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Source: (consider it) Thread: MW 2723: St Magnus the Martyr, London
Angloid
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by ExclamationMark:
Case in point: Monday's service at Westminster Abbey was wonderful. But it's about as close to everyday life in St Puddles as the moon. It either raises unrealistic expectations of what church might be like

The ceremonial was very simple - MOTR+ - one crucifer, two acolytes.

Many parish churches offer than every week.

I don't know if Exclamation Mark was referring particularly to ceremonial. However, other comments on that service (and I can't remember whether they were here on the Ship, on Facebook, in the Guardian, the Church Times or wherever) imply that it was very much an Establishment occasion with not even an ordinary soldier or civilian having a walk-on part. But then what do you expect...?
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leo
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There were quotations from 'ordinary' soldiers and people from the congregation being interviewed beforehand about fairly ordinary soldiers.

The abbey has become much less 'posh' under its present dean.

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ExclamationMark
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by ExclamationMark:
Case in point: Monday's service at Westminster Abbey was wonderful. But it's about as close to everyday life in St Puddles as the moon. It either raises unrealistic expectations of what church might be like

The ceremonial was very simple - MOTR+ - one crucifer, two acolytes.

Many parish churches offer than every week.

I was referring to the content of the service. Once again a public occasion limited by invitation only seating and readings from "celebs"
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St. Punk the Pious

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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
There were quotations from 'ordinary' soldiers and people from the congregation being interviewed beforehand about fairly ordinary soldiers.

The abbey has become much less 'posh' under its present dean.

At the risk of staying off topic, Dean Hall makes a point to make people feel welcome. Most services at the Abbey I've attended, he is at the door greeting people as they leave.

And with the large congregations they have been attracting, that can take a while.

I've also found him to be very approachable. And I could go on and on.

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Bishops Finger
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It does seem as though Westminster Abbey tries its best to cater for 'Establishment' services (and those are part of our British national life, whether we will or we nill), and for 'ordinary' worshippers - whilst also, at the same time, being almost overwhelmed by the tourist hordes............

What's that old adage about pleasing some people some of the time etc..........??

I really don't like it when people try to reduce worship - and the ways in which we worship - to some sort of lowest common denominator. It Does Not Please Our Lord Or His Blessed Mother.

So there.
[Razz]

Ian J.

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leo
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I was annoyed that the commentator showed his ignorance by talking about the 'Paschal' (pronounced like the French phisopher) candle.

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Bishops Finger
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[Disappointed]

Ian J.

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Clavus
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Perhaps the commentator thought that the candle might or might not exist, but that it would be best for him to act as though it did.
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St. Punk the Pious

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quote:
Originally posted by Bishops Finger:
It does seem as though Westminster Abbey tries its best to cater for 'Establishment' services (and those are part of our British national life, whether we will or we nill), and for 'ordinary' worshippers - whilst also, at the same time, being almost overwhelmed by the tourist hordes............

What's that old adage about pleasing some people some of the time etc..........??

I really don't like it when people try to reduce worship - and the ways in which we worship - to some sort of lowest common denominator. It Does Not Please Our Lord Or His Blessed Mother.

So there.
[Razz]

Ian J.

If I've attended Westminster Abbey worship in pre-Hall days, I don't remember much about it. Has it changed under Dean Hall?

(Or were you referring to something else?)

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leo
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A definite change with Hall - occasional use of incense makes it have a more catholic feel, as does chasubles instead of copes for the eucharist. It feels like a prayed in, living church.

BTW, can't resist another comment - Camilla Parker-Bowles grinned at everyone as if she were at some royal garden party rather than at an act of solemn remembrance.

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Angloid
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I think we are getting off track, not just of the original OP, but of the objection to the Abbey commemoration service. It's not about the style of worship, the highbrowness or otherwise of the music, but about how representative it, and the participants, were of the ordinary citizens of this country whose forebears were caught up in or lost their lives in that war. Not having seen it, I can't comment, but having heard some comments to the effect that those involved were overwhelmingly from the ranks of the [ironic quotes] 'great and good' I was hoping that others might confirm or rebut that. In the absence of evidence to the contrary I will continue to believe that Westminster Abbey is an Establishment Shrine and no more.

