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Source: (consider it) Thread: Find your inner chef - Recipes 2018
Hedgehog

Ship's Shortstop
# 14125

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I'm so pleased you like it! I am relatively new to lentil soups (being actually a little surprised that there even were different colors!) and I personally find that red lentils are tastier than "regular" lentils.

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"We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it."--Pope Francis, Laudato Si'

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lily pad
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The red ones cook up quickly too.

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Sloppiness is not caring. Fussiness is caring about the wrong things. With thanks to Adeodatus!

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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The tastiest, but fiddliest, of lentils are mung dahl. Those little balls of happiness have to be soaked overnight, but once that is over, water in a pot at medium heat cooks them thoroughly. Well worth the effort, cooked with chilies, garlic pieces to taste.

If you are confident with a pressure cooker, the pre-soak can be skipped.

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Even more so than I was before

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Piglet
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I think next time I'm in Soup Dragon mode (probably early next week) I'll give Hedgehog's lentil soup a go too - it looks yummy.

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
Hedgehog, that soup (with vegetable broth) was a great success.

I'm actually going to use veggie broth to make it again on Saturday! My friend is coming home from a long vaca, and I want to surprise her with a batch of it in her fridge when she gets home!

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MaryLouise
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quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Pete:
The tastiest, but fiddliest, of lentils are mung dahl. Those little balls of happiness have to be soaked overnight, but once that is over, water in a pot at medium heat cooks them thoroughly. Well worth the effort, cooked with chilies, garlic pieces to taste.

If you are confident with a pressure cooker, the pre-soak can be skipped.

I'd forgotten mung beans are from the same family as peas and lentils, but mung dahl or moong dal is very popular out here in South Africa where many Indian South Africans are from a Gujarati background. I make a mung dahl (called khatta mung) with chilli, cumin, ground coriander, turmeric, garlic, ginger and a little creamy yoghurt. Delicious and cooling in hot weather.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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LutheranChik
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My spouse is having upcoming surgery that requires a pre- operative three weeks of a mostly liquid diet...which is leaving me on my own as far as my meals. Because I don’t want to be sitting across from E1 and her chicken broth with some delectable feast on my own plate, I’m trying to eat foods she either hates outright ( salmon, parsnips) or couldn’t eat anyway ( most fibrous veggies; most vegan dishes). This week I think I’m going to try a vegan lasagna based on something I saw on Pinterest; it has a tofu faux- ricotta filling and is topped with faux Parmesan cheese made from nutritional yeast and cashews...sufficiently icky from E1’s perspective, lol.

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Pangolin Guerre
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I post this with some reservation, but friends of mine to whom I've passed this on have been very positive. I offer this up.

While there is considerable variation by locale, 27 January is widely observed as Holocaust Memorial Day. This is from a documentary on CBC Radio1, a programme called The Doc Project. It's a cake recipe that survived the Shoah. Make it - or whatever else - to help you remember.

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Pangolin Guerre
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I'll try the link again.
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Pangolin Guerre
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Ah! That works.
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LutheranChik
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The vegan lasagna was outstanding. I had low expectations for both the ricotta and Parmesan analogs, but they both turned out great. The parm is 3/4 cup raw cashews ( or blanched almonds), 3 Tbs nutritional yeast and 1 tsp salt, buzzed in a food processor. The ricotta was made with one 15 oz package of extra- firm tofu, drained and pressed; 1/4 cup nutritional yeast; 1 tsp salt; 1/2 tsp each onion and garlic powders and ground pepper; about a dozen minced basil leaves or dried equivalent; and the juice and rind of one lemon. ( The lemon seems excessive, but it was fine.) I layered the lasagna with spinach and sautéed mushrooms.

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Simul iustus et peccator
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MaryLouise
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That sounds delicious, LutheranChik. After several years now of cooking and eating many vegan dishes, I have forgotten associations with the meat/dairy dishes from which they are derived so just think of nut or tofu or mushroom flavours rather than Parmesan or ricotta or meaty sauces.

