homepage
  roll on christmas  
click here to find out more about ship of fools click here to sign up for the ship of fools newsletter click here to support ship of fools
community the mystery worshipper gadgets for god caption competition foolishness features ship stuff
discussion boards live chat cafe avatars frequently-asked questions the ten commandments gallery private boards register for the boards
 
Ship of Fools


Post new thread  Post a reply
My profile login | | Directory | Search | FAQs | Board home
   - Printer-friendly view Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
» Ship of Fools   » Community discussion   » Heaven   » Kan yu speell? (Page 4)

 - Email this page to a friend or enemy.  
Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  4 
 
Source: (consider it) Thread: Kan yu speell?
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

 - Posted      Profile for Pigwidgeon   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by geroff:
A bit of a tangent perhaps, but in the early days of spellcheckers I had a secretary, who was terrible at spelling, that used to add her spellings to the dictionary. Another colleague used to have to correct the dictionary every evening after she had gone home! (This is at a date when there was just one computer in our architects office, so probably 1988, Word Perfect?)

This sounds like the co-worker I mentioned in Post #26 -- only it was a parish office, not an architect. Maybe they're related. (It was in 1985-86.)
[Biased]

--------------------
"...that is generally a matter for Pigwidgeon, several other consenting adults, a bottle of cheap Gin and the odd giraffe."
~Tortuf

Posts: 9835 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
wild haggis
Shipmate
# 15555

 - Posted      Profile for wild haggis         Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
If you are dyslexic dictionaries aren't too much help. Spell checkers are much better.

I hate it when people judge you because you can't spell. It usually isn't your fault but to do with how your brain is wired.
...........................................

I'm always puzzled by people who say they know who English was spoken in Shakespeare's time. They didn't have recordings. How can we tell the audible sounds form the written? We can only guess and we might be very wrong.

Vowels are particularly bad as the same grapheme can be pronounced differently in different parts of the country.

Maybe we have discovered some magical recordings from Shakespeare's time!

--------------------
wild haggis

Posts: 166 | From: Cardiff | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

 - Posted      Profile for Pigwidgeon   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
I'm always puzzled by people who say they know [how] English was spoken in Shakespeare's time.

People who know more about these things than I do can pick up hints of pronunciation by studying the plays. The way they're written can often indicate which words rhyme, which syllables are stressed, etc. Even his many puns tell us a lot. Obviously it's not 100% accurate, but the Bard did give us a lot of leads.

Oops! Bad thread for a misspelling!

[ 18. February 2018, 14:35: Message edited by: Pigwidgeon ]

--------------------
"...that is generally a matter for Pigwidgeon, several other consenting adults, a bottle of cheap Gin and the odd giraffe."
~Tortuf

Posts: 9835 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Piglet
Islander
# 11803

 - Posted      Profile for Piglet   Email Piglet   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I suppose it's also possible that in Shakespeare's day pronunciation (and spelling) may have been more regional than it is today. Although he worked in London, would he have written his plays and poetry with a West Midlands accent?

I'm trying not to imagine To be or not to be sounding like someone from Crossroads ... [Snigger]

--------------------
I may not be on an island any more, but I'm still an islander.
alto n a soprano who can read music

Posts: 20272 | From: Fredericton, NB, on a rather larger piece of rock | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
leo
Shipmate
# 1458

 - Posted      Profile for leo   Author's homepage   Email leo   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by wild haggis:
Bye the bye.
Enoch and anyone else in the area - did you feel the earthquack this afternoon?

Yes - I was at the computer as the floor seemed to move for about 5 seconds.

--------------------
My Jewish-positive lectionary blog is at http://recognisingjewishrootsinthelectionary.wordpress.com/
My reviews at http://layreadersbookreviews.wordpress.com

Posts: 23198 | From: Bristol | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Curiosity killed ...

Ship's Mug
# 11770

 - Posted      Profile for Curiosity killed ...   Email Curiosity killed ...   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I have seen a production of Shakespeare in original pronunciation, Henry V, which was being studied as among the soldiers are English, Scots and Welshmen and the script gives hints as to their accents. The performance was prefaced by a discussion between David and Ben Crystal. (If anyone wants to look it up, the company is Passion in Practice, led by Ben Crystal, son of David Crystal, the linguist.)

--------------------
Mugs - Keep the Ship afloat

Posts: 13794 | From: outiside the outer ring road | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
aliehs
Shipmate
# 18878

 - Posted      Profile for aliehs   Author's homepage   Email aliehs   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
which I suppose leads us to the great vowel shift. Always sounded very uncomfortable to me. I am still not quite sure I have the hang of it. I shall consult Google and Wikipedia, those founts of all knowledge, whether accurate or speculative.
I always spell Wikipedia as Wikioaedia , and it corrects me every time.

--------------------
Now I see through a glass darkly. Maybe I should clean my specs.
sld2A

Posts: 157 | From: Australia | Registered: Dec 2017  |  IP: Logged
aliehs
Shipmate
# 18878

 - Posted      Profile for aliehs   Author's homepage   Email aliehs   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
I Typed WIKIPADIA; this time it emerged without the p, and with an O. I admit that this might have been my typing error.