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dj_ordinaire
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I guess we are somewhat off track - the track being, I suppose, the appropriateness of worship at the parish church in the MW report.

The question of the role of 'national monuments' such as Westminster Abbey in an interesting one and deserves a thread of its own!

dj_ordinaire, Eccles host

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dj_ordinaire
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... having said which I've started a new thread thusly. Please direct any further pursuit of this tangent over there!

dj_o.

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moonlitdoor
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I went up to see the poppies at the Tower of London first thing this morning, and afterwards attended the remembrance day eucharist at St Magnus Martyr, choosing it because it is close by and a lot of the city churches don't have a regular Sunday service.

There were several things I did not understand about what went on, as I am not very familiar with this style of service.

Father Philip Warner and two other priests entered wearing black hats. These were taken off and put back on a few times during proceedings, but I could not determine the principle on which it was determined which parts they should be worn for.

The first two scripture reading were delivered facing the congregation, but the gospel was read facing sideways, to the north, which I have not seen done before. What might be the reason for that ?

While Father Philip was shaking some incense to the altar, the other two priests were on either side of him, and lightly held his sleeve by the elbow, rather as one might guide someone who was unsteady on their feet.

He and the other priests were wearing black chasubles, but immediately after distributing the eucharist to us all, he put on a black cope. I have seen one worn to process in from outside at the start, and then taken off, but never one put on close to the end.

The service ended not with a blessing or dismissal, but with the collect for Lady Day. I was unclear whether that was because it remembrance day or whether they do that every week.

I know there are people here who know this churchmanship well, and am hoping you can enlighten me.

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Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras
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The black hats were no doubt birettas, which are a form of clerical headwear that one still finds in use amongst many advanced Anglo-Catholics. Roman Catholic clergy have largely abandoned them, and Anglican clergy who are not self-identified Anglo-Catholics have rarely worn them. The biretta is not worn at the altar itself, but is worn in procession, coming and going, and at the sedilla (seats for the clergy in the sanctuary), but is always doffed at the Holy Name of Jesus.

During censing of the altar and the oblations (the latter at the offertory), the deacon and subdeacon hold the back of the celebrant's chasuble, raising it a little off his shoulders, which is meant to make it easier for the celebrant to do the censing. In point of fact, it's usually just traditional these days, but once upon a time chasubles could be very heavy, so holding it off the shoulders was a practical assistance.

In the old Roman rite, the gospel at a high mass was sung to the liturgical north, because the heathen lived in northern Europe and still needed converting -- symbolic evangelism. At a sung or low mass, the gospel is read or intoned on the "gospel side" of the altar, which is again at the liturgical north end. Very few Anglo-Catholics still sing the gospel toward liturgical north at high mass, instead having a gospel procession into the nave, which has become pretty universal Anglican and Lutheran style (but not RC, where everything is to be read/sung and preached at the same ambo).

Did the celebrant put on the cope in order to do the absolution of the dead at the catafalque, or some other liturgical action? I can't cast light on this without knowing more about what the clergy were doing when they left the altar at the end.

The collect for Lady Day, I would think, was the concluding collect of the Angelus, with it's refrains and three Hail Marys.

[ 09. November 2014, 19:22: Message edited by: Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras ]

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Zappa
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quote:
Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
... the gospel was read facing sideways, to the north, which I have not seen done before. What might be the reason for that ?

too much of the sap of the poppy?

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Knopwood
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quote:
Originally posted by Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras:
Did the celebrant put on the cope in order to do the absolution of the dead at the catafalque, or some other liturgical action? I can't cast light on this without knowing more about what the clergy were doing when they left the altar at the end.

I initially misread this bit as "immediately before distributing Communion" and couldn't make head or tail of it. Re-reading it, I am sure, given it's St Magnus, that it must have been the "Absolution" of the Dead as LSvK suggests.

[ 10. November 2014, 02:43: Message edited by: Knopwood ]

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Laud-able

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quote:

Originally posted by moonlitdoor:
... the gospel was read facing sideways, to the north, which I have not seen done before. What might be the reason for that?

I would suppose that the practice comes from the Sarum Missal - 'and let the Gospel be always read turning to the north' - by way of Percy Dearmer's The Parson's Handbook.

