey area for Thanksgiving with my Yankee family and then up to San Francisco, from where we fly home.

Are you passing through Phoenix? If so, we'll need a Shipmeet!

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"...that is generally a matter for Pigwidgeon, several other consenting adults, a bottle of cheap Gin and the odd giraffe."
~Tortuf

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Pangolin Guerre
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# 18686

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Simontoad, if you have the slightest interest in going to The French Laundry, make your reservations well in advance and start saving, like, now. Seriously. The waiting list is long, and dinner for two is about US$750+tax+gratuity, depending what you're drinking. And let's face it, if you're paying that much for the food, you're not going to be getting crap wine to go with it - not that you'd be able to there, so my estimate is lowballing. Thomas Keller is the most famous serious chef in the US. Lay your hands on a copy of Michael Ruhlman's The Soul of a Chef - it has a section on Keller. For those truly serious about food, it will bring tears to your eyes, not out of gluttony or envy, but at the shear, humble beauty of it.
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simontoad
Ship's Amphibian
# 18096

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Thanks very much for the advice guys. The French Laundry sounds like a place to think about as a cuisine highlight. I treasure those aspects of a trip for a very long time, and fine the experiences well worth the investment. I worry about the booking aspect given our experience in the UK, but it is a factor only. I know booking is essential unless you are Kylie Kwong in Sydney and don't mind people lining up on the street in front of your place.

I find the experience of matching wines in a fine dining restaurant one that enhances my enjoyment of the meal to a certain point. After that, I sometimes catch myself wolfing down the dish and forgetting to appreciate the skills on display. I also start to slur my words a little. I hold my drink about as well as George Papadopoulos.

Pigwidgeon, thanks very much for the shipmeet suggestion. We will be passing close to Phoenix for sure. I'll be able to be more certain as our timetable works itself out.

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Human

Posts: 1571 | From: Romsey, Vic, AU | Registered: May 2014  |  IP: Logged



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