--------------------
Now I see through a glass darkly. Maybe I should clean my specs.
sld2A

Posts: 157 | From: Australia | Registered: Dec 2017  |  IP: Logged
SusanDoris

Incurable Optimist
# 12618

 - Posted      Profile for SusanDoris   Author's homepage   Email SusanDoris   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jacobsen:
I'm with Eutychus on the -ize/ise divide. Even my spell checker agrees with me. And "focussed" with a double s is logical, whereas "focused" is not.

But then, who said that English is a logical language?

As I have only started reading this thread this morning, this question has probably been responded to already, but I'll just write anyway.
If a two-syllable word such as focus, or pilot, needs a suffix, the rule is if the accent is on the first syllable, do not double the end letter, if it is on the second syllable, double the letter.
e.g. focus - focusing, pilot - piloted, omit - omitted, forget - forgetting,
Exception: Always double l, whether the accent is on first or second syllable.
e.g. level - levelled, control - controlled.

When I was teaching, I found in a cupboard in the staff room a few books, whose titles I now forget, which explained this and various other rules which was a delight to read. There were quite a few teachers who did not know the full rules too!! I parted with them only years after I'd left teaching as I knew they had gone to a good home!


I'm lucky that I've always been a good speller.

--------------------
I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Posts: 3079 | From: UK | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged
SusanDoris

Incurable Optimist
# 12618

 - Posted      Profile for SusanDoris   Author's homepage   Email SusanDoris   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Hedgehog:
I stumble over describing my brother's daughter. "Niece" but I am likely to write "neice." Yes, I know the old "i" before "e" rule, but some words are weird. Or wierd. Whatever.

This has almost certainly been responded to too, but hope you don't mind my just popping in with :
I before e except after c
when the ie rhymes with me
weird, weir and seize were the exceptions listed in that book also names Sheila, Keith etc.

--------------------
I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Posts: 3079 | From: UK | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged
SusanDoris

Incurable Optimist
# 12618

 - Posted      Profile for SusanDoris   Author's homepage   Email SusanDoris   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by M.:
'The rough coated dough faced ploughboy walked coughing and hiccoughing through the streets of Scarborough' is what I learnt.

I'm another who has always been quite good at spelling, and love the eccentricity of it. But I'm also* another who only learnt how to spell 'necessary' when I learnt the Latin!

M.

*which usually comes out as 'alos' when I type.

One of the things I think is brilliant about my software is that Synthetic Dave pronounces all the 'ough' words in your first sentence correctly! It gets a bit muddled with read (reed) and read (red) but that's okay!

--------------------
I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Posts: 3079 | From: UK | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged
SusanDoris

Incurable Optimist
# 12618

 - Posted      Profile for SusanDoris   Author's homepage   Email SusanDoris   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by balaam:
I needed the word practise. I never fail to get that one wrong.

For English spellers there's a nice mnemonic:
practiCe = Noun; practiSe = Verb.
Take the C, N, S, V and they're nicely alphabetical!

--------------------
I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Posts: 3079 | From: UK | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged
Gill H

Shipmate
# 68

 - Posted      Profile for Gill H     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
Or replace the word temporarily with ‘advice/advise’ which follows the same rules.

--------------------
*sigh* We can’t all be Alan Cresswell.

- Lyda Rose

Posts: 9313 | From: London | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
SusanDoris

Incurable Optimist
# 12618

 - Posted      Profile for SusanDoris   Author's homepage   Email SusanDoris   Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Gill H:
Or replace the word temporarily with ‘advice/advise’ which follows the same rules.

Yes - if I remember correctly there are only a few in that group, device/devise, licence/license

I googled and clicked on a link to a spelling page and I thought I had posted a comment, but it does not seem to have appeared!

--------------------
I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Posts: 3079 | From: UK | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged
Pigwidgeon

Ship's Owl
# 10192

 - Posted      Profile for Pigwidgeon   Author's homepage     Send new private message       Edit/delete post   Reply with quote 
quote:
Originally posted by SusanDoris:
For English spellers there's a nice mnemonic:
practiCe = Noun; practiSe = Verb.
Take the C, N, S, V and they're nicely alphabetical!

That would work for 'prophecy' and 'prophesy' as well.

--------------------
"...that is generally a matter for Pigwidgeon, several other consenting adults, a bottle of cheap Gin and the odd giraffe."
~Tortuf

Posts: 9835 | From: Hogwarts | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged



Pages in this thread: 1  2  3  4 
 
Post new thread  Post a reply Close thread   Feature thread   Move thread   Delete thread Next oldest thread   Next newest thread
 - Printer-friendly view
Go to:

Contact us | Ship of Fools | Privacy statement

© Ship of Fools 2016

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0

 
Check out Reform magazine
sip of fools mugs from your favourite nautical website
 
  ship of fools