I last saw the Gospel read that way at the high altar in our place in the 1950s: we have long since had a Gospel procession into the nave.

I was told at the time - I do not vouch for the accuracy of the information - that the Gospel was thus read to enlighten the dark north, which works well in the northern hemisphere, but not so well here.

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Planeta Plicata
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quote:
Originally posted by Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras:
In the old Roman rite, the gospel at a high mass was sung to the liturgical north, because the heathen lived in northern Europe and still needed converting -- symbolic evangelism. At a sung or low mass, the gospel is read or intoned on the "gospel side" of the altar, which is again at the liturgical north end.

This is the most common explanation for the practice (and appears to date, as an explanation, to at least the tenth century), but it's not the only one. Fortescue attributes it to the influence of the low mass on the high mass; Jungmann acknowledges that explanation, but thinks it more likely that it had to do with the changing orientations of churches (from having the apse to the west to having it to the east). The relevant explanations are helpfully excerpted here.
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leo
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If they were being really old-fashioned, they'd have changed out of black into purple vestments for the distribution.
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Magic Wand
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
If they were being really old-fashioned, they'd have changed out of black into purple vestments for the distribution.

Would they have? In what rite or use is that ordered?
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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by Magic Wand:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
If they were being really old-fashioned, they'd have changed out of black into purple vestments for the distribution.

Would they have? In what rite or use is that ordered?
both Fortescue and Ritual Notes - but as requiems and Good Friday mass of the presanctified - when black would have been worn - were originally non-communicating except for the celebrant, it was a rare occurrence and relegated to footnotes

[ 10. November 2014, 17:57: Message edited by: leo ]

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moonlitdoor
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Thanks to everybody for your replies, which are very informative. Having looked up an Angelus on wikipedia, that is indeed what closed the service. Would that be a usual way to finish the eucharist in a church of this type or is it particular to the occasion ?

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Knopwood
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There's actually no direct connexion to the Mass: the Angelus is traditionally rung thrice daily, at six, noon, and six. Since Sunday Mass in many parishes wraps up around noon, it's often said/sung immediately following. I will note that I have never observed this in an RC church, though.
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Planeta Plicata
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quote:
Originally posted by Knopwood:
There's actually no direct connexion to the Mass: the Angelus is traditionally rung thrice daily, at six, noon, and six. Since Sunday Mass in many parishes wraps up around noon, it's often said/sung immediately following. I will note that I have never observed this in an RC church, though.

The Papal Angelus in St Peter's Square often immediately follows mass.
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Knopwood
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Ooh, splendid! Well there you go, we're not making it up after all [Smile]
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Curiosity killed ...

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When I visited St Silas, Kentish Town, the Angelus followed mass.

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Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras
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The Angelus is recited or sung at many Anglo-Catholic parish following the principal Sunday Eucharist, again following a now fairly defunct Roman Catholic practice. In London, parishes of my acquaintance that do this include St Magnus Martyr, St Mary's Boerne Street, All Saints Margaret Street, and St Silas Kentish Town, though I am sure there are many others in greater London. In the States, my own parish of St Clement's Philadelphia does likewise.
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Planeta Plicata
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by Magic Wand:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
If they were being really old-fashioned, they'd have changed out of black into purple vestments for the distribution.

Would they have? In what rite or use is that ordered?
both Fortescue and Ritual Notes - but as requiems and Good Friday mass of the presanctified - when black would have been worn - were originally non-communicating except for the celebrant, it was a rare occurrence and relegated to footnotes
Do you happen to recall where? All I can find in the 1917 Fortescue is the following:

quote:
The rite of distributing Communion out of Mass is this: ...

Communion may be given in this way immediately before or after Mass. In this case the priest wears the Mass vestments. If they are black, he does not give the blessing. Nor, if he says Mass with black vestments in Eastertide, does he add Alleluia after the versicle.

Except in this case, holy Communion is never given with black vestments. If it is to be given on All Souls' Day the priest wears a purple stole.


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Angloid
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quote:
Originally posted by Laud-able:

I was told at the time - I do not vouch for the accuracy of the information - that the Gospel was thus read to enlighten the dark north, which works well in the northern hemisphere, but not so well here.