I made a Burns' Night dish with mushroom, lentils and cashew nuts and called it 'haggis' which was a jarring note because those who like haggis missed 'real' offaly haggis, and those who find the idea of haggis revolting would rather have called the dish a mushroom bake.

[ 26. January 2018, 06:13: Message edited by: MaryLouise ]

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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LutheranChik
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MaryLouise: As an enthusiastic omnivore, I would have totally loved your haggis! Anything with mushrooms or lentils in it makes me happy. I would also be game to taste traditional haggis. ( Lamb fries are the most offal-y cut of lamb that I have ever experienced.)

[ 26. January 2018, 15:03: Message edited by: LutheranChik ]

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Simul iustus et peccator
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Piglet
Islander
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I make my own haggis, from a recipe called "Americanised haggis" - I call it "coward's haggis", as the nearest thing to offal it has is lamb (or chicken) livers.

It also uses minced lamb, egg, oatmeal, spices and a wee drop of whisky, and is baked in a tin like a meat-loaf.

In fact, if your friends are at all squeamish, just tell them it is meat-loaf. [Big Grin]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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LutheranChik
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A few days before DS went on her full liquid diet, I made cod chowder. I’d never made a fish chowder from scratch before. DS, who lived in Maine for over a decade, declared it Maine- worthy, which was high praise.

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Simul iustus et peccator
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MaryLouise
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I’m another enthusiastic omnivore, LutheranChik although I cook a great many vegetarian and vegan dishes because I am so fond of vegetables and there are so many fascinating recipes around now, including Ottolenghi’s Middle East vegetable-based dishes.

Piglet, your ‘coward’s haggis’ sounds great. I’ve had the real deal,minced sheep’s lungs, heart, intestines etc genuine haggis served up by an anti-Sassenach-wimps fire-breathing Scot from Stornaway and it was tasty but, um, funky. I’m not sure I’d rush to make it or have it again!

The old habit of making vegetable dishes resemble meat dishes or naming them after meat dishes to make them sound more appealing is becoming a thing of the past. I always felt that lentil ‘cutlets’ didn’t do justice to lentils (ditto cottage pie with lentils) and veggie hamburgers needed a different PR.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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LutheranChik
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Last night I made chicken pot pie to use up some remade pie crust dough we had left over from Christmas. My pot pie experience has always been the frozen variety... mine turned much better than that ( yay!), and a visiting friend took seconds and took some home. Dear Spouse, who hates pot pies with the blazing intensity of a thousand suns, happily dipped her liquid. diet clear soup while we tore into the pie.

Our recent lasagna experiment aside, I agree about veggie dishes being used as meat analogs instead of being allowed to shine as themselves. When our SiL was in the hospital several years ago, in an SDA with both omnivore and vegetarian cafeterias, it was interesting to note how many cutlets and loaves were being served in the latter - it was very 1960’s health- food- store.

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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I rustled up something last night I dubbed ‘Caribbean Paella’ which lends itself to wide adaptation.

I put a tray of chopped vegetable (in this case red pepper and onion with a couple of whole chillis and garlic) scattered with halved jerk-flavoured sausages in the oven to roast. When they were dsufficiently done, I got the wok, put in a handful of frozen peas and sweetcorn and a packet of ready-cooked rice, heated those for a few minutes, then tipped in the veg and sausage with any juices (but subtracting the chillis and garlic). Stir together for a few more minutes, add a dash of stock or wine or hot sauce or whatever takes your fancy and there you go.

Obviously you can vary the vegetables, leave out the sausages, tip in prawns in the final stage, make it more Asiatic than Caribbean with egg-fried rice and tofu etc etc.

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Piglet
Islander
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That sounds like a good base for all sorts of dishes, Firenze.