I'm sure St Magnus the Martyr, being well within the M25, includes in its congregation many who see this ceremony as an illustration of the City of London in its wisdom preaching the gospel of unbridled capitalism to us poor benighted socialist northerners.

[ 10. November 2014, 21:43: Message edited by: Angloid ]

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Ecclesiastical Flip-flop
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The Church of St. Magnus the Martyr is what many would regard as "Nose-bleed high". I don't go there often enough to know how varied the liturgical practices are, but since Fr. Philip Warner took over as (Cardinal) Rector, the repertoire of liturgical practices, includes much of pre-Vatican II.

Every Mass I have been to at St. Magnus, was communicating and in both kinds. However old-fashioned the liturgical practices are, non-communicating Masses are a thing of the past, everywhere, as far as I am aware.

I am disposed to going to St. Magnus, but have got out of the habit of doing so, which is just the way things work out. Lest any misunderstanding should arise, which may have seemed that way on this thread earlier on, I met Fr. Philip Warner away from St. Magnus last week, and he and I greeted each other cordially.

[ 11. November 2014, 16:55: Message edited by: Ecclesiastical Flip-flop ]

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras:
The Angelus is recited or sung at many Anglo-Catholic parish following the principal Sunday Eucharist

Because it finishes around noon.
Sop it's because pf the time, not because the mass was the principal one.

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leo
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quote:
Originally posted by Planeta Plicata:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by Magic Wand:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
If they were being really old-fashioned, they'd have changed out of black into purple vestments for the distribution.

Would they have? In what rite or use is that ordered?
both Fortescue and Ritual Notes - but as requiems and Good Friday mass of the presanctified - when black would have been worn - were originally non-communicating except for the celebrant, it was a rare occurrence and relegated to footnotes
Do you happen to recall where? All I can find in the 1917 Fortescue is the following:

quote:
The rite of distributing Communion out of Mass is this: ...

Communion may be given in this way immediately before or after Mass. In this case the priest wears the Mass vestments. If they are black, he does not give the blessing. Nor, if he says Mass with black vestments in Eastertide, does he add Alleluia after the versicle.

Except in this case, holy Communion is never given with black vestments. If it is to be given on All Souls' Day the priest wears a purple stole.


Ritual Notes 11th edn p. 328 re Good Friday - towards the end of the veneration, the SSM are to take of their black vestments and wear purple. It doesn't mention returning to black for the final prayer.

also p. 38 says that on Good Friday and requiems, black is used except for the communion.

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Sacerdote
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Like Ecclesiastical Flip-flop I was first introduced to St Magnus the Martyr in 1960, so never knew it in the glory days of Fr Fynes Clinton's incumbency, when it was said even baptisms were in Latin! I was taken to the church by a friend who remembered the incident of the Kensitites wanting to remove the Catholic furnishings, and had actually seen the famous jam-jar, complete with maker's label, serving as a holy water font.
Another story from Fr Fynes' early days was that when incense was used for the first time at a sung Mass the protestant choir members made a great show of coughing and spluttering from the gallery every time the thurible appeared. After Mass Fr Fynes climbed the stairs, apologized to them for their discomfort, and assured them that they would not be troubled again. The next day they all received notice of their dismissal.

Around 1960 a possibly apocryphal story was doing the rounds that after Fr Fynes Clinton's death the Bishop of London, who was the patron of the living, was at a loss as to whom to appoint to this extraordinary Roman outpost scarcely a mile from his cathedral. He is said to have offered the living to Fr Colin Gill on condition that he did something - ANYTHING! - that would be seen as a token of St Magnus belonging to the Church of England! After due consideration Fr Gill is supposed to have offered to have Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament in English!

No reaction? Oh well, I suppose it just doesn't seem anything like as funny now as it did then.

There may be something in this tale, as in my experience Colin Gill never said or sang a word of Latin aloud at any publicly scheduled service. There were occasional Latin Masses for particular groups or societies, and for some years the Roman Rite continued to be used, with the offertory prayers & Canon (all sotto voce)in Latin, but with everything else in English & with a partially anglicanized calendar (Sundays after Trinity). If I remember rightly even Latin settings of the Mass were sung to BCP translations - crazy when you think that now most Anglican cathedrals happily sing Latin Masses as a norm.
It's true that even as early as 1960 there were no "non-communicating High/Sung Masses" at St Magnus, partly, perhaps, because the congregation had no convenient alternative Mass to attend for Communion, but a fair proportion of the "regulars" were still receiving in one kind in the early 70's. An RC friend from uni came with me to Mass in the post-conciliar 60s & was shocked that I received in one kind. He, of course, received, and in both kinds!