My go-to paella recipe is adapted from one in Save with Jamie by the rather ubiquitous Mr. Oliver, and has chicken, sausages, red peppers, onion, garlic, saffron, a little paprika, tomato puree, stock, rice, prawns and peas, and is really nice (and very pretty with the different coloured bits and pieces).

It's also dead easy, which is always a Good Thing. [Smile]

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I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

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jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
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May I take you on a shopping and cooking adventure? My cousin shared this recipe for ginger garlic noodle soup with bok choy.

So, off to the grocery store we go. Cri(e)mini mushrooms. Should be easy to find. Nope. One of the old fashioned words of displeasure from my parents' childhoods was criminy. Seems appropriate. OK, I'll just get plain white 'shrooms.

Rice noodles. What? I have to choose wide or tiny thin? Wide noodles it is, then.

Star anise. I used to have some a couple of decades ago. None here in the store. What to do, what to do. I'll use anise seeds and put them in a tea sock! Yeah! That'll work. (Heaven forbid I would look at the bottom of the recipe to see that stick cinnamon could be used.)

And bok choy. First time for buying that!

So, this morning, I was chopping and slicing and preparing all the ingredients so all I have to do is dump things into the soup pot, like all you excellent cooks do! It did take longer than I thought it would, though. Chop a shallot, grab a tissue and wipe eyes and nose. Wash hands. Do the same after second and third shallots. Well, who knew that once the eyes and nose started waterfalling, the same would happen while slicing the green onions (known as 'stinkers' in my family who eat them out of hand just because.)

Wipe eyes, blow nose, wash hands four million times. Buy stock in tissue company.

Ok, cooked the shallots. Added the stinkers, garlic and ginger. So far so good.

Add the chicken stock, low sodium soy sauce and anise sock. Oops. I wasn't supposed to add the soy any anise until the stock came to a simmer. Oh Well!! [Big Grin]

While that is simmering, clean up various bowls and knives and such. Pick up packet of anise seed. Oops. Picked it up from the bottom. Half of the seeds go all over the floor. Sigh. Get broom and dustpan. Clean up seeds from floor. Wash hands. Get tissue, wipe nose again. Wash hands again.

Does anyone else have adventures like this while making new recipes?

Spoiler alert! The soup is really yummy!!! It is added to my list of favorite soups to make!

The end.

[You'd think I could spell a little better at my age.]

[ 05. February 2018, 18:34: Message edited by: jedijudy ]

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

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Pangolin Guerre
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Last Friday a friend took me out for my birthday lunch to a local pub known for its food. A very cold, clear day, ca. -20C, so I had the lamb and ale stew (and a half litre of local cabernet franc). It was very good, indeed, but had something I've never had in a lamb stew before - beets! Really quite delicious (at least, for those who love beets, such as me). The rest of the vegetation was as one would expect in winter. Lots of good bread for mopping up, too.

Next lamb stew I make, I'm going to par-roast some baby or small beets, then add them during the assembling, and give it a go.

[ 06. February 2018, 03:26: Message edited by: Pangolin Guerre ]

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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I have an Ecudorean lamb stew I make occasionally which is finished with mashed ripe banana. So yes, I can believe a little sweetness goes well with lamb.
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MaryLouise
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Went out for lunch the other day and had a roasted beetroot and fresh fig salad with a sharp dressing, very pleasant combination of sweet flavours.

I add sliced fennel to lamb stews for sweetness.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Arleigh
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
I have an Ecudorean lamb stew I make occasionally which is finished with mashed ripe banana. So yes, I can believe a little sweetness goes well with lamb.

Do you have a recipe? Google couldn't show me one ...

Thanks ♥Arleigh

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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You need - (I’ve not given quantities as it depends how many your making for. But the method is based on 2 helpings)

Cubed lamb
Garlic
Red peppers, cut into strips
Fresh red chilli, seeded and finely chopped
Cumin
Limes, quartered
Wine and stock, or just stock
Ripe banana
Fresh coriander.