I think it was maybe while I was away in France in the late 60's that things started to change at St Magnus. Certainly by the the early 70's Fr Gill had introduced a curious blend of the old Roman Rite & "series 2". I believe there was considerable unhappiness at St Magnus over this "betrayal".(The last edition of the "English Missal" had Series 2 bound into it - o tempora, o mores [Frown] )
But then I swam the Tiber & lost touch with most of my Anglican contacts.
BTW, Flip-flop, I see you and I also share a familiarity with 20c French liturgy - a bit different from St Magnus!

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Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
quote:
Originally posted by Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras:
The Angelus is recited or sung at many Anglo-Catholic parish following the principal Sunday Eucharist

Because it finishes around noon.
Sop it's because pf the time, not because the mass was the principal one.

This is true, though at A-C parishes the Angelus will usually be running late, since an 11:00 Mass won't be finishing until about 12:30, typically (sometimes even later) at these places. However, what the uninitiated should know is that they may encounter the Angelus at an Anglo-Catholic parish most typically following the principal Sunday high or sung Mass.
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Ecclesiastical Flip-flop
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# 10745

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quote:
Originally posted by Sacerdote:
Like Ecclesiastical Flip-flop I was first introduced to St Magnus the Martyr in 1960, so never knew it in the glory days of Fr Fynes Clinton's incumbency, when it was said even baptisms were in Latin!

Around 1960 a possibly apocryphal story was doing the rounds that after Fr Fynes Clinton's death the Bishop of London, who was the patron of the living, was at a loss as to whom to appoint to this extraordinary Roman outpost scarcely a mile from his cathedral. He is said to have offered the living to Fr Colin Gill on condition that he did something - ANYTHING! - that would be seen as a token of St Magnus belonging to the Church of England! After due consideration Fr Gill is supposed to have offered to have Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament in English!


BTW, Flip-flop, I see you and I also share a familiarity with 20c French liturgy - a bit different from St Magnus!

It occurs to me that the Bishop of London referred to above was that of the Rt. Revd. Henry Colville Montgomery Campbell, in post from 1956 until 1961. He was a colourful character, with a dry sense of humour. I do not think he was a particular favourite with anglo-catholics, which would have reflected on his dealings with Fr. Colin Gill (who was previously the parish priest of St. Martin's Brighton). I mention this, because the said Bishop was previously Bishop of Guildford from 1949 until 1956, when he confirmed me in 1955.

Thank you very much for this interesting post, Sacerdote. You say that you see me, but when and where? If it happens again, do please make yourself known. Your notice of my interest in 20c French Liturgy, you must have spotted by reading between the lines.

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L'organist
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posted by Lietuvos Sv. Kazimieras
quote:
The Angelus is recited or sung at many Anglo-Catholic parish following the principal Sunday Eucharist...
I used to play at an AC Church where it was the first item of every Mass - after the first hymn if sung - and evening services were enlivened with either the Salve Regina or Regina caeli. The diocesan bishop loved the church and the music and used to join in with the best of them when he slipped into a Festal Evensong, just about visible through the clouds of incense.

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moonlitdoor
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# 11707

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Is it typically done in such a way that they uninitiated like me do not realise that it is two separate things ? If there had been a blessing I probably would have known, as that is what finishes the eucharist in my usual church, but maybe this style of church doesn't do that.

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Knopwood
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# 11596

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It is usually done pretty seamlessly, though IME there is usually a "final hymn" at the end of mass proper before the altar party's procession to the Lady Shrine. But at an English Missal mass like you would find at St Magnus, the blessing and dismissal would be buried in the final prayers and rather more subdued (and inverted!) and easier for the "uninitiate" to miss.