Season the lamb with salt and pepper, a little oil and crushed garlic and let it marinate at room temperature for half an hour (or as long as you’ve got while you prep stuff). Batch fry your lamb until browned and put in casserole. Add the sliced pepper, chilli and half a tsp of cumin to the pan, fry for a few minutes and add to the lamb. Deglaze the pan with the wine/stock. Pour that in. Add the lime quarters, cover and simmer (or put in a slow oven) for about an hour or until the lamb is tender. Just before serving, fish out the limes, add a mashed banana and the chopped coriander and cook for a further 5 minutes stirring constantly.

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Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
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Tonight we're having my favourite "lasagne" recipe - I put it in inverted commas, as I don't think any Italian would recognise it as lasagne - but I love it. It's a Mary Berry recipe and here it is for your delectation

I sometimes make it with cooked pasta instead of lasagne sheets, so it becomes a pasta bake instead.

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What are you doing for Lent?
40 days, 40 reflections, 40 acts of generosity. Join the #40acts challenge for #Lent and let's start a movement. www.40acts.org.uk

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Pangolin Guerre
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ML - There is an Armenian recipe for braised lamb shanks that calls for fennel bulb. Delicious. I found it in Victoria Jenanyan Wise's The Armenian Table.

Firenze - I will try the recipe, even though I'm not keen on banana. Questions: Proportionally, how much banana? Given the ingredients, I'm guessing use white wine? What could I use in lieu of banana, but still keep it Ecuadorian (a cuisine about I know nothing)?

[ 07. February 2018, 12:44: Message edited by: Pangolin Guerre ]

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Arleigh
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quote:
Originally posted by Firenze:
You need ...

Thank you - it reads delicious.
I'm going to try it (soon as the weather cools down a bit).

♥Arleigh

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MaryLouise
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PG, I'm wondering if you might try some sweet potato or yams? Not too much because that would be stodgy but mashed yam would give a similar texture and sweetness.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Gill H

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Long time Shipmates may remember Shoewoman from Germany. We stayed with her a few times and learned a recipe we’re cooking tonight.

I present to you Leeks a la Shoewoman.

Slice the top and bottom off some leeks (2 per person). Run a knife down the side so you can wash out any grit.

Part cook the leeks either in boiling water or in the microwave. Then wrap slices of ham round each leek and place in an ovenproof dish.

Cover with a cheese sauce and some grated cheese on top.

Finish off in the oven.

[ 08. February 2018, 05:12: Message edited by: Gill H ]

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- Lyda Rose

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la vie en rouge
Parisienne
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The French do much the same thing, but using endives.

(I assume the reason endives have never caught on in the UK is the bitterness. The climate is perfectly adapted to their cultivation – cold and damp. I quite like them personally.)

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Sioni Sais
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quote:
Originally posted by la vie en rouge:
The French do much the same thing, but using endives.

(I assume the reason endives have never caught on in the UK is the bitterness. The climate is perfectly adapted to their cultivation – cold and damp. I quite like them personally.)

They aren't nice with no accompaniment, but that is true of many vegetables, especially given the English tendency to put veg. on to boil at the conclusion of the previous meal.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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MaryLouise
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# 18697

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Endives are often sold as chicory or witlof here in South Africa and I enjoy them in salads or as a baked gratin.

I'm also fond of purple-red radicchio leaves in salads, although they are far more bitter than endives. It may be an acquired taste.

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“As regards plots I find real life no help at all. Real life seems to have no plots.”

-- Ivy Compton-Burnett

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Firenze

Ordinary decent pagan
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quote:
Originally posted by Pangolin Guerre:

Firenze - I will try the recipe, even though I'm not keen on banana. Questions: Proportionally, how much banana? Given the ingredients, I'm guessing use white wine? What could I use in lieu of banana, but still keep it Ecuadorian (a cuisine about I know nothing)?