[ 12. November 2014, 19:52: Message edited by: Knopwood ]

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venbede
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A priest of impeccable left wing credentials I know tells me he celebrated mass at St Magnus once. Afterwards a lady in a mantilla came up and said to him “’Allo, Ken. Remember me? You were a curate in Soho and I was a stripper in the Raymond Revuebar”.

Which just shows how symbolic and ritual worship can attract and incorporate those who would typically feel excluded by a purely verbal based service.

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And when this we rightly know,
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Angloid
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quote:
Originally posted by venbede:
A priest of impeccable left wing credentials

Who shall be nameless [Biased]
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Angloid
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# 159

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Of course, you are quite right in your comment. That's what gets me about self-styled 'inclusive' churches: they tend to only include the like-minded (mostly smug middle-class lefties like me).

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Brian: You're all individuals!
Crowd: We're all individuals!
Lone voice: I'm not!

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Sacerdote
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# 11627

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Fear not, Ecclesiastical Flip-flop, your anonymity is safe! I meant "I see THAT you and I" are both familiar with French worship, not that I see YOU. There was a time when it was rare to find a Mass in France that didn't include "Un seul Seigneur, une seule foi ..."

Wasn't it Montgomery Campbell to whom it fell to consecrate the rebuilt St Alban's, Holborn? He was said to have objected to the proposed domed tabernacle on the high altar, and to have insisted that an aumbry be installed before he would perform the consecration. Apparently it wasn't until he arrived for the consecration that he saw how St Alban's had interpreted his requirement - a hugely elaborate tabernacle/sacrament house set in the centre of the east wall, right behind the high altar. The bishop insisted that they knew perfectly well that he had meant a modest safe in the north wall, preferably of a side chapel, but it couldn't be denied that what had been installed was an aumbry, and the congregation was already gathered for the consecration, so the bishop went ahead, though apparently not with a very good grace. As you are doubtless aware, the impressive "aumbry" is still there, though I confess I've always regretted that the original plan for a domed tabernacle - and a gothic baldacchino over the altar - didn't go ahead.

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Augustine the Aleut
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quote:
Originally posted by venbede:
A priest of impeccable left wing credentials I know tells me he celebrated mass at St Magnus once. Afterwards a lady in a mantilla came up and said to him “’Allo, Ken. Remember me? You were a curate in Soho and I was a stripper in the Raymond Revuebar”.

Which just shows how symbolic and ritual worship can attract and incorporate those who would typically feel excluded by a purely verbal based service.

I would have normally agreed and, in this case, perhaps, but on reflection, I think that it is more complicated than that. Of the three (former) strippers of my acquaintance, only one (now a physician) is a smells-and-bells spike; another a novus ordo franco-ontarian, and the third (now a carpenter, as their union has a better pension fund than her former employer) is United Church of Canada. Of course, it is quite possible that I do not know the entire professional histories of my fellow-worshippers.
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leo
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# 1458

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quote:
Originally posted by Angloid:
Of course, you are quite right in your comment. That's what gets me about self-styled 'inclusive' churches: they tend to only include the like-minded (mostly smug middle-class lefties like me).

We aren't 'self-styled' inasmuch as we join the movement and abide by its statement of belief.

Inclusive Church is currently working of disability and mental health and how our churches can include, welcome and learn from such.

As a middle-class leftie, I am far from 'smug' because i find this issue very challenging.

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My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

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Angloid
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quote:
Originally posted by leo:
We aren't 'self-styled' inasmuch as we join the movement and abide by its statement of belief.

I thought the movement we joined was called the Holy Catholic Church. The problem I see with 'Inclusive Church' is that it implies that the rest of the church is exclusive, and that it buys into the consumerist model that it's OK to have different styles of the church for different people. There is truth in both of those statements, but to push both of them to the extreme is to ghetto-ise the Church. I want to see bog-standard churches everywhere just like bog-standard comprehensive schools.

I need to clarify the above as an outsider to the 'Inclusive Church' network: I've no quibble with its aims, and I don't know much about how it works out in practice. It's just that I find notices proclaiming 'We are an Inclusive Church' as off-putting as 'We are Bible-believing Christians.'

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Ecclesiastical Flip-flop
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quote:
Originally posted by Sacerdote:
Fear not, Ecclesiastical Flip-flop, your anonymity is safe! I meant "I see THAT you and I" are both familiar with French worship, not that I see YOU. There was a time when it was rare to find a Mass in France that didn't include "Un seul Seigneur, une seule foi ..."