One banana to c 500g lamb. And it really doesn’t taste bananay (the chilli sees to that). Your ignorance of Eucador can not be more profound than mine, so I have no idea what else they have to hand. I say, go with the banana. But thenI am a fan of banana fried with bacon (sweet! Salty! Sticky!)
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Gracious rebel

Rainbow warrior
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quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
Long time Shipmates may remember Shoewoman from Germany. We stayed with her a few times and learned a recipe we’re cooking tonight.

I present to you Leeks a la Shoewoman.

Slice the top and bottom off some leeks (2 per person). Run a knife down the side so you can wash out any grit.

Part cook the leeks either in boiling water or in the microwave. Then wrap slices of ham round each leek and place in an ovenproof dish.

Cover with a cheese sauce and some grated cheese on top.

Finish off in the oven.

I've known that recipe since I was a student in about 1980, and always knew it as 'St Davids Day bake'

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Posts: 4413 | From: Suffolk UK | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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quote:
Originally posted by MaryLouise:
PG, I'm wondering if you might try some sweet potato or yams? Not too much because that would be stodgy but mashed yam would give a similar texture and sweetness.

Actually, Ecuadorians do cook a certain kind of sweet potato (not African yam) so an approximation shouldn't be too off base.

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

Posts: 21377 | From: CA | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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Back around New Year’s Day I drew up a list of cooking challenges I’ve wanted to take but have just been unmotivated to do so. I cut the list into little slips, folded them up and stuck them in an envelope. Every month I will take one out and do it.

This month I drew “Make Cheese.” Hmmm.

I’m thinking yogurt cheese or ricotta. Any other ideas for fresh cheese that don’t require exotic ingredients?

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

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Allow milk to become solid but not smelly. Then strain through muslin, cheesecloth or even paper towels in a colander. The result will be soft cheese/curds. I've made curd tarts using it and they are very tasty.

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But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

Posts: 8040 | From: Æbleskiver country | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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I have never done it but I came across the fact that Paneer seems remarkable easy to make, no exotic ingredients and is a cheese.

Jengie

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"To violate a persons ability to distinguish fact from fantasy is the epistemological equivalent of rape." Noretta Koertge

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Posts: 20894 | From: city of steel, butterflies and rainbows | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dormouse

Glis glis – Ship's rodent
# 5954

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quote:
Originally posted by Gracious rebel:
quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
Long time Shipmates may remember Shoewoman from Germany. We stayed with her a few times and learned a recipe we’re cooking tonight.

I present to you Leeks a la Shoewoman.

Slice the top and bottom off some leeks (2 per person). Run a knife down the side so you can wash out any grit.

Part cook the leeks either in boiling water or in the microwave. Then wrap slices of ham round each leek and place in an ovenproof dish.

Cover with a cheese sauce and some grated cheese on top.

Finish off in the oven.

I've known that recipe since I was a student in about 1980, and always knew it as 'St Davids Day bake'
This was the first meal that I cooked for MrD when we were "courting". Being brought up by a mother who liked convenience food I was just opening the packet of cheese sauce mix when MrD walked into the kitchen. Being brought up by a mother who cooked everything from scratch, he took over and made a proper cheese sauce with a roux and grated cheese and all that.
He still married me.

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Posts: 3042 | From: 'twixt les Bois Noirs & Les Monts de la Madeleine | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

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I make curd cheese fairly regularly - as a way of using and eating milk that's on its way out. That's just a matter of letting the milk turn, then straining the curds out. I would add chopped chives or onion, ground pepper to the curds and eat.

eta - another one here who knows that leek gratinée recipe - I learned it from a work colleague in the 80s - when we worked on an industrial estate miles from anywhere and took it in turns to cook. Another of the co-workers was Greek Cypriot, so we occasionally ate homemade stifado and other delights.

[ 11. February 2018, 12:39: Message edited by: Curiosity killed ... ]

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Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Roseofsharon
Shipmate
# 9657

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I thought that milk that has been pasteurised went bad before it soured and can't be used as sour milk in scones etc. Surely that also applies to its use for cheese.
Many years ago I occasionally made paneer with acidulated milk, using lemon juice. I haven't tried vinegar, doesn't it give the cheese a vinegary flavour?


As to the ham/leek recipe, I used that back in the '70s as a basis for a Shrove Tuesday meal, wrapping the leeks & ham in pancakes before covering with cheese sauce and baking.

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Posts: 3060 | From: Sussex By The Sea | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

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I'm still alive, and the milk was usable. As suggested upthread, the curds can be used for sweet and savoury dishes.

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But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

Posts: 8040 | From: Æbleskiver country | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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BTW, another of my challenges, somewhere in the pile of slips, is to make a recipe out of one of my many cookbooks that sit around unused, lol. Up in Resort Country, in the off- season when it’s harder to attract diners, several restaurants have Cookbook Nights or months where they do something along the same lines — pick an interesting cookbook and use it to come up with off- menu specials.

Paneer is a definite possibility. We like Indian food, and I think it would also be a good alternative to queso fresco in Mexican dishes.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
jacobsen

seeker
# 14998

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I came across a second hand copy of The Soup Bible and am working my way through it, according to available ingredients, to see how many of the recipes work in my soup machine. Omitting fat and therefore any sautéing.

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But God, holding a candle, looks for all who wander, all who search. - Shifra Alon
Beauty fades, dumb is forever-Judge Judy
The man who made time, made plenty.

Posts: 8040 | From: Æbleskiver country | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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quote:
Originally posted by Jengie jon:
I have never done it but I came across the fact that Paneer seems remarkable easy to make, no exotic ingredients and is a cheese.

Jengie

As I was checking Jengie's link, I saw that there was also a process for making ricotta cheese! Therefore, yesterday I made it and used it to make a yummy white pizza!

Thanks Jengie! I remember reading a story about kids making cheese when I was a child, and have thought about that through the many years that have followed. It was an easy thing to do, and I feel so...empowered! [Big Grin]

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 18017 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Martha
Shipmate
# 185

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I made paneer once. It's amazing! You put all the milk in a pan and boil it, and are completely sceptical that a little bit of lemon juice will turn it into anything edible, but lo and behold, it all clumps up and turns cheesy!

My only difficulty was pressing it evenly to form a solid lump, but it was perfectly edible. Only to be attempted when you have a lot of excess milk,though.

Posts: 388 | From: in the kitchen | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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I am inspired!

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
LutheranChik
Shipmate
# 9826

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Sorry for the double post... but I am making split pea soup today. Actually the slow cooker is making it; I did hardly anything to contribute.

How do the rest of you make yours? And are you green or yellow split pea people? DS, who lived in Maine for a decade and ate a lot of French- Canadian food, favors yellow peas. In my family, we used them interchangably. My mom used to like to put a smoked ham hock in hers; we’re trying to avoid that amount of fat, so for this week’s soup I’m using part of a ham steak —,actually a chunky tail-end slice of a bone-in ham. I just add water, onions, carrots, celery, a bay leaf, peppercorns and savory. I have made a vegan version too that was fairly good, but I did a lot of tinkering with seasonings to get an umami note.

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Simul iustus et peccator
http://www.lutheranchiklworddiary.blogspot.com

Posts: 6462 | From: rural Michigan, USA | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
jedijudy

Organist of the Jedi Temple
# 333

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I used to make the green split peas into soup. We'd put the leftover hambone from the previous ham dinner with all the leftover bits on it, and celery, shredded carrot, salt and pepper with water to cover. Simple, but so good and filling!

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Jasmine, little cat with a big heart.

Posts: 18017 | From: 'Twixt the 'Glades and the Gulf | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged



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