Wasn't it Montgomery Campbell to whom it fell to consecrate the rebuilt St Alban's, Holborn? He was said to have objected to the proposed domed tabernacle on the high altar, and to have insisted that an aumbry be installed before he would perform the consecration. Apparently it wasn't until he arrived for the consecration that he saw how St Alban's had interpreted his requirement - a hugely elaborate tabernacle/sacrament house set in the centre of the east wall, right behind the high altar. The bishop insisted that they knew perfectly well that he had meant a modest safe in the north wall, preferably of a side chapel, but it couldn't be denied that what had been installed was an aumbry, and the congregation was already gathered for the consecration, so the bishop went ahead, though apparently not with a very good grace. As you are doubtless aware, the impressive "aumbry" is still there, though I confess I've always regretted that the original plan for a domed tabernacle - and a gothic baldacchino over the altar - didn't go ahead.

It is quite feasible that St. Alban's Holborn was reconsecrated during Bp Montgomery-Campbell's time as Bishop of London, in which case, it would have fallen to him to do so as a matter of course and what you say about him is typical of the man.

If I may indulge in a brief tangent, there is a classic anecdote about him. He was the last Bishop of Guildford to reside in Farnham Castle Palace. One day, he was in the town-centre in Farnham, when there was a retreat going on locally, and he came across a retreatant who had popped out. The Bishop enquired, "What are you doing here?". The retreatant replied, "The Holy Spirit has sent me out to do a bit of shopping". "Well, you are both wrong; it is early closing day!" Replied the Bishop. (End of tangent.)

Sacerdote, you noticed my current signature in French and this can change. I will let you into a secret; the publication "Magnificat" I have sent from France and so is published in the French Language. I selected that at random from there, making that my signature for the time-being.

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Joyeuses Pâques! Frohe Ostern! Buona Pasqua! ¡Felices Pascuas! Happy Easter!

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Forthview
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# 12376

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In the pre Vatican 2 Roman Rite as celebrated in Catholic churches in full communion with the Bishop of Rome the sequence of colours for Good Friday was black. Entering the church the celebrant wore (liturgically) alb and black stole.
After readings and the Passion gospel he put on a black cope in addition. If there was a deacon and subdeacon they assumed dalmatic and tunicle for the Solemn Prayers. For the Veneration of the Cross cope and dalmatic and tunicle were removed.
The celebrant( and his assistants ) then removed the black stole and vested in purple stole and chasuble for the Communion service - no maniples on that day.The celebrant (or deacon) had a white humeral veil also for the transfer of the Blessed Sacrament from the Altar of Repose to the main altar.

Until the later liturgical reforms it was very
common in Catholic churches to have Requiem Masses
in black vestments celebrated during the week on ferial days.On these days the celebrant would NOT change the liturgical colour for the distribution of Communion.Of course as mentioned elsewhere there were special rubrics for a Requiem Mass,the best known being (a) abbreviated prayers at the beginning and (b) no blessing at the end.

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leo
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# 1458

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quote:
Originally posted by Angloid:
quote:
Originally posted by leo:
We aren't 'self-styled' inasmuch as we join the movement and abide by its statement of belief.

I thought the movement we joined was called the Holy Catholic Church. The problem I see with 'Inclusive Church' is that it implies that the rest of the church is exclusive, and that it buys into the consumerist model that it's OK to have different styles of the church for different people. There is truth in both of those statements, but to push both of them to the extreme is to ghetto-ise the Church. I want to see bog-standard churches everywhere just like bog-standard comprehensive schools.

I need to clarify the above as an outsider to the 'Inclusive Church' network: I've no quibble with its aims, and I don't know much about how it works out in practice. It's just that I find notices proclaiming 'We are an Inclusive Church' as off-putting as 'We are Bible-believing Christians.'

I sort of agree but when many parts of the 'hole catholic church' exclude some people, they need to know that they will find a welcome elsewhere.

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My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

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dj_ordinaire
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# 4643

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Revd Father and Mr. Reader, this is neither the time nor the place - as I am sure you both know full well!

djo, Eccles host

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Flinging wide the gates...

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